open pdf file in c# windows application : Add text to pdf document online control SDK system azure wpf asp.net console 2227994-part970

with probation/parole authorities, and also with correc­
tions personnel, to identify gang members who are due 
to be released. Outreach staff can visit these inmates pri­
or to release to help develop a supportive plan for their 
return to the community and to recruit them into the 
program. 
Common needs for clients reentering the community in­
clude housing, drug and alcohol treatment, and job train­
ing and placement. Especially critical are job training and 
placement opportunities for convicted offenders, and 
programs should consider ways to make these opportuni­
ties economically feasible for both intervention and reen­
try clients. Transportation assistance that addresses safety 
issues for these clients is also important. 
Probation/parole representatives who serve on the inter­
vention team can also ensure that clients receive needed 
services and supervision. Probation and parole officers 
are familiar with reentry services within the community 
and can educate the team members on available services. 
Programs may want to augment existing services in com­
munities where reentry programs are inadequate for the 
target population or are scarce. 
Highlights From the Field—Reentry Activities 
Houston, TX. Outreach workers in Houston main­
tained regular contact with incarcerated clients, 
and developed prerelease case management 
plans to help individuals transition back into the 
community. 
Richmond, VA. Richmond funds two programs with 
two agencies to provide offender reentry programs 
to inmates prior to release back into the commu­
nity. These programs help incarcerated youth deal 
with issues such as completion of high school edu­
cation, drug and alcohol abuse, and family and par­
enting issues. In addition, Richmond has partnered 
with faith-based programs that offer residential 
programs for reentering offenders. 
Sustaining the Program 
Programs should begin planning for long-term sustain-
ability during the initial stages of implementation. Pro­
grams that were sustained long-term had two key 
practices. First, they standardized and institutionalized 
data collection to show program outcomes. Access to 
these data was invaluable for leveraging funds and 
resources. Second, these programs utilized strong and 
engaged steering committees that shared ownership and 
responsibility for the programs among the key agencies. 
The importance of these two factors in sustaining multi-
agency programs cannot be overstated. 
Other successful strategies included: 
n
  
Participating in statewide efforts to further develop 
anti-gang strategies backed by Federal and State 
funds. Programs that can demonstrate positive out­
comes and that have a good reputation in the target 
community are more likely to be funded as a part of 
larger efforts. 
n
  
Seeking the local business community’s support for 
specific elements of the program such as the interven­
tion team, outreach staff, or specific prevention 
programs. 
n
  
Pursuing commitments from key agencies to dedicate 
staff time to the project prior to implementation 
through the use of MOUs or letters of commitment. 
n
  
Leveraging funds from other agencies or planning for 
the program to be absorbed within an established 
agency. 
n
  
Requiring sustainability planning from contracted 
agencies. This may enable program partners to iden­
tify resources to sustain that element of the program 
after the original funding expires. 
Best Practices for Planning and Implementing the Comprehensive Gang Model 
29 
Add text to pdf document online - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to enter text in a pdf document; how to add text fields to a pdf document
Add text to pdf document online - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding text fields to pdf; how to add text field to pdf
Table 4: Timeline for Implementing a Comprehensive 
Gang Program 
This timeline provides a general idea of the activities in each phase and, based on experiences of other comprehensive 
projects, the approximate length of time it takes to complete the activities in each phase. Each community’s administrative 
structure and practices, community politics, and community readiness will dictate the actual length of each phase. 
Assessment and Planning (6–12 months) 
u 
Identify key stake holders. 
u 
Form a steering committee. 
u 
Establish gang definitions. 
u 
Hire a project coordinator. 
u 
Solicit a research partner. 
u 
Conduct a comprehensive community assessment 
(including the community resource inventory). 
Capacity Building (3–6 months) 
u 
Complete the contract procurement process for 
program services. 
u 
Develop program policies and procedures. 
u 
Advertise, hire, and train new staff to provide services. 
u 
Develop a client referral and recruitment process. 
u 
Select intervention team members. 
u 
Conduct intervention team training. 
u 
Provide gang awareness training to project 
service providers. 
u 
Develop a community resource referral and 
feedback process. 
u 
Develop a program referral process. 
u 
Train project partners on the project referral process. 
u 
Develop a data collection and analysis system. 
Full Implementation (12–18 months) 
u 
Initiate program services. 
u 
Initiate client referral process. 
u 
Begin client intake process for prevention and 
intervention clients. 
u 
Begin conducting client reviews during 
intervention team meetings. 
u 
Begin providing focused suppression efforts. 
u 
Begin conducting community prevention activities. 
u 
Reach program caseload capacity. 
See table 4 for a timeline that provides a general idea of 
the activities in each phase and, based on experiences of 
other comprehensive projects, the approximate length 
of time it takes to complete the activities in each phase. 
Each community‘s administrative structure and practices, 
community politics, and community readiness will dictate 
the actual length of each phase. 
See “Implementation Tools” for a list of publications, 
tools, and other resources to help communities assess 
their gang problems, develop implementation plans for 
addressing gang problems and establish intervention 
teams, plan strategies for reaching out to and interven­
ing to change the risky behaviors of gang-involved youth, 
and develop management information systems for cap­
turing program referral and individual client and contact 
data. Many of these resources can be customized for indi­
vidual communities. 
30  Best Practices To Address Community Gang Problems: OJJDP’s Comprehensive Gang Model 
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Protect. Password: Set File Permissions. Password: Open Document. Edit Digital Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work with
how to add text to a pdf file; add text to pdf without acrobat
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
adding text to a pdf in preview; how to add text box in pdf file
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
allowed. passwordSetting.IsCopy = True ' Allow to assemble document. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
how to add text to a pdf in reader; how to insert pdf into email text
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document online in C#.NET
versions. Users can add sticky note to PDF document. Able to Highlight PDF text. Able to underline PDF text with straight line. Support
add text pdf professional; how to add a text box to a pdf
Notes
1. The five survey questions were: (1) What are your units’ 
or organizations’ goals and objectives in regard to the 
gang problem? (2) What has your department (or unit) 
done that you feel has been particularly successful in 
dealing with gangs? (3) What has your department (or 
unit) done that you feel has been least effective in deal­
ing with gangs? (4) What do you think are the five best 
ways of dealing with the gang problem that are em­
ployed by your department or organization? and, (5) 
What activities do gang or special personnel perform 
in dealing with the problem? 
2. Individuals and collective factors were identified as 
having community mobilization as a strategy based on 
their use of one or more goals and/or activities from a 
list of options in Spergel’s research that led to formula­
tion of the Comprehensive Gang Model. For example, 
any strategy that attempted to create community 
solidarity, education, and involvement was viewed as 
using community mobilization strategies. Prevention 
efforts involving multiple agencies were treated as com­
munity mobilization. All references to meetings with 
community leaders and attending meetings of commu­
nity associations were regarded as reflecting a commu­
nity organization strategy. 
Networking was considered the most basic community 
mobilization strategy as long as networks were not re­
stricted exclusively to justice system agencies. Creating 
networks of law enforcement agencies only was classified 
as another strategy: suppression. Advocacy for victims 
was subsumed under the community mobilization strat­
egy when the programs attempted to integrate offenders 
back into the community or to repair relations between 
victims and offenders. Victim advocacy was labeled sup­
pression when the program was clearly a strategy of 
crime control. 
Notes 
33
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
NET programming language, you may use this PDF Document Add-On for With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from
how to add text field to pdf form; add text to pdf file reader
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
adding text to pdf reader; adding text to a pdf in reader
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
freeware download and online C#.NET class source code. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo, scanned signature or logo into PDF document page in
how to add text box to pdf document; adding text fields to pdf acrobat
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
in C#.NET framework. Support to add password to PDF document online or in C#.NET WinForms for PDF file protection. Able to create a
how to add text to a pdf file in reader; how to input text in a pdf
References
Howell, J.C. (1994). Recent gang research: Program and 
policy implications. Crime and Delinquency 40(4):495–515. 
Spergel, I.A. (1990). Strategies and perceived agency ef­
fectiveness in dealing with the youth gang problem. In 
C.R. Huff (ed.), Gangs in America (pp. 288–309). Newbury 
Park, CA: Sage Publications, Inc. 
Spergel, I.A. (1991). Youth Gangs: Problem and Response. 
Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of 
Justice Programs, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delin­
quency Prevention. 
Spergel, I.A. (1995). The Youth Gang Problem. New York, 
NY: Oxford University Press. 
Spergel, I.A., Chance, R., Ehrensaft, C., Regulus, T., Kane, 
C., and Laseter, R. (1992). Technical Assistance Manuals: 
National Gang Suppression and Intervention Program. 
Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, School of Social 
Service Administration. 
Spergel, I.A., Chance, R., Ehrensaft, C., Regulus, T., Kane, 
C., Laseter, R., Alexander, A., and Oh, S. (1994). Gang 
Suppression and Intervention: Community Models. 
Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of 
Justice Programs, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delin­
quency Prevention. 
Spergel, I.A., and Curry, G.D. (1993). The national youth 
gang survey: A research and development process. In A. 
Goldstein and C.R. Huff (eds.), The Gang Intervention 
Handbook (pp. 359–400). Champaign, IL: Research Press. 
Spergel, I.A., Curry, G.D., Chance, R., Kane, C., Ross, R., 
Alexander, A., Simmons, E., and Oh, S. (1994). Gang 
Suppression and Intervention: Problem and Response, 
Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of 
Justice Programs, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delin­
quency Prevention. 
Tatem-Kelley, B. (1994). A Comprehensive Response to 
America’s Gang Problem. Washington, DC: U.S. Depart­
ment of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Office of 
Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. 
References 
35
Appendix A: 
Demonstration and Testing of 
the Comprehensive Gang Model 
hroughout the development and implementation of the 
Comprehensive Gang Model, OJJDP has attempted to 
evaluate the effectiveness of the Model through a variety 
of demonstration initiatives. Evaluation findings from these 
initiatives are presented here. 
Little Village Implementation of the 
Comprehensive Gang Model 
With funding that the U.S. Department of Justice (Vio­
lence in Urban Areas Program) provided in March 1993, 
Spergel began implementing the initial version of the 
Comprehensive Gang Model in the Little Village neigh­
borhood of Chicago, a low-income and working-class 
community that is approximately 90 percent Mexican-
American (Spergel, 2007). Called the Gang Violence Re­
duction Program, the project lasted 5 years. The program 
targeted and provided services to individual gang mem­
bers (rather than to the gangs as groups). It targeted 
mainly older members (ages 17–24) of two of the area’s 
most violent Hispanic gangs, the Latin Kings and the Two 
Six. Specifically, the Little Village program targeted more 
than 200 of the “shooters” (i.e., the influential members 
or leaders of the two gangs). As a whole, these two 
gangs accounted for about 75 percent of felony gang 
violence in the Little Village community—including 12 
homicides in each of the 2 years before the start of proj­
ect operations (Spergel, Wa, and Sosa, 2006). 
The primary goal of the project was to reduce the ex­
tremely high level of gang violence among youth who 
were already involved in the two gangs. Outreach youth 
workers—virtually all of whom were former members of 
the two target gangs—attempted to prevent and control 
gang conflicts in specific situations and to persuade gang 
youth to leave the gang as soon as possible. Drug-related 
activity was not specifically targeted. Instead, outreach 
activities included a balance of services, such as crisis in­
tervention, brief family and individual counseling and 
referrals for services, and surveillance and suppression 
activities. (Spergel, Wa, and Sosa, 2006). 
As seen in table A1 (page 43), the process evaluation of 
the Gang Violence Reduction Program (Spergel, Wa, and 
Sosa, 2006) revealed that it was implemented very well. 
Altogether it achieved an “excellent” rating on the fol­
lowing 8 (of 18) program implementation characteristics: 
interagency/street (intervention) team coordination, 
criminal justice participation, lead agency project man­
agement and commitment to the model, social and crisis 
intervention and outreach work, suppression, targeting 
(especially gang members), balance of services, and inten­
sity of services. 
Spergel (2006) examined the effects of the Little Village 
project on the approximately 200 hardcore gang youth 
targeted for services during the period in which they 
were served by the program. The following are some of 
his findings: 
Self-reports of criminal involvement showed that the 
program reduced serious violent and property crimes, 
and the frequency of various types of offenses includ-
Appendix A 
37 
ing robbery, gang intimidation, and drive-by 
shootings. 
 
The program was more effective with older, more vio­
lent gang offenders than with younger, less violent 
offenders. 
 
Active gang involvement was reduced among project 
youth, mostly for older members, and this change was 
associated with less criminal activity. 
 
Most youth in both targeted gangs improved their ed­
ucational and employment status during the program 
period. 
 
Employment was associated with a general reduction 
in youth’s criminal activity, especially in regard to re­
ductions in drug dealing. 
Spergel (2006) next compared arrests among project 
youth versus two control groups, one that received mini­
mal services, and the other that received no services from 
project workers. This comparison revealed the following: 
 
Program youth had significantly fewer total violent-
crime and drug arrests. 
 
The project had no significant effect on total arrests, 
property arrests, or other minor crime arrests. 
Because the Little Village project specifically targeted the 
most violent gangsters and the common presumption is 
that such youth are typically drug involved, Spergel ex­
amined program effects on subgroups of offenders with 
violence and drug involvement and with violence and no 
drug involvement, using the comparison groups. Program 
effects were strong for both of these groups, but slightly 
stronger for the violence and no-drug subsample. 
Spergel (2006) also compared communitywide effects of 
the project on arrests in Little Village versus other nearby 
communities with high rates of gang crime. His analysis 
compared arrests in the periods before and during which 
the program was implemented and revealed the 
following: 
 
The project was less effective in its overall impact on 
the behavior of the target gangs as a whole, that is, 
changing the entrenched pattern of gangbanging and 
gang crime among the target gangs than in reducing 
crime among targeted members. Gang violence was 
on the upswing during the project period (1992–1997) 
in this general area of Chicago—one of the deadliest 
gang-violence areas of the city—but the increase in 
homicides and other serious violent gang crimes was 
lower among the Latin Kings and Two Six compared 
with the other Latino and African-American gangs in 
the area. 
 
Similarly, the increase in serious violent gang crimes 
was lower in Little Village than in all other comparable 
communities. Residents and representatives of various 
organizations perceived a significant reduction in 
overall gang crime and violence in Little Village during 
the program period. 
In summary, although the outcomes for the Little Village 
project are mixed, the results are consistent for violent 
crimes across analyses at all three impact levels: (1) indi­
vidual, (2) group (gang), and (3) community (especially in 
the views of residents). A similar impact was not seen on 
gang drug activity, although drug selling was reduced 
among older gang members when the project helped 
them get jobs. Given that the project targeted gang vio­
lence, not drug activity, this result was not completely 
unexpected. 
The evaluation suggested that a youth outreach (or social 
intervention) strategy may be more effective in reducing 
the violent behavior of younger, less violent, gang youth. 
A combined youth outreach and police suppression strat­
egy might be more effective with older, more criminally 
active and violent gang youth, particularly with respect 
to drug-related crimes. The best indicators of reduced 
total offenses were older age, association with probation 
38   Appendix A 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested