open pdf file in c# : Add text box in pdf document SDK application service wpf windows web page dnn 2015_Thoracic-Aorta3-part739

aortic dissections after surgical repair.
197
After type A dissection
repair, patent falselumen in the descending aorta is linked to survival
at 5years. Thus, use of intraoperativeTEE to direct elimination of the
entry tear, not just repairing the ascending aorta, is of great impor-
tance.
c. Partial False Luminal Thrombosis.–Studies have shown that
completely thrombosed false lumens have improved outcomes,
whereas patent falselumens carryan increased risk for aortic expan-
sion and death.
197,210
However, in the IRAD series, partial
thrombosis of the false lumen, defined as the concurrent presence
of both flow and thrombus and present in a third of patients, was
the strongest independent predictor of follow-up mortality, with a
2.7-fold increased risk for death compared to patients with patent
falselumen without thrombus formation.
199
Prospective studies us-
ing CTor MR for assessing the whole aorta are required to confirm
these results.
d. Entry TearSize.–The prognostic value of entrytear size was eval-
uated by Evangelista et al.,
211
who documented that a largeentrytear
is astrong predictor of latemortalityand of theneed foraortic surgical
treatment. An entrytearsize$ 10mmwasanoptimalcutoff valuefor
predicting dissection-related adverse events, with sensitivity of 85%
and specificityof 87%. TEE and CTare superior to MRI in the assess-
ment of entrytear size and location. Recently it has been shown that
agreement between entryteararea by3DTEE and CTisexcellent.
151
When the entry tear is small, the flow volume that enters the false
lumen is low, and thus the false luminal pressures will be low.
Therefore, the combination of a large entry tear and indirect signs
of high pressure of the false lumen, distinguishable by imaging tech-
niques, should be considered a predictor of aortic enlargement and
adverse events and warrants close follow-up.
e. True Luminal Compression.–True luminal compression is an
indirect sign of high false luminal pressure. However, true luminal
compression assessment may be limited by intimal flap movement
during the cardiac cycle, as wellaslocalfactorssuch asin spiraldissec-
tion, thatmayreducereproducibilityof thisfinding. Patientswith clear
overall true luminal compression have a higher risk for rapid false
luminal enlargement and further aortic complications.
10. Follow-Up Strategy. After discharge, follow-up by CTor MRI
is indicated depending on technique availability, preferentialinforma-
tion sought, and patient characteristicssuch as age, renalfunction, and
test tolerance at 3, 6, 12 months and annually thereafter.
C. IMH
1. Introduction. Advances in aortic imaging technology, including
TEE, CT, and MRI, have led to increasing recognition of aortic IMH
among patients with AAS. IMH, generally considered to be a variant
of aortic dissection, accounts for approximately 10% to 25% of AAS
(Table10). IMH was first described in 1920 as ‘‘dissection without
intimal tear’’
212
and was believed to result from rupture of the vasa
vasorum, allowing bleeding between the elastic lamina of the aortic
media.
79,212,213
However, recent findings suggest that at least some
IMHs may be initiated by small intimal tears that are undetectable
by current aortic imaging modalities and are often overlooked on
gross inspection of the aorta at the time of surgery or autopsy.
214-217
IMH is not a single entity but can be associated with several
conditions, including spontaneous (‘‘typical’’) aortic dissection,
penetrating ulcer, aortic trauma, and iatrogenic dissection (cardiac
catheterization, cardiac surgery).
2. Imaging Hallmarks and Features. The imaging hallmarks of
classicaortic dissection—thepresenceof a dissection flapand thepres-
ence of adoublechannelaorta—areboth absent inIMH(Figure38)In
addition, there is usually no reentry site. General imaging features of
IMHarelisted inTable11. Typically, IMHappears as thickening of the
Figure 42 CTA illustrating an IMH. . The arrow points to o the
crescent-shaped thickened walldue tothe IMH. Note the lumen
(L) is preserved.
Figure 41 Thisdiagramillustratesthedifferentappearancesofthehemiazygossheath(anormalstructure),atheroscleroticplaque,
and an aneurysm containing a mural thrombus from an IMH.
Journal of the AmericanSociety of Echocardiography
Volume 28 Number2
Goldstein et al 149
Add text box in pdf document - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add text boxes to pdf; add text to pdf acrobat
Add text box in pdf document - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to add text to pdf file with reader; how to add text to a pdf in acrobat
aortic wall > 0.5 cm in a crescentic or concentric pattern (Figures39
and 40).Asmentioned,amobiledissectionflapisabsent.Theaortic
lumen’s shape is preserved, and the luminal wall is curvilinear and
usually smooth, as opposed to a rough, irregular border seen with
aortic atherosclerosis and penetrating ulcer, although both may
coexist. There is no Doppler evidence of communication between
the hematoma and the true lumen, but there may be some color
Doppler flow within the hematoma. There may also be areas of
echolucency within the aortic wall hematoma. IMH is generally a
more localized process than classic aortic dissection, which typically
propagates along the entire aorta to the iliac arteries. IMH may
weaken the aortic wall and either progress outward with aortic
expansion and/or rupture or inward with disruption of the
intima-media, resulting in typical aortic dissection. Evangelista et al.
described seven evolution patterns: regression,progression to classical
dissection with longitudinal propagation, progression to localized
dissection, development of fusiform aneurysm, development of
saccular aneurysm, development of pseudoaneurysm, and persis-
tence of IMH. Therefore, serial imaging is necessary to rule out pro-
gression in patients who receive only medical treatment, because
clinical signs and symptoms cannot predict progression. Although
thereareno established guidelines fortheoptimalfrequencyand lon-
gitudinal duration for surveillance imaging of patients with IMH,
Evangelista et al.,
154
on the basis of the significant dynamic evolution
of IMH, recommended imaging at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12months fromthe
time of diagnosis. Once stability has been documented, surveillance
imaging may be annual.
IMHs present a more difficult diagnostic challenge than typical
aortic dissections because of the lack of both flow and an oscillating
dissection flap. Because IMH thickness maybeprogressive, establish-
ingthe diagnosisofIMHmayrequire observation timeand repeat im-
aging. Evangelista et al.
218
demonstrated that the initial imaging test
results were negative in >12% of patients and that a repeat study
wasrequired hours to severaldays later. IMHcan bedifficult to distin-
guish from a thrombosed false lumen of classic aortic dissection,
because they can both appear as a crescent-shaped thickening of
the aortic wall. However, in aortic dissection, the diameter of the
thrombosed false lumen is usually larger than that of most, but not
all, IMHs. Conversely, the circumferential extent of an IMH is usually
larger than that of an aortic dissection. The appearanceof a crescent-
shaped thickening of the aortic wall can be mimicked by a normal
structure, the hemiazygos sheath, which is a periaortic fat pad.
219
This fat pad is typically present on TEE when the tip of the probe is
30 to 35 cm from the incisors. Aortic atherosclerosis results in
thickening of the aortic wall but produces an irregular intraluminal
surface that differentiates it from IMH, which has a smooth luminal
surface. Moreover, the‘‘lumpy-bumpy’’ appearanceof atherosclerosis
tends to vary along each centimeter of the aorta, unlike IMH, which
tends tobesmooth overa greaterlength of theaorta. Muralthrombus
mayappearlining a TAA, most often inthedescending aorta, but typi-
callyhas an irregularluminalsurface, narrowsthelumen and doesnot
extend longitudinally as much as IMH. Figure 41 illustrates the
different features of severalof these entities fromIMH.Aortitiscauses
thickening of the aortic wall that is typically concentric and typically
has normal segments interspersed between the involved sites.
Detection of IMH by CTshows thickening of the aortic wall with
higher attenuation than intraluminal blood (from 40 to 70
Hounsfield units) on contrast-enhanced CT (Figure42). It is vitally
important to perform unenhanced CT as the first step in the
computed tomographic imaging evaluation of a suspected AAS,
because contrast material within the lumen may obscure the IMH.
On imaging follow-up of IMH, the appearance of ulcerlike projec-
tions (ULPs) is frequently observed, likely representing intimal rup-
tures that allow communication between the aortic lumen and the
medial wallhematoma.
220
MRIoffersthe possibilityof diagnosing in-
tramural bleeding in the hyperacute phase because the hematoma
shows an isointensesignalon T1-weighted images and a hyperintense
signal on T2-weighted images. From the first 24 hours, the change
from oxyhemoglobin to methemoglobin determines a hyperintense
signal on both T1-and T2-weighted images that togetherwith fat sup-
pression is useful fordifferentiating periaortic fat fromIMH. Although
greater availability and shorter examination duration favorthe use of
Table 12 IMH:keypoints
 IMHrepresents hemorrhage into medial layerof aorta
 Absence of dissectionflap between adouble-channel aorta
 Crescenticorconcentric thickening of aorticwall
 Can progress to localized orfrank dissection or rupture
 IMHthickness and maximal aorticdiameterpredict risk for pro-
gression
 CT appearance is high-attenuationeccentric or concentric wall
thickening on noncontrast image
 Subtle wall thickening can be missed at inexperienced centers
Figure 43 Diagramillustratingthecharacteristicfeaturesofa
penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer: presence of severe athero-
sclerosis and penetration of the ulcer or ‘‘outpouching’’ into
the media.
Figure 44 Gross pathology specimen from a a patient with h a
ruptured penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer (small arrow) associ-
atedwithIMHand blood externaltothe aortic wall(large arrow).
150 Goldstein et al
Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography
February 2015
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Protect. Password: Set File Permissions. Password: Open Document. Edit Digital Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work with
how to insert text box in pdf file; how to insert text box on pdf
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
NET SDK library for adding text box to PDF document in .NET WinForms application. A web based PDF annotation application able to add text box comments to adobe
add text to pdf file reader; how to insert pdf into email text
CTin theacutesetting,MRI maybecomplementaryfor the diagnosis
of IMH. The greater contrast among tissues can allow MRI to detect
even small IMHs that may go unnoticed by CT. In addition, mural
thrombi in TAAs are easier to distinguish from IMH by MRI because
mural thrombus shows a hypo- or isointense signal in both T1- and
T2-weighted sequences.
3. Imaging Algorithm. CT may be considered the first-line diag-
nostic imaging modality for IMH, particularly in the acute setting.
Detection is based on the high-attenuation signal of acute bleeding
bynoncontrast enhancement. Whenfindings on CTorTEE are equiv-
ocal, MRImaybevaluable, as thehyperintensesignalin theaorticwall
can facilitate a correct diagnosis.
4. Serial Follow-Up of IMH (Choice of Tests). As above, IMH
may evolve by reabsorption, aneurysm formation, or conversion to
classic dissection.
154
In one series, IMH regressed completely in
34%, led to aneurysm in 20% and pseudoaneurysm in 24%, and
progressed to aortic dissection in 12%. Because of their wide field
of vision allowing the identification of landmarks, MRI and CT are
superior to TEE for defining this dynamic evolution. On surveillance
imaging of IMH, the appearance of ULP is frequently observed, and
such ulcers may rupture and allow communication between the
medial hematoma and the aortic lumen.
221,222
MRI offers the
possibility of diagnosing the intramural bleeding evolution and new
asymptomatic intramural rebleeding episodes.
5. Predictors of Complications. Most of thesepredictorsmaybe
defined by imaging techniques:
1. Maximumaorticdiameterintheacutephase isoneof the majorpredictors
of progression in type B IMH and therefore should be reported. Patients
with maximum aortic diameters > 40 to 50 mm have a higher risk for
dissection,regardlessof thelocationwithinthe descendingaorta.
216,223-229
2. Wall thicknesshas beendescribed as a predictorof progression; however,
not all studieshave supported thisfinding. Thethicknessthresholdforpre-
dicting progression has beenvariably reported to be 10, 12, or 15 mm.
228
3. Theincidence of periaortichemorrhageorpleuraleffusionishigherinIMH
than in aortic dissection; in some studies, this incidence reaches to 40%.
Some seriesrelatedpleural effusion to worse prognosis in IMH; however,
this remains controversial. Two mechanismshave beendescribed: leakage
of blood from the aorta through microperforations or a nonhemorrhagic
exudate believed to be inflammatory in origin owing to the proximity of
the IMH to the adventitia.
210,230
The likely different prognostic
significance of the two pathogenic theories proposed may explain the
discordance inthe medical literature.
Key points related to IMH are listed inTable12.
D. PAU
1. Introduction. The term penetrating aortic ulcer describes the con-
dition in which ulceration of an atherosclerotic lesion penetrates the
aortic internal elastic lamina into the aortic media (Figure 43).
231
Although the clinical presentation of PAU is similar to that of classic
aortic dissection, PAU is considered to be a disease of the intima
(i.e., atherosclerosis), whereas aortic dissection and its variant (IMH)
are fundamentally diseases of the media (degenerative changes of
the elastic fibers and smooth muscle cells are paramount), and most
patients with aortic dissection typically have little atherosclerotic dis-
ease. PAUs may occur anywhere along the length of the aorta but
appear most often in the mid and distal portions of the descending
thoracic aorta, and they are uncommon in the ascending aorta,
arch, and abdominal aorta.
232
PAUs aresometimes multifocal, which
is to be expected because aortic atherosclerosis is a diffuse process.
They mayoccurin an aorta of normalcaliber but are more often pre-
sent in aortas of increased diameter.
232-235
Typically, when an ulcerpenetratesintothemedia, alocalized IMH
develops (Figure44). In most patients, this IMH is localized, but occa-
sionally it can involve the entire descending aorta.
223
Rarely, the
medial hematoma ruptures back into the aortic lumen, resulting in
aclassic-appearingdissection with flowin both lumens.Onceformed,
PAUs may remain quiescent, but the weakened aortic wall may
provide a basis for saccular, fusiform, or false aneurysm
formation.
231,233,224-227
External rupture into the mediastinum or
right or left pleural space may occur but is uncommon.
233,234
Embolization of thrombus or atherosclerotic debris from the ulcer
to the distal arterial circulation may also occur.
2. Imaging Features. The diagnosis of PAU requires demonstra-
tion of an ‘‘ulcerlike’’ or ‘‘craterlike’’ out-pouching in the aortic wall
(the internal elastic lamina is not visible on imaging studies), as seen
inFigure45. Because protrusion through the internal elastic lamina
cannot beidentified, PAUs can bedetected only when they protrude
outsidethe contour of theaortic lumen. Atheromatous ulcers that do
not enter themediamaybehard to distinguish fromPAUs. Therefore,
adiagnosis of PAU must be made with caution, especially if the sus-
pected aortic defect has been detected incidentally.
Another entity that may be mistaken for a PAU is a ULP that
may evolve from an IMH, as described above. These are localized,
Figure 45 Transesophageal echocardiogram m from a patient
witha penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer (arrow). Note the prom-
inent aortic atheroma (not labeled).
Table 13 PAUs:imagingparameterstoreport
Lesion Location
Lesion width,length, depth
Aorticdiameterat the level of thelesion
Presence/absence/extent of IMH
Contrast extension beyond/outside aortic wall
Mediastinal hematoma
Pleural effusion
Presence and length of falselumen
Journal of the AmericanSociety of Echocardiography
Volume 28 Number2
Goldstein et al 151
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
installed. Support to add text, text box, text field and crop marks to PDF document. Able class. C#.NET: Add Text Box to PDF Document. Provide
acrobat add text to pdf; how to add text box to pdf
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Line color. Select the line color when drawing annotations on PDF document. 15. Description. 17. Text box. Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF page
adding text pdf; how to add text to pdf
blood-filled pouches that protrude into the IMH, with a wide
communicating orifice of >3 mm. ULPs are felt to be the conse-
quence of a focal dissection and a short intimal flap resulting in
asmall pseudoaneurysm. Differentiation from a PAU may be diffi-
cult. Generally, a PAU has jagged edges, is accompanied by multi-
ple irregularities in the intimal layer, and may be accompanied by
localized hematoma.
TEE, CT, and MRI mayalldetect PAU and its complications. Once
identified, attention should be directed to assessing (1)the maximum
depth of penetration of the ulcer, measured from the aortic lumen;
(2) its maximum width at the entry site; and (3) the axial length of
the associated medial hematoma. Observations that should be re-
ported are listed inTable13.
3. Imaging Modalities. a. CT.–Thetypicalcomputed tomographic
finding of a PAU is a localized contrastlike out-pouching of the aortic
wall communicating with the lumen. Its appearance has been likened
toa‘‘collarbutton.’’
228
Asmentionedabove, PAUsaremostoftenfound
in themid ordistaldescendingthoracic aorta.
226
Thickening(enhance-
ment) of theaortic wall externalto sites of intimalcalcification suggests
localized IMH. These findings are usually in conjunction with severe
atherosclerosis. CT has certain advantages over TEE. It can examine
areas of theaorta not covered byTEE, allowing morecomplete identi-
fication of theout-pouching produced by PAUs. Moreover, it can also
identify calcified atherosclerotic plaques surrounding the ulcer.
Computed tomographic angiography is also more likely than TEE to
demonstrate extraluminal abnormalities, including pseudoaneurysm
or fluid in themediastinum or pleural space.
b. MRI.–MRI is excellent for detecting focal or extensive IMHs,
which appear as areas of high signal intensity within the aortic wall
on T1-weighted images.
79,229
Yucel et al.
236
demonstrated that
MRI is superior to conventional CT for differentiating acute IMH
from atherosclerotic plaque and chronic intraluminal thrombus.
MRI has the additional advantage of providing multiplane images
without the use of contrast material.
c. TEE.–TEE hasbeen lesswellstudied than CTandMRI forthediag-
nosis of PAU but maybeof valuewhen the results of CTand MRI are
inconclusive. The characteristic finding, similar to what is seen on CT
and MRI, isa craterlikeout-pouchingof theaortic wall, often with jag-
ged edges, usually associated with extensive aortic atheroma.
Although uncommon, a localized aortic dissection may occur, but
the dissection flap, if present, tends to be thick, irregular, nonoscillat-
ing, and usuallyof limited length.
237
Thereason for thelimited length
of the dissection may be that the dissection plane is lost because of
scarring oratrophyof themedia and secondaryto theatherosclerotic
process.
d. Aortography.–Catheter-based aortography is rarely performed
to diagnose PAU because of the superiority of current axial imaging
modalities and the high definition of TEE. These modalities also
Table 14 RecommendationsforchoiceofimagingmodalityforPAU
Modality
Recommendation
Advantages
Disadvantages
CT
First-line
 Superior to TEEfor detecting PAU, especially small PAUs
 Permits assessment of entire aortaand other thoracic
structures
 Detects extraluminal abnormalities betterthan TEE (e.g.,
pseudoaneurysm, mediastinal fluid)
 Follow-up by CT recommended
 Ionizing radiation exposure and iodinated
contrast material
MRI
Second-line
 Provides multipleimages without contrast
 Excellent fordetecting associated IMH complicating PAU
 Excellent fordifferentiating primary IMHfrom atheroscle-
rotic plaque and intraluminal thrombus
 Less widely available than CT
 Operator dependent
TEE
Third-line
 Differential diagnosis between PAUand ULP
 Less well studied than CT orMRI
 Semi-invasive
 Operator dependent
Table 15 EtiologiesofTAAs
1. Marfan syndrome
2. BAV-related aortopathy
3. Familial TAA syndrome
4. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome typeIV(vascular type)
5. Loeys-Dietz syndrome
6. Turner syndrome
7. Shprintzen-Goldberg (marfanoid-craniosynostosis) syndrome
8. Noninfectious aortitis (e.g., GCA, TA, nonspecific arteritis)
9. Infectious aortitis (mycotic syndrome)
10. Syphilitic aortitis
11. Trauma
12. Idiopathic
Figure 46 Diagram illustrating the two o morphologic typesof
aortic aneurysms: saccular and fusiform.
152 Goldstein et al
Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography
February 2015
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
PDF Write. Insert text, text box into PDF. Edit, delete text from PDF. Insert images into PDF. Add, Update, Delete form fields programmatically. Document Protect
adding text box to pdf; how to insert text into a pdf file
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Highlight PDF text. • Add text to PDF document in preview. • Add text box to PDF file in preview. • Draw PDF markups. PDF Protection.
how to add text field to pdf; add text to pdf
provide superior definition of the surrounding wall, making identifi-
cation of associated IMH easier. The characteristic aortography
finding, a contrast medium–filled out-pouching resembling an ulcer
of the gastrointestinal tract, is typically associated with ‘‘cobbleston-
ing’’ of the aortic wall in the region of the ulcer consistent with
diffuse atherosclerosis, in the absence of a dissection flap or false
lumen.
4. Imaging Algorithm. CTA is considered the first-line diagnostic
imaging modality.
226,234,238-240
It is widely available, permits
assessment of other thoracic structures, and provides 3D
reconstructed images that are essential in planning surgery or
TEVAR. Moreover, CT is superior to TEE for detecting small ulcers.
It is also efficient for the evaluation of the degree of ulcer
penetration and bleeding into or outside the aortic wall. MRI is
excellent for differentiating PAUs from IMH, atherosclerotic plaque,
and intraluminal chronic mural thrombus.
241,242
However, MRI is
less widely available than CT and is unable to detect displacement
of intimal calcification, which frequently accompanies PAU.
Recommendations for choice of imaging modalities for PAUs are
summarized inTable14.
Despite differences in opinion regarding the natural history and
management of PAUs, there is agreement that all PAUs, even those
found incidentally, warrant close clinical and imaging follow-up, usu-
ally by CTA. Findings concerning for progression include an increase
in aortic diameter or wall thickening or the appearance of a thin-
walled saccular aneurysm. Rupture is indicated by the presence of
extra-aortic blood.
5. Serial Follow-Up of PAU (Choice of Tests). The natural
history of PAU is unknown. As with IMH, several outcomes have
been described. Many patients with PAUs do not need immediate
aortic repair but do requireclosefollow-upwithserialimagingstudies,
by CT or MRI, to document disease progression. Although many
authors have documented the propensity foraortic ulcers to develop
progressive aneurysmal dilatation, the progression is usually slow.
Spontaneous complete aortic rupture is uncommon but may occur.
SomePAUs arefound incidentally, in which casesizeand progressive
enlargement are the only predictors of complications. Both CT and
MRI provide superior assessment to TEE in the follow-up of PAU.
Surveillance imaging should be performed at intervals similar to
what is recommended for aortic dissection.
IV. THORACIC AORTIC ANEURYSM
A. Definitions and Terminology
Aortic aneurysm is a pathologic entity that is distinct from aortic
dissection. The vast majority of aortic dissections (longitudinal
splitting of themedia) occurwithout preceding aneurysms. Truean-
eurysms result from stretching of the entire thickness of the aortic
wall; thus, the wall of an aneurysm contains all three of its layers
(intima, media, and adventitia). TAAs may involve one or more
aorticsegments (theaorticroot, ascending aorta, arch, or descending
thoracic aorta). Sixty percent of TAAs involvetheaortic root and/or
ascending tubular aorta, 40% involve the descending aorta, 10%
involve the arch, and 10% involve the thoracoabdominal aorta.
243
In 1991, the joint councils of the Society of Vascular Surgery and
the North American Chapter of the International Society for
Cardiovascular Surgery appointed an ad hoc committee to define
the standards for reporting on arterial aneurysm.
244
Aneurysm
was defined as a permanent focal dilatation of an artery having a
$50% increase in diameter compared with the expected normal
diameter of the artery in question. This definition was also adopted
bythe2010American Collegeof Cardiology Foundation, American
Heart Association, American Association for Thoracic Surgery,
American College of Radiology, American Surgical Association,
Society for Cardiac Angiography and Interventions, Society of
Interventional Radiology, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and
Society for Vascular Medicine guidelines forthediagnosis and man-
agement of patients with thoracic aortic disease.
1
Figure47 Diagramofsomeofthevariousshapesofaorticrootandascendingaorticaneurysms.(A)Normal.(B)Characteristic‘‘mar-
fanoid’’ or ‘‘pear-shaped’’ aortic root withdilatation localized tothe annulus and sinuses of Valsalva. (C, D) Twopatterns of dilatation
involvingthe annulus, sinusesof Valsalva, andascending aorta. (E) Dilatation beginningatthe STJ,butsparingthe aortic annulus and
sinuses of Valsalva.
Table 16 GoalofimagingofTAAs
1 Confirm diagnosis
2 Measure maximal diameterof theaneurysm
3 Define longitudinal extent of the aneurysm
4 Measure the diameters of the proximal and distal margins of the
aneurysm
5 Determine involvement of theaortic valve
6 Determine involvement of thearch vessel(s)
7 Detect periaortic hematomaor othersign of leakage
8 Differentiate from aorticdissection
9 Detect mural thrombus
Journal of the AmericanSociety of Echocardiography
Volume 28 Number2
Goldstein et al 153
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Highlight PDF text in preview. • Add text to PDF document. • Insert text box to PDF file. • Draw markups to PDF document. PDF Protection.
how to add a text box in a pdf file; how to insert text in pdf file
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Allow users to add comments online in ASPX webpage. Able to change font size in PDF comment box. which bring users quick and efficient working with PDF Document.
how to add text to pdf file; add text box to pdf file
Although our writing committee endorses this definition in
general, we would like to point out some practical considerations.
First, the current definition lacks an outcomes correlate; second,
many publications use the term aortic dilatation with different arbi-
trary cutoff values to define the significance of dilatation.
245-248
Last, if a common echocardiographic upper limit of 37 mm is
considered for the ascending aorta (see the section on normal
anatomy and reference values), then the ascending aorta is dilated
at a diameter of >55.5 mm (37 + 18.5 mm), which seems
excessive given that it is larger than the typical threshold for
surgery. General descriptions, such as ‘‘there is an ascending aortic
aneurysm,’’ are inadequate.
243
It is preferable to state that ‘‘there is
a 5-cm ascending thoracic aortic aneurysm,’’ because it conveys
prognostic, follow-up, and management implications. Descriptive
terms such as small, large, and giant to describe aneurysms should
also be avoided.
Other commonly used terms areincluded in the 2010guidelines
1
:
ectasia is arterial dilatation < 150% of normal arterial diameter.
Arteriomegaly is diffuse arterial dilatation involving several arterial
segments, with an increase in diameter > 50% in comparison with
the expected normal arterial diameter.
Aortic dilatation is an acceptable nonspecific term that encom-
passes both ectasia and aneurysm. Again, imaging reports must
include the diameters of the affected aortic segments. Moreover,
it is ideal to perform serial imaging studies at the same center
with the same technique, so that direct comparisons can be
made.
243
When this is not practical, direct comparison with previ-
ous examinations should be made to confirm that serial changes
are genuine.
B. Classification of Aneurysms
Aortic aneurysms can beclassified according to morphology, location
(as above), and etiology. The etiologies of TAAs are listed inTable15.
These are discussed in other sections of this document.
C. Morphology
Aneurysms of theaorta can beclassified into two morphologic types:
fusiform and saccular (Figure 46). Fusiform aneurysms, which are
more common than saccular aneurysms, result from diffuse weak-
ening of the aortic wall. This process leads to dilatation of the entire
circumference of the aorta, producing a spindle-shaped deformity
with a tapered beginning and end. Saccular aneurysms result when
only a portion of the aortic circumference is weakened, producing
an asymmetric, relatively focal balloon-shaped out-pouching. There
are also various morphologic shapes of the aortic root and ascending
aorta, some of which suggest specific etiologies (Figure47).
The major goals of imaging TAAs are listed in Table 16, and
recommendations for choice of imaging modalities are listed in
Table 17.
D. Serial Follow-Up of Aortic Aneurysms (Choice of Tests)
Aortic diameter is the principal predictor of aortic rupture or dissec-
tion.
249
The risk for rupture or dissection of TAAs from different eti-
ologies increases significantly at sizes > 60 mm. The mean rupture
rate is only 2% per year for aneurysms <50 mm in diameter, rising
slightly to 3% for aneurysms with diameters of 50 to 59 mm, but
increasing sharply to 7% per year for aneurysms $60 mm in
Table 17 RecommendationsforchoiceofimagingmodalityforTAA
Modality
Recommendation
Advantages
Disadvantages
CT
First-line
 First-line technique forstaging, surveillance
 Contrast: enhanced CT and MRI very accurate for
measuring size of all TAAs (superiorto echocardi-
ography for distal ascending aorta, arch, and de-
scending aorta)
 All segments of aortaand aortic branches well visu-
alized
 Use of ionizing radiation and ICM
 Cardiacmotion can cause imaging artifacts
MRI
Second-line
 Ideal technique forcomparativefollow-up studies
 Excellent modality in stablepatients
 Preferred for follow-up for youngerpatients
 Avoids ionizing radiation
 Can imageentire aorta
 Examination times longer than CT
 Benefits from patient cooperation (breath hold)
 Limited in emergency situations in unstable patients
and patients with implantablemetallic devices
 Benefits from gadolinium
TTE
Second-line
 Usually diagnostic foraneurysms effecting aortic
root
 Useful for family screening
 Useful for following aortic root disease
 Excellent reproducibility of measurements
 Excellent for AR, LVfunction
 Distal ascending aorta, arch, and descending aorta
not reliably imaged
TEE
Third-line
 Excellent for assessment of AR mechanisms
 Excellent images of aorticroot, ascending aorta,
arch, and descending thoracicaorta
 Less valuable forroutine screening or serial follow-
up (semi-invasive)
 Distal ascending aorta may be poorly imaged
 Does not permit full visualizationof archvessels
 Limited landmarks forserial examinations
Aortography Third-line
 Reserved for therapeuticintervention
 Useful to guide endovascularprocedures
 Invasive; riskfor contrast-induced nephropathy
 Visualizes only aortic lumen
 Does not permit accurate measurements
LV, Left ventricular.
154 Goldstein et al
Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography
February 2015
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document online in C#.NET
Name. Description. 1. Add sticky note. Click to add a sticky note to PDF document. 4. Strikethrough text. Click to strikethrough text on PDF page. 6. Add text box
add text pdf acrobat professional; adding text to a pdf file
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Line color. Select the line color when drawing annotations on PDF document. 15. Description. 17. Text box. Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF page
how to enter text into a pdf form; how to add text fields to a pdf
diameter.
250
Therate of growth is significantly greater for aneurysms
of the descending aorta, at 1.9 mm per year, than those of the
ascending aorta, at 0.07 mm per year.
249
The clinicalimportance of the maximum aortic diameter for deter-
mining thetiming of prophylacticsurgicalrepairimpliesmakesitcritical
that measurements be made as accurately as possible. It is essentialfor
the same observer to compare measurements side by side using the
sameanatomic references. Tomographic scans in a situation for which
theaorta doesnot lieperpendicularto theplaneof thescan producean
ellipticalimage with major (maximum)and minor (minimum) diame-
ters. Because the major diameter is typically an overestimate, in most
naturalhistory studies of aneurysm expansion, theminimumdiameter
has been reported to avoid the effect of obliquity.
Aortic root dilatation can be followed by TTE in most cases.
Diameter expansion, severity of AR, and left ventricular function
may be accurately evaluated when the echocardiographic window
is adequate. However, when dilatation involves the ascending aorta
above theSTJ, TTE does not always adequatelyvisualizethe affected
segment, in which caseCTor MRI should beperformed. TEE maybe
warranted when the type of surgical treatment (repair or valve
replacement) is being considered. Both TTE and TEE have limitations
for adequate measurement of distalascending aorta, aortic arch, and
descending aorta diameters. In addition, if theaorta is tortuous, trans-
esophageal echocardiographic images may be difficult to measure
accurately. The multiplanar capacity of MDCT, together with its sub-
millimeter spatial resolution, renders it an excellent techniquefor in-
terval surveillance of both thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms.
Measurements must adhere to a strict protocolthat permits compar-
ison between different imaging techniquesas well as follow-up of the
patient. MDCT permits one to choose an imaging plane in any arbi-
trary space orientation; thus, it is possible to easily find the maximum
aortic diameter plane, which must be perpendicular to the longitudi-
nalplane of theaortic segment.Whentheaxialdataarereconstructed
into 3D images (computed tomographic angiography), one can mea-
sure the tortuous aorta in true cross-section and obtain an accurate
diameter. Measurements should be taken on multiplane reconstruc-
tion images. A further common presentation of data is a parasagittal,
oblique MIP plane that passes through the aortic root, ascending
aorta, aortic arch, and descending aorta. The MIP plane must have
a thickness proportional to the aortic tortuosity to make sure that
the maximum diameter is included in the image. This plane is easily
reproducible and comparable in follow-up studies.
MRI accurately defines aortic diameter, aneurysm extent, and the
aneurysm’s relationship with the main arterial branches. It is recom-
mended to combine MR angiographic images with black-blood spin-
echo sequences, which are useful for detecting pathology of the wall
and adjacent structures that could go unnoticed if only MR angio-
graphic images are acquired. In mycotic aneurysm, postcontrast T1-
weighted images permit the identification of inflammatorychanges in
theaorticwalland adjacent fat, secondarytobacterialinfection. Thein-
formationprovidedbyMRAin aortic aneurysmassessment issimilarto
thatoffered bycurrent MDCT.Both methodspermit accurate determi-
nations of aortic diameters in sagittal plane. Furthermore, postprocess-
ing techniques(MIP, multiplanereconstruction, and volumerendering)
facilitate visualization of the aorta in its entirety, together with therela-
tionship of its principal branches, and are highly usefulwhen planning
treatment. The sagittal plane makes it possible to obtain more repro-
ducible measurements. In asymptomatic patients with aortic aneu-
rysms and those approaching the need for surgery, imaging
techniques should be performed at 6-month intervals until aortic size
remains stable, in which case imaging may be annual.
1.Algorithmfor Follow-Up. TTE can beused forserialimaging of
thedilated aortic root and proximalascending aorta when agreement
between the dimensions measured by TTE and CTor MRI has been
established. When the aneurysm is located in the mid or upper
portion of the ascending aorta, aortic arch, or descending thoracic
aorta, CT or MRI is recommended for follow-up. Measurements
should be made on multiplane reconstruction images or in parasagit-
tal, oblique MIP plane that passes through the involved aortic
segments. Although annualsurveillanceMDCThas been recommen-
ded, the strategy is not well established and should be individualized
from annually to every 2 to 3 years depending on the abnormalities
present, historyof complications among familymembers, the present
size, and the degree of change in size over time.
E. Use of TEE to Guide Surgery for TAAs
When patients with aortic root or ascending TAAs undergo aortic
repair, the anatomy of the aorta and aortic valve has usually been
defined preoperatively. Nevertheless, it is always wise to use intrao-
perativeTEE to confirm the prior imaging findings. Theinitial intrao-
perative transesophageal echocardiographic examination should
begin before the initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass, so the physi-
ology of the aortic valve can be assessed. If the valve is bicuspid,
oneshould determinethepresenceand severityof associatedvalvular
aortic stenosis, regurgitation, or both. If there is significant AR, one
should determine the mechanism, looking specifically for prolapse
and/or retraction of the conjoined leaflet, as this is a common cause
of bicuspid AR and may be correctable with BAVrepair. One should
also assess the degree of leaflet thickening, calcification, and restric-
tion, becausein thesetting of significant valve dysfunction, thesefind-
ingsmayinfluencethesurgeon’s decision regardingtheneed forvalve
repair or replacement.
Even when theaortic valveis tricuspid with otherwisenormalleaf-
lets, the presence of an ascending aortic aneurysm can result in AR.
The commissures of the aortic leaflets are located just below the
STJ; dilatation of theaorta at that level maytether the leaflets, leaving
insufficient slackfor thethreeleaflets to coapt properlyin themiddle,
resulting in a jetof centralAR.
32,194,251
AR dueto leaflet tethering can
occur with aneurysms of both the aorticroot and theascending aorta.
Fortunately, with repair of the aneurysm and restoration of normal
aortic geometry, normal leaflet coaptation is often restored, which
in turn leads to resolution of the valvular regurgitation. Therefore,
in a patient with an aneurysm with significant AR, identifying such
aortic leaflet tethering on preoperative TEE may reassure the
surgeon that aortic valve replacement is not necessary.
The ascending aorta, aortic arch, and descending aorta should each
beinspected forthepresenceof associatedpathology, such asanunrec-
ognized aortic dissection, IMH, PAU, or protruding atheromas. Large
atheromas in the ascending aorta or arch mayprompt additionalimag-
ing of theaorta using intraoperativeepiaortic echocardiographyand in-
fluencedecisions regarding thesiteof aorticcannulation and perfusion.
Postoperative TEE should begin as soon as the patient comes off
cardiopulmonary bypass. The examination should begin with inspec-
tion of theaortic valve, as unanticipated valvedysfunction mayneces-
sitate a return to bypass. If preoperatively there had been significant
AR due to leaflet tethering, one should confirm appropriate leaflet
coaptation and alleviation of ARafterrepair. If repairofbicuspidvalve
prolapse was performed, one should confirm that the prolapse has
resolved and that the AR is no longer significant. If a valve-sparing
root repair was performed, one should confirm that the three aortic
valve leaflets coapt normally and that there is little or no AR. If the
Journal of the AmericanSociety of Echocardiography
Volume 28 Number2
Goldstein et al 155
aortic valvehad been replaced,oneshouldconfirmthat theprosthetic
leaflet ordisk motion is normal, that thereisnomorethan physiologic
AR, and that there are no paravalvular leaks.
Afteraorticvalvereplacement oraorticrootreplacement, it istypical
to see focalthickening around the aortic root. It is important to docu-
ment thisso asnottoconfusethis findingwithpathologyon subsequent
imaging. For more detailed information, readers are referred to the
recently published Society of Thoracic Surgeons aortic valve and
ascending aorta guidelines for management and quality measures.
252
F. Specific Conditions
1. Marfan Syndrome. Marfan syndrome is an inherited disorderof
connective tissue that occurs as a result of a mutation in the FBN1
gene, which encodes fibrillin. Oneof thehallmark features of this dis-
orderis dilatationordissection of theproximalascending aorta (aortic
root).
253
The remaining portions of the aorta may also dilate and
dissect, but involvement of the aortic root is expected when there is
associated vascular disease. Noninvasive aortic imaging with subse-
quent elective aortic replacement has contributed to the dramatic
improvement in survival noted in patients with Marfan syndrome
over the past few decades.
254
a. Aortic Imaging in Unoperated Patients with Marfan Syn-
drome.–TTE isgenerallytheinitialimaging toolused fortheidentifica-
tion and serial follow-up of ascending aortic enlargement in patients
with known or suspected Marfan syndrome, because of its availability,
noninvasivenature,reliability,and lackof need for radiationorcontrast
material. Characteristic aortic features include dilatation of the aortic
root, whereas the STJ and remaining portions of the ascending aorta
generally are normal in size (Figure48). Normative values are used
to determinethepresenceand extent of aortic enlargement on theba-
sis of age and BSA.
9
The leading edge–to–leading edge measurement
technique is generally performed in patients with Marfan syndrome
<18 years of age, and the size of the aorta is reported along with the
Zscore.
255
Although there is dispute regarding the best echocardio-
graphic aortic measurement method, the most important concept is
that serial measurements foreach individualpatient areperformed us-
ing thesamemethod to determineaorticdimension changeovertime.
Some patients with Marfan syndrome have suboptimal transthoracic
echocardiographic images, and in these patients, serial CTor MRI is
required to monitor aortic diameter.
At the time of initial diagnosis of aortopathy in Marfan syndrome
by TTE, additional imaging with CTor MRI is generally recommen-
ded to confirmthat thesize of theaorta measured by TTE is accurate
and correlateswith the computedtomographic orMRImeasurement
and to document the diameters of the distal ascending aorta, aortic
arch, and descending aortic segments, which may also be enlarged
but are often incompletely visualized by TTE (Figure49).
For the follow-up of aortic root enlargement in patients with
Marfan syndrome, follow-up imaging in 6 months is recommended.
If at that time the aortic diameter remains stable, is <45 mm, and
thereis no family or personalhistoryof aortic dissection, then annual
aortic imaging is reasonable. Patients with Marfan syndrome who do
not meet these criteria should undergo repeat aortic imaging every 6
months.
TTE can be used for serial imaging follow-up of the dilated
ascending aorta when correlation between thedimensions measured
by TTE and CTor MRI has been documented. Occasionally, patients
with Marfan syndrome do not demonstrate aortic enlargement until
well into adulthood. These patients can be referred for transthoracic
echocardiographic screening at 2- to 3-year intervals.
Repeat CT or MRI is suggested at least every 3 years in patients
with Marfan syndrome to reassess the aortic arch and descending
Figure 48 Transthoracic long-axis s image e demonstrating
marked dilatation of the aortic root (sinuses) in a patient with
Marfan syndrome. Note the normal dimension at the STJ.
Figure 49 Computedtomographic3Dvolume-renderedrecon-
struction of the thoracic aorta demonstrating aortic root dilata-
tion (arrow) and proximal descending thoracic aorta dilatation
(asterisk). The descending thoracic aortic dilatation was not
noted on TTE.
156 Goldstein et al
Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography
February 2015
aorta and to reconfirm that TTE remains reliable in its measurement
of the ascending aorta. Patients with Marfan syndrome with aneu-
rysmal dilatation of the proximal descending thoracic aorta require
regular CTor MRI to monitor aortic stability, because TTE does not
provide reliable imaging of this region.
TEE is generally not used for the initial diagnosis or follow-up of
aortic dilatation in patients with Marfan syndrome because of its
semi-invasive nature and thedifficultydirectlycomparing dimensions
over time.
b. Postoperative Aortic Imaging in MarfanSyndrome.–Afterelec-
tive aortic root replacement, dismissalorearly (within 6months) TTE
and CTor MRI are generallyperformed to establish a baseline aortic
assessment for patients with Marfan syndrome. Annual TTE and CT
or MRI of the aorta are generally recommended after aortic root
replacement. The frequency of aortic imaging is individualized
depending on patient characteristics, such as the type of operation
performed and the extent of aortic dilatation elsewhere. Serial post-
operative follow-up imaging should focus on progression of disease
affecting the native aorta, and common postoperative complications,
including thedevelopment of pseudoaneurysm and coronaryanasto-
motic aneurysms.
c. Postdissection Aortic Imaging in Marfan Syndrome.–Patients
with Marfan syndrome with repaired type A aortic dissection should
undergo serial aortic imaging with CTor MRI; theimaging frequency
depends on the extent of aortic dissection and the type of repair.
Patients with Marfan syndrome with type B aortic dissection that
has not been repaired require regular follow-up imaging (see section
III.B, ‘‘Aortic Dissection’’).
d. FamilyScreening.–Marfan syndromeis inherited in an autosomal-
dominant fashion, so transthoracic echocardiographic screening is rec-
ommended forthefirst-degreerelatives of an affected individualunless
agenemutation has been identified and genetic testing can be used to
identifyaffected familymembers.
1
Allaffected familymembers should
undergo regular aortic imaging. Although there are no specific guide-
line recommendations for ‘‘regular’’ imaging, serial imaging should
depend on the age and specific features of a given individual.
2. OtherGeneticDiseases ofthe Aortain Adults. Two genetic
conditions associated with thoracic aortic disease, BAV and Marfan
syndrome, are relatively common and are discussed elsewhere in
this review. Many additional predisposing conditions for aortic aneu-
rysm formation and dissection arelisted inTable18. Thescope of this
document doesnot permit a detailed discussionof theselesscommon
entities, but a few pertinent details are mentioned. Importantly,
awareness of these disorders and their potential risk is critical not
only to presenting patients but also to their close relatives.
a. Turner Syndrome.–Women with Turner syndrome are at risk for
BAV, aortic coarctation, andaorticdilatation ordissection. Aortic dila-
tation in patients with Turner syndromehas beenreported to occurin
up to40%of cases. Imaging of theaorta inthesepatientsmust include
theascending aorta, aortic arch, and proximal descending aorta. Asin
other cases, aortic dilatation coexists with a BAV and/or coarcta-
tion.
256-258
Patients with Turner syndrome have a small stature
compared with same-age individuals in the general population, so
allaorticmeasurements should beindexed to BSA. An indexed aortic
diameter of >2 cm/m
2
in the ascending aorta should be followed
annually, as the risk for aortic dissection is increased.
258
b. Loeys-Dietz Syndrome.–Loeys-Dietz syndrome results from a
gene mutation of transforming growth factor b receptor 1 or 2 and
is inherited in an autosomal-dominant fashion.
259
Aortic root aneu-
rysms are present in the majority of patients with Loeys-Dietz syn-
drome. Involvement of other aortic segments and smaller arteries in
the form of aneurysms or marked tortuosity are characteristic in
this population.
259,260
Dissection can occur at dimensions smaller
than in other inherited disorders of connective tissue. Although an
annual comprehensive arterial imaging protocol with MDCT or
MRI has been recommended,
261
the strategy for follow-up is not
well established and should beindividualized from annually to every
2to 3 years depending on abnormalities present, family risk of com-
plications, and degree of evolution. Interpretation should include in-
formation about the caliber of the aortic root, the ascending and
descending aorta, and thepulmonaryartery(pulmonaryarterydilata-
tion may also occur). If progression of aortic disease has occurred, it
should be monitored every 6 months (every 12 months for other ar-
teries) given the markedly increased risk for dissection or rupture.
c. Familial TAAs.–Different gene mutations have been identified in
familial TAAs, predominantly with an autosomal-dominant inheri-
tance. Aneurysms in relatives may be seen in the thoracic aorta, the
abdominal aorta, or the cerebral circulation. Therefore, comprehen-
sive imaging for screening of first-order relatives of probands with
TAA is advisable.
262
Thefrequencyand modalityof vascular imaging
inaffected persons issimilar to that outlined forMarfan syndromebut
should be individualized.
263
d. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome.–The vascular form of Ehlers-Danlos
syndrome (type IV) is a rare autosomal-dominant disorder with
vascular involvement characterized byarterial dilatation and rupture.
The role of aortic imaging in this population is less clear. Elective sur-
gical repair of aortic aneurysms or other vascular involvement carries
ahigh risk because of due to tissue fragility, so the impact of serial
aortic imaging is unclear.
264
3. BAV-Related Aortopathy. a. Bicuspid Valve–Related Aort-
opathy.–BAVs affect 1% to 2% of thepopulation and are often associ-
ated with aortopathy.
265-269
Nearly 50% of patients with BAVs have
dilatation of either the aortic root or ascending aorta.
247,268,270
Dilatation of the aortic arch and descending thoracic aorta can also
occur but is less common. Recently, it has been reported that patients
with BAVs also are at increased risk for intracranial aneurysms
compared with the normal population,
271
although the clinical signifi-
canceof this is unknown. Progressive dilatation of theaorta may occur
irrespective of the functional status of the BAV and places patients at
increased risk for aortic dissection or rupture.
272,273
Patients with
BAVs may also have coexisting coronary artery anomalies, including
reversal of dominance, short left main coronary artery (<10 mm), and
anomalous origin of the left circumflex artery from the right coronary
Table 18 Geneticconditionsassociatedwithaorticdisease
BAV
Marfan syndrome
Loeys-Dietz syndrome
Turner syndrome
Ehlers-Danlos vascular type (type IV)
Familial TAA
Shprintzen-Goldberg (craniosynostosis) syndrome
Journal of the AmericanSociety of Echocardiography
Volume 28 Number2
Goldstein et al 157
cusp.
250,270,274-278
Failure to recognize these anomalies may result in
riskfor coronary arteryinjury during aortic valve repair or replacement.
b. ImagingoftheAortainPatientswithUnoperatedBAVs.–TTE is
the primary imaging tool for the initial diagnosis and screening as
well as serial follow-up of patients with known or suspected BAVs
with or without aortopathy. The aortic root or ascending aorta
may be dilated. The pattern of dilatation may be associated with
BAV morphology.
269
At the time of initial diagnosis of aortopathy
in patients with BAVs, imaging with CTor MRI is generally recom-
mended to confirmthat thesize of the aorta measured byTTE is ac-
curate. Eccentric dilatation of the aortic sinus adjacent to the
conjoined cusp increases the chance of underestimation of the
aortic root measurement by TTE, particularly when the measure-
ment is obtained only in the long-axis format. CTand MRI also pro-
vide important information about the size of the aortic arch and
descending aorticsegments,which areoftenincompletely visualized
by TTE (Figure49). Although BAVoccurs in >50% of patients with
coarctation, coarctation is noted in <10% of patients with BAVs.
Nevertheless, whenever a BAV is detected, coarctation should al-
ways be sought.
c. Follow-Up Imaging of the Aorta in Patients with Unoperated
BAVs.–All patients with BAVs and associated aortopathy should un-
dergo annualsurveillanceimaging of theascending aorta to monitor
growth over time. TTE can be used to monitor the aortic root and
ascending aorta when correlation between the dimensions
measured by TTE and CT or MRI has been confirmed. After the
identification of ascending aortic enlargement in a patient with
BAV, repeat imaging after 6months is recommended. If theaorta re-
mains stable at 6-month follow-up and is <45 mm in size, and there
is no familyor personal historyof aortic dissection, annualaortic im-
aging is recommended. Patients who do not meet these criteria
should undergo repeat aortic imaging using TTE every 6 months.
Occasionally, patients with BAV-related aortopathy have demon-
strated stable dilatation of the ascending aorta over several years;
thefrequencyof aorticfollow-up in thesepatients should beindivid-
ualized. Patients with BAVs and no demonstrableaortopathyshould
be screened every 3 to 5 years with TTE for the development of
aortic enlargement.
Repeat CTorMRIis suggested at least every3to 5years to reassess
theaorticarch and descending aorta and reconfirmthat transthoracic
echocardiographic measurements of the aortic root remain reliable
for serial measurements.
TEE isgenerallynot used forinitialdiagnosis andfollow-up of BAV-
related aortopathy, because of its semi-invasive nature and difficulty
comparing dimensions over time.
Patients with BAVs with aneurysmal dilatation of theaortic arch or
descending thoracic aorta or those with remote histories of type B
aortic dissection requireregular computed tomographic angiography
or MRI to monitor aortic stability. In such cases, imaging should be
repeated annually. TTE does not provide reliable imaging for serial
follow-up of the dimensions of these portions of the aorta.
d. Postoperative Aortic Imaging in Patients with BAV-Related
Aortopathy.–After elective aortic root replacement, early (dismissal
or within 6 months) TTE and CTor MRI are generally performed to
establish a baseline aortic and valve assessment. During the imaging
study, it is critical to know what surgical procedure was performed to
identify potentialresidua or sequelae (Figure50). Annualaortic imag-
ing isgenerallyrecommended after aorticroot replacement orreplace-
ment of theaorta abovethecoronaryarteries; however, thefrequency
isindividualized dependingon patient characteristics, typeofoperation
performed, and duration of follow-up. Dilatation of the remaining
ascending aorta, aortic arch,ordescending thoracic aortamay continue
after the ascending aorta has been replaced. Serial postoperative
follow-upimaging shouldalso focusoncommonpostoperativecompli-
cations, including the development of coronary button pseudoaneur-
ysm formation, anastomotic site pseudoaneurysm formation, and
progressive dilatation of other aortic segments.
Figure50 (A)Computedtomographic3Dvolume-renderedreconstructionofthethoracicaortainapatientwithprioraorticvalveand
ascending aorta replacement due to bicuspid valve–related aortopathy; the image demonstrates aortic arch dilatation(asterisk). (B)
Computed tomographic 3D volume-rendered reconstruction of the thoracic aorta in a patient with BAV and aortopathy with prior
aortic valve and supracoronary aortic replacement; the image demonstrates features of asymmetric aortic root dilatation (asterisk).
158 Goldstein et al
Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography
February 2015
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested