open pdf file in c# windows application : Adding text fields to a pdf Library control component .net web page windows mvc 2227991-part967

Purpose and Organization 
of the Report 
his Report provides guidance for communities that are consider­
ing how best to address a youth gang problem that already ex­
ists or threatens to become a reality. The guidance is based on 
the implementation of the Comprehensive Gang Model (Model) devel­
oped through the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention 
(OJJDP), U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), and most recently tested in 
OJJDP’s Gang Reduction Program. 
The Report describes the research that produced the Model, notes essential findings from evalua­
tions of several programs demonstrating the Model in a variety of environments, and outlines 
“best practices” obtained from practitioners with years of experience in planning, implementing, 
and overseeing variations of the Model in their communities. 
The Model and best practices contain critical elements that distinguish it from typical program 
approaches to gangs. The Model’s key distinguishing feature is a strategic planning process that 
empowers communities to assess their own gang problems and fashion a complement of anti-
gang strategies and program activities. Community leaders considering this Model will be able to 
call on a strategic planning tool developed by OJJDP and available at no cost. OJJDP’s Socioeco­
nomic Mapping and Resource Topography (SMART) system is available online through the OJJDP 
Web site (go to http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/ojjdp, and select “Tools”). 
The main section of the report presents best practices for the Comprehensive Gang Model and 
highlights results of a National Youth Gang Center survey and a meeting of practitioners regarding 
their experiences in implementing the Model. This section contains specific practices that work 
best in a step-by-step planning and implementation process for communities using the Compre­
hensive Gang Model framework and tools. 
Purpose and Organization of the Report 
ix 
Adding text fields to a pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text block to pdf; how to add text to a pdf document using reader
Adding text fields to a pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding text to pdf in acrobat; adding text to a pdf document acrobat
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Add Password to PDF; VB.NET Form: extract value from fields; VB.NET PDF - Add Text Box to PDF Page in VB Provide VB.NET Users with Solution of Adding Text Box to
adding text to pdf in reader; adding text to pdf file
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Provide .NET SDK library for adding text box to PDF document in .NET WinForms application. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
how to enter text in pdf file; how to add text to a pdf file in acrobat
Section 1: 
Development of OJJDP’s 
Comprehensive Gang Model 
Research Foundation of the Comprehensive Gang Model 
he Comprehensive Gang Model is the product of a national 
gang research and development program that OJJDP initiated 
in the mid-1980s. A national assessment of gang problems and 
programs provided the research foundation for the Model, and its key 
components mirror the best features of existing and evaluated programs 
across the country. 
National Assessment of Gang Problems 
and Programs 
In 1987, OJJDP launched a Juvenile Gang Suppression and 
Intervention Research and Development Program that Dr. 
Irving Spergel of the University of Chicago directed. In 
the initial phase, the researchers conducted the first com­
prehensive national assessment of organized agency and 
community group responses to gang problems in the 
United States (Spergel, 1990, 1991; Spergel and Curry, 
1993). It remains the only national assessment of efforts 
to combat gangs. In the second phase, Spergel and his 
colleagues developed a composite youth gang program 
based on findings from the national assessment. 
In the research phase of the project (phase one), Spergel’s 
research team attempted to identify every promising 
community gang program in the United States based on 
a national survey. At the outset, this study focused on 101 
cities in which the presence of gangs was suspected. The 
team found promising gang programs in a broad range 
of communities across the Nation. Once programs and 
sites were identified, the team collected information on 
the magnitude and nature of local gang problems from 
representatives of each agency or organization that other 
participants identified as being affiliated with or being a 
partner in each local program. Spergel and his team of 
researchers interviewed program developers and re­
viewed all available program documentation. 
The more demanding project goal was to identify the 
contents of each program and self-reported measures of 
success. The team made an effort to identify the “most 
promising” programs. In each of the most promising com­
munity programs, the research team identified the agen­
cies that were essential to the success of the program. 
Finally, Spergel and his team made site visits to selected 
community programs and agencies. 
Spergel and Curry (1993, pp. 371–72) used agency repre­
sentatives’ responses to five survey questions
1
to deter­
mine the strategies that communities across the country 
employed in dealing with gang problems. From respon­
dents’ answers to these questions, the research team 
identified five strategies—community mobilization, social 
intervention, provision of opportunities, organizational 
change and development, and suppression (see “Five 
Strategies in OJJDP’s Comprehensive Gang Model” on 
page 2).
Development of OJJDP’s Comprehensive Gang Model  
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references:
adding text to a pdf in acrobat; how to add text to a pdf in preview
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Password to PDF; VB.NET Form: extract value from fields; VB.NET PDF - Annotate Text on PDF Page in Professional VB.NET Solution for Adding Text Annotation to PDF
add text field to pdf; how to insert text box on pdf
Development of the Comprehensive 
Community-Wide Gang Program Model 
Spergel and his colleagues (Spergel, 1995; Spergel et al., 
1992; Spergel and Curry, 1993) developed the Comprehen­
sive Community-Wide Gang Program Model as the final 
product of the gang research and development program 
that OJJDP funded. From the information gathered 
through its multimethod study in phase one (Spergel, 
Curry, et al., 1994), the Spergel team developed technical 
assistance manuals for each of the 12 types of agencies that 
should be part of a successful local community response to 
gangs, including organizations that range from grassroots 
child-serving agencies to law enforcement, courts, and 
prosecutors’ offices (Spergel, Chance, et al., 1994). 
Spergel and his colleagues also offered the general com­
munity design of an ideal Comprehensive Community-
Wide Gang Program Model. An ideal program should 
undertake several action steps (Spergel, Chance, et al., 
1994, pp. 2–5): 
n
  
Addressing the problem. A community must recognize 
the presence of a gang problem before it can do any­
thing meaningful to address the problem. 
n
  
Organization and policy development. Communities 
must organize effectively to combat the youth gang 
problem. 
n
  
Management of the collaborative process. In a typical 
community, the mobilization process evolves through 
several stages before fruition. 
n
  
Development of goals and objectives. These must in­
clude short-term suppression and outreach services for 
targeted youth, and longer term services, such as re­
medial education, training, and job placement. 
n
  
Relevant programming. The community must system­
atically articulate and implement rationales for ser­
vices, tactics, or procedures. 
n
  
Coordination and community participation. A mobi­
lized community is the most promising way to deal 
with the gang problem. 
n
  
Youth accountability. While youth gang members must 
be held accountable for their criminal acts, they must 
at the same time be provided an opportunity to 
change or control their behavior. 
n
  
Staffing. Youth gang intervention and control efforts 
require a thorough understanding of the complexity 
of gang activity in the context of local community life. 
n
  
Staff training. Training should include prevention, in­
tervention, and suppression in gang problem localities. 
nnn
Five Strategies in OJJDP’
Five Strategies in OJJDP’
s Compr
s Compr
ehensive Gang Model
ehensive Gang Model  
Community Mobilization: Involvement of local citizens, 
including former gang-involved youth, community groups, 
agencies, and coordination of programs and staff func­
tions within and across agencies. 
Opportunities Provision: Development of a variety of 
specific education, training, and employment programs 
targeting gang-involved youth. 
Social Intervention: Involving youth-serving agencies, 
schools, grassroots groups, faith-based organizations, po­
lice, and other juvenile/criminal justice organizations in 
“reaching out” to gang-involved youth and their families, 
and linking them with the conventional world and needed  
services.  
Suppression: Formal and informal social control proce­
dures, including close supervision and monitoring of gang-
involved youth by agencies of the juvenile/criminal justice  
system and also by community-based agencies, schools,  
and grassroots groups.  
Organizational Change and Development: Development  
and implementation of policies and procedures that result  
in the most effective use of available and potential re­
sources, within and across agencies, to better address the  
gang problem.  
Source: Spergel, 1995, pp. 171–296. 
 Best Practices To Address Community Gang Problems: OJJDP’s Comprehensive Gang Model 
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Support adding protection features to PDF file by adding password, digital signatures and redaction feature. Various of PDF text and images processing features
adding text to a pdf; how to insert text into a pdf using reader
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C#.NET program. C#.NET: Draw Markups on PDF File.
add text field to pdf acrobat; add text boxes to pdf document
n
  
Research and evaluation. Determining what is most 
effective, and why, is a daunting challenge. 
n
  
Establishment of funding priorities. Based on available 
research, theory, and experience, community mobiliza­
tion strategies and programs should be accorded the 
highest funding priority. 
In 1993, Spergel began to implement this model in a neigh­
borhood in Chicago. Soon thereafter, OJJDP renamed the 
model the Comprehensive Gang Prevention and Interven­
tion Model (Spergel, Chance, et al., 1994, p. iii). 
OJJDP’s Comprehensive Gang Model 
The 1992 amendments to the Juvenile Justice and Delin­
quency Prevention Act authorized OJJDP to carry out ad­
ditional activities to address youth gang problems. An 
OJJDP Gang Task Force outlined plans for integrated of­
ficewide efforts to provide national leadership in the ar­
eas of gang-related program development, research, 
statistics, evaluation, training, technical assistance, and 
information dissemination (Howell, 1994; Tatem-Kelley, 
1994). 
This background work led to the establishment of OJJDP’s 
Comprehensive Response to America’s Youth Gang Prob­
lem. The Comprehensive Response was a five-component 
initiative that included establishment of the National 
Youth Gang Center, demonstration and testing of OJJDP’s 
Comprehensive Gang Model, training and technical as­
sistance to communities implementing this Model, evalu­
ation of the demonstration sites implementing the 
Model, and information dissemination through the Juve­
nile Justice Clearinghouse. Implementation and testing of 
the Comprehensive Gang Model were the centerpiece of 
the initiative. OJJDP prepared two publications specifi­
cally to support demonstration and testing of the Model: 
Gang Suppression and Intervention: Problem and Re­
sponse (Spergel, Curry, et al., 1994), and Gang Suppres­
sion and Intervention: Community Models (Spergel, 
Chance, et al., 1994). 
Communities that use the Comprehensive Gang Model 
will benefit from the simplified implementation process 
that OJJDP has created. OJJDP synthesized the elements 
of the Comprehensive Gang Model into five steps: 
1. The community and its leaders acknowledge the youth 
gang problem. 
2. The community conducts an assessment of the nature 
and scope of the youth gang problem, leading to the 
identification of a target community or communities 
and population(s). 
3. Through a steering committee, the community and its 
leaders set goals and objectives to address the identi­
fied problem(s). 
4. The steering committee makes available relevant 
programs, strategies, services, tactics, and procedures 
consistent with the Model’s five core strategies. 
5. The steering committee evaluates the effectiveness 
of the response to the gang problem, reassesses the 
problem, and modifies approaches, as needed. 
These steps have been tested in several settings. Informa­
tion on those initiatives is provided in appendix A. 
The Comprehensive Gang Model 
in Action—OJJDP’s Gang Reduction 
Program 
Over the years, OJJDP has tested and refined the Compre­
hensive Gang Model to meet new challenges and address 
gang problems in new locations. Most recently, OJJDP 
developed and funded the Gang Reduction Program. 
Gangs are often the result of system failures or commu­
nity dysfunction. So, to address youth gang violence, the 
OJJDP Administrator decided to test whether the Model 
could be used to initiate community change in certain 
cities. In 2003, OJJDP identified four demonstration sites: 
Los Angeles, CA; Richmond, VA; Milwaukee, WI; and. 
North Miami Beach, FL. Each test site faced a different 
gang problem. 
Development of OJJDP’s Comprehensive Gang Model  
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
application? To help you solve this technical problem, we provide this C#.NET PDF image adding control, XDoc.PDF for .NET. Similar
how to insert text into a pdf; add text to pdf acrobat
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create fillable PDF document with fields. toolkit, if you need to add some text and draw Besides, using this PDF document metadata adding control, you can add
add text box in pdf; add text to pdf document in preview
Once sites had been identified, OJJDP held meetings with 
senior political and law enforcement officials and made 
an offer: OJJDP would provide resources to support a test 
of the Comprehensive Gang Model if the city agreed to 
change how they currently addressed youth gang prob­
lems. Each city would now focus on balancing gang pre­
vention with enforcement and commit to using 
community organizations and faith-based groups to ulti­
mately sustain the work. Additionally, each site would 
have a full-time coordinator, funded by OJJDP, with direct 
access to senior political and police leadership. This coor­
dinator would be free from substantive program respon­
sibilities and would ensure that each participating agency 
or organization met its obligations. He or she would also 
ensure and that the data and information generated by 
the effort would be collected and shared. Each participat­
ing agency remained independent, but was under the 
oversight of the gang coordinator, who had the ability to 
obtain support or intervention from OJJDP leadership 
and local authorities (e.g., mayor, police chief, or 
governor). 
In addition to reducing gang violence, the goal of GRP 
was to determine the necessary practices to create a com­
munity environment that helps reduce youth gang crime 
and violence in targeted neighborhoods. Because of this, 
GRP focused on two goals: to learn the key ingredients 
for success and to reduce youth gang delinquency, crime, 
and violence. GRP accomplishes these goals by helping 
communities take an integrated approach when target­
ing gangs: 
n
  
Primary prevention targets the entire population in 
high-crime and high-risk communities. The key compo­
nent is a One-Stop Resource Center that makes services 
accessible and visible to members of the community. 
Services include prenatal and infant care, afterschool 
activities, truancy and dropout prevention, and job 
programs. 
n
  
Secondary prevention identifies young children (ages 
7–14) at high risk and—drawing on the resources of 
schools, community-based organizations, and faith-
based groups—intervenes with appropriate services 
before early problem behaviors turn into serious delin­
quency and gang involvement. 
n
  
Intervention targets active gang members and close 
associates, and involves aggressive outreach and re­
cruitment activity. Support services for gang-involved 
youth and their families help youth make positive 
choices. 
n
  
Suppression focuses on identifying the most danger­
ous and influential gang members and removing them 
from the community. 
n
  
Reentry targets serious offenders who are returning to 
the community after confinement and provides appro­
priate services and monitoring. Of particular interest 
are displaced gang members who may cause conflict 
by attempting to reassert their former gang roles. 
The program has several key concepts: 
n
  
Identify needs at the individual, family, and commu­
nity levels, and address those needs in a coordinated 
and comprehensive response. 
n
  
Conduct an inventory of human and financial resourc­
es in the community, and create plans to fill gaps and 
leverage existing resources to support effective gang-
reduction strategies. 
n
  
Apply the best research-based programs across appro­
priate age ranges, risk categories, and agency 
boundaries. 
n
  
Encourage coordination and integration in two direc­
tions: vertically (local, State, and Federal agencies) and 
horizontally (across communities and program types). 
Highlights of activities from each of the Gang Reduction 
Program sites—Richmond, VA; Los Angeles, CA; North 
Miami Beach, FL; and Milwaukee, WI—are presented in 
the next section. 
 Best Practices To Address Community Gang Problems: OJJDP’s Comprehensive Gang Model 
Section 2: 
Best Practices for Planning and 
Implementing the Comprehensive Gang Model 
he best practices presented in this report are based on years of 
demonstration and evaluation in many sites across the country. 
Appendix A provides an overview of these demonstration ini­
tiatives, beginning with the initial implementation of the Model in the 
Little Village neighborhood in Chicago in the early 1990s, through OJJDP-
sponsored demonstrations of the Model in five sites in the mid-1990s, to 
OJJDP’s current efforts to implement its Gang Reduction Program (GRP). 
To determine which practices would be most beneficial to 
communities intent on implementing the OJJDP Compre­
hensive Gang Model, the National Youth Gang Center 
(NYGC) collected data from these sources: 
n
  
Comprehensive Gang Model Survey. A Comprehensive 
Gang Model Survey (see appendix B) was conducted in 
July 2007. It collected information pertaining to sev­
eral sites in the original demonstration program (Sper­
gel Model), the Rural Gang Initiative, the Gang-Free 
Schools and Communities Initiative, and the Gang Re­
duction Program, and from selected projects and pro­
grams in Oklahoma, Utah, Nevada, and North Carolina 
that used the OJJDP Model, but OJJDP did not fund. 
The survey included questions about the assessment 
and implementation processes, program coordination, 
the lead agency, administrative structure, prevention, 
intervention and the intervention team, suppression, 
reentry, organizational change and development, and 
sustainability. 
n
  
Practitioner Meeting. The preliminary survey results 
were used to develop an agenda for a meeting that 
OJJDP sponsored in November 2007. Representatives 
from OJJDP, NYGC, the initial demonstration sites, 
Gang-Free Schools and Communities programs, Gang 
Reduction Program projects, and programs in Okla­
homa, Utah, Nevada, and North Carolina met to dis­
cuss and record best practices based on their 
experience with comprehensive anti-gang program­
ming. The meeting also produced a timeline for use by 
communities that are considering implementing such 
efforts. 
n
  
Evaluation Reports and Staff Observations. “Best prac­
tices” of demonstration programs (described in appen­
dix A) and observations of OJJDP and NYGC staff who 
have worked with these programs for 15 years were 
noted in the evaluations. 
The best practices identified from these sources are orga­
nized into seven categories—convening a steering com­
mittee, administering the program, assessing the gang 
problem, planning for implementation, implementing 
the program, selecting program activities, and sustaining 
the program—and are described below. 
Best Practices for Planning and Implementing the Comprehensive Gang Model 
n
  
Individuals with influence within the community, in­
cluding residents, and representatives of grassroots 
community groups, neighborhood associations, reli­
gious organizations, and advocacy groups. 
Steering committees have been most successful when 
they have established a formal structure, such as 
adoption of bylaws describing how the committee would 
function. Using an approach such as Robert’s Rules of Or­
der provides a way to consider opposing opinions and 
can assist the committee in reaching consensus on dif­
ficult issues. Execution of memorandums of understand­
ing (MOUs) among key agencies commits them to 
assessment tasks and long-term roles in implementing 
comprehensive strategies to address identified gang 
problems. 
Highlights From the Field—Convening a 
Steering Committee  
Richmond, VA. The organizational structure in Rich­
mond includes an executive committee, leadership 
committee, and four subcommittees to help with 
oversight, strategic planning, and implementation. 
Even though membership remained consistent for 
the most part, there were some major changes in 
top leadership during the funded period. These 
changes included a change in governor, two attor­
neys general, a mayor, and a new police chief.  The 
strength of the collaborative partnership initially 
formed allowed for a smooth transition during 
these changes and allowed staff to remain on task. 
Pittsburgh, PA. Pittsburgh’s Gang-Free Schools 
program initiated memorandums of understanding 
between steering committee members and key 
agencies that enabled the project to maintain mo­
mentum during a citywide financial crisis and sus­
tain participation from agencies that withdrew 
from other initiatives. 
Administering the Program 
Selecting the appropriate lead agency and program direc­
tor are crucial steps in ensuring program success. 
Lead Agency 
Unlike other initiatives, the lead agency in these multidis­
ciplinary programs does not assume control of the initia­
tive, but instead provides an administrative framework to 
facilitate the work of the intervention team and the 
steering committee. A wide variety of agency types have 
led these initiatives. No matter which agency assumes 
primary responsibility for this initiative, its credibility and 
influence within the community are directly correlated to 
the success of planning and implementation activities. 
The lead agency has a number of important 
responsibilities: 
n
  
Providing a secure location to house client intake in­
formation, consent forms, and intervention plans. 
n
  
Tracking the activities of the partnering agencies. 
n
  
Coordinating the activities and meetings of the inter­
vention team and the steering committee. 
n
  
Providing an administrative framework for hiring staff, 
if necessary. 
n
  
Administering funds and grant contracts as directed by 
the steering committee. 
As set forth in table 1, experience has shown that each 
type of agency has its advantages and disadvantages. 
Each community has varying needs based on existing 
community dynamics (e.g., local politics, existing collabo­
rations, agencies’ management capacities, and the loca­
tion of the target area), which will inevitably influence 
the selection of the lead agency for the program. 
Lead agencies will incur significant costs when building 
and administering the multiagency infrastructure of the 
program. These costs are closely associated with the 
gang coordinator’s position. In OJJDP’s GRP demonstra­
tion, approximately $150,000 was budgeted for the posi­
tion and necessary support. Although no site used all of 
those funds in any given year, the value of a full-time 
employee’s ability to focus partners on the message, 
Best Practices for Planning and Implementing the Comprehensive Gang Model 
Table 1: Lead Agency Advantages/Disadvantages: Program Implementation Characteristics 
Lead Agency 
Advantages 
Disadvantages 
Law 
• Law enforcement involved in planning and 
• Community members may not understand the 
Enforcement 
implementation 
• Processes in place for crime and gang 
information sharing 
• Greater access to daily updates regarding 
criminal activity 
• Access to financial and business management
support 
role of program personnel 
• It may be difficult to overcome distrust between 
outreach staff and law enforcement, resulting in 
obstacles to information sharing 
Prosecutors 
• Able to leverage the participation of law 
• They may be perceived as interested only in 
and Other 
enforcement agencies 
prosecuting/incarcerating gang members 
Criminal 
• Access to police incident reports and law 
• They may not have a strong connection to the 
Justice 
enforcement data 
target community 
Entities 
• Access to financial and business management 
support 
• There may be historic distrust between criminal
justice entities and service providers 
City 
• Access to key personnel in city departments and 
• Shifts in political leadership can destabilize the 
Government 
elected officials 
• Access to sensitive data from law enforcement
• Credibility and buy-in from city agencies
• Access to financial and business management 
support 
• Ability to set policy for key agencies 
program 
• City policies and/or budget constraints may 
make it difficult to hire personnel 
School 
• Buy-in from school administrators to ensure 
• They may be unwilling to provide services to 
Districts 
local school participation in the intervention 
team 
• Access to educational data
• Large enough to absorb the program once other 
funds are spent 
• Access to financial and business management 
support 
youth not enrolled in school 
• Decisionmaking may be bogged down by 
district policies 
• Hiring policies may make it difficult for school 
districts to employ outreach staff 
Local 
• Working knowledge of the target area
• Agencies may lack experience in working with 
Service 
• Experience with community planning 
gang-involved clients 
Providers 
and action 
• Gang programming may not be given a priority
• They lack administrative structure to manage
funds/grants 
State 
• Resources and credibility 
• The lead agency may be located well away 
Agencies 
• Expertise in grant management and 
administration 
• Access to financial and business 
management support 
from the actual program activities 
• State agencies may often be perceived as 
outsiders without a strong connection to the 
target community 
• They have less awareness of local politics and 
historical issues 
 Best Practices To Address Community Gang Problems: OJJDP’s Comprehensive Gang Model 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested