open pdf file in c# : How to insert text box in pdf file SDK software API .net windows wpf sharepoint 201307-full-issue8-part667

910    
N
otices
of
the
AMs 
V
oluMe
60, N
uMber
7
Useful Information for Deans and Department Chairs, 
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA, 1995, pp. 47–63.
13. 
———
, Institutional and departmental cultures and 
the relationship between teaching and research, in  
J. Braxton (ed.), Faculty Teaching and Research: Is 
There a Conflict? Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, 1996, 
pp. 57–66.
14. E. L. Boyer, Scholarship Reconsidered: Priorities of the 
Professoriate, Carnegie Foundation for the Advance-
ment of Teaching, Princeton, NJ, 1990.
15. A. Neumann, Professing to Learn: Creating Tenured 
Lives and Careers in the American Research Univer-
sity, The Johns Hopkins Press, Baltimore, MD, 2009.
16. A. E. Austin and R. G. Baldwin, Faculty motivation 
for teaching, in P. Seldin (ed.), Improving College 
Teaching, Anker Publishing Co., Boston, MA, 1995, 
pp. 37–47.
17. A. E. Austin, Creating a bridge to the future: Pre-
paring new faculty to face changing expectations in 
a shifting context, Review of Higher Education 26 
(2003), 119–144.
the public sphere are perfectly represented by 
these trials. Thus they serve as ideal illustrations of 
these errors and of the drastic consequences that 
faulty reasoning has on real lives” (p. x). The au-
thors’ strategy is to identify common mathematical 
errors and then illustrate how those errors arose 
in trials. They seek to accomplish two goals: first, 
to impress upon the general public the importance 
of being able to “distinguish whether the numbers 
brandished in our faces are legitimately providing 
information or being misused for dangerous ends”; 
second, “to identify the most important errors that 
have actually occurred” so that such mistakes can 
be eliminated in the future.
These are worthy if anodyne goals, and I would 
not dare argue against them. But the claims that 
Schneps and Colmez make are strong ones and 
prompt many questions. Do they adequately 
support their contention that mathematics has a 
“disastrous record of causing judicial error?” How 
influential are mathematical arguments, anyway? 
Are mathematical arguments more problematic 
Board on Science Education, National Academy Press, 
Washington, DC, 2011.
8. L. Deslauriers, E. Schelew, and C. Wieman, Improv-
ing learning in a large enrollment physics class, Sci-
ence 332 (2011), 862–864. 
9. L. B. Flick, P. Sadri, P. D. Morrell, C. Wainwright, 
and A. Schepige, A cross discipline study of reform 
teaching by university science and mathematics 
faculty, School Science and Mathematics 109 (2009),  
197–211. 
10. C. Rasmussen, K. Marrongelle, and O. N. Kwon, 
A framework for interpreting inquiry oriented teach-
ing, paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the 
American Educational Research Association, San 
Diego, CA, 2009.
11. C. Wainwright, P. D. Morrell, L. B. Flick, and 
A. Schepige, Observation of reform teaching in un-
dergraduate level mathematics and science courses, 
School Science and Mathematics 104 (2004), 322–335.
12. A. E. Austin, Understanding and assessing faculty 
cultures and climates, in M. K. Kinnick (ed.), Providing 
Math on Trial 
Leila Schneps and Coralie Colmez 
Basic Books, 2013 
US$26.99, 272 pages 
ISBN-13: 978-0465032921
In Math on Trial, Leila Schneps and Coralie Col-
mez write about the abuse of mathematical argu-
ments in criminal trials and how these flawed 
arguments “have sent innocent people to prison”  
(p. ix). Indeed, people “saw their lives ripped apart 
by simple mathematical errors.” The purpose of 
focusing on these errors, despite mathematics’ 
“relatively rare use in trials” (p. x), is “that many of 
the common mathematical fallacies that pervade 
Burden of Proof: A Review of 
Math on Trial
Reviewed by Paul H. Edelman
Book Review
Paul H. Edelman is professor of mathematics and law 
at Vanderbilt University. His email address is paul. 
edelman@vanderbilt.edu.
The author thanks Ed Cheng, Chris Slobogin, and Suzanna 
Sherry for helpful comments.
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1090/noti1024
How to insert text box in pdf file - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
adding text field to pdf; add text in pdf file online
How to insert text box in pdf file - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to add text to pdf document; how to add a text box to a pdf
A
ugust
2013 
N
otices
of
the
AMs 
911
can be deadly?” I think not. To see why, we have to 
read the presented cases with a more critical eye.
Some of the cases actually do not exhibit any 
mathematical errors at all. The supposed mathe-
matical issue arising in the case 
of Charles Ponzi, whose epony-
mous scheme bilked thousands 
of people, is that people “got 
fooled because they did not re-
alize the implications of the in-
credible rapidity of exponential 
growth” (p. 149). While that may 
be a shortcoming of individuals, 
it is hardly a misuse of math-
ematics by the legal system. It 
is also difficult to understand 
exactly how this led to people 
being defrauded by Ponzi. After 
all, investments are all about ex-
ponential growth—often in the 
5%–10% range but exponential 
nevertheless.
The chapter about sex discrimination, which 
describes Simpson’s paradox in a very accessible 
way, actually illustrates a triumph for mathematics 
in the legal context. The University of California 
was able to show that what first appeared to be 
discrimination against women in graduate admis-
sions was, in fact, anything but. Why this chapter is 
included is a bit of a mystery to me actually, since 
much of it describes the well-known sex discrimi-
nation allegations made by Jenny Harrison against 
the UC Berkeley mathematics department, a case 
which never went to trial and in which statistics 
played little role, if any.
But what of the cases that do, in fact, exhibit 
material mathematical mistakes? It is one thing 
for there to be evidence in the record exhibiting a 
faulty mathematical argument; it is quite another 
to assume that such an argument was decisive in 
the outcome of the case. Consider the Dreyfus Af-
fair, which gets quite a nice discussion in the book. 
Alphonse Bertillon, a handwriting expert, was 
called to testify on whether the critical memo was 
written by Dreyfus. He “built up an extraordinary, 
well-argued theory that Dreyfus had purposely 
forged an imitation of his own handwriting so that 
if he were caught, he could attempt to explain away 
any evidence against him by claiming he had been 
framed” (p. 196). The authors focus on this theory, 
which is quite elaborate and quite clearly daft, 
and conclude, “Bertillon’s testimony contributed 
to Dreyfus’ conviction.” But they give no reason 
to believe this, and given the machinations of the 
French military, it is difficult to imagine that the 
outcome would have been different if no such 
“evidence” had been admitted. 
Schneps and Colmez  make similar jumps 
throughout. Just because evidence is admitted 
to the record does not mean that it played a role 
than other expert testimony? What role should 
mathematics play in the judicial system? 
I will get to these questions shortly but, first, 
a brief description of the book. It consists of ten 
chapters. Each begins with a short introduction to a 
particular faulty mathematical argument and then 
illustrates the error with a discussion of a criminal 
case in which that argument was advanced. For 
instance, the first chapter, titled “Math Error Num-
ber 1, Multiplying Nonindependent Probabilities”, 
discusses The Case of Sally Clark: Motherhood 
under Attack. In this case, Ms. Clark, whose first 
child died in the crib, was charged with the mur-
der of her second child, who also died in her care. 
The error appears in the guise of testimony by an 
expert witness that the likelihood of two children 
dying innocently in her care could be computed by 
taking the square of the likelihood that a random 
baby dies innocently while in the care of the family. 
But that computation relies on the independence 
of the probabilities, which, if there is some under-
lying medical issue that caused the death, may well 
not be the case.
The range of cases presented, both geographi-
cally and historically, is in many ways the best 
feature of the book. Six of the ten cases arise in 
the United States, while the remainder are from 
Europe. There are three quite old cases, pre-World 
War I, and three from the twenty-first century, 
including one still in litigation. This breadth makes 
for a very good read, but it also leads to some 
questions. Do we really think that mathematical 
errors from the 1860s are as salient as ones from 
last year? Might advances in knowledge in the 
intervening one hundred fifty years mediate our 
concern about such errors? Moreover, continental 
Europe’s legal regime is rather different than that 
of Britain and the United States. Will those differ-
ences have any effect on how mathematics is used? 
None of these questions is addressed by the book.
There is a lot to like about Math on Trial. It 
is an easy and fun read. The cases, like so many 
criminal cases, are fascinating in their details. The 
older cases, in particular, are entertaining, and the 
mathematical hooks bring a different perspective 
to the Dreyfus affair (Ch. 10) and the story of 
Charles Ponzi (Ch. 8). The writing tends toward the 
breathless, as is common in the true crime genre, 
but rarely goes over the top. The mathematics is 
well presented and well integrated into the nar-
rative. Some of the explications are excellent: the 
discussion of the probabilistic issues in searching 
DNA databases (Ch. 5) and how Simpson’s paradox 
manifests itself in sex discrimination cases (Ch. 6) 
are especially noteworthy in this regard. 
As entertaining and informative as Math on Trial 
is, have Schneps and Colmez mustered sufficient 
evidence to justify their claim that mathematics 
has a “disastrous record of causing judicial error,” 
let alone the claim that “the misuse of mathematics 
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Extract Field Data. Data: Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work with
adding text to a pdf in acrobat; how to add text to pdf
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
with .NET PDF Library. A best PDF annotator for Visual Studio .NET supports to add text box to PDF file in Visual C#.NET project.
add text to pdf; adding text fields to pdf
912    
N
otices
of
the
AMs 
V
oluMe
60, N
uMber
7
ties and hence about 1 in 12 million. Ultimately 
the Collinses were convicted, but an appeal was 
soon filed to challenge, among other things, this 
probabilistic approach to evidence.
There are, of course, so many things wrong with 
this argument it is hard to keep count. First of all, 
the numbers themselves were produced by survey-
ing Sinetar’s secretaries (I guess we would call this 
crowd-sourcing now) and had no factual basis. The 
probabilities themselves are clearly not indepen-
dent, so multiplication is obviously inappropri-
ate. And even if both of these problems can be 
overcome, what exactly it all proves is quite prob-
lematic. The argument exhibited what is known 
as the prosecutor’s fallacy: at best he computed 
the likelihood that a random couple matched the 
characteristics of the Collinses, not the likelihood 
that the Collinses were guilty of the crime. Schneps 
and Colmez do a fine job of explaining the plethora 
of confusions in the argument.
All that is well and good, and all of it became 
recognized after the California Supreme Court 
overturned the verdict. This was just bad math-
ematics, and it certainly deserves to be excoriated. 
But did it make a difference in the outcome of the 
case? One juror is quoted as saying, “I don’t re-
member our discussing the professor much when 
we deliberated. Maybe we were overwhelmed by 
the numbers.” And a reporter who covered the 
trial wrote, “Jurors said they disregarded Marti-
nez’s testimony,…, and found the couple guilty on 
evidence given by other witnesses.”3
Obviously, I cannot go through chapter by 
chapter, but I think the point is made that many 
things happen at trial and that to focus on only one 
aspect of the evidence as the “but-for” cause of the 
outcome is a mistake. Nevertheless, having bogus 
mathematical arguments entered into the record is 
disturbing and the authors ask a legitimate ques-
tion as to how such arguments can be effectively 
prevented or countered. They argue that “it is prob-
ably going to be necessary to educate the public, 
from which juries are drawn, to recognize some 
of the most common mathematical principles that 
forensic analysis cannot do without” (p. 224). While 
promoting education is always good, raising the 
numeracy of the general public is not easy. Fortu-
nately, I do not think it is really necessary in order 
for the legal system to work adequately.
Mathematical arguments appear in a wide range 
of legal disputes. They appear in the analysis of 
race and sex discrimination, anti-trust, stock fraud, 
and torts, to name a just a few. The vast majority 
of these applications are not terribly controversial, 
although any particular model will be subject to 
criticism and interpretation. Math on Trial focuses 
on the introduction of probabilistic evidence in 
criminal trials, a very narrow, although important, 
in the outcome. In the 1865 case of Hetty Green 
(another fabulously interesting case), who was 
trying to enforce a contested will, the Harvard 
mathematician Benjamin Peirce was called in to 
decide if a certain signature was a forgery. He pre-
sented an elaborate, but seriously flawed, model 
purporting to demonstrate that fact. Perhaps this 
would be disconcerting but for the fact that the 
court decided against Ms. Green on purely legal 
grounds having nothing to do with the signature 
itself.
1
(I can’t help but also note that Ms. Green 
hardly falls into the category of people whose lives 
have been ripped apart by a mathematical mistake. 
She was already worth several million dollars or 
so in the 1860s.) 
Even the most important case in the book, 
People v. Collins, is subject to this criticism. People 
v. Collins is the first case in the United States to ex-
plicitly consider the role of probability in evidence 
and is a staple in every evidence course in every 
law school in the country. The basic facts are the 
following: On June 18, 1964, Juanita Brooks had 
her purse snatched while walking home from the 
grocery store in Los Angeles. She and another wit-
ness reported that the assailant was a woman with 
a blond ponytail who was subsequently picked up 
by a bearded African American man in a yellow 
car. A couple meeting that description, Janet and 
Malcolm Collins, were soon located in the vicinity 
and were eventually charged and tried.
One thing the district attorney, Ray Sinetar, 
had going for him was his intuition that there was 
unlikely to be more than one couple who fit this 
very uncommon description. In order to push 
this insight he managed to adduce through the 
testimony of Daniel Martinez, a professor of 
mathematics at California State Long Beach, the 
following table expressing the likelihood of vari-
ous observations:
2
Sinetar then concluded that the likelihood of such 
a couple existing is the product of these probabili-
Characteristic
Individual Probability
A.
Partly yellow automobile 1/10
B. 
Man with mustache
1/4
C.
Girl with ponytail
1/10
D.
Girl with blond hair
1/3
E. 
Negro man with beard
1/10
1
What eventually undid Hetty Green was an interpretation 
of the parol evidence rule which would not permit her 
testimony to confirm a contract with her deceased aunt. 
See The Howland Will Case, 4 Amer. L. Rev. 625 (1869).
2
Details of how this table was produced are somewhat 
murky. The reader should read Chapter 2 of the book 
being reviewed and George Fisher, “The Green Felt Jungle: 
The Story of People v. Collins”, in Evidence Stories (Rich-
ard Lempert, ed.), Foundation Press, 7 (2006).
3
These quotes are reported in Fisher on page 16.
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C#.NET program. C#.NET: Draw Markups on PDF File.
add text field pdf; add text pdf file
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Support to replace PDF text with a note annotation. Ability to insert a text note after selected text. Support to create a text box annotation to PDF file.
how to add text to a pdf file in acrobat; adding text fields to pdf acrobat
A
ugust
2013 
N
otices
of
the
AMs 
913
United States and Britain we would expect each side 
to challenge the other by providing their own experts 
on questions such as the likelihood of some event. 
This is not a perfect system, since poor defendants 
may not have the resources to hire such an expert, 
and that might be the reason there is little evidence 
of this practice in the cases discussed in Math on 
Trial. Another problem with this approach is that 
the trial can then become a battle of the experts, the 
result being that juries (and judges) throw up their 
hands and ignore the expert testimony altogether. 
This very reaction was noted in the Hetty Green 
case, where a contemporaneous account noted that 
“[T]he result of so much labor of experts, their skill, 
their ingenuity, their patience, their anxiety, simply 
demonstrates to the profession their inutility as 
witnesses in a court of justice.”7
Should we think that mathematical error is any 
more prevalent than any other kind of error? One 
might argue that because they are innumerate, law-
yers are worse at coping with mathematical issues 
than with others. This possibility has been raised 
before,8 but I am not sure that I am persuaded by 
this argument. I know of no studies that indicate that 
lawyers are less competent at dealing with elemen-
tary probability theory than with, say, sophisticated 
economic modeling questions in anti-trust. And if 
they are no more prone to error in mathematics than 
in any other technical area, would it not make more 
sense to address the issue at the broader level than 
at the discipline-specific level?
Despite these criticisms, I would agree with 
the authors that education can certainly play an 
important role. Indeed, in the case of DNA evidence, 
it already has. “Immediately after DNA’s first court-
room appearance in the 1980s, scientists from 
disciplines as varied as statistics, psychology, and 
evolutionary biology debated the strengths and limi-
tations of forensic DNA evidence. Blue-ribbon panels 
were convened, conferences were held, unscientific 
practices were identified, data were collected, criti-
cal papers were written, and standards were devel-
oped and implemented.…Most exaggerated claims 
and counterclaims about DNA evidence have been 
replaced by scientifically defensible propositions. 
Although some disagreement remains, the scientific 
process worked.”
9
area.
4
The argument put forward in People v. Col-
lins is one such example; testimony about the like-
lihood of a DNA sample coming from a particular 
individual is another.
Even within this narrow area, the significance of 
an error in mathematics can easily be overstated. 
A recent study looked at eighty-six cases in which 
people were convicted of serious crimes but were 
later exonerated on the basis of DNA evidence. In 
71% of those cases, there were erroneous eyewit-
ness identifications, 63% had forensic science 
testing errors, 44% had police misconduct, and 
28% had prosecutorial misconduct.
5
So there would 
seem to be many more important problems in the 
criminal justice system than bad mathematics. In-
deed, these more mundane problems arise in most 
of the cases discussed in Math on Trial.
Before we worry about remedying the problem 
of bad mathematics in criminal trials, we should 
probably consider what mechanisms are already 
in place to prevent bad evidence from being 
introduced. Judges and juries routinely have to 
cope with evidence of a very technical nature. One 
cannot hope for them to be adequately educated 
in all of the areas of knowledge that will be put 
before them. That is why the legal system provides 
various procedural safeguards to control what 
information is put into the legal record. Rules of 
evidence, standards for the admittance of expert 
testimony, and other procedural devices all pro-
vide means for blocking or refuting bad evidence. 
It is not a coincidence that one basis for the Cali-
fornia Supreme Court overturning the Collinses’ 
conviction, not mentioned in Math on Trial, was 
the inadmissibility of the mathematical testimony, 
since no empirical support was presented for any 
of the claims. On reading the cases in Math on 
Trial, one is struck by how ineffectual these de-
vices were, either because of inadequate counsel 
(another common thread in faulty convictions, as 
mentioned above) or the failure of the judge to 
enforce the appropriate rules. 
Lawyers have another way to deal with bad 
testimony, particularly expert testimony—they 
can provide their own experts to dispute the bad 
information.6 In the adversarial system in the 
4
Three of the ten cases presented are not of this type, 
but they are also the least persuasive of the chapters: 
the aforementioned chapters on Ponzi, Hetty Green, and 
Jenny Harrison.
5
Data reported in Michael J. Saks & Jonathan J. Koehler, 
The Coming Paradigm Shift in Forensic Identification 
Science, 309 Science 892 (2005). The remainder of issues 
on the list are false/misleading testimony by forensic 
scientists (27%), dishonest informants (19%), incompetent 
defense representation (19%), false testimony by lay wit-
nesses (17%), and false confessions (17%).
6
At least this is true in the United States and Britain. The 
situation is somewhat different in civil law regimes of 
continental Europe. 
7
The Howland Will Case on page 643.
8
Most recently in Lisa Milot, Illuminating Innumeracy, 63 
Case Western L. Rev. 1 (2013)
9
Saks & Koehler on page 893. I would note here that Colmez 
and Schneps base two chapters on what they claim to be 
faulty use of DNA evidence. One is a case involving database 
trawling and the other is on the methods of DNA testing. 
While the first case plausibly represents a mathematical 
error, the latter discussing the Meredith Kercher case (more 
commonly referred to as the Amanda Knox case in the U.S.) 
seems to me to be better described as a dispute over testing 
protocol rather than over mathematics.
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
from PDF file. Read PDF metadata. Search text content inside PDF. Extract bookmark & outlines. Extract hyperlink inside PDF. PDF Write. Insert text, text box into
adding a text field to a pdf; how to add text to pdf file with reader
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Add text to PDF document. • Insert text box to PDF file. • Draw markups to PDF document. PDF Protection. • Add signatures to PDF document.
add text boxes to pdf; how to enter text into a pdf
914    
N
otices
of
the
AMs 
V
oluMe
60, N
uMber
7
plausible in this situation), which would not meet 
the threshold required. Since the conjunction of 
the events does not exceed the 0.5 probability 
threshold, the plaintiff should lose. Mathematically 
this argument seems unexceptionable, but it is not 
recognized by the legal system.
So where does this leave us with Math on Trial? I 
think it is unconvincing in its claim that the misuse 
of mathematics in evidence is either particularly 
significant or novel. It seems much like the other 
technical expert testimony and is subject to simi-
lar costs and benefits. Their proposed solution of 
educating jurors sounds unpromising to me, but 
educating lawyers and judges, not so much in 
the mathematics itself but rather in how to be an 
educated consumer of the information, is a very 
reasonable approach. Part of that education is the 
development of techniques and analyses that gain 
acceptance within the scientific community. An 
even more productive response would be to better 
train the lawyers and judges in law and provide 
greater access to legal counsel. This would address 
errors in using evidence across the whole spectrum 
of disciplines.
Its analysis and prescriptions notwithstanding, 
Math on Trial is an entertaining and informative 
read for those interested in true crime with a 
mathematical hook. Perhaps it will impress upon 
the general public the importance of numeracy 
and inspire them to look beyond and behind the 
numbers that are trumpeted around us. If so, that 
would be all to the good.
The moral of this tale is that education can be 
successful, but it is a result of experts working 
among themselves and coming to a consensus on 
these highly technical issues. The results are then 
promulgated through the legal system via these 
experts. The authors of Math on Trial themselves 
are part of such a project, the “Bayes and the Law” 
Research Consortium, to develop “a set of criteria 
and a set of analytic tools that should ensure that 
probability will henceforth be used correctly” 
(p. 224). I wish them luck. It takes time (thirty 
years in the case of DNA) for best practices to be 
adopted, both because the scientific process is 
slow and because the legal system is a distributed 
one and so information disperses slowly through 
it. Mistakes are going to happen—it is unfortunate 
but inevitable. 
Finally, it is worth thinking about what the role 
of mathematics in the law should be in a perfect 
world of sophisticated jurors, judges, and law-
yers. There is considerable debate within the legal 
academy as to whether it is possible to put formal 
probabilistic foundations under the theory of evi-
dence.
10
And for those who think such a theory can 
be laid, there are a number of different candidates 
for how it should be developed.
11
The fact of the 
matter is that rigorous mathematical thinking is 
sometimes not in accord with the workings of the 
judicial system.
The Conjunction Paradox is an example of the 
kind of problem that arises when trying to estab-
lish a probabilistic theory of the burden of proof. 
In civil actions, such as tort, the plaintiff typically 
has to establish his case by a preponderance of 
the evidence, which is usually interpreted to mean 
that the probability of the offense exceeds 0.5. But 
sometimes the offense consists of two or more 
elements. For example, in a common negligence 
claim, the plaintiff might have to show both that 
the defendant was negligent and that the plaintiff’s 
injuries resulted from the defendant’s actions. 
Suppose that the plaintiff can establish both 
claims, the first with probability 0.7 and the second 
with a probability 0.6. By doing so he has met the 
burden required to demonstrate his claim, and he 
should recover his damages. This is the way most 
courts would analyze the case.
On the other hand, traditional probability would 
argue that the likelihood of both elements being 
true is closer to 0.6 × 0.7 = 0.42 (assuming the 
independence of these two events, which seems 
10
See, e.g., Ronald J. Allen, A Reconceptualization of Civil 
Trials, 66 B. U. L. Rev. 401 (1986) and Richard Lempert, 
The New Evidence Scholarship: Analyzing the Process of 
Proof, 66 B. U. L. Rev. 439 (1986).
11
Recent work includes Edward K. Cheng, Reconceptual-
izing the Burden of Proof, 122 Yale L. J. 1254 (2013) 
and Kevin Clermont, Death of Paradox: The Killer Logic 
Beneath the Standards of Proof, 88 Notre Dame L. Rev. 
(2012).
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Add text to PDF document in preview. • Add text box to PDF file in preview. • Draw PDF markups. PDF Protection. • Sign PDF document with signature.
how to insert text box in pdf file; add text to pdf file
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
annotation. Ability to insert a text note after selected text. transparency. Support to create a text box annotation to PDF file in .NET project. VB
add text to pdf file online; adding text to pdf reader
A
MERICAN 
M
ATHEMATICAL 
S
OCIETY
To learn more about the Centennial Fellowship visit www.ams.org/centfellow
Contact the AMS Development Offi ce by phone: 401-455-4111
or email: development@ams.org
2007-2008: Martin Kassabov
2010-2011: Joel Bellaiche
2010-2011: Joel Bellaiche
2006-2007:  Bryna Kra
2009-2010: Antonio Montalbán
2006-2007: Christopher Hacon
2005-2006: Mihnea Popa
2012-2013: Karin Melnick
Photo by Riza Falk
2008-2009: Christopher Hoffman
2005-2006: Yuan-Pin Lee
2011-2012: Andrew S. Toms
 Photo courtesy of the Purdue University   
 Department of Mathematics
Annually awarded to scholars
with strong potential for
excellent research, the
Centennial Fellowship Fund
advances early career
mathematicians by providing one-
year mathematical
research fellowships. 
Give to the
Centennial Fellowship Fund 
online at
www.ams.org/support
Fostering outstanding mathematical research 
AMS
Centennial Fellowship Fund
Book Review
The Evolution of an Idea
Reviewed by Robyn Arianrhod
The Noether Theorems: Invariance and
Conservation Laws in the Twentieth Century
Yvette Kosmann-Schwarzbach, translated from the
French by Bertram E. Schwarzbach
Springer, 2011, US$119.00, 218pages
ISBN: 978-0387878676
Emmy Noether, the most famous female mathe-
maticianofthetwentiethcentury,was thedaughter
of mathematician Max Noether. She received her
doctorate at Erlangen in 1907 (when she was
twenty-five) for a thesis on the topic of algebraic
invariants. She soon became part of the brilliant
circle led by Felix Klein and David Hilbert at
Göttingen, and popular legend says she influenced
even Einstein. Of course, legends tend to abound
about pioneering female mathematicians, but in
this case there is some substance to theclaim, as
The Noether Theorems shows. In the interest of
clarifying the intended readership, let me hasten
to add that this book is not a series of portraits
of colorful personalities; rather, it is a deeply
scholarly work, tersely written but generously
footnoted, that celebrates Noether’s most famous
achievements. It begins with an Englishtranslation
of Noether’s paper “Invariant variational prob-
lems”, published originally in German (“Invariante
Variationsprobleme”) in 1918, which will delight
mathematicians and mathematical physicists who
usethesetheoremswithouthavingreadtheoriginal
version.
But The Noether Theorems does more than
celebrate Emmy Noether and her theorems: as the
subtitle suggests, it traces what Yvette Kosmann-
Schwarzbach calls the “evolution of ideas” about
the relationship between mathematical invariance
and conservation laws, and it will be of great
interest to historians of mathematics. For those
who simply wish to get a feel for the work and
influence ofthis famous female mathematicianbut
Robyn Arianrhod is an adjunct research
fellow
in the school of mathematical sciences at Monash
University. Her email address is robyn.arianrhod@
monash.edu.
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1090/noti1027
whoarenotexpertinthemathematicsbehindthese
theorems (namely, Lagrangian dynamics, calculus
ofvariations, andLiegroups), letmeprovideashort
summary. A physical law has symmetries when it
is unchanged or invariant under certaincoordinate
or gauge transformations. Noether showed that
these symmetries indicate which quantities are
conservedunderthelaw.WhileNoether’s theorems
apply to laws of physics formulated in terms of
a Lagrangian, the principle can be illustrated
by a well-known example from undergraduate
mathematics.Aparticlewithmomentumpmovesin
aconservativeforcefieldFx rVxaccording
to Newton’s lawdp=dtF. IfV is invariant under
translations in the x
1
direction, then the x
1
-
component p
1
of the momentum is constant,
sincedp
1
=dt   @V=@x
1
0,so p
1
is “conserved”.
Another relevant undergraduate result is that
mechanical energy too is conserved under a
“conservative”force, becausethe“work”integral of
suchaforceis pathindependent.Themathematical
role of the boundary in Noether’s theorems is
illustrated by line integrals that depend only on
the end-points of the relevant path.
These elementary examples are more than sim-
plifying analogies. They illustrate what Kosmann-
Schwarzbach calls the “strange story” of the
Noether theorems, which were generally over-
looked in the early years precisely because their
significance lies in their generalizing a host of
already-known results like these. These known
resultshadbeenbuiltupslowlyandseparatelyover
the centuries, and it took physicists some time to
appreciate the importance of Noether’s discovery
that a single fundamental principle united math-
ematical symmetries and physical conservation
laws.
Even the concept of energy itself had been
long contested: when Leibniz first proposed the
existence and conservation of the mysterious vis
viva, which he represented by the formulamv
2
,
there was aheated and sometimes partisandebate
about why we would need any consequence of
forceother than the Cartesian/Newtonian concept
of momentum,mv! In 1740 another pioneering fe-
malemathematician, Émilie du Châtelet, played an
916
Notices of the AMS
Volume 60, Number 7
important role [1] in defending Leibniz’s concept.
Following Jean Bernouilli’s lead, mathematicians
eventuallyresolved the vis viva debate by showing
that integratingFdp=dtwith respect tot gives
the expression for momentum, while integration
with respect tox yields the formula for (what we
now call) kinetic energy. However, identifying the
latter as a “work” integral came much later (as did
definitiveexperimental confirmation of the conser-
vation of mechanical energy). Indeed, the quest to
understandtheconcept of energy is another exam-
ple of the fascinating evolution of scientific ideas.
But I digress. Kosmann-Schwarzbach’s historical
survey begins with Lagrange, who first connected
conservation laws with symmetries in the laws of
dynamics.
He took the first steptowards this connectionin
his Mécanique Analytique (1788) when he outlined
whatwenowcallLagrangiandynamics,andshowed
that the equations of motion derived in this way
lead naturally to the known conservation laws.
Kosmann-Schwarzbach writes (p. 33),
While, beforeLagrange, the various conser-
vation results had been taken to be first
principles belonging to the foundations of
dynamics, Lagrange viewed them as conse-
quences of the equations of dynamics, an
important shift of point of view.
Iwill return to this shift towards the mathema-
tization of physics later in this review. Kosmann-
Schwarzbach adds (p. 34),
It is only in the second edition of Mé-
canique Analytique (1811) that Lagrange
observed a correlation between symmetries
andtheprinciplesofconservationofcertain
quantities, in particular, energy.
Others made incremental generalizations of
theseideas, but it was EmmyNoether who took the
final step, proving a general, purely mathematical
connection between symmetry (or invariance) and
formal “conservation laws”. However, sherealized
immediately that her second theorem could be
applied to the conservation of energy in the
then-new theory of general relativity, her first
theorem being applicable to special relativity and
classical dynamics. The difference in the two
theorems concerns the nature and dimension
of the symmetry groups of transformations and
the nature of the associated conservation laws.
(The first theorem applies to theories whose
conservation laws are “proper” because they can
be derived from a flux integral over the boundary
of a surface, which leads, via Gauss’s law, to a
“continuity equation”; the field equations give a
divergence-freequantitythatexpressestherelevant
local conservation law. Noether’s first theorem
showed,for example, that “proper” conservation
of energy is a consequence of the invariance
of the Lagrangian under time-translations. Her
second theorem applies to gauge theories whose
conservation laws are “improper” because the
vanishing of ordinary divergences does not yield
meaningfullocal conservationlaws, butthesecond
theorem identifies invariant identities that can
be used to define a concept of conservation. See,
for example, Bergmann [2, p. 194], Byers [3].) As
Kosmann-Schwarzbach puts it (p. 26), “Noether
thus emphasized an essential difference between
special relativity and general relativity.…”
The problem of energy in general relativity had
perplexed both Einstein and Hilbert, and finding a
global law remains problematic because of the dif-
ficulty of including gravitational energy as well as
“local” conservation of the stress-energy tensor T.
(See Kosmann-Schwarzbach, p. 127, and for more
detail, see,e.g.,Wald[4, p.286].)Localconservation
can be expressed in terms of the vanishing diver-
gence ofT, although use of the term “divergence”
refers to the symbolic similarity with vector diver-
gences,because in general relativity one is really
talking about contracted covariant derivatives of
thetensorT, as Kosmann-Schwarzbach points out
(pp. 127–128). She also notes (p. 43) that, in 1924,
Schouten and Struik showed that when Noether’s
second theorem is applied to the Lagrangian of
general relativity, “The identities obtained were
also consequences of the Bianchi identities, which
were well known in Riemannian geometry.”
The Bianchi identities also lead to the van-
ishing of the contracted covariant derivatives of
via Einstein’s field d equations,andherein n lies
an interesting tale, which Kosmann-Schwarzbach
sketches very briefly: the story of Einstein’s field
equations versus Hilbert’s. It is importantinEmmy
Noether’s story, because she arrived in Göttingen,
at Klein and Hilbert’s invitation, in the spring of
1915,when Einstein and Hilbert were each trying
to derive the gravitational field equations. They
would both succeed in late November of that year,
although Kosmann-Schwarzbach makes the point
(pp. 40–41) that not only did Einstein lay the
foundation for Hilbert’s work, but he also (just!)
has priority in the discovery of the field equations.
Thefascinating thing about the Einstein-Hilbert
field equations is the very different approaches of
thetwo men,thephysicist andthemathematician. I
confess that I havealways beendrawnto Einstein’s
use of physical principles: the relativity principle,
together withtheconstancyof thespeed oflightin
specialrelativity, andthe“equivalenceprinciple”in
general relativity. He illustrated the latter with the
example of a freely falling lift: if you drop a ball, it
will appear stationary in the falling lift, because it
is fallingunder the influenceof gravityatthe same
rate as the lift itself. So, by changing reference
August 2013
Notices of the AMS
917
frames (from the ground to the falling lift), the
“force” of gravity on the ball is transformed away.
Similarly, according to Einstein [5, p. 114], “we are
able to ‘produce’ a gravitational field merely by
changing the system of coordinates.” In this way
he showed that gravitation could be treated in a
relativistic theory, in which the laws of physics
retain their form (that is, remain invariant) under
coordinate transformations between reference
frames. The mathematical language he used to
make this idea precise was that of tensorcalculus
(which Ricci and Levi-Civita had pioneered in the
late nineteenth century). By contrast, Hilbert’s
approach was to use a Lagrangian-style action
principle.
Kosmann-Schwarzbach shows (p. 70) that, as
early as 1910, Hilbert’s colleague Klein, who had
been working on the geometry of Lorentz groups
which arefundamental in Einstein’s special theory,
claimed that one could, “if one really wanted to,
replacetheterm ‘theory of invariants with respect
to a group of transformations’ with the term
‘relativity with respect to a group’.” The italics are
mine: what a perfect illustration of the priorities
of Klein the mathematician, for whom the theory
of relativity is a purely mathematical theory of
invariants and groups, in contrast to Einstein’s
use of physical principles! In fact, in 1916 Einstein
implicitly acknowledged the superiorelegance of
the Lagrangian/Hamiltonian formulation used by
Hilbert but concluded [5, p. 118]:
It is not my purpose in this discussion to
represent the general theory of relativity as
asystem that is as simple and logical as
possible, and with the minimum number of
axioms; but my main object is to develop
this theory in such a way that the reader
will feel that thepathwe haveentered upon
is psychologically the natural one, and that
the underlying assumptions will seem to
havethehighestpossibledegreeof security.
InJuly1915HilberthadinvitedEinsteintospend
a week at Göttingen. Einstein likely met Emmy
Noether there, and even if he did not, he soon be-
cameawareof her work. Althoughhis andHilbert’s
field equations were published at the end of 1915,
in thefollowing year they werestilltryingto clarify
the relativistic concept of conservation of energy,
and both appealed to Noether for clarification,
which she provided. (Like Hilbert, Einstein used a
Lagrangian(or rather,aHamiltonian)mathematical
approach in examining conservation of energy [5,
pp. 145–149].) By July1918 shehad completed the
“Noether theorems”, which impressed Einstein so
much that he wrote to Klein in December:
Ionce again feel that refusing her the right
to teach [because of her gender] is a great
injustice.I wouldbeveryfavorableto taking
energetic steps [on her behalf] before the
ministry. If you do not think that this is
possible, then I will go to the trouble of
doing it alone.
Kosmann-Schwarzbach gives this quote on
page 72, although she doesn’t say whether or not
Einsteincarried out hisoffer,butshenotes (pp. 48–
49) that the following year the Weimar Republic’s
newMinistryofScience, ArtsandEducationallowed
Noether to take up an appointment as a (poorly
paid) Privatdozentin, or assistant professor of
mathematics, at Göttingen. Sheseemsto havebeen
popularthere, but within just a few years she had
moved on from the “Noether theorems” to other
topics inalgebra, inwhichshewas “oneofthemost
important mathematicians of her time” (Kosmann-
Schwarzbach, p. 53). In 1933 the Nazis removed
her from her teaching position—likeEinstein, she
was Jewish, and like him, she migrated to the U.S.
in 1933. Sadly, she died in 1935.
MostofThe Noether Theorems—fiveofitsseven
chapters—is an overview of the response to these
two theorems from Noether’s contemporaries (I
have mentioned only Einstein’s reaction here) and
from later physicists and mathematicians. The
book traces theinfluence of the theorems—which
first waned, and then waxed after 1980—through
adetailed, highly technical survey of various at-
temptsto modernizeandextendtheir applicability,
as wellas tracingrecent progressinthemathemati-
cal understanding of symmetries andconservation
laws in general. A notable example is the rise of
gauge theories, in which “Noether’s theorem is
an essential tool” (p. 130). It is significant that
Kosmann-Schwarzbach concludes that resistance
to Noether’s theorems had little to do with sexism
or racism, because her later work in algebra was
“immediately recognized and admired” (p. 146);
rather, it was a product of the scientific styles and
interests of those who were driving progress at
that time.The Noether Theorems thus highlights
the role of historical and personal contingencies
in the evolution of scientific ideas in general.
For instance, a mathematical result such as
Noether’s may play a relatively small role in the
process of creating physical theories but can
become important in later refinements of the
language of the theory. Kosmann-Schwarzbach
quotes (p. 89) Vizgin’s 1985 assessment that
Hilbert’s conservation law in general relativity
is “a special case of Noether’s second theorem,
proved two and a half years later by Emmy
Noether.” Similarly, we learn (pp. 80–83) that in
1927, when Eugene Wigner used parity symmetry
to derive the quantum mechanical law associated
with parity conservation, apparently he had not
heard of Noether’s theorems. (In any case, these
918
Notices of the AMS
Volume 60, Number 7
theorems would not in themselves have applied to
the discrete symmetry he used, although discrete
analogues were developed in the 1970s (Kosmann-
Schwarzbach, pp. 80–81, 148). In 1972, however,
Wigner claimed, “We physicists pay lip service
to the great accomplishments of Emmy Noether,
but we do not really use her work.…” This quote
is given on page 82, and, as I mentioned, The
Noether Theorems then shows howthis perception
slowly changed, especially after 1980. The book
concludes with a list of the many recent fields
of application of these theorems, not only in
quantum and classical mechanics and in relativity
and quantum field theory but also in elasticity
theory, fluid mechanics, geometric optics, the
mechanics of nonholonomic systems, locomotion,
and numerical analysis.
Ithink Kosmann-Schwarzbach’s perspective is
that physicists were unduly slow in recognizing
the importance of mathematical concepts like
Noether’s. She mentions (p. 146) that, in a 1980
address, the physicist Chen Ning Yang quoted “an
amusing letter from Faraday to Maxwell as ‘a good
exampleof[our]resistanceto themathematization
of physics’,” as he put it with good-humored
self-deprecation.
Clearly Lagrange’s mathematical approach—
and therefore Hilbert’s and Noether’s—has been
marvelously successful in physics. On the other
hand, Einstein preferred to ground his theory in
a “psychologically natural” physical framework,
and it’s interesting that his point of view is
similar to Maxwell’s. In his 1873 Treatise on
Electricityand Magnetism, Maxwellgaveasummary
ofLagrangian dynamics (beforeusingitto examine
electromagnetic energy and its conservation), but
he concluded his summary as follows [6, p. 210]:
Lagrange and most of his followers, to
whom we are indebted for these methods,
haveendeavoured to banishall ideas except
those of pure quantity, so as not only to
dispense with diagrams, but even to get rid
of the ideas of velocity, momentum and
energy.…
He went on to say that mathematics has given
science many ideas that would not have been
possible otherwise, but that inexploringdynamics,
we must have our minds imbued with
dynamical truths as well as mathematical
methods…[This is in order] to avoid incon-
sistency with what is already established,
andalsothatwhenour viewsbecomeclearer,
the language we have adopted may be a
help to us and not a hindrance.
Maxwell had a genius for choosing “helpful”
mathematical language, notably his innovative use
of differential vector calculus to represent the
intuitive field concept created by the “mathemat-
ically illiterate” Faraday. Kosmann-Schwarzbach
doesn’t quoteYang’s “amusing letter from Faraday
to Maxwell,” but it’s worth noting that, despite
his lack of formal education, Faraday instinctively
knew that in trying to describe electromagnetic
effects, mathematicians like Ampère placed too
muchfaithintheaction-at-a-distancemathematical
methods of Newtonian gravity theory.
Of course, no matter which approach is more
aesthetically or psychologically pleasing to us,
a theory stands or falls on its ability to make
suitably accurate predictions. But one of the
fascinating things about scientific history is the
often serendipitous nature of discovery, and to a
mathematician surely themost thrilling of all such
contingenciesisthe“unreasonableeffectiveness”of
mathematical languagein physics, to use Wigner’s
well known but still evocative expression [7]. This
effectiveness is evident in the “mathematized”
approachof Lagrange, Hilbert, and Noether, as well
as in Einstein’s and Maxwell’s (and many others’)
combinationof experiment, physical intuition, and
appropriate mathematical language.
But, to sum up The Noether Theorems in its
own terms, it is an important study of the work
of Emmy Noether, the evolution of ideas about
conservation and symmetry, and theextraordinary
fertility of mathematical language.
References
1. É.duChâtelet,InstitutionsdePhysique,ChezPrault
Fils, Paris, 1740.
2. P.G.Bergmann,IntroductiontotheTheoryofRelativity,
with a Foreword by Albert Einstein, updated edition,
Dover, New York, 1976.
3. N.Byers,E.Noether’s discoveryofthedeepconnec-
tion between symmetries and conservation laws, paper
presented at The Heritage of Emmy Noether In Alge-
bra,Geometry,and Physics,BarIlanUniversity, Tel Aviv,
Israel, December 2–3, 1996.
4. R.M.Wald,GeneralRelativity,UniversityofChicago
Press, 1984.
5. A.Einstein,Thefoundationof thegeneraltheoryof
relativity, in ThePrincipleof Relativity: A Collection of
Memoirs ontheSpecial and General Theoryof Relativity,
by H. A. Lorentz, A. Einstein et al., translated from the
GermanbyW.PerrettandG. B.Jeffery,London, Methuen,
1923,andDover(NY) reprint, 1952. Einstein’s paperwas
originally published in German in Annalen der Physik
49, 1916.
6. J.C.Maxwell,ATreatiseonElectricityandMagnetism,
Volume 2, reprinted in1954 by Dover, New York (from
the third edition, 1891).
7. E.P.Wigner,Theunreasonableeffectivenessofmathe-
matics inthe natural sciences, Comm. Pure Appl. Math.
13(1960),1–14;anthologizedinE.Wigner,Symmetries
and Reflections, M.I.T. Press(Cambridge, MA)1970, pp.
222–237;also extractedin,e.g., T.Ferris (ed.),TheWorld
Treasury of Physics,Astronomy and Mathematics, Little,
BrownandCo., 1991, pp. 526ff.
August 2013
Notices of the AMS
919
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested