open pdf file in c# windows application : How to add text to pdf document software application dll windows html asp.net web forms 20907404-part945

41
SECTION 8
THE REGIONAL DIMENSION OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP
Entrepreneurship  has  several  regional  or  territorial dimensions  that are  relevant for policy
analysis and development.  Entrepreneurship is often dependent on its territorial context:  entrepreneurial
activity often varies markedly across sub-national regions with some regions having much higher rates of
entrepreneurial activity than others (see Table 8.1), and with certain types of activity often being clustered
together.  For example, the so-called “third Italy” has firm creation rates which are much higher than in
the southern Italian regions.
Table 8.1  Firm birth rates and variations within countries at the regional level
1
Annual firm births at the regional level
(per 10 000 persons)
Regional variations
National
Min
Max
Min/Max
average
All sectors
France (1981-91)
118
67
264
3.9
Germany (1986-89)
55
41
90
2.2
Italy
144
74
202
2.7
Sweden
(1985-89)
88
56
149
2.7
United Kingdom (1980-90)
72
42
107
2.5
United States (1986-88)
33
18
74
4.1
Manufacturing only
Germany (1986-89)
6.8
4.5
12.0
2.7
Ireland
(1980-90)
22.3
10.7
42.7
4.0
Italy
26.8
12.7
51.0
4.0
Japan (1985)
6.7
4.1
12.7
3.1
Sweden (1985-89)
10.3
4.4
28.7
6.5
United Kingdom
(1980-90)
27.5
10.0
59.5
6.0
United States
(1986-88)
16.8
2.4
114.0
47.5
1.  There is definitional variation across the countries due to differences in the methods used to measure firm births.
As a result, cross-national comparisons of the average values are not appropriate.
2.  Population 16-64 used as denominator, rather than size of workforce.
3.  Manufacturing workers used as denominators.
Source
 OECD (1993), “Regional Characteristics Affecting Small Business Formation”, ILE Notebooks No. 18, Paris.
Clusters
Silicon  Valley  in  California  is  currently  the  most  prominent  cluster  of  computer-related
entrepreneurial firms.  Clustering produces several types of benefits:  firm concentration creates a larger
How to add text to pdf document - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text fields to pdf; add text boxes to pdf document
How to add text to pdf document - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding text pdf files; add text to pdf in acrobat
42
market for specialised labour and for intermediate inputs;  and there can be “informational spill-overs”
owing  to  the  increased intensity  of  communication  facilitated  by  the  geographical  concentration  of
producers.  Clustering can be of particular benefit to smaller firms who, because of their size, often cannot
provide specialised training or maintain in-house services such as R&D or marketing.
According to one view, clusters develop naturally, based on the intrinsic advantages such as
natural resources (e.g. mines, port facilities) found in a particular region.  For example, firms in the steel
industry are often established close to energy supplies and good transportation networks.  Others argue
that  the  process  of  clustering  is  marked  by  historical  “accidents”.  An  invention  or  technological
development is exploited by an enterprising individual and leads to persistent centres of production,
7
particularly in industries which are “rootless”, that is, industries which are not dependent on fixed natural
resources (e.g. light manufacturing).  For example, Silicon Valley owes its start to the Vice-President of
Stanford University who established the famous research park on university land, leading later to the
creation of many dynamic new firms.  These two views are not mutually exclusive and a combination of
both a priori regional advantages provided by the presence of natural resources and historical accident are
responsible for the creation of many clusters.  Both views agree that clusters generate cumulative benefits
that can progressively increase the cluster’s competitive edge.
A number of intangible factors at the regional level such as culture, social capital and local
networking influence enterprise development.  Much of the literature on clusters cites the importance of
the social environment and of social cohesion within the network of firms, enabling the maintenance of a
high level of wages even in sectors dominated by developing countries which benefit from cheap labour.
This is the case, for example, in the textiles sector in Denmark and the shoe industry in Italy.
While clusters of enterprises can be stable over long periods of time, it would appear that these
cumulative advantages are not altogether decisive, and the position of an entrenched cluster can be
successfully challenged.  Examples of this abound:  steel in Europe and the United States, certain types of
computer chip-making in the United States and Japan,  automakers in  the United States, cameras in
Germany, textiles in many industrial countries.  Therefore, as production becomes standardised over time,
localisation of an industry can fade away.  There appears to be a kind of product cycle in which emergent
new industries initially flourish in localised industrial districts, then disperse as they mature.  As clusters
of enterprises mature and disperse, the regions in which they are situated may suffer an economic shock as
firms down-size or close, causing high social costs from which it is difficult to recover.
Regional policies
Traditional regional development policies introduced to assist regions suffering from a declining
industry  have  often  been  guided  by  a  development  model  which  promoted  large  investments  in
infrastructure or in social assistance.  Another relatively common regional development policy has been to
attract firms from other regions or countries to establish themselves in the disadvantaged region  by
offering subsidies of various kinds.  More recently, entrepreneurial policies have been introduced which
concentrate on improving the labour pool and intermediate inputs.  For example, training policies have
been introduced in several countries to encourage employee training, many of them targeted at small
firms.  Recognising that much of the training undertaken is informal, the Australian government has
sought to encourage more training by creating an accreditation scheme for skills obtained on-the-job
8
.
7.
Krugman, P. (1991), Geography and Trade, MIT Press, MA.
8.
Colardyn, D. (1996), La gestion des compétences, PUF.
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
adding text to pdf form; how to add text box to pdf document
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
in C#.NET framework. Support to add password to PDF document online or in C#.NET WinForms for PDF file protection. Able to create a
add text field to pdf; adding text to pdf in preview
43
Policies have also tried to improve the supply of information and advice sought by smaller firms.  For
example,  the US  government  has  created a nation-wide network of locally  managed  manufacturing
extension centres dedicated to helping smaller manufacturers improve their competitiveness by adopting
modern technologies
9
.
Entrepreneurial policies are also being introduced by local authorities who have begun to play an
increasingly important role in regional development since the 1980s.  In their view, a self-sustaining
entrepreneurial pole can be created in disadvantaged regions.  The objective of these policies is to create
the conditions which generate the cumulative benefits leading to economic growth.  A number of policies
concentrate on developing the “technological spill-overs” that come from close proximity.  For example,
prompted  by  the  high-tech  success  of  clusters  such  as  Silicon  Valley  in  California  and  Boston’s
Route 128,  geographically targeted technology  programmes  have been  introduced  in  order  to  create
similar clusters.  Some communities have created research parks in which new firms and/or the R&D
departments of large companies  carry on research  in close co-operation with a university or  public
research facility.  Others have created high-tech incubators which provide new high-tech firms with an
optimum chance of survival.  Science parks have also been created to encourage existing high-tech firms
to relocate by offering them attracting surroundings and close proximity to research facilities.
The regional dimension to entrepreneurship is not limited to clusters of enterprises but also
includes micro-enterprises and small  firms and their role  in  indigenous  development.   These  firms
contribute to economic, employment and social development as well as to the socio-cultural development
of a region, especially when they are created in disadvantaged areas.  Programmes to assist the creation
and development of micro-enterprises in inner cities and remote rural areas have become widespread
policy tools in OECD countries due to their important economic impact on the general business climate
and their potential to act as a catalyst for further growth.
Evidence is emerging that the formulation and delivery of policies to promote the start-up and
growth of small businesses can be most effectively delivered with the input of local authorities who are
more aware of and sensitive to local conditions and needs.  For example, regional and local programmes
can provide debt financing to small enterprises more effectively than national schemes.  It is argued that
loans  delivered  by  regional  credit  co-operatives  have  a  lower  loan  default  rate  than  the  loans  of
government programmes or banks because the co-op is better able to assess the credit risk of the loan
proposal.  Co-ops, being linked to trade associations, benefit from local industry experts who provide
consulting advice as well as loan monitoring.  Perhaps even more importantly, because the loan applicant
is known personally to the loan reviewer and, indeed, the other members of the co-op, this creates a very
strong social pressure on the loan recipient to fulfil his loan obligations.
10
Governments wishing to adopt the policies of other regions or countries should take the regional
context into account.  A policy  which is effective in one country  or region may not perform well
elsewhere.    Certain  regional  features,  such  as  population  density,  influence  the  effectiveness  of
entrepreneurial policy.  Policies to improve labour-force skills can be effective in urban regions or in
intermediate regions, but have little impact in rural areas where take-up rates are low.  Conversely,
policies which seek to create new firms may be more effective in rural areas than in urban or intermediate
regions due to lower dead-weight and displacement effects.
9.
Shapira, P., D. Roessner and R. Barke (1995), “New Public Infrastructures for Small Firms Industrial
Modernization in the USA”, in Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, pp. 63-85.
10.
Brusco, S. and E. Righi (1989), “Local Government, Industrial Policy and Social Concensus:  The Case of
Moden Italy”, in Economy and Society, Vol. 18, No. 4, November, pp. 405-423.
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Create high resolution PDF file without image quality losing in ASP.NET application. Add multiple images to multipage PDF document in .NET WinForms.
acrobat add text to pdf; how to insert text in pdf reader
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
allowed. passwordSetting.IsCopy = True ' Allow to assemble document. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
add text boxes to a pdf; add text to a pdf document
44
SECTION 9
BEST PRACTICE POLICIES FOR SMEs
As a conclusion, this section presents some of the lessons learned from policies implemented in
the following five areas:
 financing;
 Business environment;
 Technology;
 Management capabilities;  and
 Access to markets.
Financing
Role of government in financing SMEs
The main role of the public sector in supporting venture capital and other types of risk financing
should be to reduce the risk and cost of private equity finance.  The government should complement and
encourage the development of the private-capital industry, including enhancing the skills of the people
involved in undertaking this task.  A danger is that “excessive” public interference (including spending)
will crowd out or retard the development of private financial intermediation.  In particular, the efficacy of
financial  government-induced  incentives  is  the  subject  of  heated  debate.    Advocates  of  financial
incentives by government argue that investors are attracted to relatively risky projects which would not
otherwise have been undertaken.  Critics claim that government incentives attract unsuitable players into
the private equity market, who display poor performance and give a bad image to the whole industry.
Direct government measures and policies to encourage and support the provision of risk capital
include:  development banks;  loan guarantee  schemes;  fiscal incentives; regulations regarding the
treatment of innovations;  rules regulating investment by insurance companies and pension funds in equity
classes;  taxation and regulation of stock options;  the provision of loans at preferential rates;  and the
direct provision of risk capital for particular classes of investment as a catalyst for private financing.
Indirect measures (structural and supportive policies) include market support and regulation;  training;
communication;  support for R&D;  and privatisation.
Obstacles to providing bank credit to SMEs
“Conventional” bankers are generally less well equipped than venture capitalists to address the
specific issues and risks inherent in financing the seed and start-up stages of enterprises.  Banks' credit
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
PDF document file, edit selected text content, and export extracted text with customized format. How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary
add text box to pdf; add text pdf reader
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats
adding text to pdf online; add text box to pdf file
45
assessments are based on track record, projections of future cash flows and collateral.  Consequently,
banks are in a better position to provide loans to existing SMEs than to new SMEs.
Smaller potential borrowers have  a handicap in  obtaining  loans from banks  because credit
assessment costs are fixed.  In response, banks have been seeking ways to improve their SME credit
assessment skills so as to be in a better position to price the credit risks of SMEs as well as to better assess
their credits.  Information on the spread of interest rates paid by SMEs seems to suggest that financial
intermediaries outside the United States tend to have greater difficulties in assessing and pricing credit
risks than US financial institutions.
Loan guarantee schemes
To overcome these problems with borrowing, G7 countries such as Canada, France and the
United Kingdom, have introduced loan guarantee schemes.  A percentage of the loan is guaranteed by the
state so that, in the event of default, the loss to the financial institution is only a proportion of the sum at
risk.  In return, the charge paid by the borrower on such loans is higher than under normal arrangements
since an additional premium is paid to the state to cover expected losses.  Even so, the SME is able to
access funds from a financial institution without access to collateral.  The table below shows the financing
terms for Canada, France and the United Kingdom.
Table 9.1  Loan guarantee conditions
France
Canada
United Kingdom
% of loan guaranteed
65
90
70-85
Interest rate premium
0.6
1.75
1.5
The general lessons for loan guarantee schemes are that the criteria for success should be clearly
specified.  These include:
Minimisation of dead-weight:  the state will wish to ensure that its funds are not used by
banks as a substitute for their own loans.
Job creation:  the state may wish to be satisfied that there are wider economic benefits, for
example additional job creations, associated with the scheme.
Developing banking expertise:  the guarantee scheme may encourage banks to lend more on
the basis of the quality of the project and less on the basis of available collateral.  If private-
sector banks can develop more expertise and become better at distinguishing good projects
from bad ones, this will lead to increased lending to small firms by banks from their own
resources.
Speed of decisions:  in implementing any guarantee scheme it is vital that, since SMEs
require speedy decisions, access to the guarantee does not add significantly to the time taken
to make decisions about loans.
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Protect. Password: Set File Permissions. Password: Open Document. Edit Digital Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work with
how to insert text box in pdf file; how to add text to a pdf document
C# PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in C#.net, ASP
Using C# Programming Language. A best PDF annotation SDK control for Visual Studio .NET can help to add text to PDF document using C#.
how to add text to a pdf in reader; how to add text boxes to pdf
46
Financing the seed and start-up stages of investment
In Canada and the United States, it is relatively easy to obtain early-stage venture capital.
Outside North America raising early-stage funds is more problematic, thereby shifting the emphasis onto
later-stage investments.  In a number of countries, commercial banks have set up subsidiaries to provide
venture capital but they seem to be more active in the later stages of investment.
Involvement of institutional investors in venture financing
Institutional investors generally prefer larger and later-stage investments over relatively small
and early-stage investments.
The  evolution of  the  limited partnership  model in combination  with  favourable  regulatory
changes (in particular allowing pension funds to invest in private equity) and changes in the tax code
spurred the flow of capital to the private equity market in the United States (more than 75 per cent of
venture capital is provided through limited partnerships, with pension funds providing the bulk of total
financial commitments).
Raising private equity via limited partnerships seems to becoming more popular outside the
United States.  However, in many OECD countries, pension funds are barred from investing in the private
equity market.
The importance of exit mechanisms
Efficient exit mechanisms (trade sales, initial public offerings and repurchases) are crucial for a
healthy venture-capital industry.  In Canada and the United States, sales to portfolio investors are the most
common exit route, while in Europe trade sales and buy-ins/buy-outs are most widely used.
The limited possibility of exiting through sales to portfolio investors is a serious obstacle to the
full development of the European venture-capital industry.
Second-tier markets
Second-tier  and  private  equity  markets  for  unlisted  securities  are  important  for  SMEs.
Second-tier markets for initial public offerings constitute efficient exit vehicles in the United States and,
to a lesser extent, in Japan.
Problems with existing exit vehicles in countries outside Japan and the United States have
stimulated the development of new parallel markets, notably in Western Europe.  Thus far, these new
markets have been more successful than the earlier European experiments.
Informal venture capital
While  the  formal  venture-capital  sector  is  of  considerable  interest  to  policy  makers,  the
conditions for informal venture capital, provided by private individuals or “business angels”, are also of
primary importance.  Such individuals are thought to provide significantly more equity to private business
than the formal sector.
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Protect. Password: Set File Permissions. Password: Open Document. Edit Digital Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work with
adding text to pdf reader; add editable text box to pdf
47
Experience from Canada and the United States suggests that the informal venture-capital sector
can be stimulated through:
 improved networking services to enhance the flow of information between investors and
investees;
 use of the taxation system to encourage wealthy individuals to invest in private business.
The role of taxation
Taxation may impose a relatively heavier burden on small than on large businesses, and it is
appropriate to consider steps to reduce this distortion.
If assistance to small businesses is considered desirable, then there is a need to consider whether
such help is best delivered through the tax system.  The economic arguments for aiding small businesses
suggest helping certain types:  firms in dynamic sectors of the economy;  firms having difficulties in
raising funds, etc.  It is rarely the case that any tax paid by small businesses will coincide closely with a
target group, be it personal income tax, corporation tax, general consumption taxes or taxes on the owners
of small businesses.  The disadvantages of this lack in precise targeting of tax-based measures must, of
course, be measured against the attractions of using existing administrative machinery.  A fundamental
question is to what extent the tax system is an appropriate vehicle for removing obstacles to SMEs in a
cost-effective manner.
The following is a list of areas where the tax system has a potential role to achieve various
policy aims:  limiting the cost disadvantages faced by small businesses in complying with tax legislation;
encouraging the creation of new small businesses;  ensuring the continuation of small businesses when
control passes from the founder of the firm to another person.
Business environment
From the viewpoint of SMEs, legislation is perceived to be drafted to satisfy the interests of law-
makers, administrators and enforcers, rather than seeking the most cost-effective means of satisfying legal
requirements.
Five initiatives can help to strike a balance between the need for regulation and the interests of
those -- particularly SMEs -- complying with the regulations:
 New regulations should be scrutinised in a systematic manner.  Those proposing legislative
change should have to clearly justify any new procedures.  Economic side effects, such as
differential compliance costs according to firms size, showing be estimated and quantified.
 A Business Impact System could be implemented to ensure the audit and monitoring of new
legislation along the lines of an Environmental Impact Assessment.
 Countries such as Canada seek to trawl existing regulations with a view to eliminating those
where compliance costs exceed the benefits.  The Enterprise and Deregulation Unit in the
48
United  Kingdom  has  similarly  been  successful  in  eliminating  much  “unnecessary”
legislation.
 The government of the Netherlands has sought to introduce legislation which exists only for
a fixed period of time -- the so-called “sunsetting principle”.  The advantage is that, if at the
end of its lifespan, it is felt necessary to re-introduce the legislation, then a specific case has
to be made, rather than allowing legislation to continue by default.  This forces politicians to
debate  the  value  of  legislation  and  enables  regulated  firms  to  make  their  case  for
amendments.
 Greater  use should be  made  of  information technology.   Increased use  of  information
technology creates opportunities for reducing bureaucratic burdens on SMEs.  For example,
enterprises could be given a single number for use in all their dealings with government.
This would avoid the duplicating information to a variety of government departments such
as taxation, business registration or employment agencies.  The problem with this is that,
whilst wider adoption of electronic data interchange (EDI) would be particularly helpful to
smaller enterprises, it is precisely these firms that are the least likely to have access to
expertise in this area.  They therefore run the risk of being significantly and increasingly
disadvantaged.
Technology
Government action to remove obstacles to firm-level learning of best-practice technology and
innovation management must take into account the different needs of the various types of firms (Figure 2).
It must also avoid crowding out private initiatives in the service sector.  Table 9.2 gives examples of
recent initiatives in OECD countries.
Experience in OECD countries suggests that technology diffusion initiatives and services can be
improved through the use of best practice whether at the overall policy level, the programme level or the
service delivery level.  A recent OECD report
11
identifies a number of trends in OECD technology
diffusion programmes which also reflect emerging agreement on best practices at a general level:
Ensuring quality control -- technology diffusion programmes should take steps to ensure the
quality of service providers, the appropriate training of consultants and the effectiveness of local
delivery systems. In the United States, this is achieved among the numerous centres of the
Manufacturing Extension Partnership by merit-based competition and ongoing external review
of centre performance.  In the Austrian MINT programme, the effective training of consultants to
work with firms in developing strategic upgrade plans is a key element of the programme's
success.
Focusing  on  customers -- technology diffusion programmes should start with a focus on
customers and users and aim at meeting the changing technical needs of companies.  Germany’s
Fraunhofer  Society promotes technology development and diffusion through a network of
46 research institutes mainly through demand-led contract research projects between firms and
the research institutes.
11.
OECD (1997), “Diffusing Technology to Industry:  Government Policies and Programmes”.
49
Upgrading the innovative capacity of firms -- technology diffusion programmes should promote
a general awareness of the value of innovation among management and stimulate demand for
technical and organisational change within firms.  In Norway, the Business Development Using
New Technology (BUNT) Programme was one of the earlier schemes focused on developing the
problem-solving capacities of firms and their organisational ability to incorporate technology.
Both the Integrated Production Innovation (IPI) programme  in  Austria  and  the  Managing
Integration of New Technology (MINT) programme are based on the approaches used in BUNT.
 related  programme  is  the  Irish National Technology Audit Programme (NTAP),  which
provides an analysis of a company’s operations in relation to technology, human resources and
management with a view to the identification of opportunities for enhancing profitability.  The
Production 2000 programme in Germany supports the evaluation of technology needs in firms,
particularly for information and communications technologies, and includes recommendations
for upgrading managerial systems.
Source:  OECD Secretariat.
Benchmarking 
firms'
performance
Government provides 
benchmarking or
diagnostic services
Government encourages 
and coordinates private 
initiatives 
Private initiatives
Government monitors 
innovation performance,
evaluates innovation 
capacity and screens
firms' needs
Diagnostic of firms' managerial and 
organisational capabilities
Thematic 
diagnostic
(e.g. quality, IT) 
Overall 
diagnostic
Focus on
innovation 
management
Innovation 
Surveys 
(CIS, national 
initiatives)
Pilot SESSI 
survey (France)
DTI report on
"How The Best UK
Companies Are 
Winning"
Government facilitates
access to private 
service providers 
DTI Benchmarking
service 
(United Kingdom)
PBS service 
(United States)
MINT programme 
(Austria)
FRAM programme 
(Norway)
IMTs programme (European Union)
MEP (United States)
Consultants and consulting firms 
Table 9.2    Government promotion of technological and innovation management in SMEs 
FORBAIT 
proactive 
mentoring 
(Ireland)
STATEGIS (Canada)     Benchmarking Information Service (Australia)     
Business Links (United Kingdom)
Integrating with national innovation systems -- technology diffusion programmes should build
on  existing  inter-relationships  in  national  innovation  systems  and  have  greater  coherence
between programme design (e.g. targets, objectives, modes of support) and service delivery.
Germany's network-based strategy emphasises the  development of  bridging institutions and
partnerships to promote information flows and new technology diffusion and commercialisation,
including  incentives  to  foster  co-ordination  and  networking  within  regional  technology
infrastructures.  Similarly, in the Netherlands, a regional system of Innovation Centres (ICNs)
acts  as  intermediaries  between  firms  and  private  and  public  sources  of  knowledge.    ICN
50
counsellors advise firms and refer them to public research institutions, commercial suppliers of
knowledge and private consultants.  As a way to build on existing local, state and national
resources, the Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP) programme in the United States
provides  links  and  referrals  to  other  public  institutions  such  as  federal  laboratories  (for
technology), the Environmental Protection Agency (for environmental technology) or the Small
Business Administration (for financing and business planning).
Building  in  evaluation  and  assessment -- technology diffusion programmes should have
mechanisms for assessment which can guide and improve their operation and management on a
continuing basis.  Evaluation is currently the Achilles heal of technology diffusion policy in
OECD countries, especially when relating its specific objectives to broader policy goals.  There
are a variety of methodological, operational and programme impact issues related to evaluating
technology diffusion that could benefit from cross-national comparison.  The OECD work on
best practices in technology and innovation policy and the European Commission’s European
Innovation Monitoring System (EIMS) respond to this need in documenting and comparing the
efficiency of similar programmes across different countries.
Management capabilities
Subsidised consultancy and training services
There is a general consensus that the competitiveness of an individual SME is strongly related to
the “quality” of its owner/manager.  “Quality” is, in this context, strongly related to the human capital of
the individual, in turn influenced by a combination of formal education, training and experiential learning.
In most OECD countries, it is also the case that:
 the formal educational qualifications of individuals managing smaller enterprises are inferior
to those managing larger enterprises;  and
 the probability that a worker or manager is in receipt of formal training is significantly less
in small, than in large, enterprises.
Several G7 governments have sought to enhance the “quality” of owner/managers of SMEs
either by encouraging (subsidising) training and/or by providing access to (subsidised) advisory and
consultancy services.
The precise nature of these services varies widely from one G7 country to another.  Probably the
most extensive assistance is provided by Japan, which has both a highly developed system of advisory
services and also SME colleges.  Established initially in 1962, there are now eight colleges educating
SME employees, consultants and managers.  Formal training is provided in courses, of up to 12 months’
duration, which are certified by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI).  In 1993 alone,
short- and long-term training programmes were provided for more than 11 000 people.
Until 1994 the United Kingdom had a consultancy initiative in which SMEs employing external
consultants in marketing, quality, design, etc., for up to 15 days were subsidised at up to 50 per cent.  The
role of the consultant was to produce a development plan, in conjunction with the SME, which the SME
would then implement after the consultant’s departure.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested