open pdf file in c# windows application : How to add text to pdf file SDK software API wpf windows azure sharepoint 20907402-part943

21
SECTION 3
SMES AND REGULATORY REFORM
The regulatory burden
A review  of the regulations that  govern the establishment of an enterprise is of  particular
relevance for creating a favourable regulatory environment and should be at the forefront of the overall
economic policy agenda.  One of the effects of such regulations is that they appear to discourage the
creation of new technology-based firms and innovative start-ups which are important for employment
growth, technological change and innovation.
1
Establishing a relationship between regulation and a firm’s competitive capacity is particularly
arduous in the case of SMEs.  Regulatory regimes will have very different impacts from one firm to
another.  While empirical studies may shed light on the problems of a particular category of SMEs, it will
be hard to draw general lessons.
Analysis suggests that, while some regulations may deliberately favour SMEs (many regulations
exclude the smallest firms), in general the adverse impact of regulations on SMEs can be particularly
harmful.  This is because SMEs are less equipped to deal with problems arising from regulations since
they  have  less  capacity  than  larger  firms  to  navigate  through  the  complexities  of  regulatory  and
bureaucratic networks.  SMEs are more likely to be hampered by regulations because their strength stems
from their flexibility.  Some regulations designed to prevent entry into the market by dynamic SMEs are
particularly detrimental.
Furthermore, due to its “fixed-cost” nature, the cost burden of regulation is larger for small firms
than for larger firms:  i.e. administrative costs entailed in compliance have a disproportionate effect on
small firms.  In many cases compliance is based on an initial fixed, standard cost for all firms, irrespective
of size, followed by a sliding scale, related to increasing size.  This means that average compliance costs
per employee are much higher for small firms.  For instance, in the case of the Netherlands, of the
Gld 7 billion  spent  annually  on  meeting  administrative  obligations,  companies  employing  between
0-4 workers were required to pay annual administrative costs of around Gld 4 000 per employee, whereas
for companies employing over 500 staff, the equivalent cost per employee was only Gld 200.
2
Table 3.1,
using a different study, confirms the progressive increase of costs for smaller firms.
A major consequence of the asymmetric rise in fixed costs is not only the diversion of scarce
financial resources away from productive investment, but also, and equally important, the absorption of
management time.  Both are critical for SMEs.  Investment ability may be compromised if the cost of
1.
OECD (1996), SMEs:  Employment, Innovation and Growth -- The Washington Workshop, Paris.
2.
OECD (1995), “Reducing the Regulatory Burden on Business in the Netherlands:  How Can This be
Achieved?”, Best Practice Policies for Small and Medium-sized Enterprises, Paris.
How to add text to pdf file - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text pdf acrobat; how to add text to pdf
How to add text to pdf file - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to add text box to pdf; how to add text fields in a pdf
22
compliance to regulation deflects an excessive amount of resources, including capital as well as current
expenditure.  Absorption of management time implies that scarce managerial resources cannot be used for
directing the strategy and managing the operations of the enterprise.
Table 3.1  The average costs of administrative burdens per size class, enterprise and
employee in the Netherlands, 1993 (in ECU)
Number of employees
Costs per enterprise
Costs per employee
0
2 800
--
1-9
12 100
3 500
10-19
20 500
1 500
20-29
47 100
1 400
50-99
62 000
900
100 or more
171 000
600
All size classes
9 800
Source: 
“Administratieve lasten bedrijven 1993” (Administrative Burdens in Enterprises 1993), EIM Small Business
Research and Consultancy, 1994, cited in The European Observatory for SMEs (1995), 
Third Annual Report
, p. 287.
Finally,  the impact of regulation  on operational  flexibility  is likely  to  have  a  particularly
negative impact on smaller firms.  In one survey of the industrial cleaning sector, which is dominated by
SMEs and in which “success” is strongly influenced by flexibility, 83 per cent of the companies surveyed
linked regulations to the inability to expand their business operations.
Required policy measures
Improving the information available to SMEs
Reducing administrative and regulatory burdens would constitute a major improvement in the
business environment for SMEs.  The majority of OECD Member countries have implemented measures
to achieve this goal by reducing red tape, simplifying administrative procedures, streamlining and/or
eliminating  regulations,  improving  the  information  available  to  enterprises  about  administrative
obligations, drawing up special rules for those enterprises (usually smaller enterprises) that are most
affected by administrative burdens, improving the quality of regulations, etc.
Nevertheless, and despite the fact that the cost and complexity of regulations are recognised as
having a particularly adverse impact on SMEs, little data is available regarding regulatory burdens on
business categorised by firm size.
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
how to input text in a pdf; how to enter text in pdf form
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = true; // Add password to PDF file.
adding text to pdf in preview; how to add text to pdf file with reader
23
Table 3.2  Summary of selected evidence of costs of regulation
What is being measured?
Cost estimates
Source
Administrative costs to firms and citizens
“Tax operating costs” for firms
(administrative and compliance costs of
taxation) in the United Kingdom
More than 5 billion pounds sterling/year
(1986-87), or 4% of total tax revenue
(1.5% of GDP).
58 pounds/employee for firms with 1-5
employees, 11 pounds/employee for
firms with over 500 employees.
Sandford, Cedrick (1989) Administrative
and Compliance Costs of Taxation, Bath
Centre for Fiscal Studies, Fiscal
Publications, UK
Costs of paperwork and operational
requirements of regulation (excluding
capital costs).
Clerical cost and time, in firms, due to
regulatory requirements.
Two-thirds of firms in US spend an
average of $17 000 per employee on
regulatory compliance .
US firms with 1-4 workers spend $2 080
per employee, firms with 500-999 spend
$120 per employee.
Hopkins, Thomas (1995) A Survey of
Regulatory Burdens, Report to the US
Small Business Administration, June,
Washington, DC
Measure of recurrent direct costs of
federal government information
requirements to small and medium
enterprises in Canada.
Businesses with fewer than five
employees spend 8% of revenues on
federal information requirements;
with 5-19 employees, 3.8%
with 20-49 employees, 2.4%
with 50-99, under 2%
“Federal Information Costs for a Panel of
Small and Medium Enterprises”, Final
Report by Information Management and
Economics, Inc., Toronto, Ontario,
December 1995.
Direct compliance costs
Direct compliance costs to small
businesses (less than 20 people),
including paperwork, fees, and new
equipment purchases, of compliance with
five sectors of regulation in Queensland,
Australia
Annualised average compliance cost per
small business is A$ 17 094.
Road freight transport showed the highest
costs.
Australia, State of Queensland (1996)
Final Report: Impact of the Cost of
Compliance with Government
Regulations, Licences, Taxes, and
Chargers on Small Businesses in
Queensland, prepared for the Department
of Tourism, Small Business, and Industry
(19 August).
Source
: OECD (1997), 
Issues and Developments in Public Management: Survey 1996-97,
PUMA, pp. 69-70, Paris.
There is a need for more (and more appropriate) data in order to create a regulatory regime that
takes account of the characteristics of SMEs.  Such data could enable young and dynamic SMEs to gain a
voice in the political arena as regards their specific needs and problems:  thereby alleviating the tendency
of gearing regulatory reform to the requirements of large firms or to well organised groups of small firms.
Creating an SME environment conducive to R&D
To the extent that costs for R&D, technology generation and meeting associated standards are
high or increasing more rapidly than other costs, smaller firms and businesses may, due to inadequate
resources, be (increasingly) excluded from R&D and technology development.
This suggests that consideration be given to such issues as:  i) ensuring, wherever possible, that
compliance procedures associated with R&D and new technologies are not unnecessarily costly, complex,
or long;  and ii) that competition regulations do not prevent SMEs from achieving economies of scale in
R&D through consortia.
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to PDF; C# Protect: Add Password
how to insert text into a pdf with acrobat; add text block to pdf
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats through VB
how to enter text into a pdf form; how to enter text in a pdf document
24
Providing broader access to information on regulations
As competition increases, and flexibility and the ability to respond to changing demand and
supply conditions become even more crucial, continuous reconfiguration of enterprise resources is an
increasingly important component of firm strategy.  This calls for access to information, and the requisite
resources not only to acquire that information but also to assimilate and act upon it.  At the same time,
there may be economies of scale in acquiring, assimilating and using information (including information
about  regulations),  thus  disfavouring  smaller  business  units.    Policy  implications  may  include:
i) facilitating the availability of information in the public domain of relevance to firm strategies and
behaviour, and making sure that no unnecessary regulatory burdens exist which are exacerbated by small
size, thus hindering access to such information;  ii) where such information is not formalised, ensuring
that mechanisms exist to codify and widely distribute it without regulatory hindrance;  and iii) ensuring
that regulatory procedures do not create needlessly high thresholds to access or use information that is, in
principle, widely available and essential for business performance.
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
add text to pdf in acrobat; add text boxes to pdf
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
using RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic; using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Have a try with this sample C#.NET code to add an image to the first page of PDF file.
adding text to pdf file; adding text to pdf document
25
SECTION 4
PUBLIC SUPPORT TO SMES
Public support to industry in the OECD area
According to OECD data, public support grew by 25 per cent in nominal terms from 1989 to
1993.  Table 4.1 shows that nominal net expenditure rose from US$37 billion in 1989 to US$47 billion in
1993.  This upward trend should be even more significant when 1992 and 1993 data for certain large
support programmes becomes available.  These figures underscore that  the persisting  importance of
subsidies as an instrument of structural policy in OECD Member countries was largely outweighed by
stronger support in all other areas.
The overall trend masks considerable diversity in spending, however.  Support declined in only
one-third  of  participating  countries,  while  it  grew  in  the  remaining  two-thirds.    Regarding  policy
objectives, regional development almost doubled in the period under review and was the predominant
cause of the observed increase in public support.  Table 4.1 shows reductions in the areas of sectoral aid,
investment incentives and SMEs.
Support programmes for SMEs
One-quarter of all support programmes in OECD countries primarily target SMEs.  More than
one-third of all programmes included in the database have been designed to at least partly assist SMEs.
Of the programmes primarily targeting SMEs, slightly less than 10 per cent were designed exclusively to
finance the provision or acquisition of advisory and consultancy services.  Other programmes addressed
SME financing, offering soft loans and guarantees for start-ups, equipment modernisation and/or R&D
and technological innovation.  Job creation and training, as well as export promotion, are specified in
relatively few programmes.  However, several countries dedicated more than 50 per cent of their support
programmes to SMEs.
In terms of expenditure, support to SMEs ranked fourth at both the beginning and the end of the
period.  In terms of Net Cost to Government (NCG), SME support accounted for US$5.4 billion in 1989
and US$6.0 billion in 1990, before steadily dropping back to US$3.7 billion in 1993 (Table 4.2).  This
sharp decline is mainly the result of the reduction of one important SME programme.
Ten programmes accounted for approximately 50 per cent of the total Net Cost to Government
recorded under this policy objective.  The average support of the remainder was close to US$ 6 million in
1993.    Only  under  the  policy  objective  of  environmental  protection  was  the  average  funding  by
programme at an equally low level.  This implies that there is potential for integrating these programmes
into a smaller number with a wider scope, facilitating their understanding and implementation by SMEs,
and reducing administrative costs for governments.
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Also able to uncompress PDF file in VB.NET programs. Offer flexible and royalty-free developing library license for VB.NET programmers to compress PDF file.
adding text to pdf form; how to enter text into a pdf
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
adding text to a pdf in preview; add text box in pdf
26
Table 4.1  Reported expenditures and programmes by policy objective
Programmes
NCG
3
in current prices; million US dollars
Policy objective
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
Sectoral
147
4 449
4 923
5 813
5 194
3 388
% share
10.2
12.1
11.7
12.1
11.1
7.4
Crisis aid
53
1 625
668
875
585
3 188
% share
3.7
4.4
1.6
1.8
1.3
6.9
R&D & tech. innovation
269
6 369
7 864
9 102
9 976
8 677
% share
18.7
17.3
18.7
19.0
21.4
18.9
Regional development
213
8 510
9 803
1 4049
14 863
15 386
% share
14.8
23.1
23.3
29.3
31.8
33.4
Investment
148
2 953
2 805
2 767
2 396
2 594
% share
10.3
8.0
6.7
5.8
5.1
5.6
SMEs
359
5 432
6 031
4 340
4 693
3 750
% share
25.0
14.7
14.4
9.0
10.0
8.1
Export & foreign trade
118
6 883
8 973
9 920.2
7 813.4
7 267.8
% share
8.2
18.7
21.4
20.7
16.7
15.8
Energy efficiency
64
436
620
840
866
1 443
% share
4.5
1.2
1.5
1.8
1.9
3.1
Environment
66
249
338
276
329
333
% share
4.6
0.7
0.8
0.6
0.7
0.7
Total
1 437
36 906
42 025
47 983
46 717
46 028
Note
 All programmes are categorised according to their primary objectives.
Compared to the large numbers of SMEs in the OECD area, evidence shows that few SMEs
benefited from SME support programmes, and that the expenditure per benefiting company represented
only very small amounts.
In addition, the profile of support to SMEs has the following characteristics:
 sub-central levels of government (sub-central, regional and local) administer 52 per cent of
SME support programmes, while a further 10 per cent are managed jointly by central and
sub-central authorities;
 loans, tax concessions and  grants are the  principal financing  instruments for  delivering
support to SMEs;  and
 concerning the specific economic activities  supported by SME  programmes,  investment
costs initially attracted a large share of overall support.
The high number of programmes, and the low level of average funding per programme raises
questions regarding administrative costs
4
.  Almost 70 per cent of the programmes reported had a duration
of five years or more.  In fact, the turnover in the stock of SME support programmes was the least
3.
NCG measures the Net Cost to Government generated by a support programme.
4.
Total  cost  of  public  support  programmes  are  composed  of  the  Net  Cost  to  Government  plus  the
administrative costs.  The latter have not been taken into account in the tables.
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
page of your defined page number which starts from 0. For example, your original PDF file contains 4 pages. C# DLLs: Split PDF Document. Add necessary references
how to add text to a pdf document using acrobat; how to add text to a pdf document using reader
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
by directly tagging the second PDF file to the target one, this PDF file merge function VB.NET Project: DLLs for Merging PDF Documents. Add necessary references
add text pdf professional; how to add text fields in a pdf
27
dynamic  among  all  policy  areas.    The  relative  high  stability  in  the  stock  of  programmes  appears
problematic with respect to the responsiveness of programmes to changing policy priorities.
Table 4.2  Support patterns of small and medium-sized enterprises programmes
Programmes
(% Share)
NCG current million $
(% Share)
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
Total
359
5 426.0
6 019.2
4 325.2
4 674.6
3 734.9
Financing instrument
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
Grant
99
397.7
449.8
496.6
1 045.9
529.5
(27.6%)
(7.3%)
(7.5%)
(11.5%)
(22.4%)
(14.2%)
Interest rate subsidy
22
646.3
475.5
513.0
720.9
423.7
(6.1%)
(11.9%)
(7.9%)
(11.9%)
(15.4%)
(11.3%)
Loan
155
665.2
1 450.8
1 096.4
1 061.3
952.8
(43.2%)
(12.3%)
(24.1%)
(25.3%)
(22.7%)
(25.5%)
Guarantee
28
220.4
244.6
156.4
118.3
161.6
(7.8%)
(4.1%)
(4.1%)
(3.6%)
(2.5%)
(4.3%)
Equity capital
5
0.9
0.8
1.1
1.5
1.2
(1.4%)
(0.0%)
(0.0%)
(0.0%)
(0.0%)
(0.0%)
Tax concession
20
3 316.9
3 172.5
1 836.0
1 453.5
1 317.7
(5.6%)
(61.1%)
(52.7%)
(42.4%)
(31.1%)
(35.3%)
Mixed
29
174.0
220.1
220.5
268.3
344.4
(8.1%)
(3.2%)
(3.7%)
(5.1%)
(5.7%)
(9.2%)
Unclassified
1
4.6
5.1
5.2
4.9
4.0
(0.3%)
(0.1%)
(0.1%)
(0.1%)
(0.1%)
(0.1%)
Economic activities
supported
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
Production
56
364.5
574.7
359.6
316.3
359.8
(15.6%)
(6.7%)
(9.5%)
(8.3%)
(6.8%)
(9.6%)
Investment
124
1 870.8
2 194.2
1 941.9
1 817.3
1 239.5
(34.5%)
(34.5%)
(36.5%)
(44.9%)
(38.9%)
(33.2%)
Specialised investment
120
471.3
557.1
495.2
499.3
558.3
(33.4%)
(8.7%)
(9.3%)
(11.4%)
(10.7%)
(14.9%)
R&D
15
20.7
32.3
34.3
552.0
57.0
(4.2%)
(0.4%)
(0.5%)
(0.8%)
(11.8%)
(1.5%)
Transportation
0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
(0.0%)
(0.0%)
(0.0%)
(0.0%)
(0.0%)
(0.0%)
Non-profit institution
20
115.8
118.1
129.1
157.9
154.9
(5.6%)
(2.1%)
(2.0%)
(3.0%)
(3.4%)
(4.1%)
Unclassified
24
2 583.0
2 542.9
1 365.2
1 331.8
1 365.4
(6.7%)
(47.6%)
(42.2%)
(31.6%)
(28.5%)
(36.6%)
SME programmes by national treatment
SME programmes by programme duration
84%
4%
4%
8%
All Domes
t
ic
Wo
r
ldwide
N
at
ion
a
l Only
Uncl
a
ssified
68%
18%
3%
5%
6%
Ongoing
New
New/Sunse
tt
ing
Sunse
tt
ing
Uncl
a
ssified
Source:  OECD Industrial Support Database, April 1996.
28
SECTION 5
INNOVATIVE SMES
“Technological progress is not translated into economic benefits and jobs by governments,
countries, or sectors, but by innovative firms.  Innovative firms are not superior algorithms to maximise
production functions, but efficient learning organisations that seize technological and market opportunities
creatively in order to expand production frontiers.  The single most important finding of recent economic
research might be  that  new  evidence  from  longitudinal  microeconomic data  reveals that firms  that
innovate more consistently and rapidly employ more workers, demand higher skills, pay higher wages and
offer more stable prospects for their workforce.”
5
Among  innovative  firms,  SMEs  play  an  important  and  distinctive  role  and  face  specific
obstacles.  This explains why governments have generally increased the priority attached to SME policies
while reconsidering their focus to give greater emphasis to the promotion of innovation and technology
diffusion.   However,  given the  variety of factors  that  determine  SMEs’ innovativeness  and  growth
potential, and the heterogeneity of the SME population in terms of technological capabilities and needs
(Figure 1), they are confronted with two main issues:
 What is the appropriate balance between action on framework conditions and more focused
government support to innovation and technology diffusion?
 What is the appropriate technology and innovation policy mix between general measures
addressing generic problems related to smallness or newness and more targeted approaches
better  suited  to  the  specific  requirements  of  particular  types  of  SMEs,  such  as  new
technology-based firms?
The role of small innovative firms in a knowledge-based economy
To quantify the importance of small innovative firms, including new technology-based firms,
Figure 2 provides  first approximations based on  average figures  derived  from  selected national and
international statistics and studies:
6
 Between 30 and 60 per cent of all SMEs can be characterised as innovative, but only a
relatively small share, approximately 10 per cent, is technology-based.
 Based on average start-up rates (between 5 and 20 per cent per year) and an average survival
distribution of new firms, a simple model of enterprise demography predicts that between
5.
OECD (1996), Technology, Productivity and Job Creation, Paris.
6.
OECD, (1997), “Interim Report on Technology, Productivity and Job Creation -- Towards Best Policy
Practice” submitted to the May 1997 Council at Ministerial Level.
29
10 and 30 per cent of all SMEs could be categorised as new firms, where new is defined as
less than five years old.
 Assuming that these ratios are also valid for new SMEs, new technology-based firms would
account for between 1 and 3 percent of all firms.  For example, the US Office of Science and
Technology  estimates that there are  75 000 small  high-tech firms in  the United  States
(i.e. around 2 per cent of the total population of firms) with about 1.75-2 million direct
employees.
Small firms  and large companies play  somewhat different  roles  in  innovation.   SMEs  are
generally more market- and less  research-driven, quicker to respond to new opportunities and more
oriented to small incremental advances.  Overall their contribution to R&D or broadly based innovation
and to high-technology  employment is  very  significant  (in  1991,  in the  United  States,  small firms
produced 55 per cent of innovations and provided 25 per cent of the jobs in high-technology industries).
Among small innovative firms, technology-oriented business start-ups are a unique source of
diversity and flexibility and ensure the long-term performance of innovation systems.  They play a vital
role  in  pioneering  and  developing  new  markets  and  providing  product  diversity  and  innovation  in
fragmented existing markets, characterised by risk/reward ratios which are dissuasive to large firms.
Their principal function is to “probe, explore and sometimes develop the production and consumption
frontiers in search of unrecognised or otherwise ignored opportunities for economic growth and job
creation” (US Academy of Engineering, 1996).
Technology diffusion policy in transition
OECD  governments maintain  a  variety  of  technology  diffusion initiatives to  aid SMEs  in
identifying, absorbing and implementing technology and know-how.  Programmes to diffuse technology
are  intended  largely  to  address  market  and  systemic  failures.    Firms  may  lack  information  about
technologies  or  face  disadvantages  due  to  scale  requirements  or  high  learning  costs,  resulting  in
underinvestment in new technology.  At the system level, failures may arise from weaknesses in linkages
and interactions among different actors in national innovation systems.  In addition, part of the rationale
for public support to technology diffusion lies in maximising returns from public investment in R&D and
technology development programmes.  Other economic goals such as competitiveness, regional economic
development  and  job  creation  are  also  reasons  underlying  government  initiatives  to  disseminate
technology.
Recent years have seen a gradual shift from traditional supply-side diffusion measures toward
policies that reflect a more interactive model of innovation and recognise innovation and diffusion as
interdependent processes.  The growing realisation that the  impact of technological development on
productivity, growth and job creation greatly depends on the receptiveness and innovation capacity of
SMEs  has  prompted  changes  in  technology  diffusion  policies.    These  were  traditionally  aimed  at
facilitating technology transfer from research institutions or equipment suppliers to users (Level 1 goal in
Table 5.1).  They now seek to go beyond solving the immediate technical problems of firms to stimulating
them to develop and implement a more strategic upgrade (Levels 2 and 3 goal in Table 5.1).
30
Building the innovation capacity of SMEs:  policy rationale and new approaches
The weak technology receptiveness and innovation capacity of firms often constitutes one of the
most important bottlenecks in the diffusion process and results from barriers to firms’ rational behaviour,
and associated market imperfections, namely:
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested