open pdf file in c# windows application : Adding text to pdf online Library SDK component asp.net .net azure mvc 250730051c0-part977

Electronic Word of Mouth: 
A Genre Analysis of Product Reviews on Consumer Opinion Web Sites
Irene Pollach 
Vienna University of Economics and Business Administration 
irene.pollach@wu-wien.ac.at 
Abstract 
Consumer opinion Web sites enable consumers to post 
reviews of products and services or view the experiences 
of other consumers. This form of writing can be consid-
ered a truly digital genre, as consumers were not able to 
share their opinions with other consumers in a structured, 
written format before the advent of the Internet. To iden-
tify  rules  and  conventions  established  by  the  genre 
community, a sample of 358 product reviews was exam-
ined using a methodology that combines elements of case 
study research, corpus linguistics, and textual analysis. 
More precisely, the analysis focused on structure, content, 
audience appeals, sentence style, and word choice. The 
results of this analysis have implications for improving 
the design of consumer opinion Web sites with a view to 
making them more useful sources of consumer knowledge. 
1. Introduction 
In the past, consumers used to talk to other people 
when looking for opinions on a particular brand, product 
or  company.  This  became  known  as  word-of-mouth 
(WOM) in the marketing literature. With the advent of 
computer-mediated communication, these  conversations 
moved to the WWW where consumers can share their 
opinions,  thus  engaging  in  electronic  word-of-mouth 
(eWOM). Since such messages did not exist in writing 
before but were sent and received orally in an unstruc-
tured manner, online product reviews written by consum-
ers for other consumers are considered a new genre. Like 
any digital genre, consumer opinion sites and therefore 
online  product  reviews  are  undergoing  tremendous 
change and will continue to do so. Therefore, it may be 
useful to have a snapshot of this genre, which could serve 
as a starting point for tracking the changes it will undergo. 
The genre's evolution may be of particular interest to 
companies harvesting consumer opinion Web  sites for 
marketing intelligence. Accordingly, this paper seeks to 
gain insights into the current nature of online product 
reviews and the rules established by the genre community. 
2. The Nature of Electronic Word-of-Mouth 
In general, word-of-mouth is defined as informal, non-
commercial, oral, person-to-person communication about 
a brand, a product or a service between two or more con-
sumers [1]. WOM among consumers incorporates three 
different activities. First, information is sought for imme-
diate use aimed at risk reduction. Second, information is 
obtained and stored for future usage and, third, informa-
tion is shared in order to influence other people's deci-
sions [25]. WOM is used when buyers lack the informa-
tion necessary for a purchase or when they perceive the 
risk associated with the purchase as high [22]. Consumers 
have been found to turn to personal contacts for reas-
surance and to loose contacts for their expertise [15].  
Since people are basically willing to heed the advice 
of strangers, the anonymity of the WWW is by no means 
an obstacle to the success of eWOM. Consumer opinion 
Web  sites  have cropped  up  on  the WWW,  providing 
unprecedented opportunities for consumers to voice their 
opinions on companies, products and services in a struc-
tured, written format in the  form of product reviews, 
complaints, discussion threads, or chats [16, 30]. This 
section looks at why people participate in this genre and 
what impact it may have on consumers and businesses. 
2.1 Motivation for Participation 
In commercial settings in the offline world, consumers 
have been found to initiate conversations with other con-
sumers to offer advice and information without having 
been asked to do so [21]. Consumer opinion Web sites tap 
into this very desire of people to share information about 
topics they consider themselves to be experts on [28]. The 
availability of their opinion to others is particularly ap-
pealing to opinion leaders, who receive and transmit more 
information on topics they are interested in than other 
people [22]. On the Web, consumers can claim authorities 
they may not be and would not be able to claim in the real 
world, as  the anonymity  of the  Internet  even enables 
people to post bogus reviews on products they do not own 
or  have never even  used  [18]. Apart from the social 
Proceedings of the 39th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences - 2006
1
0-7695-2507-5/06/$20.00 (C) 2006 IEEE
Adding text to pdf online - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add text to a pdf document using reader; add text pdf acrobat professional
Adding text to pdf online - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to add a text box to a pdf; add text to pdf in preview
benefits  people  obtain  when  their  opinions  are  made 
available to and read by others, they may also reap eco-
nomic benefits. Some consumer opinion sites offer finan-
cial incentives to reviewers [23]. 
2.2 The Impact of eWOM 
In general, consumers are influenced by and rely on 
what others say about a product before they buy it [32]. If 
there is not enough information about the product avail-
able from other sources and the risk involved for the 
buyer  is  therefore  high,  the  influence  of  WOM  on 
consumers'  purchasing  decisions  is  also  high  [20]. 
However, product information provided by companies is 
less  influential  among  consumers  than  information 
provided on consumer opinion sites or discussion boards 
[5]. Also, consumers consider negative WOM information 
more helpful than positive information in distinguishing 
between high-quality products and products of low quality 
[24]. To companies, eWOM may serve as a feedback 
mechanism that helps them to improve the quality of their 
products and to acquire new customers [12]. Companies 
may even offer consumer opinion forums on their own 
Web  sites  to  strengthen  customer  loyalty  and  reduce 
service costs [7]. The feedback companies obtain should 
become a key component of electronic customer service 
[8]. 
3. Genre Theory 
Genre analysis has been used in IS research to study 
communication practices occurring  within  IT-mediated 
communication systems [17]. This study applies genre 
theory to online  product  reviews  posted on  consumer 
opinion Web sites to examine the rules established by the 
participants in this genre. The following sections take a 
theoretical look at the traditional concept of genre, genres 
that have emerged on the Internet, and the generic nature 
of online product reviews. 
3.1 Traditional Genre Theory 
Miller suggested that only writers who are familiar 
with the context of a situation are able to use rhetorical 
strategies suitable for specific situations. Accordingly, she 
defined genre as  "typified rhetorical  actions  based  on 
recurrent situations" [27]. In their seminal work on genres 
of organizational communication, Yates and Orlikowski 
characterize genres by their shared communicative pur-
poses and form, the latter of which includes structural text 
features, the communication medium, and the language 
system. They also hold that the communicative purpose of 
a genre is determined by the whole genre community 
rather than individual writers [39]. According to Bhatia, 
the notion of communicative purpose enables not only a 
distinction among different genres but also between genre 
and subgenre, although the line between the two may be a 
very fine one [3]. Swales also stresses the shared commu-
nicative  purpose  among  communicative  events  as  the 
defining  criterion  of  genre,  which  he  defines  as 
"communicative vehicles for the achievement of goals" 
[36]. Yet another view on genre is offered by Devitt et al., 
who draw on rhetorical genre theory to explain how and 
why texts are important in our lives. They see genre as a 
reciprocal dynamic  that "reflects, constructs, and rein-
forces the values, epistemology, and power relationships" 
of a genre community [13]. 
3.2 Genres on the WWW 
In line  with  Yates and Orlikowski's  argument that 
genre repertoires change when new communication media 
emerge [39], Crowston and Williams have observed that 
the WWW has modified existing genres and given rise to 
new ones. In their large-scale study of Web sites they 
identified a large number of new genres but also found 
instances of genres embedded in other genres [11]. Dillon 
and  Gushrowski,  who  found  a  shared  set  of  user 
expectations  regarding  the  content  of  personal  home 
pages, hold that the personal home page was the first true 
digital genre [14]. Shepherd and Watters have identified 
six  different  cybergenres,  including  home  pages, 
brochures,  resources,  catalogues,  search  engines,  and 
games, which they characterize according to content, form 
and functionality [34]. Cleary, both form and functionality 
of  digital  genres  are  constantly  evolving  along  with 
advances in Internet technology [37]. To account for the 
dynamic and complex nature of digital genres, Crowston 
and  Kwasnik  have  suggested  a  facetted  classification 
scheme  for  genres,  arguing  that  genre  classification 
should be based on both document characteristics and the 
context in which the document is used [10]. 
3.3. Online Product Reviews as a New Genre  
Online product reviews written by consumers can be 
considered a truly digital genre in that they are a form of 
writing that has only existed since the emergence of con-
sumer opinion sites on the  WWW. Previously, people 
shared such information only orally in the form of WOM 
communication with other consumers or wrote letters to 
companies, but did not have the opportunity to share their 
opinions with other consumers in a structured, written 
format. Also, consumers were not able to obtain product-
related information from strangers. 
The purpose of online product reviews is to inform 
potential  buyers  of  the  strengths  and  weaknesses  of 
consumer products. People who share their  experience 
help readers make purchasing decisions and may even be 
recognized as experts in a particular field if their product 
Proceedings of the 39th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences - 2006
2
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET Create new page to PDF document in both ASP.NET web server Support adding PDF page number.
add editable text box to pdf; adding text fields to pdf acrobat
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
NET Document Viewer, C# Online Dicom Viewer, C# Online Jpeg images VB.NET PDF - Add Text Box to PDF Page in VB VB.NET Users with Solution of Adding Text Box to
how to insert text box in pdf file; how to add text to a pdf file
reviews are of superior quality. Writers practicing this 
genre are not professional writers, let alone professional 
critics. Nevertheless, they seek to produce a technically 
accurate  text that  is  helpful to those  not  owning  the 
product they are reviewing. They may also not be native 
speakers  of  the  language they  are  using  to  write  the 
product review. 
Electronic word-of-mouth occurs in a variety of for-
mats, including not only product reviews but also discus-
sion threads, chatrooms or complaint sites, which enable 
consumers to interact in the form of dialogues or poly-
logues. What distinguishes online product reviews from 
other forms of consumer interactions is that they are iso-
lated texts unrelated to previous messages posted on the 
same site [30]. Further characteristics of online product 
reviews include persistency, asynchronicity and the po-
tential absence of feedback.  
4. Data and Methodology 
Genre analysis, broadly defined as "the study of situ-
ated linguistic behaviour" [4], yields more insights when 
its focus is narrow, e.g. when studying a typical example 
of a genre, as it needs to take into account the complexi-
ties and dynamics of the world. Typically, genre studies 
incorporate a range of research methods, the most promi-
nent being corpus linguistics, textual analysis, and case 
studies  [4].  This  paper  makes  use  of  these  three 
approaches, attempting to identify the formal, structural 
and linguistic features of the genre of online product 
reviews. The results will contribute to our understanding 
of  their  nature,  scope,  and  significance.  Further,  this 
analysis provides a starting  point for analyzing future 
changes this genre is subject to. 
A corpus of online product reviews was collected from 
reviewcentre.com, a large online product forum covering 
hundreds of different products. The product category of 
digital cameras was chosen for the analysis, as it is a 
highly competitive market selling information-intensive, 
expensive products. Therefore, consumers are likely to 
turn to online sources for opinions on digital cameras 
before making purchasing decisions and at the same time 
may be willing to share their own experiences once they 
have bought one.  
Overall,  a  corpus  of  358  product  reviews  was 
compiled, using  all reviews posted in the category of 
digital cameras for the top 15 digital cameras from each 
of the top four digital-camera brands (as ranked by the 
forum). The 358 reviews resulted in a corpus of 64,400 
words, with an average of roughly 180 words per review.  
The  textual data pertaining to the genre  of online 
product  reviews  were  analyzed both  qualitatively and 
quantitatively.  First,  all  messages  were  closely  read 
multiple times to discover emerging themes that help to 
understand formal and linguistic peculiarities of this genre 
[40]. Second, the texts were analyzed quantitatively using 
WordSmith  Tools  and  a spreadsheet package.  For  the 
calculation  of  several  quantitative  features  it  was 
necessary to convert the text corpus into a word list. The 
large number of spelling errors in the text necessitated the 
manual correction of all mistakes using the spell checker 
of a word processing package. Ultimately, all words were 
lemmatized to remove apostrophes, plural endings, verb 
inflections, and adverb endings.  
Further, to be able to interpret the textual statistics of a 
text corpus, it is necessary to compare it to other text 
corpora. For the purpose of this analysis, one issue of the 
Economist  (November  30, 2002)  and  a  corpus  of  50 
privacy  policies  originally  compiled  for another study 
[29] were used as reference corpora in order to compare 
the product reviews to two completely different corpora. 
5. Results 
The analysis  looks at the genre of  online product 
reviews  from  four different  angles.  These  include  (1) 
structure and format, (2) content, (3) appeals to audience, 
and (4) choice of sentence style and words, as suggested 
by Devitt et al. [13]. The analysis takes into account both 
regularities  and  deviations  to  understand  the  rules 
established by the genre community. 
5.1. Structure and Format 
On reviewcentre.com, reviewers need to register with 
the site in order to be able to voice their opinions using a 
self-selected screen name. First, they are supposed to rate 
the product according to pre-defined categories relevant 
for a particular product. For digital cameras, these catego-
ries  include:  "Time  Digital  Camera  Owned",  "Image 
Quality",  "Battery  Life",  "Features",  "Ease  of  Use", 
"Value for Money", "Overall Rating", and the question 
"Would you recommend it to a friend?". Users can then 
voice  their  opinions  verbally  in  the  categories  "good 
points", "bad points", and "general comments". A typical 
review looks as follows: 
Good Points: 
Size, sexy shape, features. 
Bad Points: 
None I've found so far! Although I miss a view finder. 
General Comments: 
After having an Olympus 35mm camera for many years I 
was unwilling to have any other make of digital - you just 
cannot beat the lenses on Olympus. So when I got a Mju 
Mini for Christmas - WOW.  
A small, light sexy beast – intuative [sic!] to use, good 
display and handling. The only thing I miss is the view 
finder! 
Proceedings of the 39th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences - 2006
3
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Support adding protection features to PDF file by adding password, digital signatures and redaction feature. Various of PDF text and images processing features
add text field pdf; how to add a text box in a pdf file
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Viewer, C# Online Dicom Viewer, C# Online Jpeg images VB.NET PDF - Annotate Text on PDF Page in Professional VB.NET Solution for Adding Text Annotation to PDF
adding text to pdf form; how to insert text into a pdf
This structure channels the writer's opinion into con-
sidering both negative and positive points, even if his/her 
prior opinion strongly leans towards one end of the spec-
trum of possible opinions. However, a few reviews do not 
follow  this  format,  containing  either  only  general 
comments, only good points or only bad points. Three 
reviews  were  also typed exclusively in capital letters, 
which is detrimental to the readability of the text. For 
example: 
Good Points: 
Bad Points: 
General Comments: 
GREAT CAMERA FOR THE MONEY. COMES 
HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. 
On reviewcentre.com, readers of product reviews can 
respond to a product review by indicating whether they 
found the review helpful or not and—if they own the 
same product—they can also indicate whether they agree 
with what the reviewer has written. These evaluations are 
translated into points, indicating the "respect" shown to a 
reviewer. Further, readers can add verbal comments to a 
review. When users browse the product reviews posted 
for  a  particular  product  they  see  both  the  reviewer's 
overall rating of the product (expressed in points) and the 
readers' "respect" towards the reviewer, also expressed in 
points (see Figure 1). 
5.2 Content 
It would not be insightful to perform a detailed content 
analysis, as all reviews contain mostly positive, negative, 
or neutral information about digital cameras and digital 
photography. It seems to be more interesting to look at 
irregularities and deviations from the ordinary instead, as 
the amount of variation is inversely related to the level of 
consistency  of  discourse  [31].  Apart  from  comments, 
evaluations,  and  personal  stories  (e.g.  weddings, 
vacations, christenings) involving the product reviewed, 
the texts contain only few irregular features. One such 
feature is hyperlinks. Although people are not able to 
provide activated hyperlinks, five reviewers still pasted 
the URL into their texts. These links direct readers either 
to the store where they have bought their cameras or to 
their own online photo albums boasting pictures taken 
with the camera they are reviewing. 
Figure 1. Exemplary Review from reviewcentre.com 
Proceedings of the 39th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences - 2006
4
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
for adding text box to PDF document in .NET WinForms application. A web based PDF annotation application able to add text box comments to adobe PDF file online
how to add text to pdf; adding text to pdf file
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
C# source code for adding or removing annotation from PDF Support to take notes on adobe PDF file without Support to add text, text box, text field and crop
add text to pdf document in preview; add text to pdf using preview
A second deviation from the ordinary is questions. 
Rather than advising other people on digital cameras and 
photography some people ask readers for advice, e.g. Any 
ideas guys? or Can anyone help?. The corpus contains a 
total of ten such questions or cries for help. The fact that 
none of these were answered indicates that reviews are 
meant to remain in isolation and that other members of 
the genre community consider such questions to be viola-
tions of the genre rules and therefore do not answer them. 
In a few rare cases reviewers took up what other re-
viewers had written. Overall, there are six instances of 
such intertextuality in the corpus. They occur in two dif-
ferent forms. First, two reviewers back their own claims 
by referring to other people who have voiced the same 
opinion: I agree with previous comments on ... and other 
reviews all agree on. Second, they advise people not to 
pay attention to negative reviews, claiming that the re-
viewers just do not know how to use the product properly 
(4  times).  For  example,  one  reviewer  claims:  These 
people  should  properly  read  the  manual  before 
rubbishing a very good product. 
5.3 Appeals to Audience 
The interlocutors in computer-mediated communica-
tion are only textually realized personas and therefore 
visually anonymous [6]. Since people may not be who 
they claim to be, credibility is an inherent problem in 
consumer-to-consumer interactions on the WWW. Prod-
uct reviewers may well be manufacturers or merchants 
seeking to promote their products with guerilla marketing 
tactics or badmouthing those of others. Therefore, to be 
credible  reviewers  need  to  convince  readers  of  their 
expertise and trustworthiness. 
To examine whether authors of product reviews use 
appeals to credibility, the corpus was examined in light of 
Aristotle's classic credibility appeals of pathos (emotions), 
logos  (reason),  and  ethos  (character  of  the  speaker). 
Pathos-based arguments attempt to persuade by eliciting 
emotional responses from the audience. Appeals to logos 
use sound logic and often  also inductive reasoning to 
persuade, while ethos-based arguments seek to persuade 
by calling attention to the character of the speaker/writer, 
e.g. expertise, experience, authority [9]. 
Emotive appeals were only used sparsely in the prod-
uct reviews. The only instances  found were ironic re-
marks,  typically  self-mockery,  e.g.  even  for  a  novice 
thicko  like  me  or  idiot  proof,  so  that  suits  me.  On 
reviewcentre.com reviewers cannot integrate or link to 
images, which could serve as emotional appeals, into their 
product reviews to enhance the credibility of their claims. 
Appeals to reason were not very prevalent in the cor-
pus either. They were presented in the form of independ-
ent, third party evaluations of the reviewer's purchasing 
decision. Examples of such appeals include the claim that 
other people loved the pictures taken with this camera, 
awards the reviewers had won for pictures taken with 
their cameras, and the fact that other people bought the 
same camera after they had seen the reviewer's pictures. 
By far the most prevalent type of credibility appeal 
was  ethos.  Most  authors  of  product  reviews  provide 
information about their own history of digital photogra-
phy, often in the introductory sentence of their reviews. 
For example, most of them state the date on which they 
purchased their digital camera or for how long they had 
used  single  lens  reflex  (SLR)  cameras  before  they 
switched to digital photography. Also, they often stressed 
how thoroughly they had researched the market before 
they decided on a camera. Other information provided to 
demonstrate  their  expertise  includes  the  number  of 
pictures taken so far and occasions at which the camera 
proved invaluable. 
One cannot safely say whether the authors of product 
reviews seek  to  establish their authorities consciously 
(e.g. to be shown more "respect") or unconsciously, but 
the  analysis  of  argumentation  shows  that  they  do  so 
mostly  by  appealing  to  their  readers'  trust  in  their 
experience  as  photographers.  It  is  not  surprising  that 
emotive appeals are not used frequently, given that the 
raison d'être of this genre is to inform readers rather than 
to stir their emotions. 
5.4 Sentence Style and Word Choice 
 
5.4.1. Word and Sentence Length. Word lengths in the 
corpus of online product reviews and the two reference 
corpora were compared by looking at the distribution of 
word lengths in each corpus, which range from 1 to 12 
characters. Figure 2 depicts the relative distribution of 
word lengths in the three corpora. As the diagram shows, 
the  product reviews  examined contain  relatively  more 
short words (3 to 6 letters) than the other two corpora, 
while the other two corpora contain relatively more words 
of 7 to 12 letters. These results suggest that individuals 
participating  in  computer-mediated  communication 
(CMC) use shorter words than writers of more formal text 
such as articles in print media or legal documents. 
0%
5%
10%
15%
20%
25%
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Product reviews
Economist
Privacy policies
Figure 2. Relative Distribution of Word Lengths 
Proceedings of the 39th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences - 2006
5
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Support adding and inserting one or multiple pages to Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+.
add text to pdf in acrobat; adding text to pdf reader
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Access to freeware download and online C#.NET class source code. you solve this technical problem, we provide this C#.NET PDF image adding control, XDoc
how to add text boxes to pdf; how to insert text in pdf reader
The average length of sentences in the corpus of prod-
uct reviews and the two reference corpora was calculated 
using WordSmith Tools. The  average sentence lengths 
were 17.4 words for the product reviews, 22.5 for the 
Economist and 26.8 for the privacy policies. These results 
seem to mirror the level of formality inherent in these 
texts. Privacy policies as legal documents tend to have the 
longest sentences, while the Economist as a news and 
business  magazine  uses  sentences  of  medium  length. 
Online product reviews, however, use the shortest sen-
tences. A reason for this may be that they are not written 
by  professional  writers  and  that  they  are  written 
specifically  for  the Internet,  which  means that people 
often use simpler structures or do not even write in com-
plete sentences. 
5.4.2.  Lexical  Richness.  To  study  the distribution  of 
words in the corpus, a type-token analysis was performed. 
The type-token ratio (TTR) divides the number of distinct 
words in the corpus (types) by the total number of words 
(tokens), while the standardized type-token ratio (sTTR) 
is a running average based on consecutive 1,000-word 
chunks of text [26]. The sTTR makes text of differing 
lengths  comparable,  since  shorter  texts  tend  to  have 
higher TTR than longer ones. In general, a high TTR 
suggests that the vocabulary used is rather heterogeneous, 
whereas a low TTR indicates that a corpus is lexically not 
very  rich.  As  Table  1  shows,  the  corpora  of product 
reviews and privacy policies have rather small type-token 
ratios,  suggesting  that  the  vocabulary  used  is 
homogenous, as are the foci of these two corpora (i.e. 
product reviews and privacy policies). By contrast, one 
issue of the Economist covers a broader variety of topics, 
thus containing more lexical variety. Thus, the results 
suggest that lexical richness among product reviews is 
low, but not as low as among privacy policies. 
Table 1. Corpora Types, Tokens and TTR 
Product 
Reviews 
Economist 
Privacy 
Policies 
Documents 
358 
1 issue 
50 
Tokens 
64,400 
53,089 
60,255 
TTR 
7.12% 
16.32% 
5.00% 
sTTR 
39.90% 
49.74% 
33.41% 
5.4.3.  Word  Frequencies.  A  frequency  analysis  was 
performed,  looking  at  the  100  most  frequent  content 
words in the corpus. For this purpose all grammatical 
words (e.g. articles, conjunctions, prepositions, pronouns 
etc.)  and  other  words  without  semantic  content  (e.g. 
numbers, brand names) were removed. Also, photography 
terms were removed, as a high frequency of such terms is 
to be expected and the focus of the analysis is on the 
genre of product reviews in general rather than reviews of 
digital cameras. The remaining 100 most frequent words, 
which occurred from 39 to 676 times, were grouped into 6 
categories according to their meaning plus 2 categories 
containing  the  remaining  verbs/nouns  and  adjectives. 
Table 2 shows for each category the number of different 
words (types), the three most frequent words, the total 
number of words (tokens), and the type-token ratio.  
Table 2. Word-List Types, Tokens, and TTR 
Category 
Types Top Three 
Tokens TTR 
Verbs/nouns 
36  use, quality, take 
3,885  0.93%
Positive 
19  good, easy, great 
2,357  0.81%
Negative 
 not, no, problem 
1,241  0.64%
Emphasis 
 very, only, real(ly) 
1,046  0.76%
Consumption
 buy, price, need 
761  0.92%
Adjectives 
10  small, little, full 
599  1.67%
Time 
 time, last, day 
501  1.40%
Expression 
 recommend, say, think 
344  1.45%
TOTAL 
100  good, use, not 
10,695  0.94% 
Clearly, verbs and nouns with general meanings make 
up  the  largest  proportion in  terms of  both types  and 
tokens. As is also evident from Table 2, positive words, 
negative words, and words of emphasis play an important 
role in product reviews. The fact that the TTR of these 
three categories is lower than those obtained for general 
verbs/nouns  (0.93%)  and  the  total  sample  (0.94%), 
indicates that each of these words occurs relatively more 
often, and words of consumption do so slightly as well. 
The noteworthy frequency of time-related words can be 
put down to the fact that people tend to state in their 
reviews when they bought the product or for how long 
they have had it.  
5.4.4. Computer-Assisted Semantic Analysis. To assess 
the semantic content of all product reviews, several so-
called "dictionaries" (in the sense of word lists) originally 
compiled for the General Inquirer project [19, 35] were 
compared against the words used in the product reviews. 
These dictionaries capture all words that relate to a certain 
semantic  category but  are  not  mutually exclusive. To 
account for lexical ambiguities such as polysemes (words 
with several related meanings) and homographs (words 
with unrelated meanings sharing the same orthographic 
form), the  dictionary entries give the  probability  with 
which words carry each of their possible meanings and 
therefore belong to certain dictionaries. For this study, 
only words that belong to a category with a probability of 
99% were considered [33]. 
Of  the  182  dictionaries  included  in  the  General 
Inquirer, 13 were considered potentially relevant to the 
study of this genre (see Appendix for details on these 
dictionaries). They were compared against a lemmatized 
list of all words and their frequencies in the product-
review corpus to determine which semantic categories are 
the most prevalent in the corpus. This kind of analysis 
differs  from  the  analysis  of  word  frequencies  above 
(5.4.3) in that the former looked at which words (and 
Proceedings of the 39th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences - 2006
6
concepts)  were  used  most  often,  thus  pursuing  an 
inductive  strategy,  whereas  this  analysis  adopts  a 
deductive  approach  by  comparing the entire range  of 
words  used against  predefined lists of  words, thereby 
corroborating the findings from 5.4.3. 
Table 3 summarizes the findings from this analysis. It 
gives  the  number  of  words  each  General  Inquirer 
dictionary contains (GI Words), the percentage of these 
words represented in the corpus (Types), the frequency 
with which these types occur in the corpus in absolute 
terms (Tokens), the average number of instances of the GI 
words (Token/Word), and the type-token ratios. 
The  type-token  ratios for  the  GI  dictionaries  give 
insights into the distribution of GI words by calculating 
the average frequency with which a type occurs in the 
corpus. A high TTR indicates that a greater variety of GI 
words is used, while a low ratio suggest that only a few 
GI words (or maybe just one) are used very often. In fact, 
the five lowest TTR (approx. 5% or lower) can all be put 
down to just on GI word used more than twice as often as 
the second most frequent GI word in that category. These 
words  include:  very  (Overstatement),  small  (Under-
statement), excellent (PosAff, Evaluation), and seem (If). 
Table 3. General Inquirer Analysis 
GI 
Words  Types  Tokens 
Token/  
Word 
TTR 
Negative 
1,947 
13.2% 
2,184 
1.12  11.8% 
Positive 
1,472 
19.2% 
1,954 
1.33  14.5% 
Econ 
367 
22.6% 
992 
2.70 
8.4% 
Quality 
246 
20.7% 
427 
1.74  11.9% 
Know 
235 
31.5% 
1,000 
4.26 
7.4% 
NegAff 
133 
16.5% 
142 
1.07  15.5% 
Fail 
113 
8.8% 
31 
0.27  32.3% 
Overstatement 
72 
68.1% 
1,384 
19.22 
3.5% 
PosAff 
67 
40.3% 
558 
8.33 
4.8% 
Evaluation 
39 
74.4% 
582 
14.92 
5.0% 
Try 
36 
19.4% 
20 
0.56  35.0% 
Understatement 
24 
79.2% 
438 
18.25 
4.3% 
If 
10 
70.0% 
137 
13.70 
5.1% 
For a category to be highly represented in the corpus, 
the results obtained for the relative number of types and 
the  token-word  ratios  would  have  to  be  high.  In the 
present analysis those categories most prevalent in the 
corpus include Understatement, Evaluation, If, and Over-
statement. Not only was a high proportion of these GI 
words found in the corpus (approx. 70%), but the GI 
words  also resulted  in a  very  high  number  of tokens 
relative to the number of GI words (13.70 and above on 
average). Those categories least represented in the corpus 
include Fail, Try, NegAff, and Negative. 
5.4.5. Negation. Since product reviewers are encouraged 
to deal with  negative aspects of the product they  are 
reviewing, it is worth examining how reviewers report 
negative information about products they rate positively 
overall. In 52 instances, for example, reviewers coupled 
words like problem, gripe, complaint, niggles, drawback, 
quirks,  downer,  down  point,  bug  bear,  criticism,  and 
irritation with mitigating adjectives like only, occasional, 
small, slight and minor to downplay negative points. Also, 
semantically  neutral  words  such  as  thing,  point  or 
comment carry negative meaning when coupled with bad 
or negative.  
Syntactically,  negative  information  was  often 
presented together with positive information and linked 
with the contrastive conjunction but, e.g. It is true that the 
camera has limitations but ... or This camera is not 110% 
perfect but ... Also the argument that every product has 
downsides  or  that  certain  problems  occur  with  every 
digital camera were used. 
5.4.6. Personal Pronouns. Looking at pronouns can give 
insights into the extent to which people talk about them-
selves, about their audience, or about third parties. To 
ensure  that  only  pronouns  that  unmistakably  refer  to 
human beings are included in the analysis, third-person 
plural  pronouns  (they,  their/s,  them/selves)  were 
excluded. The results in Table 4 show that personal pro-
nouns  occur  quite  frequently,  averaging  8  personal 
pronouns per product review (excluding references to the 
third person plural).  
In particular, the frequent use of "I" (on average 4 per 
review)  indicates  that  writers  talk  frequently  about 
themselves. There are only a total of 42 references to the 
first person plural, suggesting that writers talk about their 
personal experience rather than their  families'. Writers 
also address their audiences directly or generically, but to 
a far lesser extent than they talk about themselves. In fact, 
a total of 2,035 first-person pronouns are used, but only 
755 second-person pronouns. Third parties are referred to 
with personal pronouns only to a miniscule extent. 
Table 4. Breakdown of Pronouns  
1,550 
you 
629 
my 
359 
your, yours, yourself 
126 
me, mine, myself 
126 
we, us, our(s), ourselves 
42 
(s)he, him, his, her(s), him/herself 
20 
Total 
2,852 
Pronouns per review 
5.4.7.  Formality.  The language  of  computer-mediated 
communication tends to be colloquial in nature and often 
reads as if it was spoken. Electronic discourse thus has 
characteristics  of both  oral and written  language [38]. 
Evidence for the informality of CMC language found in 
the corpus includes abbreviated word forms (e.g. addl, 
cam, yrs), non-standard spellings (e.g. pix, coz, w/o), and 
colloquial  contractions (e.g.  kinda, dunno, gonna).  To 
save writing time, apostrophes are frequently omitted in 
Proceedings of the 39th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences - 2006
7
contracted  forms  (e.g.  dont,  thats)  and  messages  are 
written  in  lowercase  throughout.  Further,  the  corpus 
contains a small number of conventionalized acronyms, 
used in CMC to shorten commonly used expression. Only 
three such acronyms were found in the online product 
reviews, including BTW (once), IMO (twice), and IMHO 
(once). These observations suggest that people seek to 
make their writing more efficient by using short forms, 
but are not avid users of Internet lingo. 
It seems that people do not take the time to proofread 
their messages and subject them to a spell check before 
they  post  them. Apostrophes  are  frequently  misplaced 
(e.g. is'nt, it's successor) and both spelling  errors and 
typographical mistakes (e.g. unfotunatelly, amature, or 
enthousiatic) abound. This suggests that the error toler-
ance in this genre community is high, valuing content 
over form. However, while writers probably feel that the 
anonymity of the Web protects them from embarrassment, 
such errors will impact the literate reader's impression, 
since language is the only means of self-presentation in 
online product reviews
In addition to shortened forms and errors, the language 
of online product reviews is characterized by interjections 
characteristic  of  spoken  language  rather  than  written. 
These interjections include ah/oh well, bugger, erm, hey, 
man, no, oh yeah, wow, and yes. For example: 
ɷ  Yes it was more expensive, but: 
ɷ  No, no, I dont [sic!] work for Olympus! 
ɷ  So when I got a Mju Mini for Christmas – WOW 
To  some  extent,  these  patterns  mirror  monologic  or 
dialogic speech, reflecting a conversation rather than a 
piece of writing. This seems to confirm the notion that the 
language of  CMC  is a  hybrid of  spoken and  written 
discourse. 
5.4.8. Paralinguistic Features. Participants in computer-
mediated  communication  have  developed  orthographic 
strategies designed to compensate the impersonality of 
written  discourse.  When  using  these  non-verbal  cues 
"[t]he writer tries to enforce a univocal interpretation on 
prose that is otherwise open to many interpretations" [6]. 
In particular, capitalization, spelling, and punctuation are 
used to express what disembodied words on a computer 
screen cannot convey [38], e.g. emotions or emphasis. 
One  such  means  is  iconic  sequences  of  ASCII 
characters  ("emoticons")  intended  to  add  positive  or 
negative tones to utterances or to indicate irony [2]. Only 
twelve emoticons were found in the corpus (9 positive, 2 
ironic, 1 negative). To signal emphasis of certain words 
visually, people use capital letters for individual words or 
put them in between asterisks (e.g. GREAT, *really*). 
Similarly, people overuse punctuation marks, in particular 
exclamation marks, to express enthusiasm for the product 
they  bought  (e.g.  Recomended!!!!  [sic!]),  but  also 
question marks (e.g. So what???), or combinations of the 
two (e.g. What's up with this??!!!) to express anger or 
disappointment.  To  convey  emotions  in  computer-
mediated conversations people also use conventionalized 
acronyms [2]. The only such acronym found in the corpus 
was LOL, expressing laughter. In general, non-verbal cues 
expressing  emotions  were  not  very  prevalent  in  the 
corpus, suggesting that people take their task as reviewers 
seriously, using neutral, non-emotive language. 
6. Discussion and Conclusion 
Writing is both a cognitive act and a social practice. 
Writing  adequately,  therefore,  means  adapting  one's 
words to the expectations of the interlocutors [40]. These 
expectations can also be viewed as the rules implicitly 
established by the genre community. The online product 
reviews studied also seem to adhere to such implicit genre 
rules regarding content, format, and language.  
Reviewers tend to take their task as critics seriously, 
stating not just that they love or hate the product but 
reporting  problems  in  great  detail  or  describing  in 
reasonable detail how useful the product was to them on a 
certain occasion. Typically, product reviews contain the 
product's  good  points,  its  bad  points  and  general 
comments,  all  of  which  the  site  encourages  users  to 
provide. It is common for reviewers to provide evidence 
for the expertise they claim, e.g. by specifying since when 
they have used the product and for what purposes they 
have used it. Notably, these reviews remain in isolation. 
They are generally not linked textually or hypertextually 
to other relevant information. Also, authors do generally 
not seek to encourage readers to respond to what they 
have written. 
The  language  used  in  these  product  reviews  has 
relatively few instances of the language typical of CMC. 
The sparse use of paralinguistic features suggests that 
reviewers  are  careful  not  to  make  their  reviews  too 
informal and  thus appear unprofessional. At the same 
time, the texts are less formal than news features and legal 
texts, as the narrower lexical range and shorter sentences 
and words suggest. Words of emphasis, de-emphasis, and 
vagueness as well as words judging the quality of the 
product are very prevalent  in online product reviews, 
suggesting  that  reviewers  are  enthusiastic  about  the 
product but are careful not to present their opinions as the 
universal  truth.  They  also tend  to  include  themselves 
using expressive verbs in their texts (e.g. I think) rather 
than the categorical present tense to describe how things 
are.  
Another point to consider in genre analysis is how or 
why the texts have been textualized the way they are. In 
the present study, the writers' state of strong emotional 
arousal may be the reason why they participate in this 
genre in the first place. The frequent use of overstate-
ments, understatements and words of emphasis as well as 
Proceedings of the 39th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences - 2006
8
orthographic phenomena such as overpunctuation, capi-
talization, and emoticons suggest that the genre partici-
pants are strongly emotionally involved with the subject 
matter. They need to express strong emotions verbally or 
sometimes orthographically to voice their satisfaction or 
dissatisfaction  with  a  product  and  to  recommend  it 
strongly or to advise people not to buy it.  
Noteworthy  deviations from  the  genre conventions 
found in the online product reviews include: Three re-
views typed in capital letters, ten questions directed at the 
audience, five hyperlinks, six intertextual comparisons, 
five  acronyms (IMO, IMHO, BTW, LOL),  and twelve 
emoticons. These features were found in 37 product re-
views, i.e. 10.33% of all reviews. One review contained 
three irregularities, two reviews included two such fea-
tures, and 34 reviews had one irregular feature each. In 
the genre community studied, there are no direct penalties 
for violating genre conventions. Readers can post com-
ments and show their "respect" towards a reviewer, but 
the usefulness of a review is not necessarily reduced when 
linguistic genre conventions are violated and therefore it 
seems unlikely that readers use these facilities to penalize 
reviewers for violating genre rules. 
Although the findings may not be generalizable to 
reviews of products other than digital cameras, the results 
of the genre analysis still have implications for the design 
of consumer opinion Web sites and in particular product-
review sites. In particular, some of the deviations of the 
genre rules can presumably be put down to the design of 
the  Web  site. For  example,  questions  directed  at  the 
audience would not appear in product reviews if the site 
had  a  discussion  forum  as  well.  Further,  if  the  site 
supported activated hyperlinks more people would make 
use  of this  facility  to  direct other users to their own 
picture galleries.  Also, giving users the possibility to 
make  personal profiles available to others  would help 
reviewers to provide information about themselves in a 
more structured manner. Alternatively, the site could add 
a field on top of the review box where people enter for 
how long they have used the product. It is worth noting 
that orthographic errors were so prevalent in the corpus 
that they can hardly be considered a deviation from genre 
rules. Although texts made available on a Web site are 
potentially planned and prepared beforehand, this does 
not seem to be the case with online product reviews. 
Rather, they appear to be the spontaneous product of high 
spirits. Offering a spell checker to writers would not only 
raise their credibility but would also make the texts better 
suited for corporate data mining activities, which could 
help companies to improve the quality of their products 
and services.  
References 
[1]  Arndt,  J.  (1967).  "The  Role  of  Product-Related 
Conversations  in  the  Diffusion  of  a  New  Product", 
Journal of Marketing Research, 4, 291-295. 
[2]  Baym,  N.K.  (1998).  "The  Emergence  of  On-Line 
Community",  Cybersociety  2.0.  Revisiting  Computer-
Mediated  Communication  and  Community.  Ed.  S.G. 
Jones. Thousand Oaks, Sage. 35-68. 
[3]  Bhatia, V.K. (1993). Analysing Genre: Language Use in 
Professional Settings, Harlow: Longman. 
[4]  Bhatia, V.K. (2002). "Applied Genre Analysis: A Multi-
Perspective Model", Ibérica, 4, 3-19. 
[5]  Bickart, B. and Schindler, R.M. (2001). "Internet Forums 
as Influential Sources of Consumer Information", Journal 
of Interactive Marketing, 15(3), 31-40. 
[6]  Bolter, J.D. (1996). "Virtual Reality and the Redefinition 
of  Self",  Communication  and  Cyberspace.  Social 
Interaction in an Electronic Environment. Eds. L. Strate, 
R. Jacobson and S.B. Gibson. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton 
Press. 105-119. 
[7]  Chiou, J.-S. and Cheng, C. (2003). "Should a Company 
Have Message Boards on its Web Sites?", Journal of 
Interactive Marketing, 17(3), 50-61. 
[8]  Cho, Y. et al. (2002). "An Analysis of Online Customer 
Complaints: Implications for Web Complaint Manage-
ment", Proceedings of the 35th Hawaii International 
Conference on System Sciences, Los Alamitos: IEEE 
Press. 
[9]  Cragan, J.F. and Shields, D.C. (1998). Understanding 
Communication Theory. Boston: Allyn and Bacon. 
[10]  Crowston, K. and Kwasnik, B.H. (2004). "A Framework 
for  Creating  a  Facetted  Classification  for  Genres: 
Addressing Issues of Multidimensionality", Proceedings 
of the 37th Hawaii International Conference on System 
Sciences, Los Alamitos: IEEE Press. 
[11]  Crowston, K. and Williams, M. (1997). "Reproduced and 
Emergent Genres of Communication on the World Wide 
Web", The Information Society, 16(3), 201-215. 
[12]  Dellarocas, C. (2003). "The Digitization of Word of 
Mouth: Promise  and Challenges of Online Feedback 
Mechanisms", Management Science, 49(10), 1407–1424. 
[13]  Devitt, A., Reiff, M.J., and Bawarshi, A. (2004). Scenes 
of Writing: Strategies for Composing with Genres. New 
York: Longman. 
[14]  Dillon, A. and Gushrowski, B. (2000). "Genres and the 
Web: Is the Personal Home Page the First Uniquely 
Digital Genre?", Journal of the American Society for 
Information Science, 51(2), 202-205. 
[15]  Duhan, D.F. et al. (1997). "Influences on Consumer Use 
of Word-of-Mouth Recommendation Sources", Journal 
of the Academy of Marketing Science, 25(4), 283-295. 
[16]  Evans, M. et al. (2001). "Consumer Interaction in the 
Virtual  Era:  Some  Qualitative  Insights",  Qualitative 
Market Research, 4(3), 150-159. 
[17]  Firth, D. and Lawrence, C. (2003). "Genre Analysis in 
Information Systems Research", Journal of Information 
Technology Theory and Application, 5(3), 63-77. 
Proceedings of the 39th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences - 2006
9
[18]  Gelb, B.D. and Sundaram, S. (2002). "Adapting to Word 
of Mouse", Business Horizons, 45(4), 21-25. 
[19]  General Inquirer, http://www.wjh.harvard.edu/~inquirer/ 
[20]  Gilly,  M.C.  et  al.  (1998).  "A  Dyadic  Study  of 
Interpersonal  Information  Search",  Academy  of 
Marketing Science, 26(2), 83-100. 
[21]  Harris, K. and Baron, S. (2004). "Consumer-to-Consumer 
Conversations in Service Settings", Journal of Service 
Research, 6(3), 287-303. 
[22]  Haywood,  K.M.  (1989). "Managing  Word of  Mouth 
Communications", The Journal of Services Marketing, 
3(2), 55-67. 
[23]  Hennig-Thurau, T. et al. (2004). "Electronic Word-of-
Mouth via Consumer-Opinion Platforms: What Motivates 
Consumers to Articulate Themselves on the Internet?", 
Journal of Interactive Marketing, 18(1), 39-52. 
[24]  Herr, P.M., Kardes, F.R., and Kim, J. (1991). "Effects of 
Word-of-Mouth  and Product-Attribute Information on 
Persuasion", Journal of Consumer Research, 17(4), 454-
462. 
[25]  Lampert,  S.I. and  Rosenberg, L.J. (1975).  "Word of 
Mouth Activity as Information Search: A Reappraisal", 
Academy of Marketing Science, 3(4), 337-354. 
[26]  Lebart, L., Salem, A. and Berry, L. (1998). Exploring 
Textual Data. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers. 
[27]  Miller, C.R. (1984). "Genre as Social Action", Quarterly 
Journal of Speech, 70, 151-167. 
[28]  Nah,  F.  et  al.  (2002).  "Knowledge  Management 
Mechanisms  in  E-Commerce:  A  Study  of  Online 
Retailing and Auction Sites", The Journal of Computer 
Information Systems, 42(5), 119-128. 
[29]  Pollach, I. (2004). "Online Privacy Statements — Are 
They Worth Reading?", Innovations Through Informa-
tion Technology. Ed. M. Khosrow-Pour. Hershey: Idea 
Publishing. 217-220. 
[30]  Pollach, I. (2005). "Trust, Quality, and Motivation in 
Consumer-to-Consumer  Interactions  on  the  WWW", 
Managing  Modern  Organizations  with  Information 
Technology.  Ed.  M.  Khosrow-Pour.  Hershey:  Idea 
Publishing. 425-428. 
[31]  Potter,  J.  and  Wetherell,  M.  (1994).  "Analyzing 
Discourse", Analyzing Qualitative Data. Eds. A. Bryman 
and R.G. Burgess. London: Routledge. 47-66.  
[32]  Price,  L.L.  and  Feick,  L.F.  (1984).  "The  Role  of 
Interpersonal  Sources  in  External  Search:  An 
Informational  Perspective",  Advances  in  Consumer 
Research Vol. 11. Ed. T.C. Kinnear. 250-253. 
[33]  Scharl,  A.,  Pollach,  I.  and  Bauer,  C.  (2003). 
"Determining the Semantic Orientation of Web-Based 
Corpora", Intelligent Data Engineering and Automated 
Learning. Lecture Notes in Computer Science Vol. 2690. 
Eds. J. Liu et al. London: Springer. 840-849. 
[34]  Shepherd, M. and Watters, C. (1999). "The Functionality 
Attribute  of  Cybergenres",  Proceedings  of  the  32nd 
Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, 
Los Alamitos: IEEE Press.  
[35]  Stone,  P.J.  et  al.  (1966).  The  General  Inquirer:  A 
Computer Approach to Content Analysis. Cambridge: 
MIT Press. 
[36]  Swales,  J.M.  (1990).  Genre  Analysis:  English  in 
Academic and Research Settings, Cambridge: Cambridge 
University Press. 
[37]  Toms,  E.G.  (2000).  "Recognizing  Digital  Genre", 
Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science 
and Technology, 27(2), 20-22. 
[38]  Werry,  C.C.  (1996).  "Linguistic  and  Interactional 
Features of Internet Relay Chat", Computer-Mediated 
Communication. Linguistic, Social and Cross-Cultural 
Perspectives.  Ed.  S.C.  Herring.  Amsterdam:  John 
Benjamins. 47-63. 
[39]  Yates,  J.  and  Orlikowski,  W.J.  (1992).  "Genres  of 
Organizational  Communication:  A  Structurational 
Approach  to  Studying  Communication  and  Media", 
Academy of Management Review, 17(2), 299-326. 
[40]  Zucchermaglio,  C.  and  Talamo,  A.  (2003).  "The 
Development of a Virtual Community of Practices Using 
Electronic Mail and Communicative Genres", Journal of 
Business and Technical Communication, 17(3), 259-284. 
Appendix – General Inquirer Dictionaries  
Dictionary 
Contains words indicating ... 
Positive 
positive connotations 
Negative 
negative connotations 
PosAff 
positive feelings 
NegAff 
negative feelings 
Overstatement  emphasis 
Understatement  de-emphasis 
Try 
actions taken to reach goals 
Fail 
that goals have not been achieved 
If 
doubt, uncertainty and vagueness 
Know 
(un)awareness, (un)importance, (un)certainty 
Econ 
concepts of business and economics 
Evaluation 
judgment and evaluation 
Quality 
qualities or degrees of qualities 
Proceedings of the 39th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences - 2006
10
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested