open pdf file in c# : Add text to pdf reader software application dll winforms html windows web forms 2015_Thoracic-Aorta5-part741

Although classically the temporal and/or other cranial arteries are
involved, the aorta and its major branches are affected in
approximately 10% to 18% of patients.
410,411
Dilatation of the
aortic root and ascending aorta are common and can lead to
aortic dissection or rupture, usually several years after the initial
diagnosis. If a diagnosis of extracranial GCA is suspected,
echocardiography, CT, or MRI is recommended. The finding of a
thickened aortic wall on CTor MRI indicates inflammation of the
aortic wall (Figure58) and thus active disease.
412
Studies with posi-
tron emission tomography have suggested that subclinical aortic
inflammation is often present in patients with GCA.
413
IX. POSTSURGICAL IMAGING OF THE AORTIC ROOT AND
AORTA
Advances in diagnostic imaging techniques haveallowed earlier diag-
nosis of and moreprompt surgicalintervention for thoracic aorticdis-
ease, whichin turn haslikelyimproved outcomes for both emergency
and elective surgery of the aorta. As a consequence increasing
numbers of patients are presenting for follow-up care.
For both aortic dissections and aneurysms involving the ascending
aorta, the surgeon usually replaces the ascending aorta with an inter-
position Dacron graft but leaves the native aortic root, arch, and de-
scending aorta behind. Thus, survivors of the initial repair may
remain at considerable riskforfuture aneurysmaldilatation and even-
tualrupture. Consequently, appropriatefollow-up requireslong-term
clinical monitoring and follow-up imaging to detect such complica-
tions and to allow timely surgical or percutaneous reintervention.
The foundation for such follow-up imaging is obtaining adequate
baseline imaging that provides a reliablereferencefor futurecompar-
isons of aortic size and appearance. Moreover, baseline imaging will
detect technical failures and improper or incomplete repairs with
the potential for subsequent complications.
A. What the Imager Needs to Know
To evaluatepostoperativefindings accurately, the imaging physician
must possess a general understanding of the surgical techniques
availableto treat thoracic aortic diseases and awareness of the details
of the surgical procedure that was used in the individual patient. In
most instances, the postoperative image may differ in important
ways from that seen before the surgical intervention. It follows
that the expected postoperative image and any possible variations
as presented by the relevant imaging modality must be understood.
Only then can the spectrum of potential postsurgical complications
be accurately recognized and distinguished from the expected post-
operative appearance.
B. Common Aortic Surgical Techniques
Listed inTables30and31 are some of the more common aortic
procedures and some of the alternative or less common
procedures. A brief discussion of some of the more common
procedures follows. The scope of this review does not permit
detailed discussion of modifications of standard procedures or of
less commonly used techniques.
1.Interposition Technique. This currentlystandard techniquein-
cludes excision of thediseased segment of thenative ascending aorta
and its replacement with a polyester (Dacron) graft. The proximal
anastomotic site is often supracoronary, and the distal anastomotic
site is immediately proximal to the brachiocephalic artery. The anas-
tomoticsitesareoften reinforced with externally placed circumferen-
tial strips of Teflon felt.
2. Inclusion Technique. The inclusion technique consists of an
aortotomy, placement of an artificial graft within the diseased native
aorta, and enclosing or ‘‘wrapping’’ the graft with the native aorta,
which is sutured around the graft. This procedure creates a potential
space between the graft and the native aortic wall, which has impor-
tant imaging implications. The use of this technique has diminished
significantly because improved graft materials have led to decreased
bleeding (this technique was used to provide a space into which
leakage through grafts could occur to minimize extensive bleeding
into the mediastinum).
3. Composite Grafts. A composite graft, or conduit, is a synthetic
(commonly Dacron)aortic graft that includes a directly attached me-
chanical valve or bioprosthetic valve. With composite graft replace-
ment, the coronary ostia are dissected from the native aorta with a
rim of surrounding aorta (‘‘button technique’’), and each button is
then reanastomosed individually to the composite graft.
4. AorticArch Grafts. For select patients with aortic arch involve-
ment, open surgerymayrange from partial to completearch replace-
ment with or without debranching and reattachment of one or more
of the arch vessels.
5. Elephant Trunk Procedure. Surgery for treatment of diffuse
thoracicaorticdiseaseiscommonlyperformedinatwo-stageoperation.
The first stage consists of repair of the ascending aorta and aortic arch
(withreconstructionof thegreat vessels);anextensionoftheaorticgraft
is inserted into the lumen of the proximal descending thoracic aorta,
Table 30 Commonaorticsurgicalprocedures
1. Valveless ascending grafts
a. Interposition technique
b. Inclusiontechnique
2. Composite aortic grafts
3. Aortic arch grafts
4. Descending aortic grafts
5. Endovascularstent grafts
6. Resuspension of the aortic valve
7. Valve-sparing root replacement
8. Use of biologic adhesives and sealants
9. Coronary artery (button) reimplantation
Table 31 Lesscommonaorticsurgicalprocedures
1. ‘‘Elephant trunk’’ procedure
2. Cabrol shunt procedure
3. Cabrol coronary graft procedure
4. Aortic tailoring (aortoplasty)
5. Fenestration
6. Obliteration of false lumen (primary repair)
a. Glue aortoplasty
b. Insertion of foreign material
c. Thromboexclusion
7. Aortic girdling (wrapping the aortawith Dacronmesh)
Journal of the AmericanSociety of Echocardiography
Volume 28 Number2
Goldstein et al 169
Add text to pdf reader - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text in pdf file online; add text field to pdf
Add text to pdf reader - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to add text fields in a pdf; adding text to a pdf in reader
whereit floats freelyand isreferred to asthe‘‘elephant trunk.’’ Thesec-
ond stageoftheoperation consists of repairofthedescending aortaus-
ing theelephant trunkfortheproximalanastomosisofanopensurgical
graft or as the proximal landing zonefor an endovascular stent graft.
6. Cabrol Shunt Procedure. The Cabrol shunt procedure is an
uncommon adjunct to the inclusion graft technique, performed to
prevent progressive bleeding into the potential space between the
graft and the native aortic wall, as described earlier. This procedure
consists of a surgically created shunt between this potential space
and the right atrium to alleviate any pressure in the perigraft space.
7. Technical Adjuncts. Foralltypes ofgrafts, circumferentialfelt or
pericardial rings are often used to buttress anastomoses. Felt pledgets
are also used to reinforce the graft or the native aortic wall at sites of
intraoperativecannulaplacement. These rings and pledgetshaveimag-
ing implications for each of the imaging modalities, such as otherwise
unexplained thickenings, reverberations, and acoustic shadowing.
Avariety of adhesives, or biologic glues, have been used as an
adjunct to standard methods of achieving anastomotic hemostasis
(such as sutures and clips). Thesebioglues have also been used for re-
approximating layers of the dissected aorta and for strengthening
weakened aortic tissues by a ‘‘tanning’’ process. Although the value
of these tissue adhesives is recognized, there are reports of tissue
necrosis leading to false aneurysms.
414
Moreover, these substances
mayproduceedema, inflammation,and fibrosis, leadingto thickening
of theaortic walloradjacent tissues. Such thickening can beconfused
with leakage and hematoma by imaging techniques.
C. Normal Postoperative Features
Thedetails of thesurgery that has been performed will determinethe
appearance of the ascending aorta on prospective imaging studies.
There are only a few descriptions of the echocardiographic appear-
ance of the ascending aorta after reconstruction. More information
is available on computed tomographic and MRI findings. An aortic
interposition graft isvisualized as a thin,corrugated tubewith an echo-
density greater than that of thenativeaorta. Thereisusually an abrupt
change between the graft and the native aorta as felt strips that are
used to reinforce the anastomoses provide visual markers of those
borders. Occasionallythereis angulation of the aortic graft, especially
neartheanastomoses.Thesepoints of angulation arenot clinicallysig-
nificant but can mimic a dissection flap, especially on axial computed
tomographic images.
Asmallamountofperigraftthickening (<10mm)is acommon post-
operative finding. This presumably results from minor leakage at the
anastomotic suture lines created by needle holes. The uniform and
concentric distribution of this thickening helps differentiate it from
more serious leakage. Another mimicker of pathology can be seen at
the site of coronary anastomoses. When the coronary arteries are re-
sected witha rimofnativeaortictissue(buttontechnique),a focalbulge
at this site can be misinterpreted as an incipient pseudoaneurysm.
Importantly, theinclusion graft technique creates a potentialspace be-
tween thegraft and its wrap, thenativeaorta. Thisspace often contains
fluidand/or hematoma, which can be a normalfindingwith no clinical
significance, especially when <10 mm in thickness.
After repair of a type A dissection, a persistent dissection flap is
seen distal to the ascending aortic graft in 80% of patients.
40
This
persistence of a double-channel aorta after surgery is not considered
acomplication, provided it does not increaseinsize. In chronic dissec-
tions, the residual dissection flap becomes thickened because of
collagen deposition and becomes less oscillatory or even immobile.
ManyearlypostoperativeCTstudies showpleuralor pericardialef-
fusions, mediastinallymph nodeenlargement, and/orleft lobeatelec-
tasis. Thesefindings diminish in frequencyover timeand presumably
represent normalpostoperativefindings without adverseclinicalcon-
sequences.
D. Complications after Aortic Repair
Total removal of the diseased aortic segment is seldom possible with
surgical repair of aortic lesions such as aneurysm and dissection, and
theanastomoses between graft and nativeaorta arepotential sites for
late complications. Therefore, periodic postoperative surveillance by
cardiovascularimagingspecialistswhoarefamiliarwithaortic diseases
and surgical procedures cannot be overemphasized. Early detection
of complications can facilitate optimal management, including reop-
eration when appropriate. Potential postoperative complications are
listed inTable32. An awareness of such complications, and the ability
to differentiate them from the spectrum of ‘‘normal’’ postoperative
findings, is obviously important. Some of the more common compli-
cations are discussed.
1. Pseudoaneurysm. Pseudoaneurysm is an important early or
latecomplicationthat can occur aftersurgeryforaneurysmdissection.
In the vast majority of patients, pseudoaneurysm is not associated
with any clinical symptoms.
415
The silent nature of these potentially
life-threatening complications emphasizes the need for surveillance
imaging. Pseudoaneurysms usually occur at anastomoses. Although
they can form at the site of needle holes even when the suture lines
are intact, more often they originate from partial dehiscence of the
proximalordistalsuturelinesorat thesiteof coronaryreimplantation.
The size of the pseudoaneurysm, its change over time, and the pa-
tient’s symptoms and clinical status will determine management.
Small, sterile pseudoaneurysms can remain stable for years without
further intervention. Pseudoaneurysms are readily detectable by
both CTand MRI. TEE is also reliable for detecting pseudoaneurysms
of the aorticroot and proximalascending aorta but can misslesionsin
the distal ascending aorta because of theinterposition of the trachea.
2.FalseLuminal Dilatation. SurgeryfortypeA aorticdissection is
usually limited to the ascending aorta. Distal to the ascending aortic
Table 32 Potentialpostoperativecomplicationsofaortic
surgery
1. Anastomotic leakage,disruption, dehiscence
2. Pseudoaneurysm(at proximal, distal, or coronary anastomotic
site)
3. Progressive AR
4. Involvement of aortic branches
5. Perigraft infection
6. Compression of graft by hematoma (inclusiontechnique)
7. Aneurysmal dilatation of false lumen (status post dissection
repair)
8. Compression or collapse of true lumen (by expandingfalse
lumen)
9. Frank rupture
10. Anastomotic stenosis
11. Development of recurrentdissectionor aneurysm proximal to a
graft inpatients inwhom a supracoronary procedurehas been
performed.
12. Aortoesophageal or aortopulmonary fistula
13. Graft herniation into thoracotomy defect
170 Goldstein et al
Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography
February 2015
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF reader installed. Insert images into PDF form field. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo
add text fields to pdf; add text pdf file
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
how to enter text in pdf file; add text boxes to a pdf
graft, a dissection flap and a false lumen with demonstrable blood
flow are present in approximately 80% of patients.
40
Strictly
speaking, this is not a complication, but there is a potential for false
luminal expansion. Typically, the median diameter of the aortic
arch, descending thoracic aorta, and abdominal aorta are all mildly
enlarged after typeA aortic dissection repair.
416
Although expansion
rates are low, progressive dilatation of the patent false lumen, facili-
tated by thepoor condition of the weakened and thinned wall, often
occurs. This may result in late aortic rupture or collapse of the true
lumen.Intheminorityof patients, thefalselumencan becomethrom-
bosed. Although the influence of thrombosis of the false lumen on
long-term survival remains speculative, it may be associated with
improved survival.
3. Involvement of Aortic Branches. Extension of a dissection
flap and/or IMH into an aortic branch may result in luminal narrow-
ing or total obstruction. In addition, dilatation of a patent false lumen
and associated collapse of the true lumen may also affect the branch
vessels. These complications may occur in the coronary arteries,
supra-aortic vessels, or visceral vessels.
4. Infection. Early- or late-onset infection complicates prosthetic
aortic graft insertion in 0.5% to 5% of patients. CT is considered
the standard imaging method for aortic graft infection.
417
The role
of TEEfor detection for graft infection has not been thoroughlyinves-
tigated.
E. Recommendations for Serial Imaging Techniques and
Schedules
Theimaging modalityofchoice forevaluating thepostoperativeaorta
has not been clearly determined. Both CT and MRI are reasonable
choices. Thesetechniques providepreciseand reproduciblemeasure-
ments of the native aorta diameter at any level and have the advan-
tage compared with TEE of including the supra-aortic and visceral
vessels in a single examination and providing reproduciblelandmarks
for comparing images from serial studies.
We consider contrast-enhanced CT to be the optimal diagnostic
tool for follow-up of patients after surgery for aortic disease. MRI is
also valuable for serial follow-up because image resolution is compa-
rablewiththat of CT. In somepatients,MRImaybepreferred because
neither radiation nor contrast media are required. This is especially
true in young patients (e.g., those with Marfan syndrome) because
theradiation exposurefromserialexaminations maybeconsiderable.
TTE, although a routine study for many cardiology patients, is
limited in its utilityto followpatientsafter aorticsurgery. TTEprovides
an adequate assessment of theaortic valve, aortic root, and proximal
ascending aorta but is limited in its ability to image the remainder of
the thoracic aorta.
TEE has some advantages over CT and MRI. It is portable, pro-
vides excellent images of the aortic root, can precisely assess the
morphology and function of the aortic valve, and provides informa-
tion on left ventricular function. However, it may not be able to
imagethe distal ascending aorta (which maybethe siteof theaortic
graft’s distal anastomosis), the proximal aortic arch, the proximal
aortic arch vessels, and the distal abdominal aorta. Moreover, it
cannot assess the relationship of aortic pseudoaneurysms to adja-
cent anatomic structures such as the lung or mediastinum. Last,
TEE is semi-invasive, which is a drawback for serial, repeated exam-
inations.
The plan for follow-up surveillance imaging should not be left to
other practitioners alone. Primary responsibility lie with the aortic
specialist (cardiac surgeon, cardiologist, or vascular surgeon) over-
seeing the evaluation and management of the patient. Ideally, there
should bea computerdatabase into which the relevant clinical, surgi-
cal, and imaging details of every patient with thoracic aortic disease
are entered. The surveillance imaging modality and the frequency
of follow-up should bedecided on thebasis of the individualpatient’s
clinical history, prior intervention, and rate of progression of the dis-
ease, outlined inTable 5. In general, patients with small aortas or
mild disease can be followed at less frequent intervals than arethose
with largeraortas. Although it is reasonableto permit surveillance im-
aging examinations to be performed at sites close to the patient’s
home, ideally the images should be reviewed and the patient fol-
lowed by a provider or center with expertise and experience in the
management of thoracic aortic disease.
X. SUMMARY
In conclusion, the considerable advances in diagnostic imaging tech-
niqueshavegreatlyincreasedour understanding of thoracicaorticdis-
eases. The availability, cost/benefit ratio, and additive value of each
technique determine its indications. TTE continues to be the tech-
nique most used in clinical practice for aortic root assessment. CT
has theadvantage of its high-resolution assessment of the entire aorta
and excellent accuracyon sizemeasurements.MRI offers thegreatest
morphologic and dynamicinformation of theaortawithout radiation,
although in clinical practice it is less commonly available.
New advances such as time-resolved 3D phase-contrast velocity
(four-dimensional flow) on MRI, electrocardiographically gated
MDCT, and the use of contrast in echocardiographic studies, will
permit further improvement in the definition of biomechanical prop-
erties of the diseased aorta wall, which can be expected to influence
theprognostication and management of patients with aortic diseases.
NOTICE AND DISCLAIMER
This report is madeavailablebyASE and the European Association of
Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI) as a courtesy reference source for
members. This report contains recommendations only and should
not be used as the sole basis to make medical practice decisions or
for disciplinary action against any employee. The statements and rec-
ommendations contained in this report are based primarily on the
opinions of experts, rather than on scientifically verified data. The
ASE and EACVI make no express or implied warranties regarding
the completeness or accuracy of the information in this report,
includingthewarrantyof merchantabilityorfitnessfor aparticularpur-
pose. In no event shall the ASE and EACVI be liable to you, your pa-
tients, or any other third parties for any decision made or action
taken by you or such other parties in reliance on this information.
Nor doesyouruseofthisinformation constitutetheoffering of medical
advicebytheASE and EACVIorcreateanyphysician-patient relation-
ship between the ASE and EACVI and your patients or anyone else.
REFERENCES
1. HiratzkaLF,BakrisGL,BeckmanJA,BersinRM,CarrVF,CaseyDEJ,
et al. 2010 ACCF/AHA/AATS/ACR/ASA/SCA/SCAI/SIR/STS/SVM
guidelines forthe diagnosis and management of patients with Thoracic
Journal of the AmericanSociety of Echocardiography
Volume 28 Number2
Goldstein et al 171
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
adding text to pdf in reader; how to add text to a pdf file in reader
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats
how to insert text box in pdf document; adding a text field to a pdf
AorticDisease:a report of the AmericanCollegeof CardiologyFounda-
tion/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines,
American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American College of Radi-
ology, American Stroke Association, Society of CardiovascularAnesthe-
siologists, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions,
Society of Interventional Radiology, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and
Society forVascularMedicine. Circulation 2010;121:e266-369.
2. GottVL,PyeritzRE,MagovernGJJ,CameronDE,McKusickVA.Surgical
treatment of aneurysms of the ascendingaorta in the Marfansyndrome.
Resultsofcomposite-graftrepairin 50patients. N Engl J Med1986;314:
1070-4.
3. RomanMJ,DevereuxRB,NilesNW,HochreiterC,KligfieldP,SatoN,
etal.Aorticrootdilatationasacauseofisolated,severeaorticregurgitation.
Prevalence, clinical and echocardiographic patterns, and relation to left
ventricularhypertrophy and function. Ann InternMed1987;106:800-7.
4. VrizO,DriussiC,BettioM,FerraraF,D’AndreaA,BossoneE.Aorticroot
dimensions and stiffness in healthy subjects. Am J Cardiol 2013;112:
1224-9.
5. BurmanED,KeeganJ,KilnerPJ.Aorticrootmeasurementbycardiovascular
magneticresonance:specificationofplanesandlinesof measurementand
correspondingnormal values. CircCardiovasc Imaging 2008;1:104-13.
6. Devereux RB, , de e Simone G, Arnett t DK, , Best LG, Boerwinkle E,
HowardBV, et al. Normal limitsinrelation toage, body size andgender
oftwo-dimensional echocardiographicaorticroot dimensionsinpersons
>/=15years of age. Am JCardiol 2012;110:1189-94.
7. Hager A, Kaemmerer H, , Rapp-Bernhardt t U, Blucher S, Rapp K,
Bernhardt TM, et al. Diameters of the thoracic aorta throughout life as
measured with helical computed tomography. J Thorac Cardiovasc
Surg2002;123:1060-6.
8. LinFY,DevereuxRB,RomanMJ,MengJ,JowVM,JacobsA,etal.Assess-
mentofthe thoracicaortabymultidetectorcomputedtomography:age-
andsex-specificreferencevaluesinadultswithoutevidentcardiovascular
disease. J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr2008;2:298-308.
9. RomanMJ,DevereuxRB,Kramer-FoxR,O’LoughlinJ.Two-dimensional
echocardiographic aorticrootdimensionsin normal childrenandadults.
AmJ Cardiol 1989;64:507-12.
10. VasanRS,LarsonMG,BenjaminEJ,LevyD.Echocardiographicrefer-
ence valuesfor aortic root size: the Framingham Heart Study. JAmSoc
Echocardiogr 1995;8:793-800.
11. LamCS,XanthakisV,SullivanLM,LiebW,AragamJ,RedfieldMM,etal.
Aorticrootremodelingover the adult life course: longitudinal data from
the FraminghamHeart Study. Circulation 2010;122:884-90.
12. DaimonM, Watanabe H,Abe Y,Hirata K, Hozumi T, Ishii K, et al.
Normal values of echocardiographic parameters in relation to age in a
healthy Japanese population:the JAMP study. CircJ 2008;72:1859-66.
13. VasanRS,LarsonMG,LevyD.Determinantsofechocardiographicaortic
root size. The FraminghamHeart Study. Circulation 1995;91:734-40.
14. DrexlerM,ErbelR,MullerU,WittlichN,Mohr-KahalyS,MeyerJ.Mea-
surement of intracardiac dimensions and structures in normal young
adult subjects by transesophageal echocardiography. Am J Cardiol
1990;65:1491-6.
15. SheilML,JenkinsO,ShollerGF.Echocardiographicassessmentofaortic
root dimensions innormal childrenbased onmeasurementof anew ra-
tio of aorticsize independent of growth. Am J Cardiol 1995;75:711-5.
16. LangRM,BierigM,DevereuxRB,FlachskampfFA,FosterE,PellikkaPA,
et al. Recommendations for chamber quantification: a report from the
AmericanSocietyofEchocardiography’sGuidelinesandStandardsCom-
mittee and the Chamber Quantification Writing Group, developed in
conjunction with the European Association of Echocardiography, a
branch of the European Society of Cardiology. J Am Soc Echocardiogr
2005;18:1440-63.
17. IskandarA,ThompsonPD.Ameta-analysisofaorticrootsizeineliteath-
letes. Circulation 2013;127:791-8.
18. PellicciaA,DiPaoloFM,DeBlasiisE,QuattriniFM,PisicchioC,GuerraE,
et al. Prevalence and clinical significance of aorticroot dilation in highly
trained competitive athletes. Circulation 2010;122:698-706. 3 p
following 706.
19. PellicciaA,DiPaoloFM,QuattriniFM.Aorticrootdilatationinathletic
population. Prog Cardiovasc Dis2012;54:432-7.
20. Wolak A, GransarH, , ThomsonLE, Friedman n JD, , Hachamovitch h R,
Gutstein A, et al. Aortic size assessment by noncontrast cardiac
computed tomography: normal limits by age, gender, and body surface
area. JACC Cardiovasc Imaging2008;1:200-9.
21. Kalsch H, , Lehmann n N, , Mohlenkamp S, Becker A, Moebus S,
Schmermund A, et al. Body-surface adjusted aorticreference diameters
forimprovedidentificationofpatientswiththoracicaorticaneurysms:re-
sultsfromthepopulation-basedHeinz Nixdorf Recall study. IntJCardiol
2013;163:72-8.
22. DeBackerJ,LoeysB,DevosD,DietzH,DeSutterJ,DePaepeA.Acrit-
ical analysis of minorcardiovascularcriteriain the diagnostic evaluation
of patients withMarfan syndrome. Genet Med 2006;8:401-8.
23. LuTL,HuberCH,RizzoE,DehmeshkiJ,vonSegesserLK,QanadliSD.
AscendingaortameasurementsasassessedbyECG-gatedmulti-detector
computed tomography: a pilot study to establish normative values for
transcatheter therapies. Eur Radiol 2009;19:664-9.
24. MaoSS,AhmadiN,ShahB,BeckmannD,ChenA,NgoL,etal.Normal
thoracic aorta diameter on cardiac computed tomography in healthy
asymptomatic adults: impact of age and gender. Acad Radiol 2008;15:
827-34.
25. TsangJF,LytwynM,FaragA,ZeglinskiM,WallaceK,daSilvaM,etal.
Multimodalityimagingofaorticdimensions:comparisonoftransthoracic
echocardiography withmultidetectorrowcomputedtomography.Echo-
cardiography 2012;29:735-41.
26. GarcierJM,PetitcolinV,FilaireM,MofidR,AzarnouchK,RavelA,etal.
Normal diameterof the thoracic aorta in adults:a magnetic resonance
imaging study. Surg Radiol Anat 2003;25:322-9.
27. MuraruD,MaffessantiF,KocabayG,PelusoD,BiancoLD,PiasentiniE,
et al. Ascending aorta diameters measured by echocardiography using
bothleading edge-to-leading edge andinneredge-to-inneredge conven-
tions in healthy volunteers. Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Imaging 2014;15:
415-22.
28. Quint LE, LiuPS,BooherAM, Watcharotone K,MylesJD. Proximal
thoracic aortic diameter measurements at CT: repeatability and repro-
ducibility according to measurement method. Int J Cardiovasc Imaging
2013;29:479-88.
29. SahnDJ,DeMariaA,KissloJ,WeymanA.Recommendationsregarding
quantitation in M-mode echocardiography:results of a survey of echo-
cardiographicmeasurements. Circulation 1978;58:1072-83.
30. LeeRT,KammRD.Vascularmechanicsforthecardiologist.JAmColl
Cardiol 1994;23:1289-95.
31. WilkinsonIB,FranklinSS,HallIR,TyrrellS,CockcroftJR.Pressureampli-
ficationexplainswhypulsepressureisunrelatedtorisk inyoungsubjects.
Hypertension 2001;38:1461-6.
32. LathamRD,WesterhofN,SipkemaP,RubalBJ,ReuderinkP,MurgoJP.
Regionalwavetravel andreflectionsalongthehumanaorta:astudywith
six simultaneous micromanometric pressures. Circulation 1985;72:
1257-69.
33. LaurentS,Cockcroft J,VanBortel L,BoutouyrieP, GiannattasioC,
Hayoz D, et al. Expert consensusdocument on arterial stiffness: meth-
odological issues and clinical applications. Eur Heart J 2006;27:
2588-605.
34. Van Bortel LM, , Laurent t S, Boutouyrie P, , Chowienczyk P,
Cruickshank JK, De Backer T, et al. Expert consensus document on
the measurement of aortic stiffness in daily practice using carotid-
femoral pulse wave velocity. J Hypertens 2012;30:445-8.
35. DoguiA,RedheuilA,LefortM,DeCesareA,KachenouraN,HermentA,
et al. Measurement of aortic arch pulse wave velocity in cardiovascular
MR: comparison of transit time estimators and description of a new
approach. J MagnReson Imaging 2011;33:1321-9.
36. EarnestF4th,MuhmJR,SheedyPF2nd.Roentgenographicfindingsin
thoracicaorticdissection. MayoClinProc 1979;54:43-50.
37. JagannathAS,SosTA,LockhartSH,SaddekniS,SnidermanKW.Aortic
dissection: a statistical analysis of the usefulness of plain chest radio-
graphic findings. AJR Am J Roentgenol 1986;147:1123-6.
172 Goldstein et al
Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography
February 2015
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
C# Sample Code: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied in C#.NET. This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
add text boxes to pdf document; adding text to pdf in preview
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
add text to pdf document online; add text to pdf file online
38. vonKodolitschY,Schwartz AG, NienaberCA. Clinical predictionof
acute aortic dissection. Arch Intern Med 2000;160:2977-82.
39. Evangelista A, Flachskampf FA, Erbel R, , Antonini-Canterin n F,
Vlachopoulos C, Rocchi G, et al. Echocardiography in aortic diseases:
EAE recommendations for clinical practice. Eur J Echocardiogr 2010;
11:645-58.
40. GoldsteinSA,MintzGS,LindsayJJ.Aorta:comprehensiveevaluationby
echocardiography and transesophageal echocardiography. J Am Soc
Echocardiogr 1993;6:634-59.
41. Goldstein SA, Lindsay JJ. . Aortic c Dissection: Noninvasive Evaluation.
ACC Curr J Review 2001;10:18-20.
42. Nienaber CA, von n Kodolitsch Y, , Nicolas s V, Siglow V, , Piepho o A,
BrockhoffC,etal.Thediagnosisofthoracicaorticdissectionbynoninva-
sive imaging procedures. N Engl J Med 1993;328:1-9.
43. TamboriniG,GalliCA,MaltagliatiA,AndreiniD,PontoneG,QuagliaC,
et al. Comparison of feasibility and accuracy of transthoracic echocardi-
ographyversuscomputedtomographyinpatientswithknownascending
aortic aneurysm. Am J Cardiol 2006;98:966-9.
44. Weyman AE, , Caldwell RL, Hurwitz RA, Girod DA, Dillon n JC,
Feigenbaum H,etal. Cross-sectional echocardiographic characterization
ofaorticobstruction. 1. Supravalvularaorticstenosisandaortichypopla-
sia. Circulation1978;57:491-7.
45. WeymanAE.Cross-sectional echocardiography.Philadelphia:Leaand
Febiger; 1982.
46. MintzGS,KotlerMN,SegalBL,ParryWR.Twodimensionalechocardio-
graphicrecognitionofthedescendingthoracicaorta. AmJCardiol 1979;
44:232-8.
47. SteinbergCR,ArcherM,SteinbergI.Measurementoftheabdominalaorta
after intravenous aortography in health and arteriosclerotic peripheral
vasculardisease.AmJRoentgenolRadiumTherNuclMed1965;95:703-8.
48. FisherEA,StahlJA,BuddJH,GoldmanME.Transesophagealechocardi-
ography:proceduresandclinicalapplication.JAmColl Cardiol 1991;18:
1333-48.
49. Seward JB, , Khandheria a BK, , Oh h JK, , Abel MD, Hughes RWJ,
Edwards WD, et al. Transesophageal echocardiography: technique,
anatomic correlations, implementation, and clinical applications. Mayo
Clin Proc 1988;63:649-80.
50. Taams MA, , Gussenhoven n WJ, Schippers LA, Roelandt J, van
HerwerdenLA, BosE,etal. Thevalue oftransoesophageal echocardiog-
raphy for diagnosis of thoracic aorta pathology. Eur Heart J 1988;9:
1308-16.
51. SewardJB,KhandheriaBK,FreemanWK,OhJK,Enriquez-SaranoM,
Miller FA, et al. Multiplane transesophageal echocardiography: image
orientation, examination technique, anatomic correlations, and clinical
applications. Mayo Clin Proc 1993;68:523-51.
52. HungJ,LangR,FlachskampfF,ShernanSK,McCullochML,AdamsDB,
et al. 3D echocardiography: a review of the current status and future
directions. J Am Soc Echocardiogr 2007;20:213-33.
53. LangRM,BadanoLP,TsangW,AdamsDH,AgricolaE,BuckT,etal.EAE/
ASE recommendations for image acquisition and display using three-
dimensional echocardiography. J Am SocEchocardiogr2012;25:3-46.
54. MonaghanMJ.Roleofrealtime3Dechocardiographyinevaluatingthe
left ventricle. Heart 2006;92:131-6.
55. SchoenhagenP,TuzcuEM,KapadiaSR,DesaiMY,SvenssonLG.Three-
dimensional imaging of the aorticvalve andaortic root withcomputed
tomography: new standards in an era of transcatheter valve repair/im-
plantation. Eur Heart J 2009;30:2079-86.
56. WeiJ,HsiungMC,TsaiSK,OuCH,ChangCY,ChangYC,etal.The
routine use oflive three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography
in mitral valve surgery:clinical experience. Eur J Echocardiogr 2010;11:
14-8.
57. ScohyTV,GenietsB,McGhieJ,BogersAJ.Feasibilityofreal-timethree-
dimensional transesophageal echocardiography in type A aortic dissec-
tion. Interact Cardiovasc ThoracSurg 2010;11:112-3.
58. ErbelR,AlfonsoF,BoileauC,DirschO,EberB,HaverichA,etal.Diag-
nosis and management of aortic dissection. Eur Heart J 2001;22:
1642-81.
59. FattoriR,CaldareraI,RapezziC,RocchiG,NapoliG,ParlapianoM,etal.
Primary endoleakage in endovascular treatment of the thoracic aorta:
importance of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography. J
ThoracCardiovascSurg 2000;120:490-5.
60. Koschyk DH, Nienaber CA, Knap p M, Hofmann n T, , Kodolitsch h YV,
SkriabinaV, etal. How to guide stent-graft implantation in typeB aortic
dissection? Comparisonofangiography,transesophagealechocardiogra-
phy, and intravascularultrasound. Circulation 2005;112:I260-4.
61. KpodonuJ,RamaiahVG,DiethrichEB.Intravascularultrasoundimaging
as applied to the aorta:a new tool forthe cardiovascular surgeon. Ann
ThoracSurg 2008;86:1391-8.
62. RocchiG,LofiegoC,BiaginiE,PivaT,BracchettiG,LovatoL,etal.Trans-
esophageal echocardiography-guided algorithm forstent-graft implanta-
tionin aortic dissection. JVasc Surg 2004;40:880-5.
63. FernandezJD,DonovanS,GarrettHEJ,BurgarS.Endovascularthoracic
aortic aneurysmrepair: evaluating the utility of intravascularultrasound
measurements. J Endovasc Ther 2008;15:68-72.
64. Sebastia C, Pallisa E, Quiroga S, , Alvarez-Castells s A, Dominguez R,
Evangelista A. Aortic dissection: diagnosis and follow-up with helical
CT. Radiographics 1999;19:45-60. quiz 149-50.
65. VernhetH,SerfatyJM,SerhalM,McFaddenE,BonnefoyE,AdeleineP,etal.
Abdominal CTangiographybeforesurgeryasa predictor of postoperative
deathin acute aorticdissection. AJRAm J Roentgenol 2004;182:875-9.
66. LiY,FanZ,XuL,YangL,XinH,ZhangN,etal.ProspectiveECG-gated
320-row CTangiography of the whole aorta andcoronary arteries. Eur
Radiol 2012;22:2432-40.
67. RoosJE,WillmannJK,WeishauptD,LachatM,MarincekB,HilfikerPR.
Thoracicaorta:motionartifactreductionwithretrospectiveandprospec-
tive electrocardiography-assisted multi-detector row CT. Radiology
2002;222:271-7.
68. FleischmannD,MitchellRS,MillerDC.Acuteaorticsyndromes:newin-
sights from electrocardiographically gated computed tomography.
Semin ThoracCardiovasc Surg 2008;20:340-7.
69. GaoY,LuB,HouZ,YuF,CaoH,HanL,etal.Lowdosedual-sourceCT
angiographyininfantswithcomplexcongenital heart disease:arandom-
ized study. Eur JRadiol 2012;81:e789-95.
70. SchlosserFJ,MojibianHR,DardikA,VerhagenHJ,MollFL,MuhsBE.
Simultaneoussizingandpreoperative risk stratificationforthoracicendo-
vascular aneurysm repair: role of gated computed tomography. J Vasc
Surg 2008;48:561-70.
71. RunzaG,FattouchK,CademartiriF,LaFataA,DamianiL,LaGruttaL,
et al. ECG-gated multidetector computed tomography for the assess-
ment of the postoperative ascending aorta. Radiol Med 2009;114:
705-17.
72. BolenMA,MastracciTM,SchoenhagenP.Useofelectrocardiographic-
gated 4-dimensional CT to assess patency of abdominal aortic branch
vesselsintypeBdissection.JCardiovascComput Tomogr2009;3:415-6.
73. PicanoE,VanoE,RehaniMM,CuocoloA,MontL,BodiV,etal.The
appropriateandjustifieduse of medical radiationincardiovascularimag-
ing:aposition document of the ESCAssociationsof CardiovascularIm-
aging,PercutaneousCardiovascularInterventionsandElectrophysiology.
EurHeart J2014;35:665-72.
74. KatzbergRW, Lamba R. Contrast-inducednephropathyafterintrave-
nous administration: fact or fiction? Radiol Clin North Am 2009;47:
789-800, v.
75. EllisJH,CohanRH.Reducingtheriskofcontrast-inducednephropathy:
a perspective on the controversies. AJR Am J Roentgenol 2009;192:
1544-9.
76. HuntCH,HartmanRP,HesleyGK.Frequencyandseverityofadverse
effects of iodinated andgadolinium contrast materials:retrospective re-
view of 456,930 doses. AJR Am J Roentgenol 2009;193:1124-7.
77. NakayamaY, Awai K,FunamaY, LiuD,NakauraT,TamuraY,etal.
Lower tube voltage reduces contrast material and radiation doses on
16-MDCTaortography. AJR Am J Roentgenol 2006;187:W490-7.
78. MoritaS,UenoE,MasukawaA,SuzukiK,MachidaH,FujimuraM.Hy-
perattenuatingsignsatunenhancedCT indicatingacute vasculardisease.
Radiographics 2010;30:111-25.
Journal of the AmericanSociety of Echocardiography
Volume 28 Number2
Goldstein et al 173
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; Add Image to PDF; VB.NET Protect: Add Password to VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word
adding text to pdf document; add text field pdf
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Evaluation library and components enable users to annotate PDF without adobe PDF reader control installed. Able to add notes to PDF using C# source code in
adding text to a pdf document; adding text to pdf form
79. Yamada T, , Tada a S, , Harada a J. . Aortic dissection n without t intimal
rupture: diagnosis with MR imaging and CT. Radiology 1988;168:
347-52.
80. KoSF,HsiehMJ,ChenMC,NgSH,FangFM,HuangCC,etal.Effectsof
heart rate on motion artifacts of the aorta onnon-ECG-assisted0.5-sec
thoracic MDCT. AJR AmJ Roentgenol 2005;184:1225-30.
81. vanPrehnJ,VinckenKL,MuhsBE,BarwegenGK,BartelsLW,ProkopM,
et al. Towardendografting of the ascending aorta: insight into dynamics
using dynamiccine-CTA. J Endovasc Ther 2007;14:551-60.
82. HayterRG,RheaJT,SmallA,TafazoliFS,NovellineRA.Suspectedaortic
dissectionandotheraorticdisorders:multi-detectorrowCTin373cases
in the emergency setting. Radiology 2006;238:841-52.
83. WuW,BudovecJ,FoleyWD.ProspectiveandretrospectiveECGgating
forthoracicCTangiography:a comparative study.AJRAm JRoentgenol
2009;193:955-63.
84. RozenblitAM,PatlasM,RosenbaumAT,OkhiT,VeithFJ,LaksMP,etal.
Detection of endoleaks after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic
aneurysm: value of unenhanced and delayed helical CT acquisitions.
Radiology 2003;227:426-33.
85. EvangelistaA,PinedaV,CuellarH.AorticAtherosclerosis,Aneurysm
and Dissection. In: M G, editor. Noninvasive Cardiovascular Imaging:
Amultimodality Approach. Philadelphia, PA:Lippincott Williams&Wil-
kins; 2010.
86. AgarwalPP,ChughtaiA,MatzingerFR,KazerooniEA.MultidetectorCT
of thoracicaortic aneurysms. Radiographics 2009;29:537-52.
87. LellMM,AndersK,UderM,KlotzE,DittH,Vega-HigueraF,etal.New
techniquesinCTangiography.Radiographics2006;26(Suppl 1):S45-62.
88. Boll DT, LewinJS, Duerk JL,SmithD,SubramanyanK,MerkleEM.
Assessmentofautomaticvessel trackingtechniquesinpreoperativeplan-
ning of transluminal aorticstent graft implantation. J Comput Assist To-
mogr 2004;28:278-85.
89. Lu TL, , Rizzo o E, , Marques-Vidal PM, Segesser LK, Dehmeshki i J,
Qanadli SD.Variability of ascendingaortadiametermeasurementsasas-
sessed with electrocardiography-gated multidetector computerized to-
mography and computer assisted diagnosis software. Interact
CardiovascThorac Surg 2010;10:217-21.
90. DillavouED, BuckDG, MulukSC, MakarounMS. Two-dimensional
versus three-dimensional CT scan for aortic measurement. J Endovasc
Ther2003;10:531-8.
91. CayneNS,VeithFJ,LipsitzEC,OhkiT,MehtaM,GargiuloN,etal.Vari-
ability ofmaximal aortic aneurysmdiametermeasurements on CTscan:
significance andmethods to minimize. J Vasc Surg 2004;39:811-5.
92. SinghK,JacobsenBK,SolbergS,BonaaKH,KumarS,BajicR,etal.Intra-
and interobserver variability in the measurements of abdominal aortic
and common iliac artery diameter with computed tomography. The
Tromso study. Eur JVascEndovascSurg 2003;25:399-407.
93. SainiS,FrankelRB,StarkDD,FerrucciJTJ.Magnetism:aprimerandre-
view. AJRAm J Roentgenol 1988;150:735-43.
94. DuerinckxAJ,WexlerL,BanerjeeA,HigginsSS,HardyCE,HeltonG,
et al. Postoperative evaluation ofpulmonary arteriesincongenital heart
surgery by magnetic resonance imaging: comparison with echocardiog-
raphy. Am Heart J1994;128:1139-46.
95. EdelmanRR,ChienD,KimD.FastselectiveblackbloodMRimaging.
Radiology 1991;181:655-60.
96. Haddad JL, Rofsky NM, Ambrosino o MM, , Naidich h DP, , Weinreb b JC.
T2-weightedMRimaging of thechest:comparisonof electrocardiograph-
triggered conventional and turbo spin-echo and nontriggered turbo spin-
echosequences.J MagnReson Imaging 1995;5:325-9.
97. NienaberCA,RehdersTC,FratzS.Detectionandassessmentofcongen-
italheartdiseasewithmagneticresonancetechniques.JCardiovascMagn
Reson 1999;1:169-84.
98. CortiR,FusterV.Imagingofatherosclerosis:magneticresonanceimag-
ing. EurHeart J2011;32:1709-19.
99. Flamm SD, White RD, Hoffman n GS. The e clinical application n of
‘edema-weighted’ magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of
Takayasu’s arteritis. Int J Cardiol 1998;66(Suppl 1):S151-9; discussion
S161.
100. KrinskyGA,RofskyNM,DeCoratoDR,WeinrebJC,EarlsJP,FlyerMA,
et al. Thoracicaorta: comparison of gadolinium-enhanced three-dimen-
sionalMRangiographywithconventional MRimaging.Radiology1997;
202:183-93.
101. GrovesEM,BireleyW,DillK,CarrollTJ,CarrJC.Quantitativeanalysisof
ECG-gated high-resolution contrast-enhanced MR angiography of the
thoracicaorta. AJR Am J Roentgenol 2007;188:522-8.
102. SetserRM,KotysM,BolenMA,MuthupillaiR,FlammSD.Highresolu-
tionimagingoftherightventricle usingZOOMMRI.JCardiovascMagn
Reson 2010;12:M8.
103. UtzJA, HerfkensRJ, HeinsimerJA, ShimakawaA, GloverG,PelcN.
Valvularregurgitation: dynamicMRimaging. Radiology1988;168:91-4.
104. HundleyWG,LiHF,HillisLD,MeshackBM,LangeRA,WillardJE,etal.
Quantitation of cardiac output with velocity-encoded, phase-difference
magnetic resonance imaging. Am JCardiol 1995;75:1250-5.
105. BolenMA,PopovicZB,RajiahP,GabrielRS,ZurickAO,LieberML,
et al. Cardiac MR assessment of aortic regurgitation: holodiastolic flow
reversal in the descending aorta helps stratify severity. Radiology 2011;
260:98-104.
106. O’BrienKR,Gabriel RS, GreiserA, CowanBR, YoungAA, KerrAJ.
Aorticvalve stenoticarea calculationfromphase contrastcardiovascular
magnetic resonance: the importance of short echo time. J Cardiovasc
MagnReson2009;11:49.
107. HundleyWG,LiHF,LangeRA,PfeiferDP,MeshackBM,WillardJE,etal.
Assessment of left-to-right intracardiac shunting by velocity-encoded,
phase-difference magnetic resonance imaging. A comparison with oxi-
metric and indicatordilutiontechniques. Circulation 1995;91:2955-60.
108. HopeMD,MeadowsAK,HopeTA,OrdovasKG,SalonerD,ReddyGP,
et al.Clinicalevaluationofaorticcoarctationwith4D flowMRimaging.J
MagnResonImaging 2010;31:711-8.
109. HsiaoA,AlleyMT,MassabandP,HerfkensRJ,ChanFP,VasanawalaSS.
Improved cardiovascular flow quantification with time-resolved volu-
metric phase-contrast MRI. PediatrRadiol 2011;41:711-20.
110. FrancoisCJ,TuiteD,DeshpandeV,JerecicR,WealeP,CarrJC.Unen-
hanced MRangiography of the thoracic aorta:initial clinical evaluation.
AJR AmJ Roentgenol 2008;190:902-6.
111. CohenEI,WeinrebDB,SiegelbaumRH,HonigS,MarinM,WeintraubJL,
et al. Time-resolved MR angiography for the classification of endoleaks
after endovascular aneurysm repair. J Magn Reson Imaging 2008;27:
500-3.
112. Naehle CP, Kaestner r M, Muller A, , Willinek k WW, , Gieseke e J,
Schild HH, et al. First-pass and steady-state MR angiography of
thoracic vasculature in children and adolescents. JACC Cardiovasc
Imaging 2010;3:504-13.
113. BoonyasirinantT,RajiahP,SetserRM,LieberML,LeverHM,DesaiMY,
et al. Aortic stiffness is increased in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with
myocardial fibrosis: novel insights in vascular function from magnetic
resonance imaging. J Am Coll Cardiol 2009;54:255-62.
114. LaffonE,Galy-LacourC,LaurentF,DucassouD,MarthanR.MRIquan-
tification of the role of the reflected pressure wave on coronary and
ascending aorticbloodflow. Physiol Meas2003;24:681-92.
115. Efstathopoulos EP, , Patatoukas G, , Pantos s I, , Benekos s O, , Katritsis s D,
KelekisNL.Measurementofsystolicanddiastolicarterialwallshearstress
in the ascending aorta. PhysMed 2008;24:196-203.
116. SaremiF,GrizzardJD,KimRJ.OptimizingcardiacMRimaging:practical
remedies for artifacts. Radiographics2008;28:1161-87.
117. FerreiraPF,GatehousePD,MohiaddinRH,FirminDN.Cardiovascular
magneticresonance artefacts. J CardiovascMagnReson2013;15:41.
118. BansalRC,ChandrasekaranK,AyalaK,SmithDC.Frequencyandexpla-
nationoffalsenegative diagnosisofaorticdissectionby aortographyand
transesophageal echocardiography. J Am Coll Cardiol 1995;25:
1393-401.
119. ErbelR,EngberdingR,DanielW,RoelandtJ,VisserC,RennolletH.Echo-
cardiography in diagnosis of aorticdissection. Lancet 1989;1:457-61.
120. MooreAG,EagleKA,BruckmanD,MoonBS,MaloufJF,FattoriR,etal.
Choice of computed tomography, transesophageal echocardiography,
magneticresonance imaging, andaortographyinacute aortic dissection:
174 Goldstein et al
Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography
February 2015
C# PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in C#.net, ASP
Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; Add Image to PDF; VB.NET Protect: Add Password to VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word
add text box in pdf; how to add text box in pdf file
International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection (IRAD). Am J Cardiol
2002;89:1235-8.
121. NienaberCA,EagleKA.Aorticdissection:newfrontiersindiagnosisand
management: Part I: from etiology to diagnostic strategies. Circulation
2003;108:628-35.
122. ShigaT,WajimaZ,ApfelCC,InoueT,OheY.Diagnosticaccuracyof
transesophageal echocardiography, helical computed tomography, and
magnetic resonance imaging for suspected thoracic aortic dissection:
systematic review and meta-analysis. Arch Intern Med 2006;166:
1350-6.
123. SvenssonLG,LabibSB,EisenhauerAC,ButterlyJR.Intimaltearwithout
hematoma:an important variant of aortic dissectionthat canelude cur-
rent imaging techniques. Circulation 1999;99:1331-6.
124. vonKodolitschY,CsoszSK,KoschykDH,SchalwatI,LooseR,KarckM,
et al. Intramural hematoma of the aorta: predictors of progression to
dissection and rupture. Circulation2003;107:1158-63.
125. WeintraubAR,ErbelR,GorgeG,SchwartzSL,GeJ,GerberT,etal.Intra-
vascularultrasoundimaginginacute aorticdissection. JAmColl Cardiol
1994;24:495-503.
126. YamadaE,MatsumuraM,KyoS,OmotoR.Usefulnessofaprototype
intravascular ultrasound imaging in evaluation of aortic dissection and
comparisonwithangiographicstudy,transesophagealechocardiography,
computedtomography,and magneticresonance imaging. AmJ Cardiol
1995;75:161-5.
127. NienaberCA,KischeS, SkriabinaV,InceH.Noninvasiveimagingap-
proachestoevaluate thepatient withknownorsuspectedaorticdisease.
Circ Cardiovasc Imaging 2009;2:499-506.
128. VilacostaI,RomanJA.Acuteaorticsyndrome.Heart2001;85:365-8.
129. HaganPG, NienaberCA,IsselbacherEM, BruckmanD, KaraviteDJ,
Russman PL, et al. The International Registry of Acute AorticDissection
(IRAD):new insights into anolddisease. JAMA2000;283:897-903.
130. LansmanSL,SaundersPC,MalekanR,SpielvogelD.Acuteaorticsyn-
drome. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2010;140:S92-7. discussion
S142-S146.
131. MacuraKJ,CorlFM,FishmanEK,BluemkeDA.Pathogenesisinacute
aortic syndromes: aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, and pene-
trating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer. AJR Am J Roentgenol 2003;181:
309-16.
132. RamanathVS,OhJK,SundtTM3rd,EagleKA.Acuteaorticsyndromes
and thoracicaortic aneurysm. Mayo Clin Proc 2009;84:465-81.
133. Vilacosta I, , Aragoncillo o P, , Canadas s V, , San Roman n JA, , Ferreiros s J,
Rodriguez E. Acute aortic syndrome:a new look at anoldconundrum.
Heart 2009;95:1130-9.
134. HigginsCB.Modernimagingoftheacuteaorticsyndrome.AmJMed
2004;116:134.
135. MurashitaT,KuniharaT,ShiiyaN,AokiH,MyojinK,YasudaK.Ispres-
ervation of the aortic valve different between acute andchronic type A
aortic dissections? EurJ CardiothoracSurg 2001;20:967-72.
136. Pego-Fernandes PM, Stolf NA, Moreira a LF, , Pereira a Barreto o AC,
Bittencourt D,JateneAD. Management of aorticinsufficiencyinchronic
aortic dissection. Ann ThoracSurg 1991;51:438-42.
137. ShimonoT,KatoN,YasudaF,SuzukiT,YuasaU,OnodaK,etal.Trans-
luminal stent-graft placements for the treatments of acute onset and
chronic aortic dissections. Circulation 2002;106:I241-7.
138. Weber TF, , Ganten MK,BocklerD, GeisbuschP, Kopp-SchneiderA,
KauczorHU, etal.Assessmentofthoracicaorticconformational changes
byfour-dimensionalcomputedtomographyangiographyinpatientswith
chronic aorticdissection type b. EurRadiol 2009;19:245-53.
139. DeBakeyME,HenlyWS.Surgicaltreatmentofanginapectoris.Circula-
tion 1961;23:111-20.
140. DebakeyME,HenleyWS,CooleyDA, MorrisGCJr.,CrawfordES,
Beall AC Jr. SURGICAL MANAGEMENT OF DISSECTING ANEU-
RYSMS OF THE AORTA. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 1965;49:
130-49.
141. DeBakey ME, , Beall ACJ, Cooley y DA, Crawford ES, , Morris s GCJ,
Garrett HE, et al. Dissecting aneurysms of the aorta. Surg Clin North
Am1966;46:1045-55.
142. HirstAEJr.,JohnsVJJr.,KimeSWJr.Dissectinganeurysmoftheaorta:a
review of 505 cases. Medicine (Baltimore) 1958;37:217-79.
143. LevinsonDC,EdmaedesDT,GriffithGC.Dissectinganeurysmofthe
aorta; its clinical, electrocardiographic and laboratory features; a report
of 58 autopsiedcases. Circulation 1950;1:360-87.
144. BorstHG, HeinemannMK, Stone CD. Surgical Treatmentof Aortic
Dissection. New York: Churchill Livingstone; 1996.
145. CecconiM,ChirilloF,CostantiniC,IacoboneG,LopezE,ZanoliR,etal.
Theroleoftransthoracicechocardiographyinthe diagnosisandmanage-
ment of acute type A aortic syndrome. Am Heart J 2012;163:112-8.
146. Evangelista A, AveglianoG, AguilarR,CuellarH,Igual l A,Gonzalez-
Alujas T, et al. Impact of contrast-enhanced echocardiography on the
diagnostic algorithm of acute aortic dissection. Eur Heart J 2010;31:
472-9.
147. AdachiH,OmotoR,KyoS,MatsumuraM,KimuraS,TakamotoS,etal.
Emergency surgical interventionof acute aorticdissectionwith therapid
diagnosis by transesophageal echocardiography. Circulation 1991;84:
III14-9.
148. Ballal RS, , Nanda a NC, , Gatewood d R, , D’Arcy B, Samdarshi i TE,
Holman WL, et al. Usefulness of transesophageal echocardiography in
assessment of aorticdissection. Circulation 1991;84:1903-14.
149. GoldsteinSA.Echocardiographicevaluationofaorticdissection.Cardiac
UltrasoundToday 2001;7:167-80.
150. HashimotoS,KumadaT,OsakadaG,KuboS,TokunagaS,TamakiS,
et al. Assessment of transesophageal Doppler echography in dissecting
aortic aneurysm. J Am Coll Cardiol 1989;14:1253-62.
151. EvangelistaA,AguilarR,CuellarH,ThomasM,LaynezA,Rodriguez-
Palomares J, et al. Usefulness of real-time three-dimensional transoeso-
phageal echocardiographyinthe assessment ofchronicaorticdissection.
Eur J Echocardiogr 2011;12:272-7.
152. ErbelR,OelertH,MeyerJ,PuthM,Mohr-KatolyS,HausmannD,etal.
Effect of medical andsurgical therapy onaortic dissection evaluated by
transesophageal echocardiography. Implications for prognosis andther-
apy. TheEuropeanCooperativeStudyGrouponEchocardiography.Cir-
culation 1993;87:1604-15.
153. KeaneMG,WiegersSE,YangE,FerrariVA,StJohnSuttonMG,BavariaJE.
StructuraldeterminantsofaorticregurgitationintypeAdissectionandthe
roleof valvularresuspensionasdeterminedbyintraoperativetransesopha-
geal echocardiography. Am J Cardiol 2000;85:604-10.
154. EvangelistaA,DominguezR,SebastiaC,SalasA,Permanyer-MiraldaG,
AveglianoG, et al. Long-termfollow-up ofaorticintramural hematoma:
predictors of outcome. Circulation 2003;108:583-9.
155. EvangelistaA,DominguezR,SebastiaC,SalasA,Permanyer-MiraldaG,
AveglianoG, et al. Prognosticvalue ofclinical and morphologicfindings
inshort-termevolutionofaorticintramural haematoma.Therapeuticim-
plications. EurHeart J2004;25:81-7.
156. Appelbe AF, Walker r PG, , Yeoh h JK, , Bonitatibus A, , Yoganathan n AP,
MartinRP. Clinical significance and originof artifacts in transesophageal
echocardiography of the thoracic aorta. J Am Coll Cardiol 1993;21:
754-60.
157. Evangelista A, Garcia-del-Castillo H, , Gonzalez-Alujas s T, , Dominguez-
Oronoz R, Salas A, Permanyer-Miralda G, et al. Diagnosis of ascending
aortic dissection by transesophageal echocardiography: utility of M-
mode inrecognizing artifacts. JAm Coll Cardiol 1996;27:102-7.
158. LosiMA,BetocchiS,BriguoriC,ManganelliF,CiampiQ,PaceL,etal.
Determinants of aortic artifacts during transesophageal echocardiogra-
phy of the ascending aorta. Am Heart J1999;137:967-72.
159. VignonP,SpencerKT,RambaudG,PreuxPM,KraussD,BalasiaB,etal.
Differential transesophageal echocardiographicdiagnosisbetweenlinear
artifacts and intraluminal flap of aortic dissection or disruption. Chest
2001;119:1778-90.
160. HarrisKM,StraussCE,EagleKA,HirschAT,IsselbacherEM,TsaiTT,
et al. Correlates of delayed recognition and treatment of acute type A
aortic dissection: the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection
(IRAD). Circulation 2011;124:1911-8.
161. SommerT,FehskeW,HolzknechtN,SmekalAV,KellerE,LutterbeyG,
et al. Aortic dissection: a comparative study of diagnosiswith spiral CT,
Journal of the AmericanSociety of Echocardiography
Volume 28 Number2
Goldstein et al 175
multiplanar transesophageal echocardiography, and MR imaging. Radi-
ology 1996;199:347-52.
162. YoshidaS,AkibaH,TamakawaM,YamaN,HareyamaM,MorishitaK,
etal. ThoracicinvolvementoftypeAaorticdissectionandintramuralhe-
matoma:diagnosticaccuracy–comparisonof emergency helical CTand
surgical findings. Radiology 2003;228:430-5.
163. BurnsMA,MolinaPL,GutierrezFR,SagelSS.Motionartifactsimulating
aortic dissectionon CT. AJRAmJ Roentgenol 1991;157:465-7.
164. DuvernoyO,CouldenR,YtterbergC.Aorticmotion:apotentialpitfallin
CT imagingofdissectionintheascending aorta.JComputAssist Tomogr
1995;19:569-72.
165. QanadliSD,ElHajjamM,MesurolleB,LavisseL,JourdanO,RandouxB,
et al. Motion artifacts of the aorta simulating aortic dissection on spiral
CT. J Comput Assist Tomogr1999;23:1-6.
166. Zeman RK, Berman PM, Silverman n PM, , Davros s WJ, , Cooper C,
Kladakis AO, et al. Diagnosis of aortic dissection: value of helical CT
with multiplanar reformation and three-dimensional rendering. AJR
Am J Roentgenol 1995;164:1375-80.
167. AbbaraS,KalvaS,CuryRC,IsselbacherEM.Thoracicaorticdisease:
spectrum of multidetector computed tomography imaging findings. J
Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr 2007;1:40-54.
168. ShapiroMD, DoddJD,KalvaS, WittramC,HsuJ,NasirK,et al. A
comprehensive
electrocardiogram-gated
64-slice
multidetector
computed tomography imaging protocol to visualize the coronary ar-
teries, thoracic aorta, and pulmonary vasculature in a single breath
hold. JComput Assist Tomogr 2009;33:225-32.
169. CheongB,FlammSD.Useofelectrocardiographicgatingincomputed
tomographyangiographyoftheascendingthoracicaorta.JAmColl Car-
diol 2007;49:1751; author reply 1751-2.
170. ChungJH,GhoshhajraBB,RojasCA,DaveBR,AbbaraS.CTangiog-
raphy of the thoracicaorta. Radiol ClinNorthAm2010;48:249-64, vii.
171. DeSanctisRW,DoroghaziRM,AustenWG,BuckleyMJ.Aorticdissec-
tion. N Engl J Med 1987;317:1060-7.
172. GoettiR,BaumullerS,FeuchtnerG,StolzmannP,KarloC,AlkadhiH,
etal. High-pitchdual-sourceCTangiographyofthe thoracicandabdom-
inalaorta:issimultaneouscoronaryarteryassessmentpossible?AJRAmJ
Roentgenol 2010;194:938-44.
173. MoonMC,GreenbergRK,MoralesJP,MartinZ,LuQ,DowdallJF,etal.
Computed tomography-based anatomic characterization of proximal
aortic dissection with consideration for endovascular candidacy. J Vasc
Surg 2011;53:942-9.
174. YoshikaiM,IkedaK,ItohM,NoguchiR.Detectionofcoronaryarterydis-
ease in acute aortic dissection: the efficacy of 64-row multidetector
computed tomography. JCardSurg 2008;23:277-9.
175. DasKM,AbdouSM,El-MenyarA,KhulaifiAA,NabtiAL.Coronaryar-
tery dissection withrupture of aortic valve commissure following type A
aorticdissection:theroleof64-sliceMDCT.JCardSurg2008;23:548-50.
176. BeeresM,SchellB,MastragelopoulosA,HerrmannE,KerlJM,Gruber-
Rouh T,etal. High-pitchdual-source CTangiography ofthe wholeaorta
without ECG synchronisation: initial experience. Eur Radiol 2012;22:
129-37.
177. KarloC,LeschkaS,GoettiRP,FeuchtnerG,DesbiollesL,StolzmannP,
et al. High-pitch dual-source CT angiography of the aortic valve-aortic
root complex without ECG-synchronization. Eur Radiol 2011;21:
205-12.
178. WuestW,AndersK,SchuhbaeckA,MayMS,GaussS,MarwanM,etal.
Dual source multidetectorCT-angiography before Transcatheter Aortic
Valve Implantation (TAVI) using a high-pitch spiral acquisition mode.
EurRadiol 2012;22:51-8.
179. FujiokaC,HoriguchiJ,KiguchiM,YamamotoH,KitagawaT,ItoK.Sur-
vey of aorta and coronary arteries with prospective ECG-triggered
100-kV 64-MDCT angiography. AJR Am J Roentgenol 2009;193:
227-33.
180. AyaramD,BellolioMF,MuradMH,LaackTA,SadostyAT,ErwinPJ,
et al. Triple rule-out computed tomographic angiography for chest
pain: a diagnostic systematic review and meta-analysis. Acad Emerg
Med 2013;20:861-71.
181. PoonM,RubinGD,AchenbachS,AtteberyTW,BermanDS,BradyTJ,
et al. Consensus update onthe appropriate usage of cardiac computed
tomographic angiography. J Invasive Cardiol 2007;19:484-90.
182. CigarroaJE,IsselbacherEM,DeSanctisRW,EagleKA.Diagnosticimag-
ing in the evaluation of suspected aortic dissection. Old standards and
new directions. N Engl J Med 1993;328:35-43.
183. NienaberCA,SpielmannRP, vonKodolitschY,SiglowV,PiephoA,
JaupT, et al. Diagnosisof thoracicaorticdissection. Magnetic resonance
imaging versustransesophageal echocardiography. Circulation1992;85:
434-47.
184. vonKodolitschY,SimicO,NienaberCA.Aneurysmsoftheascending
aorta: diagnostic features and prognosis in patients with Marfan’s syn-
drome versus hypertension. ClinCardiol 1998;21:817-24.
185. ChangJM,FrieseK,CaputoGR,KondoC,HigginsCB.MRmeasure-
mentof bloodflowin the true andfalse channel inchronic aorticdissec-
tion. J Comput Assist Tomogr 1991;15:418-23.
186. NijmGM,SwirynS,LarsonAC,SahakianAV.Characterizationofthe
magnetohydrodynamiceffectas asignal fromthe surface electrocardio-
gramduringcardiacmagnetic resonance imaging. IEEE; 2006.
187. WilliamsDM,JoshiA,DakeMD,DeebGM,MillerDC,AbramsGD.
Aorticcobwebs:ananatomicmarkeridentifyingthefalse lumeninaortic
dissection–imaging and pathologic correlation. Radiology 1994;190:
167-74.
188. Fattori R, NienaberCA. MRIofacuteandchronicaorticpathology:
pre-operative and postoperative evaluation. J Magn Reson Imaging
1999;10:741-50.
189. PitcherA,CassarTE,LeesonP,FrancisJM,BlairE,WordsworthPB,etal.
Aorticdissection: visualisation of aorticbloodflow and quantification of
wall shearstress using time-resolved, 3D phase-contrast MRI. J Cardio-
vasc Magn Reson2011;13:1-2.
190. KrinskyG,RofskyN,FlyerM,GiangolaG,MayaM,DeCorotoD,etal.
Gadolinium-enhanced three-dimensional MR angiography of acquired
arch vessel disease. AJR AmJ Roentgenol 1996;167:981-7.
191. Zhu H, , Buck DG, Zhang g Z, Zhang H, Wang g P, Stenger r VA, et t al.
High temporal and spatial resolution 4D MRA using spiral data sam-
pling and sliding window reconstruction. Magn Reson Med 2004;52:
14-8.
192. CloughR,HussainT,UribeS,TaylorP,RezaviR,SchaeffterT,etal.An
MRI examination for evaluation of aorticdissection using a blood pool
agent. J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2010;12:O63.
193. MovsowitzHD,LevineRA,HilgenbergAD,IsselbacherEM.Transeso-
phageal echocardiographic description of the mechanisms of aortic
regurgitation in acute type A aortic dissection: implications for aortic
valve repair. JAm Coll Cardiol 2000;36:884-90.
194. LaCannaG,MaisanoF,DeMicheleL,GrimaldiA,GrassiF,CaprittiE,
et al. Determinants of the degree of functional aortic regurgitation in
patients with anatomically normal aortic valve and ascending thoracic
aorta aneurysm. Transoesophageal Doppler echocardiography study.
Heart 2009;95:130-6.
195. ArmstrongWF,BachDS,CareyL,ChenT,DonovanC,FalconeRA,
et al. Spectrumofacutedissectionoftheascending aorta:atransesopha-
geal echocardiographicstudy. JAmSoc Echocardiogr1996;9:646-56.
196. WhitleyW,TanakaKA,ChenEP,GlasKE.Acuteaorticdissectionwith
intimal layer prolapse into the left ventricle. Anesth Analg 2007;104:
774-6.
197. ParkKH,LimC,ChoiJH,ChungE,ChoiSI,ChunEJ,etal.Midterm
changeofdescendingaorticfalselumenafterrepairofacutetypeIdissec-
tion. Ann Thorac Surg 2009;87:103-8.
198. Tsai TT, Evangelista A, Nienaber CA, , Myrmel l T, Meinhardt G,
Cooper JV, et al. Partial thrombosis of the false lumen in patients with
acute type B aorticdissection. N Engl J Med2007;357:349-59.
199. Rousseau H, , Chabbert V, Maracher MA, El Aassar O, Auriol J,
MassabuauP, et al. The importanceof imaging assessment before endo-
vascular repair of thoracic aorta. Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg 2009;38:
408-21.
200. BartelT,EggebrechtH,MullerS,GutersohnA,BonattiJ,PachingerO,
et al.Comparisonofdiagnosticandtherapeuticvalue of transesophageal
176 Goldstein et al
Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography
February 2015
echocardiography, intravascular ultrasonic imaging, and intraluminal
phased-array imaging in aortic dissection with tear in the descending
thoracicaorta (type B). AmJ Cardiol 2007;99:270-4.
201. SwaminathanM,LinebergerCK,McCannRL,MathewJP.Theimpor-
tance ofintraoperative transesophageal echocardiographyinendovascu-
lar repairof thoracicaorticaneurysms. Anesth Analg 2003;97:1566-72.
202. ChavanA,HausmannD,DreslerC,RosenthalH,JaegerK,HaverichA,
et al. Intravascular ultrasound-guided percutaneous fenestration of the
intimal flapin the dissected aorta. Circulation 1997;96:2124-7.
203. LeeDY,WilliamsDM,AbramsGD.Thedissectedaorta:partII.Differ-
entiation of the true from the false lumen with intravascular US. Radi-
ology 1997;203:32-6.
204. WainRA,MarinML,OhkiT,SanchezLA,LyonRT,RozenblitA,etal.
Endoleaksafterendovasculargrafttreatment ofaorticaneurysms:classi-
fication, risk factors, and outcome. J Vasc Surg 1998;27:69-78; discus-
sion78-80.
205. KoschykDH,MeinertzT,HofmannT,KodolitschYV,DieckmannC,
Wolf W, et al. Value of intravascular ultrasound for endovascular
stent-graft placement in aortic dissection and aneurysm. J Card Surg
2003;18:471-7.
206. OrihashiK,MatsuuraY,SuedaT,WatariM,OkadaK,SugawaraY,etal.
Echocardiography-assisted surgery in transaortic endovascular stent
grafting:role oftransesophageal echocardiography.J ThoracCardiovasc
Surg 2000;120:672-8.
207. Bossone E, Evangelista A, , Isselbacher E, Trimarchi S, , Hutchison S,
Gilon D, et al. Prognostic role of transesophageal echocardiography in
acute type Aaorticdissection. AmHeart J2007;153:1013-20.
208. FattouchK,SampognaroR,NavarraE,CarusoM,PisanoC,CoppolaG,
et al. Long-term results after repair of type a acute aortic dissection ac-
cordingto false lumen patency. Ann Thorac Surg 2009;88:1244-50.
209. SongJM,KimSD,KimJH,KimMJ,KangDH,SeoJB,etal.Long-term
predictorsofdescendingaortaaneurysmal changeinpatientswithaortic
dissection. J Am Coll Cardiol 2007;50:799-804.
210. HataN,TanakaK,ImaizumiT,OharaT,OhbaT,ShinadaT,etal.Clinical
significance of pleural effusion in acute aortic dissection. Chest 2002;
121:825-30.
211. EvangelistaA,SalasA,RiberaA,Ferreira-GonzalezI,CuellarH,PinedaV,
et al. Long-term outcome of aortic dissection with patent false lumen:
predictive role of entry tear size and location. Circulation 2012;125:
3133-41.
212. KrukenbergE.Beitragezurfragedesaneurysmadissecans.BeitrPathol
Anat Allg Pathol 1920;67:329-51.
213. MurrayJG,ManisaliM,FlammSD,VanDykeCW,LieberML,LytleBW,
etal.Intramural hematomaof thethoracicaorta:MRimage findingsand
their prognostic implications. Radiology 1997;204:349-55.
214. BanningAP. Aorticintramural hematoma. N Engl J J Med 1997;337:
1476-7.
215. ChaoCP,WalkerTG,KalvaSP.NaturalhistoryandCTappearancesof
aortic intramural hematoma. Radiographics 2009;29:791-804.
216. O’Gara PT, DeSanctis s RW. Acute e aortic c dissection n and its s variants.
Toward a common diagnostic and therapeutic approach. Circulation
1995;92:1376-8.
217. ParkKH,LimC,ChoiJH,SungK,KimK,LeeYT,etal.Prevalenceof
aortic intimal defect in surgically treatedacute type A intramural hema-
toma. Ann Thorac Surg 2008;86:1494-500.
218. EvangelistaA,MukherjeeD,MehtaRH,O’GaraPT,FattoriR,CooperJV,
et al. Acute intramural hematoma of the aorta: a mystery in evolution.
Circulation 2005;111:1063-70.
219. Ionescu AA, , Vinereanu u D, , Wood d A, , Fraser AG. Periaortic fat pad
mimicking an intramural hematoma of the thoracic aorta: lessons for
transesophageal echocardiography. J Am Soc Echocardiogr 1998;11:
487-90.
220. SueyoshiE,MatsuokaY,SakamotoI,UetaniM,HayashiK,NarimatsuM.
Fate of intramural hematoma of the aorta: CT evaluation. J Comput
Assist Tomogr1997;21:931-8.
221. KitaiT,KajiS,YamamuroA,TaniT,KinoshitaM,EharaN,etal.Detec-
tionof intimal defect by 64-rowmultidetectorcomputedtomographyin
patients with acute aortic intramural hematoma. Circulation 2011;124:
S174-8.
222. WuMT,WangYC,HuangYL,ChangRS,LiSC,YangP,etal.Intramural
bloodpoolsaccompanying aorticintramural hematoma:CTappearance
andnatural course. Radiology 2011;258:705-13.
223. Braverman AC. Penetrating atheroscleroticulcersof the aorta. Curr
Opin Cardiol 1994;9:591-7.
224. ChoKR,StansonAW,PotterDD,CherryKJ,SchaffHV.SundtTMr.Pene-
trating atherosclerotic ulcer of the descending thoracicaorta and arch. J
ThoracCardiovascSurg2004;127:1393-9; discussion1399-1401.
225. CookeJP,KazmierFJ,OrszulakTA.Thepenetratingaorticulcer:patho-
logicmanifestations, diagnosis, andmanagement. MayoClinProc1988;
63:718-25.
226. HayashiH,MatsuokaY,SakamotoI,SueyoshiE,OkimotoT,HayashiK,
et al. Penetrating atherosclerotic ulcerof the aorta:imaging featuresand
disease concept. Radiographics 2000;20:995-1005.
227. Vilacosta I, San Roman JA, , Aragoncillo o P, Ferreiros J, Mendez R,
Graupner C, et al. Penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer: documenta-
tion by transesophageal echocardiography. JAmColl Cardiol 1998;32:
83-9.
228. QuintLE,WilliamsDM,FrancisIR,MonaghanHM,SonnadSS,PatelS,
et al. Ulcerlikelesionsof the aorta:imaging featuresandnatural history.
Radiology 2001;218:719-23.
229. Vilacosta I, San Roman JA, Ferreiros J, Aragoncillo P, Mendez R,
CastilloJA,etal.Natural historyandserial morphologyofaorticintramu-
ralhematoma:anovelvariantofaorticdissection.AmHeartJ1997;134:
495-507.
230. TristanoAG,TairouzY.Painlessrighthemorrhagicpleuraleffusionsas
presentation sign of aortic dissecting aneurysm. Am J Med 2005;118:
794-5.
231. Stanson AW, Kazmier FJ, , Hollier r LH, Edwards WD, Pairolero o PC,
Sheedy PF, et al. Penetrating atheroscleroticulcers of thethoracicaorta:
natural historyandclinicopathologiccorrelations.AnnVascSurg1986;1:
15-23.
232. CoadyMA,RizzoJA,HammondGL,PierceJG,KopfGS,ElefteriadesJA.
Penetrating ulcerof the thoracicaorta: what is it? Howdowe recognize
it? How do we manage it? J Vasc Surg 1998;27:1006-16; discussion
1015–6.
233. HarrisJA,BisKG,GloverJL,BendickPJ,ShettyA,BrownOW.Pene-
tratingatherosclerotic ulcersof theaorta.J VascSurg1994;19:90-8;dis-
cussion 98–9.
234. KazerooniEA,BreeRL,WilliamsDM.Penetratingatheroscleroticulcers
of the descending thoracic aorta: evaluation with CT and distinction
fromaortic dissection. Radiology 1992;183:759-65.
235. TroxlerM, MavorAI,Homer-VanniasinkamS.Penetratingatheroscle-
rotic ulcers of the aorta. BrJ Surg 2001;88:1169-77.
236. Yucel EK, Steinberg FL, Egglin TK, , Geller r SC, Waltman AC,
Athanasoulis CA. Penetrating aortic ulcers:diagnosis with MRimaging.
Radiology 1990;177:779-81.
237. WelchTJ, StansonAW, SheedyPF2nd,JohnsonCM, McKusick MA.
Radiologic evaluation of penetrating aortic atherosclerotic ulcer. Radio-
graphics1990;10:675-85.
238. BischoffMS,GeisbuschP,PetersAS,Hyhlik-DurrA,BocklerD.Pene-
trating aorticulcer:definingrisks andtherapeuticstrategies. Herz 2011;
36:498-504.
239. LitmanovichD,BankierAA,CantinL,RaptopoulosV,BoisellePM.CT
and MRI in diseases of the aorta. AJR Am J Roentgenol 2009;193:
928-40.
240. Salvolini L,RendaP,FioreD,ScaglioneM,PiccoliG,Giovagnoni A.
Acute aortic syndromes: Role of multi-detector row CT. Eur J Radiol
2008;65:350-8.
241. LedbetterS,StukJL,KaufmanJA.Helical(spiral)CTintheevaluationof
emergent thoracic aortic syndromes. Traumatic aortic rupture, aortic
aneurysm, aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, and penetrating
atherosclerotic ulcer. Radiol ClinNorth Am 1999;37:575-89.
242. LevyJR,HeikenJP,GutierrezFR.Imagingofpenetratingatherosclerotic
ulcersof the aorta. AJRAm J Roentgenol 1999;173:151-4.
Journal of the AmericanSociety of Echocardiography
Volume 28 Number2
Goldstein et al 177
243. IsselbacherEM.Thoracicandabdominalaorticaneurysms.Circulation
2005;111:816-28.
244. Johnston KW, Rutherford RB, Tilson MD, Shah h DM, , Hollier r L,
StanleyJC.Suggestedstandardsforreportingonarterial aneurysms. Sub-
committee on Reporting Standards for Arterial Aneurysms, Ad Hoc
Committee on Reporting Standards, Society for Vascular Surgery and
North American Chapter, International Society for Cardiovascular Sur-
gery. J VascSurg 1991;13:452-8.
245. CoadyMA,RizzoJA,HammondGL,KopfGS,ElefteriadesJA.Surgical
intervention criteria for thoracic aortic aneurysms: a study of growth
rates and complications. Ann ThoracSurg 1999;67:1922-6; discussion
1953-8.
246. LaCannaG,FicarraE,TsagalauE,NardiM,MorandiniA,ChieffoA,
et al. Progression rate of ascending aortic dilation in patients with nor-
mally functioning bicuspid and tricuspid aortic valves. Am J Cardiol
2006;98:249-53.
247. Michelena HI, Desjardins VA, Avierinos s JF, , Russo o A, , Nkomo o VT,
SundtTM, et al. Natural history of asymptomaticpatients withnormally
functioning orminimally dysfunctional bicuspidaorticvalveinthe com-
munity. Circulation 2008;117:2776-84.
248. TzemosN,TherrienJ,YipJ,ThanassoulisG,TremblayS,JamorskiMT,
et al. Outcomes in adults with bicuspid aorticvalves. JAMA 2008;300:
1317-25.
249. DaviesRR,GoldsteinLJ,CoadyMA,TittleSL,RizzoJA,KopfGS,etal.
Yearly rupture or dissection rates for thoracic aorticaneurysms: simple
prediction based on size. Ann Thorac Surg 2002;73:17-27; discussion
27-8.
250. PalomoAR,SchragerBR,ChahineRA.Anomalousoriginoftheright
coronary artery from the ascending aorta high above the left posterior
sinus of Valsalvaof abicuspidaorticvalve.AmHeartJ 1985;109:902-4.
251. UnderwoodMJ,ElKhouryG,DeronckD,GlineurD,DionR.Theaortic
root: structure, function, and surgical reconstruction. Heart 2000;83:
376-80.
252. SvenssonLG,AdamsDH,BonowRO, KouchoukosNT, MillerDC,
O’GaraPT,etal. Aorticvalveandascendingaortaguidelinesformanage-
ment andquality measures. Ann ThoracSurg 2013;95:S1-66.
253. Loeys BL, , Dietz HC, Braverman n AC, Callewaert t BL, De e Backer r J,
Devereux RB, et al. The revised Ghent nosology for the Marfan syn-
drome. J Med Genet 2010;47:476-85.
254. AmmashNM,SundtTM,ConnollyHM. Marfansyndrome-diagnosis
and management. Curr Probl Cardiol 2008;33:7-39.
255. Gautier M, Detaint t D, Fermanian n C, , Aegerter r P, Delorme G,
Arnoult F, et al. Nomograms for aortic root diameters in children us-
ing two-dimensional echocardiography. Am J Cardiol 2010;105:
888-94.
256. HjerrildBE,MortensenKH,SorensenKE,PedersenEM,AndersenNH,
Lundorf E, et al. ThoracicaortopathyinTurnersyndrome andthe influ-
ence of bicuspidaorticvalvesandbloodpressure:aCMRstudy. JCardi-
ovascMagnReson2010;12:12.
257. HoVB,BakalovVK,CooleyM,VanPL,HoodMN,BurklowTR,etal.
Major vascular anomalies in Turner syndrome: prevalence and mag-
neticresonance angiographic features. Circulation 2004;110:1694-700.
258. MaturaLA,HoVB,RosingDR,BondyCA.Aorticdilatationanddissec-
tion in Turnersyndrome. Circulation2007;116:1663-70.
259. LoeysBL,ChenJ,NeptuneER,JudgeDP,PodowskiM,HolmT,etal.A
syndrome of altered cardiovascular, craniofacial, neurocognitive and
skeletal development caused by mutations in TGFBR1 or TGFBR2.
Nat Genet 2005;37:275-81.
260. LoeysBL,SchwarzeU,HolmT,CallewaertBL,ThomasGH,PannuH,
etal.Aneurysmsyndromescaused by mutations inthe TGF-betarecep-
tor. N Engl J Med2006;355:788-98.
261. JohnsonPT,ChenJK,LoeysBL,DietzHC,FishmanEK.Loeys-Dietzsyn-
drome: MDCTangiography findings. AJR Am J Roentgenol 2007;189:
W29-35.
262. AlbornozG,CoadyMA,RobertsM,DaviesRR,TranquilliM,RizzoJA,
et al. Familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections–incidence,
modes of inheritance, and phenotypic patterns. Ann Thorac Surg
2006;82:1400-5.
263. Regalado E, , Medrek k S, Tran-Fadulu u V, , Guo o DC, , Pannu u H,
Golabbakhsh H, et al. Autosomal dominant inheritance of a predisposi-
tion to thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections and intracranial
saccular aneurysms. AmJ Med Genet A2011;155A:2125-30.
264. PepinM,SchwarzeU,Superti-FurgaA,ByersPH.Clinicalandgenetic
features of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV, the vascular type. N Engl
JMed 2000;342:673-80.
265. FazelSS,MallidiHR,LeeRS,SheehanMP,LiangD,FleischmanD,etal.
The aortopathy of bicuspid aortic valve disease has distinctive patterns
and usually involves the transverse aortic arch. J Thorac Cardiovasc
Surg 2008;135:901-7. 907.e1-2.
266. HolmesKW,LehmannCU,DalalD,NasirK,DietzHC,RavekesWJ,
et al. Progressive dilationofthe ascendingaorta inchildrenwith isolated
bicuspidaortic valve. Am JCardiol 2007;99:978-83.
267. KariFA,FazelSS,MitchellRS,FischbeinMP,MillerDC.Bicuspidaortic
valve configuration and aortopathy pattern might represent different
pathophysiologic substrates. J ThoracCardiovasc Surg 2012;144:516-7.
268. Michelena HI, , Khanna a AD, Mahoney D, , Margaryan n E, Topilsky Y,
Suri RM,et al.Incidence ofaorticcomplicationsinpatientswithbicuspid
aortic valves. JAMA2011;306:1104-12.
269. SchaeferBM,LewinMB,StoutKK,GillE,PrueittA,ByersPH,etal.The
bicuspid aortic valve: an integrated phenotypic classification of leaflet
morphology and aorticroot shape. Heart 2008;94:1634-8.
270. SiuSC,SilversidesCK.Bicuspidaorticvalvedisease.JAmCollCardiol
2010;55:2789-800.
271. SchievinkWI,RaissiSS,MayaMM,VelebirA.Screeningforintracranial
aneurysms in patients with bicuspid aortic valve. Neurology 2010;74:
1430-3.
272. FerencikM,PapeLA.Changesinsizeofascendingaortaandaorticvalve
function with time in patients with congenitally bicuspid aortic valves.
AmJ Cardiol 2003;92:43-6.
273. PlaisanceBR,WinklerMA, Attili AK,Sorrell VL.Congenital bicuspid
aortic valve first presenting as an aortic aneurysm. Am J Med 2012;
125:e5-7.
274. DotyDB.Anomalousoriginoftheleftcircumflexcoronaryarteryasso-
ciated with bicuspid aortic valve. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2001;122:
842-3.
275. HigginsCB,WexlerL.Reversalofdominanceofthecoronaryarterial
system in isolated aortic stenosis and bicuspid aortic valve. Circulation
1975;52:292-6.
276. HutchinsGM, NazarianIH,BulkleyBH. Associationofleftdominant
coronaryarterialsystem withcongenital bicuspidaortic valve. Am JCar-
diol 1978;42:57-9.
277. RobertsWC.Thecongenitallybicuspidaorticvalve.Astudyof85au-
topsy cases. Am JCardiol 1970;26:72-83.
278. XenikakisT, MalliotakisP, BarbetakisN,ManousakisE,HassoulasJ.
Congenital malformations of the aortic root: bicuspid aortic valve in
combination with unruptured aneurysm of the left sinus of Valsalva
and aberrant left coronary artery. Hellenic J Cardiol 2008;49:
288-91.
279. BinerS,RafiqueAM,RayI,CukO,SiegelRJ,TolstrupK.Aortopathyis
prevalentinrelativesofbicuspidaortic valve patients.JAmColl Cardiol
2009;53:2288-95.
280. CookCC,GleasonTG.Greatvesselandcardiactrauma.SurgClinNorth
Am 2009;89:797-820, viii.
281. LoperaJE, RestrepoCS, GonzalesA,TrimmerCK,ArkoF.Aortoiliac
vascular injuries after misplacement of fixation screws. J Trauma 2010;
69:870-5.
282. BurackJH,KandilE,SawasA,O’NeillPA,SclafaniSJ,LoweryRC,etal.
Triage and outcome of patients with mediastinal penetrating trauma.
AnnThorac Surg 2007;83:377-82; discussion 382.
283. Dosios TJ, SalemisN, Angouras D, NonasE. Blunt andpenetrating
trauma of the thoracicaorta and aorticarch branches: anautopsystudy.
JTrauma 2000;49:696-703.
178 Goldstein et al
Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography
February 2015
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested