open pdf file in c# windows application : Acrobat add text to pdf control application utility azure html windows visual studio 20907403-part944

31
Figure 5.1   Company types
Source: 
Arnold, E. and Thuriaux, B. (1997), Supporting Companies' Technological 
Capabilities", Technopolis report to the OECD.
Low-technology
SMEs
No meaningful technological 
capability
No perceived need for this
May be no actual need
Minimum-
capability
SMEs
One engineer 
Able to adopt/adapt
packaged solutions
May need help to implement
Technological
competents
Multiple engineers
Some budgetary discretion
Able to participate in 
technology networks
Research
performers
Research department
or equivalent
Able to take long run view 
of technological capabilities
0
25
50
75
100
Total stock 
of firms
of which 
SMEs:  90-98%
of which
new:  10-30% 
of which 
innovative:  30-60% 
of which 
technology-based:  5-15% 
100% 
90-98% 
9-29% 
3-18% 
1-3% 
Percentage of the total stock of firms
Figure 5.2   Share of new technology-based firms
1
1.   All figures are orders of magnitude which may vary considerably between countries and years.  They roughly 
correspond to a definition of SMEs as establishments/enterprises with less than 500 employees.
Source: 
OECD, Eurostat, 
Enterprises in Europe.
of which 
innovative:  
30-60% 
Acrobat add text to pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
adding text fields to pdf acrobat; how to add text field to pdf
Acrobat add text to pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding text to a pdf in preview; add text to pdf file
32
 The “low capability trap”, which means that until a firm has learnt something it cannot
properly specify what it needs to learn.  More generally, despite market pressures SMEs tend
to overestimate their capability relative to competitors’ best practices.
 Organisational inadequacies which prevent the rational exploitation and matching of new
technological and market opportunities;  and/or deficiencies in business skills preventing a
sound self-diagnosis of needs and reducing the perceived value of organisational change and
external (e.g. consulting) market services.
 Inadequate  availability  of  information  on  technological  and  market  opportunities,  the
business infrastructure, and/or business services.
Table 5.1   Typology of technology diffusion programmes
Goal
Programme types
Objectives
Technology, institution, 
or sector-specific
To diffuse a specific technology to a wide number 
of firms and sectors,  to promote technology 
transfer from specific institutions, or to diffuse 
technology to a particular industrial sector
Demonstration
Technical assistance
To assist firms in diagnosing technology needs 
and in problem solving
Information networks
Assistance for small-scale 
R&D projects
Diagnostic tools
Assist firms to develop innovation-oriented 
management (includes organisational change)
Benchmarking
Transmit best practice from elsewhere
Sector-wide technology 
road map
Systematic planning for future strategic 
technology investments
University-industry 
collaboration
Upgrade the knowledge base of the firm
Level 1:  Improve the adoption and
adaptation of specific technologies
Level 2:  Improve the general
technology receptor capacity of firms
Level 3:  Build the innovation
capacity of firms
Source:  OECD/GD(97)60.
Promoting new technology-based firms
Realising the potential contribution of new technology-based firms to economic growth and job
creation depends on the  existence of business opportunities, an entrepreneurial  culture,  a supportive
business and technical infrastructure, and availability of and access to key resources.
In  addition  to  facilitating  access  to  technology  and  know  how  and  ensuring  appropriate
conditions for business start-ups in general (e.g. simplification of administrative and legal procedures),
governments need to address the  combined impact of  a  number of  factors on  opportunities for  the
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Redact text content, images, whole pages from PDF file. Add, insert PDF native annotations to PDF file. Print. Support for all the print modes in Acrobat PDF.
how to add text to a pdf in acrobat; add text to pdf document in preview
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. If you need to get text content from PDF file, this C# PDF to
how to add text to a pdf file in preview; how to add text to a pdf in preview
33
creation, survival and growth of small technology-based firms.  These factors fall within different realms
of government policy:
 New technology-based firms already have to cope with an exceptional level of technical and
commercial  risks  and  may  consequently  be  more  vulnerable  than  other  firms  to  the
additional  uncertainties  that  government  action  may  create  in  their  tax,  regulatory  or
macroeconomic environment.
 The rewards expected by entrepreneurs and their financiers should be proportionate to the
risks they take.  Framework conditions should not impact unfavourably on the risk/reward
ratio (e.g. tax systems which discriminate against capital gains, high interest rates) but rather
should aim to provide mechanisms for rewarding investment in new technology-based firms.
 Flexibility  in  seizing  market  opportunities  and  developing  innovative  responses  is  a
characteristic of  successful  new  technology-based  firms  which  rests  primarily  on  their
individual managerial and organisational skills but depends also on external factors, such as
the  mobility  of  human  resources  and  the  good  functioning  of  markets  for  specialised
services.
 In many activities technology-based firms do not themselves create new knowledge through
formal  R&D activities,  but rather test on  the market  new  ways  of  combining existing
technical solutions.  Spin-offs of technology, personnel and business opportunities from
large firms’ R&D efforts are important in this respect and they must be accounted for when
assessing government financial support to private R&D.  The more diversified the research
portfolio of universities and other non-business organisations, the better the springboard it
represents for small firms in a wide spectrum of activities.
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
this VB.NET Imaging PDF Watermark Add-on, you create a watermark that consists of text or image users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat.
adding text to a pdf form; how to insert text into a pdf file
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
adding a text field to a pdf; how to add text fields to pdf
34
SECTION 6
HIGH-GROWTH SMES
Introduction
Analysis  suggests  that  a  small  group  of  high-growth  small  and  medium-sized  enterprises
(HGSMEs) make important contributions to job creation and productivity growth.  In particular, it has
been shown that both job creation and job destruction tend to be concentrated:  a significant part of gross
job creation is in a comparatively small number of very rapidly expanding firms and a large part of gross
job destruction is in a relatively small number of rapidly contracting or exiting firms.  However, the role
of, and factors influencing, growing firms is not fully understood.  A more complete understanding of
high-growth firms may lead to adjustments in government policies to enhance their unique contributions
to economic growth.
Results of selected country studies
Canada
In Canada, there has been a series of three studies on SMEs conducted by Statistics Canada on
the causes of firm dynamics:
 The first study, “Strategies for Success” (Baldwin et al., 1994), provides an overview of the
strategies and activities of a group of 2 000 typically “established” SMEs experiencing rapid
growth between 1984 and 1988.  It focuses on the differences between the faster and slower
growing firms in the sample and finds that innovation is the key to success.  However, the
research also shows that business performance depends primarily on the insight and energy
of the entrepreneur and that financial management provides a core capability of a firm.  The
study also reported on other areas in which the practices of these growing firms differ from
those of less successful ones:  the importance given to the quality of labour skills;  the
significant amount of business conducted outside their regions;  and the use of networking
for learning and assistance.
 The second study, “Successful Entrants: Creating the Capacity for Survival and Growth”
(Baldwin et al., 1997), looks at a group of new firms.  In general, it was found that the faster
growing successful  entrants outperform  in  every area  -- innovation  and the  search for
improvement being the key factors.  Moreover, these faster growing firms also reach more
often beyond the bounds of their established market.
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
how to insert text into a pdf using reader; how to insert text into a pdf with acrobat
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
how to add text field to pdf form; how to add text to pdf file
35
 The third study, “Failing Concerns:  Business Bankruptcy in Canada” (Baldwin et al., 1997),
investigates the characteristics associated with failure.  The major findings of this study are
that internal and external factors are equally responsible for firm failure.  Internal factors are
more important among firms that are less than five years old.  Major internal deficiencies,
particularly in these younger firms, fall into the area of management capabilities.
United States
 For the 1991-95 period, it was found that 3 per cent of new firms i) start with at least
US$100 000 in first year sales;  and ii) generate at least 20 per cent annual sales growth.
Gross job creation tends to be concentrated among such high-growth firms or “gazelles”
(Birch, et al., 1996) that are found in all economic sectors, accounting for 6 per cent of start-
ups in manufacturing, 3.4 per cent in trade (wholesale and retail), 2.4 per cent in finance,
insurance  and  real  estate  (FIRE);   2.1 per  cent  in  services;   and 3.5 per  cent in other
(agriculture,  mining,  construction,  and  transportation,  communications  and  utilities).
Smaller firms, including high-growth firms, are a major source of job growth in all of the
nine major regions of the United States.
 In an analysis of all sectors of the US economy before 1976-88, it was found that 31 000, or
4 per cent, of the 814 000 firms created in 1977-78 were responsible for 74 per cent of the
gross employment growth of the entire cohort by 1984 (Kirchhoff, 1994, p. 187).  After
eliminating those firms that recorded “unbelievable growth”, firms with growth rates in
excess of 300 per cent (an average of 50 per cent per year over six years) were considered
high-growth (Kirchhoff, 1994, p. 178-179).
 Analysis was  carried  out  using  data  provided  by  representative  samples of  new  firms
1-6 years old in all economic sectors from Minnesota (1985 sample), Pennsylvania (1994
sample), and Wisconsin (1993 sample).  About 8 per cent of these firms had both growth and
initial annual sales above the median (high-growth, high-start).  They were responsible for
15 per cent of the jobs, 27 per cent of the sales and 40 per cent of the out-of state exports of
the cohort (Reynolds and White, in press).   The top  2 per cent of the  firms from  the
Minnesota and Pennsylvania samples with at least two years of sales accounted for 10 per
cent of the jobs created in the cohort (Reynolds, 1993).
Given this diverse and incomplete assessment of firm growth, its relationship to age, and its
contribution  to  overall  economic  growth,  there  is  clearly  a  strong  justification  for  a  more  careful
assessment.
France
This case study uses the database of the Ministry of Industry and examines the complete set of
23 000 manufacturing firms with more than 20 employees in 1994.
 The first analysis shows that half the enterprises were permanent throughout the period
between 1985 and 1994.  These permanent enterprises lost jobs equivalent to 10 per cent of
their aggregate workforce, but these job losses stemmed solely from very large firms with
over 2 000 employees.  This confirms the observation of concentration of job losses in a
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
free hand, free hand line, rectangle, text, hotspot, hotspot no more plug-ins needed like Acrobat or Adobe Users need to add following implementations to your
adding text pdf; add text to pdf file reader
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
Excel documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion.
how to add text to a pdf file in reader; add text to pdf file online
36
small number of firms.  No analysis has yet been conducted concerning job creation but a
similar pattern of concentration is likely.
Europe’s 500
Comparisons across European countries have been carried out in an extensive analysis sponsored
by the European Commission.  The study shows that during 1989 and 1984, a period of recession, 500 of
Europe’s most dynamic entrepreneurs increased employment levels in their companies by almost 160 per
cent.  The report focuses on these entrepreneurs and explains how they managed to create jobs during a
period of rising unemployment across Europe:
 These dynamic entrepreneurs are typically male, aged 40-50, generally have a university
degree, consider themselves to be “trained professionals”, and rate themselves most highly
on skills typically associated with general management.  They are typically “team starters”,
but at the same time they own a majority of the company’s shares and seek to maintain its
independence.
 Dynamic entrepreneurs are found in all the European countries and in all major sectors, but
there  is  an  above-average  representation  in  the  service  sector.    The  majority  of  the
entrepreneurs selected for Europe’s 500 have pursued well-defined strategies to achieve
rapid rates of growth.  Their strategies are proactive and outward-looking, based on product
differentiation  rather  than  low  cost.    Quality  is  their  watchword  throughout  their
organisations and in the products and services they offer.  They like to be financially self-
reliant to the greatest possible extent, but say that people are the key to their success.  They
devote enormous energy to creating and then maintaining a highly motivated and well-
qualified staff.
A tentative summary of the characteristics and strategies of high-growth firms
From the above-mentioned US and Canadian studies and Europe’s 500, a number of features
emerge which appear to characterise HGSMEs:
Innovation and attention to human resources are most strongly related to growth.  Regardless
of sectors, innovators grow faster than no-innovators.  At the earlier stages management
capabilities are crucial to survival.  As the firm matures, human resource and innovation
strategies increase in importance.  By the time the firm has reached an established stage, its
management and human resource capabilities are typically quite developed, and growth is
more closely associated with innovation.
 Faster-growing successful entrants are almost twice as likely to innovate as slow-growing
firms.  Similarly, fast-growth firms place more emphasis on strategies relating to enhancing,
updating  or  expanding  their product line,  and  improving  production.    Successful  fast
growing entrants are those that translate their strategic emphases into action by undertaking
R&D, innovation and training.
 Successful  fast-growing  firms  place  greater  emphasis  on  hiring skilled employees  and
motivating their employees.
BMP to PDF Converter | Convert Bitmap to PDF, Convert PDF to BMP
Also designed to be used add-on for .NET Image SDK, RasterEdge Bitmap Powerful image converter for Bitmap and PDF files; No need for Adobe Acrobat Reader &
add text box in pdf; add text to pdf document online
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
It can be used standalone. JPEG to PDF Converter is able to convert image files to PDF directly without the software Adobe Acrobat Reader for conversion.
add text to pdf without acrobat; how to enter text into a pdf
37
Balance -- an emphasis on striving to enhance their capabilities in all areas -- is a consistent
theme among faster-growing firms.  Nevertheless, balance appears to be more important to
growth in the high-knowledge sectors than in the low-knowledge sectors.
Main barriers to HGSMEs and policy implications
Market failures in capital markets can make it more difficult to obtain financing than is
justified by the potential of start-up and small firms.  As mentioned above, faster-growing
successful entrants tend to be more innovative than slower ones.  However, given the risk of
knowledge  investments,  firms  will  undertake  sub-optimal  amounts  of  this  type  of
investment, both because they cannot be guaranteed to reap the rewards and because they
cannot get financing for it.
Government regulations and policies are seen by the entrepreneurs of the fastest growing
firms as the main obstacles to the development of their businesses.  Entrepreneurs rate
bureaucracy, social  security  contributions,  company taxes, personal  income taxes,  fiscal
policy and labour law, in that order, as representing the governmental interference with the
most negative impact.  In general, entrepreneurs indicate that indirect labour costs are a
barrier to growth.
Access to foreign markets is also considered to be difficult for small businesses.  Exchange
rate  fluctuations,  identifying  and  prospecting  markets,  different  technical  standards,
discriminatory public contract award procedures and bureaucracy all represent barriers to
international trade and globalisation.
Access to existing technologies should not be hampered by lack of information, insufficient
bargaining power of SMEs or abuse of dominant positions by large firms.
 Difficulties in recruiting qualified staff and skilled workers are also considered a major
barrier to the fast growth of small business.
On a preliminary basis what can be said about the role of government?  The broad findings of
these studies tend to indicate that the role of government should be oriented towards ensuring a supportive
business environment for SME growth.  The results also show that, although new and small hi-tech firms
have a potential to grow fast, they are far from being the only group of successful high-growth entrants.
Therefore, governments should have a broad scope for action and should look for ways to promote
knowledge investments in order to overcome the underinvestment problems faced by SMEs in general.
Governments can help by focusing on the timely provision of vitally needed information, knowledge and
expertise, in particular with regard to access to foreign markets, access to technology, skill building and in
encouraging the creation and support of business networks.
38
SECTION 7
WOMEN-OWNED SMES
Women-owned SMEs are growing at a faster rate than the economy as a whole in several OECD
countries.  The potential of women-owned SMEs for job and wealth creation, as well as innovation, is
increasingly focusing the attention of policy makers on this sector and was recently the subject of the
“OECD Conference on Women Entrepreneurs in SMEs” held on 16-18 April 1997.  While data and
statistics on this phenomenon are not available in all Member countries, the following information appears
to indicate the importance of this trend throughout the G7 countries:
 In the United States, in the last several years, the number of firms created and managed by
women has grown twice as fast as those set up and managed by men.  Recent statistics
indicate that approximately 8 million businesses are owned and managed by women in the
United States.  According to the same source, one out of four private sector jobs in the
United States is provided by firms headed by a woman.  Three out of four female-owned
companies stay in business longer than three years, compared to only two out of three male-
owned companies.
 According to the Japan Small Business Research Institute (JSBRI), 23.3 per cent of private
Japanese firms are set up by women (2.56 million of 11 million).
 In Germany, women in the new German Länder  have been responsible for the creation of
one-third of new firms since 1990, representing 1 million jobs and US$15 billion in turnover
per year.
 In France and the United Kingdom, one out of four firms is headed by a woman.
 In Canada, women own and/or operate 30.3 per cent of all firms, and the number of women-
led firms is increasing at twice the national average.
This trend is also evident in other OECD countries:  in Australia, one-third of existing firms are
now owned and managed by women, while in the Netherlands and Denmark, one-third of new enterprises
are held and managed by women.
The need to improve economic performance and social well-being today calls for a closer look at
the  contributions  and  needs  of  women-owned  SMEs  and  for  the  implementation  of  commensurate
structural reforms.  This is true for a number of reasons:  facilitating the development of women-owned
SMEs allows societies to capitalise on the skills of educated and trained women who may be blocked in
corporate advancement because of the “glass ceiling”;  the increased flexibility inherent in owning one’s
own business allows women to contribute to the income of their families while balancing their work and
39
family responsibilities, thus enhancing social cohesion;  lastly, the  resulting  economic independence
reduces disparities between men and women, thus leading to a more active and representative role by
women in the economic and political life of their countries.
Issues
While the numbers provided above indicate the growing importance of this sector, the economic
potential  of  women  entrepreneurs  remains  partly  untapped.    Research  indicates  some  unique
characteristics of, and barriers to, women-owned businesses.  Although these characteristics are tentative
and  further  research  is  needed,  they  must  be  taken  into  account  when  addressing  how  women
entrepreneurs can best realise their potential:
 Women tend to establish enterprises in sectors and under legal structures which are different
from those chosen by men.  In the United States, men represent 75 per cent of independent
businesses  whereas  women  represent  70 per  cent  of  family  businesses.    In  all  OECD
countries, a great majority of businesses run by women are in the wholesale and service
sectors.  Estimates from a poll of 17 000 women in several European countries (with the
exception of Spain and Portugal) show that nearly 5 million women work independently.
Almost 46 per cent of these women are in retail, 12 per cent in the beauty and skin care
business, 10 per cent in professional services (doctors, lawyers, etc.), 9 per cent in crafts and
only 1 per cent in the manufacturing sector.
 In  some countries,  female  businesses  seem  to  have  a higher rate of failure  than  male
businesses.  This phenomenon seems to be related more to the type of business chosen than
inadequate management but may also reflect barriers to their operations.  In other countries,
the opposite is true, which has been argued to be associated with the more risk-averse
attitudes of women entrepreneurs.
 Access to capital is one of the principle barriers encountered by women entrepreneurs.
Women tend to be risk-averse and borrow less capital than men, raising their average cost of
loans.
 Women are less likely to seek counselling and expert advice in starting up and developing
their businesses.  This is due in part to their unawareness of the existence of these services,
and because women’s enterprises (due to their size and sector) are often not targeted by SME
experts.
 Women often lack networks which would allow them to facilitate business development,
know-how concerning corporate and public sector procurement, and mastery of technologies
that would enable them to penetrate new markets.
 In certain countries, women co-entrepreneurs who are part of a family business do not
always  receive  retirement  benefits  that  take  their  contribution  to  the  enterprise  into
consideration.  Spouse-partners also face the added problem of obtaining social security
coverage.
 In the 1990s there has been a tendency towards the development of support services for
women entrepreneurs.  This seems to be more prevalent at the regional than the national
40
level.  National programmes tend to be more motivated by concern for equal opportunity
than in encouraging female entrepreneurship.
Policy implications and recommendations
 broad  set  of  recommendations  emerged  from  the  “OECD  Conference  on  Women
Entrepreneurs  in  SMEs” for  actions to  be taken  by  government, business  and  financial  institutions.
Among these are:
 The knowledge of women's entrepreneurship should be deepened with a view to increasing
the overall effectiveness of SME policy.  In this context, the OECD should play a leadership
role, and in particular encourage and facilitate the collection and standardisation of statistics
and data on SMEs, including women-owned SMEs, on a worldwide basis.
 Best practices in the financing of women entrepreneurs should be identified, with particular
attention to the role played by “business angels”, equity or quasi-equity formation (including
tax-driven  mechanisms),  guarantee  programmes,  women’s  loan  funds,  micro-business
financing programmes, and training and counselling programmes linked to financing.
 OECD Member countries should be encouraged to define the mix of private and government
actions required to improve access to capital for women entrepreneurs.  Research should
analyse the nature and value of “intellectual capital” so as to provide financial institutions
with new elements to consider in evaluating credit risk.
 International networks of existing national women entrepreneurs’ associations should be
encouraged and strengthened in partnership with government and corporations.
 Technology use should be promoted to improve competitiveness and networking.  Education
and training in technology and business skills should be provided to women business owners
in centres, educational institutions and, through technology, in the home.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested