open pdf file in c# windows application : How to add text fields to a pdf application control utility azure html .net visual studio 2227993-part969

The Intervention Team 
Highlights From the Field—Maintaining the 
Steering Committee 
The intervention team is a primary component of the 
comprehensive approach. The steering committee should
Riverside, CA. During implementation, many steer­
ing committee members stopped attending meet-
determine the composition of this team and assign repre­
ings because they did not feel they were needed at 
sentatives to serve on it. Because the intervention team 
the table after the planning stage. The project di-
brings together individuals from disparate disciplines and
rector held face-to-face meetings with former and 
experiences, building a functional team is probably the
current members to provide current information 
about the project and their role. 
most complex aspect of the model.  
Pittsburgh, PA. Steering committee members were 
The intervention team:
provided a packet of meeting materials prior to 
meetings to ensure that time was not wasted dur­
n
Identifies appropriate youth/clients/individuals for this
ing the meeting. The steering committee chair en­
sured that the meeting time was reserved for 
program.  
substantive issues impacting the project. 
n
Engages these people to work with the team.
Richmond, VA. Staff are extremely dedicated to 
maintaining and growing partnerships. In addition, 
staff receive requests from organizations and per-
n
Assesses them on an individual basis to determine 
sons who wish to become involved in the collabora-
their needs, goals, and issues.  
tive partnership. 
n
Develops an individualized intervention plan for each 
client. 
OJJDP Compr
OJJDP Compr
ehensive Gang Model
ehensive Gang Model 
Core Strategy: Social Intervention 
Critical Elements 
Youth-serving agencies, schools, grassroots groups, 
Street outreach is established to focus on core gang 
faith-based and other organizations provide social 
youth and later on high-risk youth, with special capacity 
services to gang youth and youth at high risk of gang 
to reach both nonadjudicated and adjudicated youth. 
involvement as identified through street outreach 
The primary focus of street outreach services is ensuring
and driven by the problem assessment findings. 
safety while remaining aware of and linking youth and 
Social intervention is directed to the target youth indi-
families to educational preparation, prevocational or 
vidually and not primarily to the gang as a unit, al-
vocational training, job development, job referral, par-
though understanding and sensitivity to gang structure 
ent training, mentoring, family counseling, drug treat-
and “system” are essential to influencing individual 
ment, tattoo removal, and other services in appropriate 
gang youth and providing effective intervention. 
ways. 
All key organizations located in the target area are 
Outreach activities such as recreation and arts are care-
encouraged to make needed services and facilities 
fully arranged so as not to become a primary focus but 
available to gang youth and youth at high risk of 
a means to establish interpersonal relationships, de-
gang involvement. 
velop trust, and provide access to opportunities and 
other essential resources or services.
Targeted youth (and their families) are provided with 
a variety of services that assist them to adopt prosocial 
In-school and afterschool prevention and education 
values and to access services that will meet their social, 
programs such as Gang Resistance Education and Train-
educational, and vocational needs. Mental health ser-
ing (G.R.E.A.T.), anti-bullying, peer mediation, tutoring, 
vices are a critical ingredient. 
and others are offered within the target area(s), as are 
community programs to educate parents, businesses, 
and service providers. 
Best Practices for Planning and Implementing the Comprehensive Gang Model 
19 
How to add text fields to a pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to insert text into a pdf with acrobat; add text field pdf
How to add text fields to a pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to add text fields to a pdf; add text to pdf
n
  
Ensures that multiple services in the individualized in­
tervention plan are integrated. 
The team should work together to determine whether 
referred individuals are appropriate for their services 
and then work as a team to serve these clients. 
Key agencies should quantify and clarify their participa­
tion on the intervention team through MOUs (previously 
discussed under steering committee). These memoran­
dums should address information sharing/confidentiality 
issues, the role each member will play in the team, the 
member’s participation level on the team, and other re­
sponsibilities the member’s agency may have in interven­
tion team activities. 
At a minimum, the following key agencies that are crucial 
to an effective intervention team should be represented 
on the team: 
n
  
Law enforcement representatives involved in gang in­
vestigation and enforcement. 
n
  
Juvenile and adult probation/parole officers who will 
have frequent contact with program clients. 
n
  
School officials who can access student educational 
data for program clients and leverage educational 
services. 
n
  
Appropriate social service and/or mental health pro­
viders who can leverage services and provide outcome 
information to the team. 
n
  
A representative who can assist in preparing program 
clients for employment and find them jobs. 
n
  
Outreach workers who can directly connect to pro­
gram clients on the street, in their homes, or at school. 
Other agencies may be asked to participate on an as-
needed basis, including faith-based organizations, 
recreational programs, community development organi­
zations, and grassroots organizations. 
Based on data collected during the assessment process, 
screening criteria for clients should be regulated by the 
steering committee. The screening criteria are designed 
to help the team narrow down possible referrals to en­
sure that they serve the most appropriate clients for gang 
intervention. Items to consider when developing target 
criteria include a demographic profile from police inci­
dent reports, an aggregate demographic profile of 
known gang members from gang intelligence files, and 
information collected from student surveys and school 
data. The screening criteria should be strictly adhered to; 
otherwise, the program risks losing its desired focus and 
effect. 
The intervention team should develop protocols for client 
intake assessments, obtaining consent/releases to serve 
clients, and sharing information across agency 
boundaries. 
Sharing data across service areas and with law enforce­
ment raises many issues. Successful efforts are character­
ized by solid relationships, clear protocols, and a 
commitment that information sharing is done to help 
individuals and not law enforcement. Other data and in­
formation sharing protocols already exist for law enforce­
ment purposes, and judicial warrants are always available 
in the appropriate case. 
Outreach Staff 
The outreach component of this model is critical to pro­
gram success. An outreach worker’s primary role is to 
build relationships with program clients and with other 
gang-involved youth in the community. Outreach workers 
typically work in the community, connecting with hard­
to-serve youth. These workers often constitute the pri­
mary recruitment tool for the program and serve an 
important role in delivering services. Outreach workers 
are the intervention team’s eyes and ears on the street, 
giving the team perspective on the personal aspects of 
gang conflicts and violence and how these affect the 
team’s clients. In addition to relationship building, out­
reach workers’ responsibilities include: 
n
  
Identifying appropriate clients and recruiting them for 
the program. 
20  Best Practices To Address Community Gang Problems: OJJDP’s Comprehensive Gang Model 
VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in
featured PDF software, it should have functions for processing text, image as Add necessary references Demo Code to Retrieve All Form Fields from a PDF File in
how to insert text in pdf using preview; how to insert text in pdf reader
C# PDF Form Data Read Library: extract form data from PDF in C#.
Able to retrieve all form fields from adobe PDF file in C# featured PDF software, it should have functions for processing text, image as Add necessary references
how to add text to pdf file with reader; how to enter text in pdf
Highlights From the Field—Intervention Team 
Richmond, VA. At the beginning of the GRP project, 
the project coordinator recognized that many orga­
nizations had come together on the team that were 
not used to sharing information or strategizing to­
gether.  Professional bonds and the ability to com­
municate across agencies have been strengthened 
through the collaborative process, which resulted in 
the free exchange of information between organi­
zations. The project has recognized and responded 
to the growing Hispanic population of the target 
area by providing culturally appropriate activities 
to that population. The Richmond intervention 
team has recommended funding for more than 
50 programs, many of which can be used as 
referral sources to the intervention team. 
Los Angeles, CA. Establishing policies and proce­
dures, such as an information sharing protocol, 
helped to clearly define members’ roles and bound­
aries, which facilitated the team’s functioning. Es­
tablishing individual relationships among team 
n
  
Identifying youths’ needs and goals to help the team 
develop a more comprehensive intervention plan. 
n
  
Coaching and providing role models for each youth. 
n
  
Coordinating appropriate crisis responses to program 
clients following violent episodes in the community. 
n
  
Providing assistance to families in distress, ranging 
from accessing basic needs to helping resolve family 
conflicts. 
n
  
Visiting clients who are incarcerated and helping to 
reconnect them to services when they are released 
from custody. 
n
  
Resolving conflicts and/or mediating between clients, 
their families, other youth, and/or agencies. 
n
  
Acting as a liaison between program clients and ser­
vice providers/schools to facilitate client access to 
services. 
n 
Working with clients who are seeking employment, 
from helping these youth develop résumés, to 
members by participating in team trainings and 
team retreats helps build rapport and trust among 
members, which in turn helps the functioning of 
the entire team. 
Riverside, CA. Information shared by outreach 
workers and probation during intervention team 
meetings helped provide missing links in investiga­
tions or follow-up with cases.  The team also 
worked together to identify gaps in services and 
participated in joint staff training that focused on 
how to work effectively with gang-involved youth. 
Pittsburgh, PA. The team was able to bring 
together representatives from law enforcement, 
probation, and outreach, along with school repre­
sentatives, from agencies that had a long history of 
distrust and hostility. The relationships of mutual 
respect established by the intervention team led to 
widespread support among participating agencies. 
identifying their skills and qualifications, to helping 
them apply for jobs or work with workforce services 
programs. 
n
  
Conducting gang awareness presentations in schools. 
Developing written job descriptions for outreach staff 
helps ensure that all parties are aware of the role of out­
reach workers within the team and the community. Some 
programs have hired former gang members. The ratio­
nale behind hiring individuals with previous gang con­
nections is their perceived ability to gain street credibility. 
However, these previous ties may cause strained relation­
ships between the outreach workers and other partners 
such as schools, law enforcement agencies, and other 
criminal justice entities. One option to ensure that out­
reach workers have street credibility is to hire individuals 
from the target community who do not have gang ties. 
If programs hire former gang members, it is extremely 
important that local law enforcement vet these hires to 
ensure that the prospective outreach workers’ gang ties 
are indeed broken. Further, outreach workers need to 
understand that their conduct in the community must be 
Best Practices for Planning and Implementing the Comprehensive Gang Model 
21 
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
Convert PDF to text in .NET WinForms and ASP.NET project. Text in any PDF fields can be copied and pasted to .txt files by keeping original layout.
add text pdf acrobat; how to insert text box in pdf
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
how to add text to a pdf in acrobat; adding text box to pdf
Table 2: Comparison of Advantages and Disadvantages of Internal Versus Contract Outreach 
Lead Agency 
Advantages 
Disadvantages 
Outreach Staff 
Employed by 
Lead Agency 
• Greater control and accountability over the job 
performance of outreach workers 
• Opportunities for intensive professional 
development 
• Many lead agencies may resist hiring individuals 
who have a criminal history 
• Outreach workers must maintain boundaries to 
avoid being considered police informants 
• Outreach workers may not have a strong connec­
tion to the community, and it may take time to 
develop these connections 
Outreach Staff 
Employed by 
Contracted Entity 
• Often have a long-standing history working with 
high-risk populations in the community 
• May have an existing client base that can be lever­
aged for this program 
• Steering committee and/or lead agency may have 
less control over the job performance of outreach 
workers 
above reproach, or else the entire program’s integrity can 
be compromised. Agencies that hire former gang mem­
bers need to monitor these employees’ behavior on and 
off the job to ensure that they stay true to their mission 
in the program. 
Outreach workers may be employed by the lead agency, 
or the steering committee may contract outreach services 
from an existing program. Table 2 illustrates the pros and 
cons to both of these approaches. 
Almost all communities that have implemented compre­
hensive initiatives have found that intensive professional 
development will likely be needed. Most skilled outreach 
workers have excellent relationship-building skills with 
youth, as well as indepth knowledge of the community 
and the youth who live there. However, outreach workers 
may have difficulty interacting with partners from other 
disciplines and navigating the educational and/or criminal 
justice systems. Outreach workers will likely need training 
on administrative requirements of the job, such as man­
aging a caseload, maintaining appropriate professional 
boundaries with clients, communicating effectively, and 
documenting client contacts. 
Building trust between street outreach workers and law 
enforcement officers must begin with the first meeting of 
the team. Outreach workers must understand that they 
are not police officers and should be discouraged from 
riding in police vehicles, attending meetings in police sta­
tions, or carrying police radios. Whether he or she has 
had prior law enforcement experience or has a concealed 
carry permit, an outreach worker cannot carry weapons 
on his person or in his or her vehicle. Similarly, law en­
forcement officers need to understand that the outreach 
worker is not a police informant. With the exception of 
information that could prevent bodily harm, law enforce­
ment should not expect street outreach workers to pro­
vide police officers with gang intelligence. 
Outreach worker turnover can affect the program’s pro­
cess. Program staff should develop a contingency plan 
when an outreach worker position is vacant to ensure 
that client services are not disrupted and that client refer­
rals are processed according to program policies. Projects 
that do not have a contingency plan will experience dif­
ficulty maintaining contact with active intervention cli­
ents and will have a waiting list for referrals. 
22  Best Practices To Address Community Gang Problems: OJJDP’s Comprehensive Gang Model 
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats
add text to pdf in acrobat; acrobat add text to pdf
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
how to add text to a pdf file in preview; how to add text to pdf document
Highlights From the Field—Outreach Staff 
Los Angeles, CA. The Los Angeles GRP outreach 
provider provided a “one-stop shop” for job train­
ing and preparation, job placement, counseling, 
and case management. The outreach provider also 
partnered with the mentoring program working 
with prevention clients to complete a mural project. 
Successful intervention clients spoke to prevention 
clients about their experiences and ways to avoid 
similar pitfalls. 
Richmond, VA. Richmond partnered with the high 
school located in the target area that was experi­
encing behavioral challenges with at-risk and gang-
involved youth. The school allowed Richmond staff 
to conduct meetings and bring resources directly to 
the school. These resources included the outreach 
workers and mentors. Richmond staff’s involvement 
in the school has led to ongoing conversations with 
State and private organizations to bring a free 
health clinic directly into the high school. 
North Miami Beach, FL. Outreach staff in North Mi­
ami Beach were selected based on their profession­
al experience and their ability to work with the 
Haitian population, the program’s primary target 
population. In addition to staff being bilingual and 
having experience working with the Haitian popu­
lation, they also provide support and education to 
program clients by facilitating participant self-help 
groups. 
Pittsburgh, PA, and Houston, TX. Outreach workers 
for the Gang-Free Schools programs in Pittsburgh 
and Houston worked with law enforcement and 
school representatives to identify potentially vola­
tile situations following violent incidents in the 
community, and to keep the peace on school cam­
puses in the target area. Outreach workers routine­
ly were involved in mediations between rival gangs 
in the target area and counseling with program 
clients. 
Miami-Dade, FL. Outreach staff from the Miami-
Dade Gang-Free Schools project identified families 
of program clients that were in need of food and 
basic assistance and built relationships with these 
families by providing gift baskets at the holidays 
and ongoing food delivery. 
Law Enforcement Personnel 
The selection of law enforcement personnel is crucial to 
the success of the program. Law enforcement officers se­
lected to work with the program should have: 
n
  
A strong connection with the community and the abil­
ity to build trusting relationships with community 
members, outreach workers, and other intervention 
team members. 
n
  
A clear understanding of the gang culture. 
n
  
The ability to communicate effectively with gang 
members. 
n
  
An understanding of the need for a comprehensive 
approach to address the gang problem. 
n
  
The respect of their peers, which may have a positive 
impact on the entire agency’s perception of the 
program. 
Program staff may face significant challenges initially en­
gaging law enforcement in the program. There may be 
historical distrust between law enforcement and other 
program partners. Staff may have to use unconventional 
strategies to initially engage law enforcement, such as 
providing overtime pay to conduct gang-crime analysis 
and to target and expand suppression strategies, recog­
nizing their participation, and bestowing awards. 
Consistent representation from law enforcement agen­
cies is crucial to program success. This ensures that offi­
cers understand their roles, are familiar with program 
clients, and have established relationships with program 
partners. Some programs found that establishing a peri­
odic rotation for law enforcement representatives gave 
the program greater exposure within law enforcement 
agencies, resulting in an improvement in the agency’s 
understanding and attitudes toward the program. 
Best Practices for Planning and Implementing the Comprehensive Gang Model 
23 
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
add text pdf acrobat professional; add text boxes to pdf
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
how to enter text into a pdf; adding a text field to a pdf
Selecting Program Activities 
Selecting the appropriate program activities is an impor­
tant step to ensure program goals are achieved. Activities 
fall into four general categories—intervention, preven­
tion, suppression, and reentry. 
Intervention Activities 
The intervention team, especially the outreach workers, is 
a primary service-delivery mechanism in this comprehen­
sive approach. Some best practices include the following: 
n
  
Intervention team members should review each client 
at referral; obtain consents to serve the client; perform 
an intake evaluation (one or more members can be 
assigned to this task); and then, as a team, discuss the 
client’s needs and issues and brainstorm together to 
create an appropriate intervention plan for each 
client. 
n
  
If referrals to services at specific agencies will be made 
by the team, the agency receiving the referral needs to 
follow up with the team to provide updated informa­
tion on the client’s behavior and participation. Service 
providers need to be readily accessible and culturally 
competent and should regularly participate in inter­
vention team meetings to ensure that they can pro­
vide client status updates and are aware of client 
service needs. 
n
  
Types of services that most teams will need to provide 
include employment assistance, vocational training, 
remedial/alternative education assistance, group coun­
seling, individual counseling, substance abuse services, 
mentoring, and services for families (such as support 
groups and/or parenting classes). 
n
  
It is important to clearly outline the roles and responsi­
bilities of each member of the team, as well as rules 
about information sharing prior to accepting clients. 
n
  
Setting a consistent meeting place, time, and day of 
the week will help to ensure regular participation by 
key agencies. Another strategy to ensure that the 
meeting does not go past the scheduled end time is 
to establish a client rotation schedule. 
Highlights From the Field—Intervention 
Activities 
Richmond, VA. The most successful programs were 
those that were either offered directly in the target 
area or where transportation was provided. Even 
though Richmond has public transportation, the 
community readily engaged with groups that 
brought services to them. An example is the One-
Stop Resource Center, which is located in the middle 
of an apartment complex with more than 4,000 res­
idents. Many of Richmond’s programs are housed in 
the center, including a free health clinic and com­
puter lab for area youth. 
Los Angeles, CA. The GRP program’s outreach pro­
vider is a well-respected and established service 
provider within the target community. The provider 
offers the majority of the project’s intervention ser­
vices, including job readiness, job placement, coun­
seling, and case management services. 
Riverside, CA. The intervention team created ser­
vices that did not exist previously. They established 
a job training program for clients that covered top­
ics such as how to fill out job applications, how to 
conduct an interview, and appropriate interper­
sonal skills on the job site. 
Houston, TX. Good communication and trust build­
ing with clients and their families were the biggest 
factors to successfully targeting gang members and 
at-risk youth. Providing the services directly and 
through referrals to other agencies showed the cli­
ents that the project staff were serious about offer­
ing help. 
Miami-Dade, FL. Miami-Dade created an on-the-job 
training program by partnering with a local home-
builder. With the assistance of school personnel and 
outreach staff, this program provided an incentive 
to engage youth from the target area in gaining 
needed job skills, improving social interactions, 
and boosting school attendance. 
Prevention Activities 
Even if their initial strategies did not include prevention, 
most comprehensive gang programs have eventually in­
corporated prevention programming. These prevention 
Best Practices for Planning and Implementing the Comprehensive Gang Model 
25 
Highlights From the Field—Prevention Activities 
Richmond, VA. Through meetings with community 
representatives, project staff learned that there was 
a need for a number of programs that ultimately 
led to the funding of more than 50 programs. For 
example, community members identified the need 
for longer afterschool hours and options for sum­
mer activities. The project expanded their partner­
ship with Boys and Girls Clubs, and also entered 
into a partnership with the faith-based Richmond 
Outreach Center to provide additional activities and 
longer hours. A viable One-Stop Office has been a 
key part of integrating services to clients. The abil­
ity of the Office of the Attorney General to reach 
out to all partners and successfully communicate 
the overall goals of the project has contributed to 
successfully integrating services for clients. 
Miami-Dade, FL. The main prevention efforts were 
a direct response to a student survey that asked stu­
dents what would keep them from getting involved 
in gang activities. The response was “something to 
do or a job.” The project designed an on-the-job 
training program that has been a main draw for 
students. The greatest success of the on-the-job 
training component of the project was the resulting 
level of pride and commitment that the youth 
showed while participating in the program. This 
component provides long-term effects and knowl­
edge that the youth can use for career advance­
ment and entrepreneurship. 
Houston, TX. Gang awareness presentations result­
ed in more calls from residents to report suspected 
gang-related crime according to reports from 
police. 
Suppression/Social Control Activities 
Suppression in these comprehensive programs goes 
beyond law enforcement activities. Ideally, all program 
partners work together to hold the targeted youth ac­
countable when necessary. Law enforcement’s role in 
these programs includes: 
n
  
Ongoing crime data analysis. 
n
  
A high level of information sharing between agencies 
and across disciplines. 
n
  
Participation in the intervention team and steering 
committee. 
n
  
Suppression activities tailored to address specific gang-
related problems. 
n
  
Apprising other intervention team members of unsafe 
situations. 
Gang crime data should drive gang suppression strategies 
used in the target community and should also be respon­
sive to the local community, the intervention team, and 
the steering committee. These strategies should be 
viewed as part of a larger whole, rather than as singular, 
one-time-only activities. 
Some examples of successful suppression strategies 
include: 
n
  
Participating in joint police/probation activities, includ­
ing conducting probation searches of the homes and 
vehicles of gang-involved probationers. 
n
  
Targeting enforcement to the times, places, and events 
where data analysis and historic gang enforcement 
patterns indicate gangs are active. 
n
  
Designing investigative strategies to address specific 
gang-related crimes. 
n
  
Executing directed patrols of locations where gang 
members congregate. 
n
  
Conducting community forums to address incidents. 
n
  
Establishing community prosecution and/or vertical 
prosecution strategies to prosecute gang crime more 
effectively. 
n
  
Making informal contacts with targeted youth and 
their families. 
Program partners should work together with law en­
forcement to enforce community norms for youth behav­
ior. These activities may be used in concert with 
suppression strategies to address less serious antisocial, 
gang-related behavior. Examples of ways that other part­
ner agencies can assist with suppressing gang activity 
include: 
Best Practices for Planning and Implementing the Comprehensive Gang Model 
27 
n
  
Use of in- and out-of-school suspensions, when 
needed. 
n
  
Tracking and reporting of attendance/grades. 
n
  
Tracking of program participation. 
n
  
Being aware of and supporting conditions of 
probation/parole. 
n
  
Reinforcing program requirements and supporting 
other programs’ rules. 
In the best programs, suppression is integrated with 
services. Even outreach workers play a significant role in 
addressing negative behaviors with program clients and 
requiring accountability. 
Reentry Activities 
Reentry within these comprehensive programs is often 
handled as an overlapping function with intervention. 
Because gang-involved individuals are almost constantly 
entering or leaving one system or another, and because 
many of them are frequently incarcerated for brief 
periods of time, intervention clients are generally served 
during incarceration through regular contacts and pre­
release planning. 
Program staff should develop a policy for serving clients 
who become incarcerated during the program. The 
length and location of incarceration may affect the pro­
gram’s ability to maintain contact and services to a client. 
In general, clients serving sentences of less than 6 months 
to 1 year should receive at least monthly contacts from 
outreach workers or other team members—face-to-face 
or by e-mail or telephone. The intervention team may 
consider closing the cases of clients serving long-term 
sentences, but it should remember that any contact with 
a client during incarceration may have a positive impact. 
Beyond maintaining intervention clients, it is recom­
mended that the program be aware of the influence of 
incarcerated gang members returning to the community 
and develop policies to address these individuals. For in­
stance, the program may want to establish a relationship 
Highlights From the Field—Suppression/Social Control Activities 
Richmond, VA. The directed patrol program used 
crime statistics and crime data logs to determine 
high crime days and times in the target area. Ad­
ditional foot, bicycle, motorcycle, and walking of­
ficers were added during those times. This resulted 
in a significant decrease in crime during those peri­
ods. During the funded periods, Richmond dropped 
from being the 5th most dangerous city to the 15th. 
More recently, it has dropped to 29th. 
Riverside, CA. Any proposed suppression strategies 
were discussed at the intervention team meeting 
and brought to the attention of the steering com­
mittee for their guidance and approval. 
North Miami Beach, FL. North Miami Beach part­
nered with the local police department to imple­
ment directed patrols and the continuation of a 
truancy interdiction program. 
Houston, TX. The law enforcement and criminal 
justice partnership assisted in providing more vis­
ibility and presence of gang unit officers to deter 
youth on probation from committing more crimes. 
The police improved their gang intelligence process 
through getting to know youth and families on a 
personal level and interaction with other criminal 
justice agencies. This strategy also helped prevent 
gang shootings or fights around schools and parks. 
Police initially started out with a “suppression only” 
mentality, but soon understood the benefits of es­
tablishing a relationship with gang members that 
would then lead to information that could help 
solve or prevent crimes. 
Miami-Dade, FL. Changes were made to the field 
interview cards officers used to more effectively 
capture gang information and gang crime data. 
This change was a result of the direction of the 
steering committee’s leadership and their commit­
ment to communicate with law enforcement. 
28  Best Practices To Address Community Gang Problems: OJJDP’s Comprehensive Gang Model 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested