open pdf file in c# : Add text box to pdf file Library software component asp.net winforms wpf mvc 2015_Thoracic-Aorta1-part737

important pathophysiologic and prognostic information that may
have clinical implications both in disease states and in the general
population.
II. IMAGING TECHNIQUES
A. Chest X-Ray (CXR)
Most articles describing theuse of imaging to evaluate patients with
suspected AAS have focused on the role of CT, MRI, echocardiog-
raphy, and aortography. Although routine CXR rarely provides a
definitivediagnosis, it can provideseveralimportant diagnostic clues
to aortic diseases that prompt further evaluation.Table3 lists some
of the common and uncommon plain CXR findings of aortic
diseases.
Moreover, in cases of asymptomatic or chronic aortic diseases,
CXRs may actually provide the first clue to aortic pathology.
Importantly, CXR can identify other chest disorders that may
contribute to a patient’s illness (e.g., pneumonia, pneumothorax, rib
fracture). Nevertheless, although CXR may be valuable, it is neither
sensitive nor specific for AAS.
36-38
Moreover, normal results on
CXR with respect to the aorta should never prevent or delay the
further diagnostic evaluation of a patient with a suspected AAS.
In summary, although useful in drawing attention to thepossibility
of aortic disease, its low sensitivity, specificity, and interobserver
agreement limit the role of the CXR.
B. TTE
Thethoracic aorta should be routinely evaluated byTTE,
39-42
which
provides good images of the aortic root, adequate images of the
ascending aorta and aortic arch in most patients, adequate images
of the descending thoracic aorta in some patients, and good images
of the proximal abdominal aorta. New advances in imaging quality
and harmonic imaging have significantly improved the assessment
of the aorta by TTE.
The aortic root and proximal ascending aorta are best imaged in
the left parasternal long-axis view. The left lung and sternum often
limit imaging of the more distal portion of the ascending aorta
from this transducer position. In some patients, especially those
with aortic dilatation, theright parasternal long-axis viewcan provide
supplemental information. The ascending aorta may also be visual-
ized in the apical long-axis (apical three-chamber) and apical five-
chamber views and (especially in children) in modified subcostal
views.
There is usually no clearechocardiographic delineation between
the sinus and tubular portion of the ascending aorta, but occasion-
ally a fibrotic or sclerotic ridge, located at the STJ, is imaged. This
ridge may be prominent and should not be confused with vegeta-
tion, abscess, mass, atherosclerotic plaque, dissection flap, or supra-
aortic stenosis. The maximum diameter of the aorta is normally in
the root (sinus portion), which is immediately distal to the aortic
valve.
Echocardiographic measurements of theaortic root will vary in an
individual patient at different levels (Figure 10).
3,43,44
The aortic
diameter is smallest at the annulus and largest at the mid–sinuses of
Valsalva. The tubular portion of the ascending aorta is typically
about 10% smaller than the diameter at the sinus level.
45
The aortic
arch is usually easily visualized from the suprasternal view. Portions
of the ascending and descending aorta can be visualized simulta-
neously. One or more of the three arch branches can usually be
imaged: the left carotid and left subclavian arteries are identified in
>90% of cases and the brachiocephalic (inniminate) artery in up to
90% (Figure11). Just distal to the left subclavian artery is the level
of the ligamentum arteriosum, which is a common site of atheroscle-
rosis, and a shelf or indentation (a ductus diverticulum) is sometimes
imaged in this region.
The descending thoracic aorta is often incompletely imaged by
TTE. A cross-sectional view of the descending thoracic aorta may
be seen in the parasternal long-axis view, as it passes posteriorly to
the left atrium near the atrioventricular groove. It can also be seen
in short axis in the apical four-chamber view. By rotating the trans-
ducer 90, a long-axis view of the midportion of the descending
thoracic aorta maybeobtained.A portion of thedescending thoracic
aorta can also be imaged from a suprasternal view. In patients with
left pleural effusion, scanning from the back may also provide satis-
factory views of the descending thoracic aorta. However, the distal
descending thoracic aorta frequently cannot be imaged clearly
because of reduced resolution in the far field. Moreover, physical
characteristics of some patients exceed the limit of ultrasound pene-
tration.
The normal descending thoracic aorta is smaller than both the
aortic root and ascending aorta. As it descends, its diameter progres-
sively narrows from 2.5 to 2.0cm. Larger dimensions arereported in
patients with hypertension, aortic valve disease, and coronary athero-
sclerosis.
46
The aorta is consistently about 2 mm smaller in female
than it is in male subjects.
47
Asubstantial portion of the upper abdominal aorta can be easily
imaged in subcostal views, to the left of the inferior vena cava. This
should be routinely performed as a part of a 2D echocardiographic
study.
16
Often the proximal celiac axis and the superior mesenteric
artery can also be imaged. When present, aneurysmal dilatation,
external compression, intra-aortic thrombi, protruding atheromas,
and dissection flaps can be imaged, and flow patterns in the abdom-
inal aorta can be assessed. The infrarenal abdominal aorta is best
imaged as part of an abdominal ultrasound examination by use of a
linear array probe.
In summary, to reliably evaluatepatients with suspected aortic dis-
ease, the entire thoracic aorta must beimaged well. This is possiblein
some, butnot all, patientson systematic TTE. TTE is particularlyuseful
Figure 12 Transesophagealechocardiographicdeeptransgas-
tric view, which illustrates the aortic root (Ao R), the entire
ascending aorta (AA), and the proximal arch (not labeled). The
left coronary artery is also imaged (black arrow).
Journal of the AmericanSociety of Echocardiography
Volume 28 Number2
Goldstein et al 129
Add text box to pdf file - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text field pdf; add text to pdf file online
Add text box to pdf file - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to insert text into a pdf using reader; adding text to pdf in acrobat
for evaluating the aortic root, and the ascending aorta and arch may
also beadequately visualized in patients with good acousticwindows.
TTE is less helpful for evaluating the descending thoracic aorta.
However, TTE is an excellent screening tool for detecting aneurysms
of the upper abdominal aorta.
C. TEE
TEE,introducedclinicallyin thelate1980s, hashad a major impact on
the evaluation of numerous diseases involving theaorta. TEE has two
main advantages over TTE. First, superior image quality can be
obtained from the use of higher frequency transducers than are
possible with TTE. Second, because of the close proximity of the
esophagus to the thoracic aorta, TEE provides high-quality imaging
of nearly all of the ascending and descending thoracic aorta.
48-50
TEE incorporates all the functionality of TTE, including 3D imaging,
which can reliably interrogate cardiovascular anatomy, function,
hemodynamics, and blood flow. The current multiplane TEE
transducer consists of a single array of crystals that can be rotated
electronically or mechanically around the long axis of the
ultrasound beam in an arc of 180
.With rotation of the transducer
array, multiplane TEE produces a continuum of transverse and
longitudinal image planes.
1.Imaging oftheAorta. Asmentioned,theanatomic proximityof
the thoracic aorta and the esophagus allows superb visualization of
the aorta using TEE. The multiplane transesophageal echocardio-
graphic examination of the aorta is conducted as follows
51
:with the
tip of thetransesophageal echocardiographic probein theesophagus,
the ascending aorta is best visualized from a 100
to 140
view: the
imageisanalogous to thetransthoracic echocardiographic parasternal
long-axis view (but ‘‘flipped’’ upside down if the transesophageal
echocardiographic probe ‘‘bang’’ is at the top). This view can be opti-
mized by carefully rotating the transducer between 100 and 140.
Short-axis views of the aortic root and ascending aorta can be
obtained from the45 to 60 angle, usuallywith ananteflexed probe.
From the midesophagus at 0, theprobeneeds to be rotated posteri-
orly to obtain short-axis images of the descending thoracic aorta.
Figure 13 IVUSdocumentationofanIMHevolvingtofulldissectionon(left)withcorrespondingcontrastaortogramshowingonly
luminal compression (right).
Figure 14 IVUSevaluationofanaorticdissectionextendingacrosstheleveloftheleftrenalartery(leftframe,arrow);theIVUSinthe
true lumen identifies the renal artery ostium and the reentry point (right frame, arrow) at the orifice level. FL, False lumen; TL, true
lumen.
130 Goldstein et al
Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography
February 2015
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Document Protect. Password: Set File Permissions. Password: Open Document. Edit Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work with
adding text to pdf reader; how to add text field to pdf form
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
with .NET PDF Library. A best PDF annotator for Visual Studio .NET supports to add text box to PDF file in Visual C#.NET project.
how to add text fields in a pdf; adding text fields to a pdf
Whilekeepingthethoracic aorta in view, theprobecan bewithdrawn
to image upperthoracic levels of the descending aorta oradvanced to
sequentially image the lower thoracic and upper abdominal aorta.
With the transducer array at 90, a longitudinal view of the aorta
can be obtained.
Byadvancing the probe into the stomach, the proximal portion of
the abdominal aorta and the celiac trunk can be seen. The mid and
distalabdominal aorta are usuallynot seen because of difficultymain-
taining good contact with the mucosa of the stomach. To obtain
images of the arch, the transesophageal echocardiographic probe
needs to be facing posteriorly and withdrawn from the midesopha-
gus. With the transducer array at 90, a short-axis view of the trans-
verse arch can be obtained. It is usually possible to visualize the
takeoff of the left subclavian artery, but the left common carotid
and brachiocephalic arteries can be difficult or impossible to image
and usuallyrequire careful clockwiserotation of the probe. A portion
of the distal ascending aorta and proximal aortic arch may not be
visible because of interposition of the trachea. This ‘‘blind spot’’ can
be partially resolved with longitudinal views. An additional view,
the deep transgastric view, can sometimes image theentire ascending
aorta and often the proximal arch (Figure12).
D. Three-Dimensional Echocardiography
Real-time3DTEE, a relativelynew technology, appears to offer some
advantages over 2D TEE in a growing number of clinical applica-
tions.
52-56
However, as of this writing, there is limited information
regarding the clinical application of this novel technology to the
thoracic aorta.
57
Moreover, 3DTEE has somelimitations. Like2D TEE, it often fails
to adequately visualize the distal ascending aorta and the aortic arch
and its branches, because of interposition of thetrachea. In addition,
spatial imaging of the thoracic aorta is limited because of the90 im-
age sector, which is too narrow to include long segments of the
thoracic aorta and therefore limits topographic orientation. In sum-
mary, recent advances in 3D TEE provide an opportunity to recon-
sider the role of TEE for diagnosing and monitoring patients with
aortic diseases.Futureexperiencewillberequired to verifyits benefits
and establish its value relative to CTand MRI.
E. Intravascular Ultrasound (IVUS)
IVUS is performed by introducing a miniature, high-frequency
(10–30 MHz) ultrasound transducer mounted on the tip of a
disposable catheter, through a large arterial (usually femoral)
sheath, and advanced over conventional guidewires using fluoro-
scopic guidance. Less commonly, the IVUS imaging catheter can
be inserted into the femoral vein, navigated into the inferior
vena cava, and aimed at the adjacent aorta. IVUS produces an axial
view that is a 360
real-time image. Consecutive axial images can
be obtained during a ‘‘pullback’’ of the ultrasound catheter. This
procedure can be safely performed in a few minutes.
58
Because of its intraluminal position, IVUS permits visualization of
the aortic wall from theinside. This intraluminal perspectivecan pro-
videinformation that supplements theother imaging modalities.
59-62
Using the pullback technique, luminal diameter, cross-sectional area,
and wall thickness can be measured. In addition to providing mea-
surements, IVUS also provides qualitative information on nearly all
aortic pathologies, including aortic aneurysms, aortic dissections,
atherosclerosis, penetrating ulcers, and traumatic lesions (Figures13
and 14). Unlike TEE, IVUS S can also determine e the e dissection
characteristics in the abdominal aorta.
1.Limitations. Thenormalaortaappears on IVUSasa circularcross-
sectional image with an intact wall and a clear lumen. The ultrasound
catheter and the guidewire are seen within the lumen. In some in-
stances, it can be difficult to obtain complete cross-sectional images
of the aorta within a single frame of the image display at the arch
and locations where the aorta is significantly dilated, because of diffi-
cultymaintaining theultrasoundcatheter in a centraland coaxialorien-
tation and because of the limited penetration with high-frequency
transducers. This limitation can bepartially overcome byperiodic reor-
ientation of the ultrasound catheters. There are also concerns with
IVUS measurements. Off-center measurements or those taken in
tortuous portions of the aorta (tangential measurements on a curve)
do not reflect a true centerline diameter, mayprovide an obliqueslice,
and areless accurate than centerline computed tomographic measure-
ments.
63
Another major limitation of IVUS is that it lacks Doppler
capabilities (color Doppler can detect flow into small arteries, false
luminalflow, andendoleaks). Last, thehigh cost of thedisposabletrans-
ducers andinvasivenatureofthetechniquelimit IVUSformost clinical
applications other than guidance of endovascular procedures.
F. CT
Multidetector computed tomographic scanners ($64 detector rows)
are the currently preferred technology for aortic imaging. Computed
tomographic aortography (CTA) remains one of the most frequently
Figure 15 Volume-renderedimagefromanelectrocardiograph-
ically gated thoracic computed tomographic aortogram in the
presurgical study of a patient with ascending aortic aneurysm.
Note the excellent quality of both the aortic and coronary ves-
sels, with calcified atheromatous plaques of the coronary ar-
teries.
Journal of the AmericanSociety of Echocardiography
Volume 28 Number2
Goldstein et al 131
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
C#.NET: Add Text Box to PDF Document. examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C# C#.NET: Draw Markups on PDF File.
how to insert text in pdf reader; how to add text fields to a pdf
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
C#.NET WPF PDF Viewer control allows to add various annotation comments to PDF document in .NET Support to create a text box annotation to PDF file.
add text to pdf document online; adding text pdf
used imaging techniques for diagnosis and follow-up of aortic condi-
tions in acute as well as chronic presentations. This popularity reflects
its widespread availability, accuracy, and applicability, even forcritically
illpatients or those with relative contraindications to MRI such as per-
manent pacemakersand defibrillators. Multidetector CT(MDCT)pro-
vides extensivez-axiscoverage(in thelong axis of thebody), with high
spatialresolution images acquired at modest radiation exposurewithin
a scan time lasting a few seconds.
1,64
Furthermore, CTA allows
simultaneous imaging of vascular structures, including the vessel wall
and of solid viscera.
65
The minimization of operator variability and
the capacity of delayed reprocessing of sourceimages make it an ideal
technique for comparative follow-up studies.
1,64
The latest innovations in clinical practice include electrocardio-
graphically gated
66
aortic computed tomographic studies leading to
high-quality, precise imaging of theascending aorta, as well as simul-
taneous evaluation of the coronary arteries
67
(Figure 15).
Electrocardiographically gated CTA adds valuable information in
the study of aortic pathology involving the aortic root and valve,
68
in congenitalheart disease,
69
for simultaneous aortocoronaryevalua-
tion,
66
for planning of endovascular therapy,
68,70
for imaging of the
postsurgical ascending aorta,
71
and to show dynamic changes of
true luminal compression in aortic dissection.
72
Themaindrawbacksof CTaretheuseofionizing radiation and iodin-
ated contrast media (ICM).
73
Using optimalacquisition methods, large
reductions in ionizing radiation dose can be achieved. These include
theuseoftubecurrentmodulation,prospectiveelectrocardiographically
triggered acquisitions, or tube voltage reductions to 80 to 100 kV.
Radiation dosebecomes most relevant in younger men and premeno-
pausalwomen. Contrast-associated nephropathy
74
maybeavoidedor
significantly decreased by proper patient hydration and use of the
minimum volumeof low- or iso-osmolar ICM.
75
Therateofadverse
reactions to low-osmolar ICM in CT is approximately 0.15%, with
most cases self-resolving and mild.
76
Among patients with renal
insufficiency, the rates of contrast-associated nephropathy are low.
Pooled data from recently published prospective studies have
shown an overall rate of contrast-associated nephropathyof 5% af-
ter intravenous injection of ICM in 1,075 patients with renal insuf-
ficiency, with no serious adverse outcomes (dialysis or death).
74
Thecurrent generation of computed tomographic scanners is able
to significantlydecrease the effective radiation doseand thetotal vol-
ume of ICM required for aortic imaging.
77
Additionally, CT for
follow-up of aortic expansion may be performed without ICM,
relying on noncontrast images only.
1. Methodology. a. CTA.–Thecombination of wide multidetector
arrays with short gantry rotation times in $64-detector computed
tomographic scanners results in standard acquisition times of 3 to
4sec for the thoracic aorta and <10 sec for the thoracoabdominal
aorta and the iliofemoral arteries.
The minimal technical characteristics of state-of-the-art CTA are a
slice thickness of #1 mm and homogeneous contrast enhancement
in the aortic lumen. Complete examination of the aorta from the
Figure16 Sagittalmultiplanarreformatted(A)anddoubleobliqueimages(B,C)fromacomputedtomographicaortograminapatient
withAAS. The anatomic locations of the planesof (B) and (C) are markedon(A). Note the transitionfrom a type Bacute IMHinvolving
the descending thoracic aorta to a type B aortic dissection involving the abdominal aorta.
132 Goldstein et al
Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography
February 2015
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Add text to PDF document in preview. • Add text box to PDF file in preview. • Draw PDF markups. PDF Protection. • Sign PDF document with signature.
how to input text in a pdf; adding text to pdf form
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Highlight PDF text in preview. • Add text to PDF document. • Insert text box to PDF file. • Draw markups to PDF document. PDF Protection.
add text to pdf in preview; add editable text box to pdf
supra-aortic vessels to the femoral arteries is needed for evaluation
beforetransthoracic endovascularaorticrepair(TEVAR),but asa gen-
eralrulethescanlength (anatomicscan range)on CTA should beindi-
viduallytailoredto avoid unnecessaryexposureto ionizing radiation.
1
i. NoncontrastCTbefore AortographyIn theacutesetting of a sus-
pected AAS, it is important to initiate the protocol by a noncontrast
thoracic computed tomographicscan to rule outIMH. This scaniden-
tifies concentrated hemoglobin in recently extravasated blood within
the aortic wall that shows a characteristically high computed tomo-
graphic density (40–70 Hounsfield units),
78
facilitates the character-
ization of the hematoma,
79
can identify vascular calcifications, and
provides a baseline examination for postcontrast evaluation.
ii. Electrocardiographically Gated CTA Motion artifacts involving
the thoracic aorta are evident in most (92%) standard nongated
computed tomographic angiograms. Because of the limited temporal
resolution of CT, imaging artifacts arising fromthe peduncular motion
of the heart, the circular distension of the pulsewave, aortic distensi-
bility, and the hemodynamic state may appear as a ‘‘double aortic
wall’’ on standard nongated CTA.
8,23,24,80,81
This finding may also
lead to a false-positive diagnosis of a dissection flap
64,67,80
and impair
accurate measurement of the aortic root and ascending aorta.
67,82
Prospective or retrospective synchronization of data acquisition
with theelectrocardiographic tracing eliminates theseartifacts, thereby
improving the accuracy of diagnosis and reproducibility of aortic size
measurements.
67
Low-dose prospective electrocardiographically
gated CT protocols have the advantage of decreased radiation expo-
sure compared with the standard technique.
83
iii. Thoracoabdominal CT after Aortography A late thoracoabdo-
minal scan (50 msec after bolus injection) improves the detection
of visceralmalperfusion in theacutesetting of aortic dissection,
65
de-
tects slowendograftleaks,
84
distinguishesslowflow fromthrombusin
the false lumen,
85
and allows alternative abdominal diagnoses in the
absence of acute aortic pathology.
Figure 17 Themethodologyofdoubleobliqueaorticimages.Multiplanarreformattedimages(A–F)indifferentplanesobtainedfrom
acomputedtomographic aortogram (C) correspondstothe axialsource image andshowsanellipticaldescending aorta. The sagittal
(A) and coronal(B) correlates show the reference planes of (C) as well as the tortuosity of the aortic segment, which results ina dis-
torted shape. The plane is corrected in both the sagittal (D) and coronal(E) images to achieve perpendicularity to the aortic flow, re-
sulting in a corrected true transversal image of the aortic lumen, which is circular in this case.
Figure 18 Image from m a a 44-year-old d man with BAV. . Single
end-systolic image from cine steady-state free precession
(SSFP) sequence depicts a bicuspid valve (yellow arrows) with
normal leaflet thickness and unrestricted opening.
Journal of the AmericanSociety of Echocardiography
Volume 28 Number2
Goldstein et al 133
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
PDF Write. Insert text, text box into PDF. Edit, delete text from PDF. Insert images into PDF. Edit, remove images from PDF. Add, edit, delete links. Form Process
adding text to pdf reader; adding text to a pdf in acrobat
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Allow users to add comments online in ASPX webpage. Able to change font size in PDF comment box. Able to save and print sticky notes in PDF file.
how to enter text in a pdf document; how to input text in a pdf
iv.ExposuretoIonizingRadiationRadiation minimization protocols
include limiting scan range, prospectively electrocardiographically
triggered acquisitions,
66
and using low tube voltage (80–100 kV)
for low–body weight patients (<85 kg) without risking loss of diag-
nostic quality.
77
Application of iterative reconstruction algorithms
providethe opportunity foreven larger reductions in scan acquisition
parameters. Despite progress in radiation reduction, the use of alter-
native methods such as MRI and echocardiographyremains a consid-
eration for serial studies.
1
v. Measurements In contrast with other aortic imaging techniques,
CTA depicts the aortic wall, thereby permitting measurement of
boththeinner-inner(luminal)andouter-outer(total)aortic diameters.
Imaging artifacts from the highly contrasted lumen frequently impair
the visualization of a thin and healthy wall in the ascending aorta.
24
Multiplanar reconstruction of the axial source data can create
aortic images in a plane perpendicular to the aortic lumen direction
(double-oblique or true short-axis images of the aorta; see
Figures 16 and 17). This s method corrects shape distortions
introduced by aortic tortuosity.
8,86,87
In cases of noncircular aortic
shape, both major and minor diameters should be measured. The
manual procedure of double-oblique images is time consuming and
may add observer variability.
88
Automated aortic segmentation
software is available at many institutions but, like most automated
software, has limitations and requires manual adjustment.
The measurement technique must be highly reproducible to
correctly assess follow-up studies. Accurate assessment of aortic
morphologic changes can be achieved by side-by-side comparison of
source axial images from two or more serial computed tomographic
aortographic examinations with anatomic landmark synchronization
andaslicethickness#1mm.Electrocardiographicallygated ortriggered
imaging isan additionalrefinement that furtherreducesvariability, with
a maximum interobserver variability of 61.2 mm in the ascending
aorta.
89
Measures in the axial plane are valid only for aortic segments
with a circular shape and craniocaudal axis, like the midascending and
thedescendingaorta.
1
Distortion in theaxialimageintroducedbyaortic
tortuosity may be minimized by measuring the lesser diameter.
90
Interobserver variability is always higher than intraobserver vari-
ability,
91,92
suggesting thatfollow-up ofaorticdiseaseina specificpatient
should be performed by a single experienced observer.
88,89
In summary, CTA is oneof the most used techniques in theassess-
ment of aortic diseases. Advantages of CTA over other imaging
Figure 19 Imagesfroma54-year-oldwomanwithanelevatedsedimentationrateanddilatationofthedescendingaorta.Wallthick-
eningiswelldepicted indark (black) blood images(left, yellow arrow). Short tauinversion recovery(STIR) images(right) demonstrate
bright signal in the aortic wall (yellow arrow), a result consistent with edema. Surgical repair was performed in this patient, and his-
tology was consistent with GCA.
Figure 20 Imagesfroma60-year-oldmanwithmoderatelysevereaorticinsufficiency.Three-chamber(left)andcoronaloblique
(right) cine steady-state freeprecession(SSFP)imagesdepictdarksignal(yellow arrows)caused byintravoxeldephasing associated
with the posteriorly directed jet of insufficiency.
134 Goldstein et al
Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography
February 2015
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Other PDF edit functionalities, like add PDF text, add PDF text box and field.
adding text to pdf online; how to add text fields to a pdf document
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Other Tab. Item. Name. Description. 17. Text box. Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF page. Line color and fill can be set in properties.
add text field to pdf acrobat; how to add text to pdf document
modalities include the short time required for image acquisition and
processing, the ability to obtain a complete 3D data set of the entire
aorta, and its availability. Moreover, MDCT permits a correct evalua-
tion of the coronaryarteries and aortic branch disease. Its main draw-
backs aretheradiationexposureandneedforcontrastadministration.
G. MRI
MRI is a versatiletoolfor assessing the aorta and aorta-related pathol-
ogies. This imaging modality can be used to define the location and
extent of aneurysms, aortic wall ulceration, and dissections and to
demonstrate areas of wall thickening related to aortitis or IMH.
MRI can also be used for preoperative and postoperative evaluation
of the aorta and adjacent structures. Additionally, MRI can provide
functionaldata, including quantification of forward and reverse aortic
flow, assessment of aortic wall stiffness and compliance, and aortic
leaflet morphology and motion (Figure18). All of this information
is obtainablewithout theburden of ionizing radiation and, in some in-
stances, without the need for intravenous contrast.
MR images are based on the signal collected from hydrogen
nuclei,
93
which align and process along the axis of themagnetic field
when a patient enters the scanner. This precession can be altered by
applying magnetic field pulses in a controlled fashion to create‘‘pulse
sequences.’’ After these pulse sequences are applied, the signal from
the hydrogen nuclei is measured and then processed to produceMR
images. Theversatility of MRI can be attributed to the multipletypes
of pulsesequences that can be used to define structure, characterize
tissue, and quantify function.
1. Black-Blood Sequences. Black-blood MRI sequences,
acquired with spin-echo techniques, and often including inversion
recovery pulses, are useful for defining morphology across a spec-
trum of aortic conditions without theneed for intravascular contrast
medium.
94-97
With these sequences, the use of multiple
radiofrequency pulses nulls the signal from moving blood, causing
the dark blood appearance; mobile protons in stable or slowly
moving structures (e.g., aortic wall) provide the signal in the
image. Aortic wall morphology can be defined and tissue
characterized with T1- and T2-weighted sequences and their vari-
ants, including T2-weighted dark-blood techniques and T2 turbo
spin-echo
and
short-tau
inversion
recovery
sequences
(Figure 19).
98-100
Each of these imaging protocols has relative
strengths and limitations;forexample, T2-weighted MRI is sensitive
to areas of increased water content, as is often noted in pathologic
conditions, but is limited by relatively low signal-to-noise ratio.
MRI of the thoracic aorta can be obtained with high spatial resolu-
tion, with in-plane resolution typically in the range of
1.5  1.5 mm and submillimeter acquisition achievable with more
specialized MRI sequences.
101,102
2. Cine MRI Sequences. Bright-blood imaging with approaches
such as steady-statefreeprecession and gradient-echo techniquesis use-
ful for obtaining high–temporal resolution cine images of flow in the
aorta. In theseimages, the blood poolis bright compared with theadja-
centaorticwall,whichistypicallyintermediatein signal. Cineimagingcan
demonstrate flow within aortic lumens (true or false), and areas of low
signalcausedbyintravoxeldephasingcan beseenwithcomplexflowpat-
terns associated with valvular stenosis or regurgitation (Figure20).
103
3.FlowMapping. Velocity-encoded phase-contrast imaging can be
usedto quantifyaorticflow. Thephase-contrasttechniqueis based on
thefact thatprotonsundergo a changein phasethat is proportionalto
velocity when they pass through a magnetic field gradient consisting
of equalpulses that areof opposite polarityand slightly offset in time.
Blood flow can bequantified byintegrating thesemeasured velocities
within theaortic lumen throughout thecardiac cyclewith values that
haveshown strong agreement with phantom models and other mea-
surement approaches.
104
Phase-contrast imaging of the aorta can be
used to assess forward flow and stenotic and regurgitant valves
105,106
and can aid in assessment of congenital heart disease.
107
Phase-
contrast imaging is typically acquired in a single in-plane or
through-plane direction, with someapplications allowing flowencod-
ing in multiple directions.
108,109
4. Contrast-Enhanced MR Angiography (MRA). Contrast-
enhanced MRA can provide a 3D data set of the aorta and branch
vessels, allowing complex anatomy and postoperative changes to
be depicted
through
postprocessing techniques such as
maximum-intensity projection and multiplanar reformatting
(Figure21). In patients with contraindications to contrast or in cases
of difficult intravenous access, a 3D angiogram of the aorta can still
beobtained with unenhancedsegmented steady-statefreeprecession
angiography.
110
When precise dimensions of the aortic root and
proximal ascending aorta are needed, electrocardiographically gated
techniques can beused.
101,110
Improved scanning speed allows time-
resolved MRA.
111
Although contrast timing for contrast-enhanced
MRA can be a challenge, particularly in the concurrent assessment
of the aorta and pulmonary arteries or veins, the use of newer
blood-pool contrast agents can circumvent the limitations of tradi-
tional interstitial gadolinium contrast agents and in conjunction with
Figure 21 MIPimageobtainedfromMRAina60-year-oldman
with a dilated ascending aorta (large yellow arrow). There was
suspicion of coarctation of the descending aorta raised by sur-
face echocardiographic imaging; however, MRArevealed amild
kink inthe isthmus withoutsignificant stenosis (large red arrow)
and normal-sizedintercostal(smallredarrow)andinternalmam-
mary (small yellow arrow) arteries, results consistent withpseu-
docoarctation.
Journal of the AmericanSociety of Echocardiography
Volume 28 Number2
Goldstein et al 135
electrocardiographic and respiratory gating has been shown to in-
crease vessel sharpness and reduce artifacts.
112
MRI may also be used as a tool to investigate aortic physiology.
Quantification of stiffness, an important predictor of cardiovascular
outcome, can be obtained with pulsewave measurements from
high–temporal resolution cine imaging.
113
MRI can provide insight
into the elastic properties of the aorta, quantify the resultant blood
flow,
114
and estimate aortic wall shear stress.
115
5. Artifacts. Similar to echocardiographic imaging, MRI artifacts
occur. Consequently, consistently recognizing artifacts can prevent
misinterpretation. The reader is referred to two excellent reviews
for a detailed discussion of these.
116,117
H. Invasive Aortography
Once considered the reference standard for the diagnosis of acute
aortic diseases, invasive catheter-based aortography has largely
been replaced by less invasive techniques, including CT, MRI,
and TEE.
42,118-124
These noninvasive imaging modalities provide
higher sensitivity and specificity for detecting AAS and enable
the assessment of aortic wall pathologies that are not seen on
lumenograms (as obtained by contrast aortography). In addition,
CT, MRI, and TEE also provide greater sensitivity in detecting
supporting findings such as pericardial or pleural hemorrhage or
effusion. Moreover, aortography is time consuming and incurs a
risk for contrast-induced nephropathy. Thus, invasive aortography
Figure 22 Contrast aortogram m (left) ) before e (A) and after r (B) ) endovascular r repair showing g relief f of malperfusion syndrome.
Three-dimensional CTA (right) shows corresponding computed tomographic angiographic reconstructions before (C) and after (D)
repair.
Figure 23 Sensitivityof imaging modalitiesin evaluating sus-
pected aortic dissection in a meta-analysis of 1,139 patients.
Massachusetts General Hospital Thoracic Aortic Center; re-
produced with permission.
Figure 24 Specificityofimaging modalitiesinevaluating sus-
pected aortic dissection in a meta-analysis of 1,139 patients.
Massachusetts General Hospital Thoracic Aortic Center; re-
produced with permission.
136 Goldstein et al
Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography
February 2015
no longer has a role as a primary diagnostic modality for
AAS.
42,120-122,124
Although invasive aortography has been replaced for diagnostic
purposes, it continues to be useful to guide endovascular procedures
and to screen for endoleakage. Intraprocedural contrast aortography
is often essential to identify aortic side branches and provide impor-
tant landmarks during the endovascular procedure.Figure22 reveals
the resolution of distal dynamic aortic obstruction after a stent graft
was placed in a type Bdissection. IVUS is an alternative imaging tech-
nique during endovascular procedures.
59,60,62,125,126
I. Comparison of Imaging Techniques
With advances in imaging technology, therearenow multiple modal-
ities well suited to imaging the thoracic aorta, including CTA, MRA,
echocardiography, and aortography.
1,127
No single modality is
preferred for all patients or all clinical situations. Instead, the choice
of imaging modality should be individualized on the basis of a
patient’s clinical condition, the relevant diagnostic questions to be
answered, and local institutional factors such as expertise and
availability. A few pertinent comments follow.
When assessing broadly for the presence of thoracic aortic aneu-
rysms (TAAs), or to size such aneurysms, CTA or MRA is preferred,
as all segments of the thoracic aorta are well visualized. As well, the
aorta and its branches can be displayed in multiple planar views,
which permits more accurate diameter measurements than axial im-
aging. In addition, both modalities can provide a reconstructed,
surface-shaded 3D display of the aorta, which is helpful in demon-
strating the anatomic relations of the aorta and its branch vessels. In
contrast, TEE is not generally preferred for routine aortic imaging,
because it is semiinvasive, is relatively unpleasant for the patient,
does not provide full visualization of the arch vessels, and does not
permit easy identification of landmarks when comparing serialexam-
inations to assess aortic changes over time.
When the region of clinical interest is specifically the aortic root,
such as in screening for or following Marfan syndrome, TTE may
be preferred, because the aortic root is generally well visualized and
easily measured, whereas on conventional nongated CTA, the aortic
root maybepoorlyvisualized because of its angulation and significant
motion artifact produced by the beating heart. On the other hand,
echocardiography is less consistently able to image the distal
ascending aorta, aortic arch, and descending thoracic aorta. To image
thesesegments, CTA and MRA are preferred. Another consideration
in selecting an imaging modalityis theprevious modality used. When
following a patient with an enlarging aortic aneurysm, it is best to use
thesameimagingmodalityforfutureimaging, so that a comparison of
onestudy with thenext is comparing apples to apples rather than ap-
ples to oranges.
For imaging of suspected AAS, the primary consideration should
be the accuracy of the imaging modality, given the serious
Figure25 ‘‘Real-world’’sensitivityofimagingmodalitiesineval-
uating suspected aortic dissection ina sample of 618patients in
the IRAD.  Massachusetts General Hospital Thoracic Aortic
Center; reproduced with permission.
Table 4 Comparisonoffiveimagingmodalitiesfor
diagnostic features of AAS
Diagnostic performance
CTA TTE TEE MRA Angiography
Sensitivity
+++ ++
+++ +++ ++
Specificity
+++ ++
+++ +++ +++
Ability to detect IMH
+++ +
++
+++ 
Site of intimal tear
+++ 
++
+++ ++
Presenceof AR
+++ +++ ++
+++
Coronary artery involvement
+
++
+
+++
Presenceof pericardial
effusion
++
+++ +++ ++
Branch vessel involvement
++
+
++
+++
CTA, Computed tomographic angiography; +++, very positive; ++,
positive; +, fair; , no.
Adapted from Cigarroa et al.
182
and Isselbacher.
243
Table 5 Practicalassessmentoffiveimagingmodalitiesin
the evaluation of suspected AAS
Advantages of modality
CTA
TTE
TEE
MRA
Angiography
Readily available
+++
+++
++
+
+
Quickly performed
+++
+++
++
+
+
Performed at bedside
+++
+++
Noninvasive
+++
+++
+
+++
No iodinated contrast
+++
+++
+++
No ionizing radiation
+++
+++
+++
Cost
++
+
++
++
+++
CTA, Computed tomographic angiography; +++, very positive; ++,
positive; +, fair; , no.
Adapted from Cigarroa et al.
182
and Isselbacher.
419
Table6 BenignconditionsorfindingsthatcanmimicAASon
the basis of imaging studies
Aortitis
Atheromatous plaque
Prior surgery of aorta
Pericardial recess
Remnant of anonpatent PDA
Artifacts on CT (streakand motion)
Reverberation artifacts in ascending aortaonTEE
Innominatevein
Periaortic fat and hemiazygos sheath may mimicIMH
PDA, Patent ductus arteriosus.
Journal of the AmericanSociety of Echocardiography
Volume 28 Number2
Goldstein et al 137
consequences of false-positive and particularly of false-negative re-
sults. There have been a number of studies carried out over the
past two decades comparing CTA, MRA, TEE, and aortography for
the diagnosis of aortic dissection, and a recent meta-analysis by
Shiga et al.
122
showed that CTA, MRA, and TEE are all outstanding,
with sensitivities of 98% to 100%, as shown inFigure23. On the
other hand,aortographyhas asensitivityof only88%, perhapsreflect-
ing the fact that IMH often goes undetected with this technique. In
the same meta-analysis, the specificity of the four imaging modalities
was roughly equivalent at 94% to 98%, as shown in Figure 24.
Therefore CTA, MRA, and TEE are all reasonable first-line imaging
studies to choose for this purpose.
It is important to note, however, that the research studies that
evaluate the accuracy of imaging modalities are usually performed
at centers of excellence and interpreted by designated experts in
aortic imaging, and it is thereforereasonableto suspect thataccuracy
may be lower when the same imaging modalities perform in the
‘‘real-world’’ setting. Indeed, a report from the International
Registryof AcuteAorticDissection (IRAD)examined this veryques-
tion, and theresults are shown inFigure25.
120
Thereal-world sensi-
tivity of both CTA and TEE is lower than in theabovemeta-analysis,
probably reflecting a lesser degree of expertise among the readers.
Interestingly, the real-world sensitivity of MRA remained at 100%,
which may reflect the fact that MR angiograms tend to be read by
specialists (e.g., vascular radiologists) rather than generalradiologists
(e.g., emergency department radiologists). The diagnostic and prac-
tical features of each of the five common imaging modalities are
summarized inTables4and5.
III. ACUTE AORTIC SYNDROMES
A. Introduction
The term AAS
128
refers to the spectrum of aortic pathologies,
including classic aortic dissection, IMH, penetrating aortic ulcer
(PAU), and aortic aneurysm rupture (contained or not contained).
Although the pathophysiologyoftheseheterogeneous conditions dif-
fers, they are grouped because they share common features: (1)
similar clinical presentation (‘‘aortic pain’’), (2) impaired integrity of
the aortic wall, and (3) potential danger of aortic rupture requiring
emergency attention.
128-133
Moreover, some of these conditions
may represent stages in the evolution of the same process. We have
elected not to include, as some authors do, aortitis and traumatic
aortic rupture, because they have totally distinct clinical and
pathophysiologic profiles.
128
Clinical databases, such as the IRAD,
have contributed tremendously to our knowledge of these acute
aortic pathologies.
134
Becauseof the life-threatening nature of theseconditions, prompt
and accurate diagnosis is paramount. Misdiagnosis of these condi-
tions, usually because of confusion with myocardial ischemia, can
lead to untimely deaths.Table6 lists some less urgent conditions
that can potentially mimic AAS.
Thenoninvasiveimaging techniques that playa fundamentalrole
in thediagnosis and managementof patientswith AASincludeCTA,
TTE, TEE and MRI. Some patients may require more than one
noninvasive imaging study and, in rare instances, invasive aortog-
raphy may be necessary. Imaging is used to confirm or exclude
the diagnosis, determine the site(s) of involvement, delineateexten-
sion, and detect complications to plan themost appropriatemanage-
ment approach.
B. Aortic Dissection
1. Classification of AorticDissection. Accurate classification of
aortic dissection is important because significant differences in clin-
ical presentation, prognosis, and management depend on the loca-
tion and extent of the dissection. Figure 26 illustrates the two
commonly used classifications: the DeBakey system (types I, II,
and III)
124,125
and the Stanford system (types A and B).
126
Dissections involving the aortic arch without involving the
ascending aorta are classified as type B in the Stanford system.
The majority of dissections, whether type A or type B, propagate
beyond the diaphragm to the iliac arteries.
The appropriate management of aortic dissections depends not
only on the location of the dissection but also on the time that has
elapsed between onset of the process and the patient’s presentation.
Although the adjectives acute, subacute, and chronic areoften applied,
thereisno standard definition for these timeperiods.
135-138
Thereis a
24-hour ‘‘hyperacute’’ period during which dissections involving the
ascending aorta carry a risk for rupture approaching 1% per hour.
Studies have shown that 75% of aortic dissection–related deaths
occur in the initial 2weeks. At the opposite extreme are ‘‘old dissec-
tions’’ encountered incidentally during aortic imaging or surgery.
These are clearly ‘‘chronic.’’ Hirst et al., Levinson et al., and DeBakey
considered an aortic dissection to be ‘‘acute’’ when the onset of
Figure 26 Diagramillustratingthetwocommonlyusedclassifi-
cation systems for aortic dissection. Inthe older of the two, the
DeBakey system, type I dissection originates in the ascending
aorta and propagates distally to includes at least the arch and
typically the descending aorta. Type II dissection, not shown
(the least common type) originates in and is confined to the
ascendingaorta. Type IIIdissectionoriginatesinthe descending
thoracic aorta(usually justdistaltotheleftsubclavianartery)and
propagates distally, usually to below the diaphragm. The Stan-
ford system, in a simpler scheme, divides dissections into two
categories: those that involve the ascending aorta, regardless
of the site of origin, are classified as type A, and those beginning
beyond the archvesselsare classifiedastype B. The majority of
dissections, whether type A or type B, propagate beyond the
diaphragm to the iliac arteries.
138 Goldstein et al
Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography
February 2015
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested