open pdf file in c# windows application : Add text pdf SDK control API wpf azure asp.net sharepoint 28-4.FAIRMAN2-part987

2007] 
FUCK 
1731 
IV.
F
UCK 
J
URISPRUDENCE
A.     The First Amendment: From Fighting Words to 
“Fuck the Draft” 
The First Amendment may say that Congress shall make no law 
abridging the freedom of speech,
134
but of course it doesn’t really mean 
that.    Whole  categories  of  expression  are  carved  out  of  protectable 
speech.    Defamation,  fraudulent  misrepresentation,  and  incitement  to 
violence are all types of speech that can be punished.
135
Political speech 
cannot.  In this dichotomous world of protected and unprotected speech, 
where does fuck  fall?   One commentator laments that  a  person “with 
four spare  lifetimes and a  burning  desire to find out whether  he may 
legally  scream  ‘Fuck!’  in  a  crowded  theater  will  come  away  in 
confusion if he looks for his answer in the opinions of the United States 
Supreme  Court.”
136
 To  be  sure,  the  Court’s  categorical  approach, 
compounded  by fuck ’s  utility,  makes  the  task  complicated;  but  it’s 
doable.  Generally, fuck  is protected “offensive speech” straddling two 
pillars of unprotected speech—“fighting words” and “obscenity.” 
In the regrettable 1942 decision, Chaplinsky v. New Hampshire,
137
the  Supreme  Court  carved  out  of  the  First  Amendment  so-called 
“fighting  words.”    At  issue  was  whether  the  states  could  punish  a 
speaker  for  calling  a  city  marshal  offensive  names  such  as  “God 
damned  racketeer”  and  “damned  Fascist.”
138
 Noting  that  there  has 
always been limited classes of unprotected speech, the Court described 
this  universe  as  including  “the  lewd  and  obscene,  the  profane,  the 
libelous, and the  insulting or  ‘fighting’ words—those which by  their 
utterance  inflict  injury  or  tend  to  incite  an  immediate  breach  of  the 
peace.”
139
 Thus,  the  use  of  “threatening,  profane,  or  obscene 
revilings”
140
could  be  punished  if  it  was  likely  to  provoke  a  violent 
reaction.  With rhetoric from the Court that lewd, profane, and insulting 
speech could be punished, fuck  would appear in jeopardy. 
Lucky  for fuck , the Supreme  Court  hasn’t used Chaplinsky as  a 
blunderbuss against  taboo language.   Instead, fighting words  doctrine 
has been narrowed to require that the speech be a direct personal insult 
likely to provoke retaliation from the average person.
141
Consequently, 
134
U.S. C
ONST
. amend. I. 
135
See Ashcroft v. Free Speech Coalition, 535 U.S. 234, 245-46 (2002). 
136
D
OOLING
supra note 3, at 57. 
137
315 U.S. 568 (1942). 
138
Id. at 569. 
139
Id. at 572. 
140
Id. at 573. 
141
See Cohen v. California, 403 U.S. 15, 20 (1971) (discarding fighting words doctrine 
because it was not personally directed in a provocative fashion); Street v. New York, 394 U.S. 
Add text pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
adding text pdf files; adding text to pdf reader
Add text pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text to pdf without acrobat; how to add a text box in a pdf file
1732 
CARDOZO LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 28:4 
the  Court  protects  speech  and  reverses  convictions  premised  on  the 
fighting words doctrine even when streams of dirty words are uttered in 
anger.    You  can  call  teachers  “mother-fuckers”  at  a  school  board 
meeting.
142
A mother can yell “god-damn—mother fucker police” as 
they arrest her son.
143
And even though a Jehovah’s Witness can’t call 
the city marshal a “damned fascist,” a Black Panther can call the police 
“mother-fucking fascist pig cops.”
144
While rulings  like this seem to 
leave little of Chaplinsky intact, it has still never been overturned.
145
Obscenity is another First Amendment doctrine with a relationship 
to fuck   and  taboo.    Long  recognized  as  a  category  of  unprotected 
speech, obscenity is hard to define.  In the nineteenth century, American 
courts embraced the British standard that focused on the sexual nature 
of the material and its tendency to corrupt those susceptible to it such as 
youths.
146
Such a standard reflects the taboo nature of sexual conduct 
and language prevalent at the time.  Even in the mid-twentieth century, 
the Supreme Court’s definition of obscenity as “material  which deals 
with sex in a manner appealing to prurient interest”
147
still has taboo at 
its core.  One could legitimately write about sex, but characteristics such 
as  “utterly  without  redeeming  social  importance”  and  tendency  to 
“excite lustful thoughts” or “prurient interests” would still support an 
obscenity conviction.
148
Justice Potter Stewart’s classic line—“I know 
it  when  I  see  it”—seems  to  sum  up  the  definitional  difficulty.
149
Apparently, the Court didn’t see it very often from 1967 through 1973 
576, 592 (1969) (reversing conviction where it was conceivable that defendant’s words might 
have moved listeners to retaliate because speech was not inherently inflammable). 
142
See Rosenfeld v. New Jersey, 408 U.S. 901 (1972).  Rehnquist’s dissent stated that 
Rosenfeld used the adjective “M- - - - - f- - - - -” four times.  Id. at 910 (Rehnquist, J., dissenting). 
143
See Lewis v. City of New Orleans, 408 U.S. 913 (1972).  Justice Rehnquist wrote in 
dissent: “G- - d- - m- - - - - f- - - - - police.”  408 U.S. at 909. 
144
See Brown v. Oklahoma, 408 U.S. 914 (1972).  According to Justice Rehnquist, “[d]uring a 
question and answer period [Brown] referred to some policemen as ‘m- - - - - f- - - - - fascist pig 
cops.’”  408 U.S. at 911. 
145
These “contempt-of-cop” and “disruption-of-public-meeting” cases were decided on over 
breadth grounds leading some to speculate on whether more carefully drawn restrictions might 
withstand constitutional scrutiny.  See William S. Cohen, A Look Back at Cohen v. California, 34 
UCLA
L.
R
EV
 1595,  1603-06  (1987)  (discussing  cases).  If  fighting  words  doctrine  merits 
retention, it would be valuable to draw upon social science research to determine which words, in 
fact, do provoke a reasonable person to react.  See J
AY
supra note 71, at 217-19.  While federal 
courts realize the limits of Chaplinsky, Professor Caine’s recent work includes a survey of state-
court cases where  he  found  significant  on-going convictions  used primarily  to  punish  racial 
minorities for talking back to the police.  See Burton Caine, The Trouble with “Fighting Words”: 
Chaplinsky v. New Hampshire is a Threat to First Amendment Values and Should Be Overruled , 
88 M
ARQ
.
L.
R
EV
. 441, 548-50 (2004). 
146
See Regina v. Hicklin,  3 L.R.-Q.B. 360 (1868); see also L
AURENCE 
H.
T
RIBE
,
A
MERICAN 
C
ONSTITUTIONAL 
L
AW 
658 (1978). 
147
Roth v. United States, 354 U.S. 476, 487 (1957). 
148
Id. at 484, 487. 
149
Jacobellis v. Ohio, 378 U.S. 184, 197 (1964) (Stewart, J., concurring). 
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
adding text to a pdf in acrobat; add text to pdf reader
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
add text to pdf in acrobat; add text boxes to pdf
2007] 
FUCK 
1733 
when it overturned thirty-two obscenity convictions without opinion.
150
Finally  in Miller v. California,
151
the  Court  reaffirmed  the 
unprotected  nature  of  obscene  material  and  articulated  a  now  well-
known three-part test that: (1) the average person, applying community 
standards, would find the work, taken as a whole, appeals to the prurient 
interest; (2) the work depicts or describes in a patently offensive way 
sexual conduct specifically defined by the applicable state law; and (3) 
whether  the  work,  taken  as  a  whole,  lacks  serious  literary,  artistic, 
political,  or  scientific  value.
152
 This  test,  however,  essentially 
guarantees that fuck  is not legally obscene.
153
Recall  the  linguists’  categorization  of Fuck
1
and Fuck
2
   Only 
Fuck
relates to the act of sex.
154
By defining obscenity as inherently 
relating  to sexual  conduct,  any  use of Fuck
2
—which  has  no intrinsic 
definition at all—cannot be obscene.
155
Similarly, the figurative use of 
Fuck
1
as to deceive would be outside of obscenity doctrine’s reach as 
well.
156
Even if the term is used in a plainly sexual sense, the likelihood 
that the additional burdens of the Miller test, such as holistic review, 
community standards, and lack of value, could be met.  While fuck  may 
be commonly mislabeled as an “obscenity,” modern obscenity doctrine 
reinforces sexual taboo, but poses little threat to the use of the taboo 
word itself. 
By  far,  the  most  important  victory for  breaking  the  word  taboo 
comes in Cohen v. California
157
—the “Fuck the Draft” case—where the 
Court  comes  to  terms  with  this  four-letter  word.    In  protest  of  the 
Vietnam War and the draft, Paul Cohen wore a jacket bearing the phrase 
“Fuck  the  Draft”  while  in  the  Los  Angeles  County  Courthouse.
158
Cohen  didn’t threaten to  or  engage in  violence or  make any  loud  or 
unusual noises.
159
All he did was walk through the corridor of a public 
building  wearing  the  jacket.
160
 He  was  arrested,  convicted,  and 
150
See H. Franklin Robbins, Jr. & Steven G. Mason, The Law of Obscenity—or Absurdity?, 15
S
T
.
T
HOMAS 
L.
R
EV
.
517, 526-27 n.82 (2003) (collecting cases). 
151
413 U.S. 15 (1973). 
152
Id. at 24. 
153
See D
OOLING
supra note 3, at 61 (“Because of the well-established ‘prurient’ requirement, 
foul language and profanity are almost never considered obscene . . . .”). 
154
See  supra note 54 and accompanying text.  But see Blomquist, supra note 122, at 98 
(claiming “all F-word usage has at least an implicit sexual meaning”).  Blomquist’s statement, 
however,  is  inconsistent  with his four-page  discussion  on  varied  use  of fuck  and  the  many 
examples provided with plainly nonsexual meanings.  See id. at 70-74. 
155
See supra notes 56-57 and accompanying text. 
156
See supra note 55 and accompanying text. 
157
403 U.S. 15 (1971). 
158
Id. at 16. 
159
Id. at 16-17. 
160
Interestingly, Cohen had no problem entering the courthouse wearing the jacket.  Once in, 
he actually removed it and draped it over his arm.  Only after a bailiff alerted a municipal court 
judge of Cohen’s jacket was Cohen arrested as he was leaving the building.  See id. at 19 n.3; see 
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats
add text to pdf file; how to input text in a pdf
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
how to add text field to pdf form; add text field to pdf acrobat
1734 
CARDOZO LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 28:4 
sentenced  to  thirty  days  in  jail  for  violating  a  California  statute 
prohibiting malicious and willful disruption of the peace by offensive 
conduct.
161
The Supreme Court reversed holding “the State may not, 
consistently  with  the  First  and  Fourteenth  Amendments,  make  the 
simple public display here involved of this single four-letter expletive a 
criminal offense.”
162
To reach this result, the Court first found that Cohen’s use of fuck  
didn’t fall into other categories of proscribed speech.  This was not a 
fighting words case because there was no direct, provocative personal 
insult.
163
This was not an obscenity case either.  “Whatever else may be 
necessary to give rise to the State’s broader power to prohibit obscene 
expression, such expression must be, in some significant way, erotic.”
164
There was nothing erotic with “Cohen’s crudely defaced jacket.”
165
Nor 
was this a captive audience case.  “Those in the Los Angeles courthouse 
could  effectively  avoid  further  bombardment  of  their  sensibilities 
simply by averting their eyes.”
166
Cohen was about “punishing public utterance of this unseemly 
expletive.”
167
To the Court, the stakes were high as our political system 
rests  on  the  right  to  free  expression.    “To  many,  the  immediate 
consequence of this freedom may often appear to be only verbal tumult, 
discord,  and even  offensive utterance. . . .   That the air may at  times 
seem  filled  with  verbal  cacophony  is,  in  this  sense  not  a  sign  of 
weakness but of strength.”
168
Although alert to the divisiveness in the 
country, the Court would not allow discord to silence debate.  With the 
elegant  prose  of  Justice  Harlan, fuck   was  protected:  “For,  while  the 
particular  four-letter  word  being  litigated  here  is  perhaps  more 
distasteful than most others of its genre, it is nevertheless often true that 
one man’s vulgarity is another’s lyric.”
169
While I speak of “the Court” as a monolithic oracle, the men who 
judged fuck  in 1971 brought to the bench not only their vision of the 
First Amendment, but also their blind spot of taboo.  They were not all 
of  like  mind  on  this  case  with  four  justices  dissenting.    Blackmun, 
joined by Chief Justice Burger and Black, wrote “Cohen’s absurd and 
immature antic, in my view, was mainly conduct and little speech.”
170
also FCC v. Pacifica Found., 438 U.S. 726, 747 n.25 (1978) (describing facts of Cohen). 
161
Cohen, 403 U.S. at 16. 
162
Id. at 26. 
163
Id. at 20. 
164
Id. 
165
Id.  The Court’s opportunity to fully explore the parameters of obscenity was still a couple 
of years away in Miller
166
Id. at 21. 
167
Id. at 23. 
168
Id. at 24-25. 
169
Id. at 25. 
170
Id. at 27 (Blackmun, J., dissenting).  Blackmun’s “fuck as conduct” argument is hard to 
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
add text to pdf file online; add text pdf reader
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
C# Sample Code: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied in C#.NET. This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
adding text to pdf in preview; how to add text fields in a pdf
2007] 
FUCK 
1735 
Blackmun  further  dissented  due  to  an  alternative construction  of  the 
California  statute;  Justice  White  concurred  in  this  portion  of  the 
dissent.
171
 But  thanks  to  Bob  Woodward’s  and  Scott  Armstrong’s 
inside account of the Supreme Court, The Brethren, we can witness the 
effect of word taboo on the high court’s five to four decision.
172
Ironically,  Harlan  originally  called  the Cohen  case  a  “peewee,” 
while Black initially found the conviction so outrageous he supported 
summarily  reversing  without  oral  argument.
173
 It  was  Harlan’s 
opposition  that  led  to  oral  argument  and  allowed  for  the  most 
triumphant blow against word taboo imaginable.  On February 22, 1971, 
Chief  Justice  Burger,  obviously gripped  by  his  own  view  of fuck   as 
taboo,  called  the case for  oral  argument, but admonished  petitioner’s 
counsel  to  keep  it  clean:  “the  Court  is  thoroughly  familiar  with  the 
factual setting of this case and it will not be necessary for you . . . to 
dwell  on  the  facts.”
174
 Paul  Cohen’s  lawyer,  Professor  Melville 
Nimmer, responded: “At Mr. Chief Justice’s suggestion, I certainly will 
keep very brief the statement of facts. . . .  What this young man did was 
to  walk through a courthouse  corridor . . .  wearing a  jacket  on which 
were inscribed the words ‘Fuck the Draft.’”
175
The Chief was irritated; 
the  rest  of  the  Court  refused  to  say fuck ,  referring  instead  to  “that 
word.”
176
 Nimmer was  brilliant.    In  that  tête-à-tête, Cohen won.    If 
Nimmer  had  acquiesced  to  Burger’s  word  taboo,  he  would  have 
conceded that there were places where fuck  shouldn’t be said like the 
sanctified courthouse.
177
The case would have been lost. 
understand.  He cites the troubling case of Giboney v. Empire Storage & Ice Co., 336 U.S. 490, 
498 (1949), which states that First Amendment protection doesn’t extend “to speech or writing 
used as an integral part of conduct in violation of a valid criminal statute.”  As Professor Volokh 
recently pointed out: 
Likewise,  uttering  words  that  may  cause  a  fight  would  also  be  constitutionally 
protected today, unless the words are specifically targeted at the offended party.  This 
distinction in modern fighting words law between unprotected speech “directed to the 
person of the hearer (“Fuck you” said to a particular person) and protected speech said 
to the world at large (“Fuck the draft” said on a jacket) may be sound. But the Giboney 
principle that speech may be punishable when it carries out an illegal course of conduct 
doesn’t help justify that distinction. 
Eugene Volokh, Speech as Conduct: Generally Applicable Laws, Illegal Courses of Conduct, 
“Situation-Altering Utterances,” and the Uncharted Zones, 90 C
ORNELL 
L.
R
EV
. 1277, 1323 
(2005).  For those generally interested in the speech-as-conduct issue, Professor Volokh’s article 
provides not only a comprehensive summary of the law and commentary in this area, but also a 
warning that we should avoid the temptation of resorting to labels when confronted by troubling 
speech and its First Amendment implications.  See id. at 1347-48. 
171
Cohen, 403 U.S. at 27 (Blackmun, J., dissenting), id. at 28 (White, J., dissenting). 
172
See B
OB 
W
OODWARD 
&
S
COTT 
A
RMSTRONG
,
T
HE 
B
RETHREN
128-133 (1979). 
173
Id. at 128. 
174
Id. at 129. 
175
Id
176
Id
177
See id. (recounting Nimmer’s thought that he would lose if he didn’t say fuck at least once); 
Levinson, supra note 1, at 1365-66 (explaining that making the concession would probably not 
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
How to VB.NET: Add Text to PDF Page. Add necessary references: This is a piece of VB.NET demo code to add text annotation to PDF page.
add text block to pdf; how to add text boxes to pdf
C# PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in C#.net, ASP
A best PDF annotation SDK control for Visual Studio .NET can help to add text to PDF document using C#. C#.NET Demo Code: Add Text to PDF Page in C#.NET.
how to insert text box in pdf document; how to add text to a pdf in reader
1736 
CARDOZO LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 28:4 
Woodward  and  Armstrong  provide  additional  accounts  of  the 
Justices’ word taboo and the influence of taboo on their votes.
178
Not 
surprisingly, Burger relied on euphemism and referred to the case as the 
“screw  the  draft”  case;  he  voted  to  uphold  Cohen’s  conviction.
179
Black—who  had always  been viewed in  absolutist no-law-means-no-
law  First  Amendment  terms—said  it  was  unacceptable  conduct,  not 
speech.  Black’s clerks recount that it was word taboo that led to the 
about-face: “What if Elizabeth [his wife] were in that corridor.  Why 
should she have to see that word?”
180
Harlan, who had triumphed over 
his initial fuck  fears, now wanted to reverse the conviction: “I wouldn’t 
mind telling my wife, or your wife, or anyone’s wife about the slogan 
. . . .”
181
 With  that,  Harlan  became  the  fifth  vote  of  the  new fuck  
majority and was assigned the opinion.  The Chief, however, never rose 
above the grip of taboo.  When Harlan was to deliver the  opinion in 
open court, Burger begged: “John, you’re not going to use ‘that word’ 
in delivering the opinion, are you?  It would be the end of the Court if 
you  use  it,  John.”
182
 Harlan  laughed.    The  Chief  waited.    Harlan 
delivered the opinion—without saying fuck .
183
Even in guaranteeing the 
right to say fuck , the word taboo was too strong for Justice Harlan. 
One would think that is the end of it.  The Supreme Court says you 
can say fuck .  It’s not obscenity.  Its use—without more—isn’t fighting 
words.  But the taboo effect of a word like fuck isn’t going to be broken 
by  a  five  to  four  vote.    So,  if  you  say fuck  on  television,  in  the 
workplace,  or  in  the  classroom,  you  had  better  hope  that  one  of 
Nimmer’s disciples is available to take your case. 
B.     Fuck and the FCC 
Despite the  strong  rhetoric  in Cohen,  it didn’t  take  long  for  the 
Supreme Court
184
to create another category of lesser-protected speech 
to  contain fuck—indecency.    With  the  approval  of  administrative 
regulation of indecent speech, the Court elevates another player in the 
have constituted malpractice). 
178
See W
OODWARD 
&
A
RMSTRONG
supra note 172, at 129-33; Levinson, supra note 1, at 
1360-62. 
179
W
OODWARD 
&
A
RMSTRONG
supra note 172, at 130. 
180
Id. at 131. 
181
Id
182
Id. at 133. 
183
Id. 
184
The Court’s composition changed dramatically from Cohen in 1971 to Pacifica in 1978.  
Justice  Harlan  (the  author of Cohen and  its  deciding vote),  Justice  Douglas (another Cohen 
majority vote), and Justice Black (of “no-law-means-no-law” fame) were all gone by 1978.  They 
were replaced by Justices Powell, Rehnquist, and Stevens—all part of the majority upholding 
FCC action against indecency in Pacifica
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
VB.NET PDF - Add Text Box to PDF Page in VB.NET. Add Annotation – Add Text Box Overview. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
add text field pdf; how to enter text in pdf form
2007] 
FUCK 
1737 
censorship  game,  the  Federal  Communications  Commission  (FCC).  
However, the FCC treats fuck  inconsistently.  The resulting arbitrariness 
of decision-making chills speech.  FCC procedures compound concerns 
that  new  speech  vigilantes  are  influencing  the  entire  direction  of 
broadcast discourse.  With taboo language at issue, the concentration of 
power over words into the hands of speech zealots guarantees greater 
restriction.  Simply ask comedian George Carlin. 
1.     Pacifica and a Pig in the Parlor 
George  Carlin’s  now  infamous  monologue  “Filthy  Words” 
spawned indecent speech regulation in FCC v. Pacifica Foundation.
185
At  2:00  pm  on  Tuesday,  October  30,  1973,  a  New  York  City  radio 
station played a recording of Carlin’s comedy routine about the seven 
“words you  couldn’t say.”
186
Fuck and motherfucker made  his short 
list.
187
One parent, who was driving with his son, heard the broadcast 
and  wrote  a  letter  complaining  to  the  FCC.    The  complaint  was 
forwarded to the radio station for a response.  In its response, Pacifica 
defended  the  monologue  as  a  program  about  contemporary  society’s 
attitude  toward  language.
188
 Additionally,  the  station  had  advised 
listeners of the “sensitive language” to be broadcast.
189
The FCC issued 
an order granting the complaint and holding that the station “could have 
been  the  subject  of  administrative  sanctions.”
190
 Seizing  upon  its 
statutory  authority  to  restrict  “any  obscene,  indecent,  or  profane 
language,”  the  Commission  characterized  the  Carlin  monologue  as 
“patently offensive,” though not obscene.
191
As “indecent” speech, the 
Commission concluded it could regulate its use to protect children from 
exposure to such patently offensive terms relating to sexual or excretory 
185
438 U.S. 726 (1978). 
186
Id. at 729-30. 
187
The other five were: shit, piss, cunt, cocksucker, and tits.  Id. at 751 (appendix containing 
transcript).   There  were originally  only  six dirty words  when  Carlin debuted  the routine  in 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin at a lakefront festival.  On July 21, 1972, Carlin was arrested and charged 
with disorderly  conduct.  The complaint  alleged that  Carlin used  the following  words  (fuck, 
fucker, mother-fucker, cock-sucker, asshole, and tits) while performing before a large gathering 
including minor children ranging from infancy to the upper teens.  The complaint also alleged 
that Carlin used language tending to create or provoke a disturbance by stating “I’d like to fuck 
every one of you people out there.”  See Reinhold Aman, George Carlin’s Milwaukee Six, in 2 
M
ALEDICTA 
40, 40-41 (Reinhold Aman ed., 1978). 
188
Pacifica, 438 U.S. at 729-30. 
189
Id. at 730. 
190
Id. (citation omitted). 
191
Id. at 731.  The Commission’s statutory authority provided at that time that “[w]hoever 
utters any obscene, indecent, or profane language by means of radio communication shall be 
fined not more than $10,000 or imprisoned not more than two years, or both.”  Id. (citing 18 
U.S.C. § 1464 (1976)). 
1738 
CARDOZO LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 28:4 
activities  and  organs.
192
 This  conclusion  is  a  perfect  example  of 
institutional taboo. 
The Supreme Court agreed holding that it was permissible for the 
FCC to impose sanctions on a licensee because the offensive language 
was  indecent—that  is,  nonconforming  with  accepted  standards  of 
morality.
193
The Court differentiated unprotected obscenity (requiring 
prurient appeal) from lesser-protected indecent speech.
194
As the Court 
explains, the Carlin monologue was unquestionably speech within the 
meaning  of  the  First  Amendment;  the  FCC’s  objection  to  it  was 
unquestionably  content  based.
195
 Justice  Stevens,  writing  for  the 
majority, even gets the rhetoric right: “But the fact that society may find 
speech offensive is not a sufficient reason for suppressing it.  Indeed, if 
it  is  the  speaker’s  opinion  that  gives  offense,  that  consequence  is  a 
reason for according it constitutional protection.”
196
While words like 
fuck “ordinarily lack literary, political, or scientific value, they are not 
entirely outside the protection of the First Amendment.”
197
However, in the context of broadcasting, twin concerns of privacy 
and parenting trump the First Amendment.  Patently offensive, indecent 
material broadcast “over the airwaves confronts the citizen, not only in 
public, but also in the privacy of the home, where the individual’s right 
to  be left  alone  plainly  outweighs  the  First Amendment  rights  of an 
intruder.”
198
 Additionally,  broadcasting  is  uniquely  accessible  to 
children.    “Pacifica’s  broadcast  could  have  enlarged  a  child’s 
vocabulary in an instant.”
199
Consequently, the Commission’s special 
treatment  for  indecent  broadcasting  was  reasonable  under  the 
circumstances.  “We simply hold that when the Commission finds that a 
pig has entered the parlor, the exercise of its regulatory power does not 
depend on proof that the pig is obscene.”
200
The  Court’s  justification  for  regulation  of  indecent  speech  is 
transparent—word taboo.  The Court, through the FCC, imposes its own 
notions of propriety on  the  rest of us.   The dissenters  recognized the 
inconsistency with Cohen immediately.
201
The privacy interests within 
192
Pacifica, 438 U.S. at 732. 
193
See id. at 739-40.  In an attempt to keep the Supreme Court’s courtroom clean, Chief 
Justice Burger told counsel for the Commission at oral argument that he need not lay out the 
specific language at issue as the Chief did to Nimmer in Cohen This time it worked because it 
was precisely the position of the FCC that the words were socially unacceptable and needed to be 
restricted.  See Levinson, supra note 1, at 1365. 
194
Pacifica, 438 U.S. at 740. 
195
Id. at 744. 
196
Id. at 745. 
197
Id. at 746. 
198
Id. at 748. 
199
Id. at 749. 
200
Id. at 750-51. 
201
Id. at 764.  Justice Brennan wrote a dissent joined by Justice Marshall.  Id. at 762.  Justice 
Stewart also dissented and was joined by Justices Brennan, White, and Marshall.  Id. at 777. 
2007] 
FUCK 
1739 
your home are not infringed when one turns on a public medium, like 
the radio.
202
Instead, this is an action to take part in public discourse by 
listening.  The voluntary act of admitting the broadcast into your own 
home, and inadvertently confronting Carlin saying fuck , is no different 
from  walking  through  the  courthouse  corridor  and  seeing  Cohen 
wearing Fuck.
203
Just as you can avert your  eyes from the offensive 
jacket, you can hit the off button on the radio. 
What of the potential presence of children rationale?  The interests 
of  the  “unoffended  minority”  who  want  to  hear  the  dirty  words  are 
ignored  in  favor  of  majoritarian  tastes.
204
 Justice  Brennan  clearly 
understood the folly of this.  He notes that parents, not the government, 
have the right to decide what their children should hear.  “As surprising 
as it may be to  individual Members of this Court, some parents  may 
actually find Mr. Carlin’s unabashed attitude towards the seven ‘dirty 
words’ healthy,  and  deem it desirable to expose their  children  to the 
manner  in  which  Mr.  Carlin  defuses  the  taboo  surrounding  the 
words.”
205
FCC censorship protects neither privacy nor parental rights 
while sacrificing First Amendment rights.  As Brennan reminds us, even 
though a pig may  be in  the  parlor, you don’t have to burn  down the 
house to roast it.
206
2.     Powell, Profanity, and the New Speech Vigilantes 
Following Pacifica  and  the  Supreme  Court’s  abdication  of 
indecency to the  FCC,  the Commission has  tried to  keep our parlors 
“swine-free” for over thirty years.  However, the inherent problem of 
proscribing speech based on its content, the Commission’s inconsistent 
rulings,  the  resilience of  broadcast personalities, and the  rise  of  new 
forms  of  media,  all  contribute  to  the  FCC’s  inability  to  eradicate 
indecency.  The speech vigilantes are still at it though—armed with new 
weapons to extinguish fuck .
207
With the so-called shock jocks of morning radio trending toward 
more  explicit  programming,  the  FCC  released  a  revised  Policy 
202
Id. at 764-65 (Brennan, J., dissenting). 
203
Id. at 765. 
204
Id. at 767. 
205
Id. at 770.  This is certainly the parenting approach I have taken in raising my daughter 
with no cataclysmic effects. 
206
Id. at 766 (citing a similar metaphor drawn by Justice Stevens in Butler v. Michigan, 352 
U.S. 380, 383 (1957)). 
207
See Clay Calvert, The First Amendment, the Media, and the Culture Wars: Eight Important 
Lessons from 2004 About Speech, Censorship, Science and Public Policy, 41 C
AL
.
W.
L.
R
EV
325, 325 (2005) (describing the FCC as launching an “all out assault on indecent speech” in 2004 
with major opinions and record-breaking fines); John Garziglia & Micah Caldwell, Warning: Not 
for the Kids, L
EGAL 
T
IMES
, Apr. 11, 2005, at 54. 
1740 
CARDOZO LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 28:4 
Statement on Indecency in 2001.
208
The Policy Statement retains FCC 
regulatory basics  such as:  the  safe harbor period from 10:00  P.M.  to 
6:00 A.M., concern for children, and empowering parental supervision 
over them.
209
The Policy Statement also articulates a two-part test to 
define indecent broadcasting.  First, the material must relate to sexual or 
excretory organs or activities.
210
If so, then the FCC determines if the 
material is patently offensive as measured by community standards for 
the  broadcast  medium.
211
 The  subjectivity  involved  in  applying  a 
standard  made up of vague terms  that are in turn  defined by  equally 
vague terms certainly chills speech.
212
Moreover, the process is subject 
to  manipulation  by  a  vocal  minority  that  can  fashion  a  community 
standard for the broadcast medium that doesn’t reflect the true measure 
of tolerance for taboo language.
213
You  only  need  to  look  at  two  recent  examples  of  television 
broadcasting  of  the  word fuck   to  appreciate  the  problems  of  FCC 
indecency  regulation—Bono  at  the  Golden  Globe  Awards  and  Tom 
Hanks at Normandy.  The poster child for subjectivity of the FCC and 
fuck incidents is U2’s lead singer Bono.  During the 2003 Golden Globe 
Awards, Bono accepted the award for Best Original Song in a Motion 
Picture
214
with excitement:  “This is  really, really fucking  brilliant.”
215
208
See Federal Communications Commission Policy Statement on Industry Guidance on the 
Commission’s Case Law Interpreting 18  U.S.C. § 1464 and Enforcement Policies Regarding 
Broadcast  Indecency,  66  Fed. Reg.  21,984  (2001), available at http://www.fcc.gov/Bureaus/ 
Enforcement/Orders/2001/fcc01090.doc. 
209
Id. at 3. 
210
Id. at 4. 
211
Id. 
212
Professor  Calvert squarely identifies this basic principle: the vaguer the definition, the 
greater the government censorship.  See Calvert, supra note 207, at 347-49; see also Clay Calvert 
& Robert D. Richards, Free Speech and the Right to Offend: Old Wars, New Battles, Different 
Media, 18 G
A
.
S
T
.
U.
L.
R
EV
. 671, 701 (2002) (stating vague terms such as “indecency” and 
“offensive” chill free expression). 
213
Because the FCC pegs indecency to a contemporary community standard, it often uses the 
number of citizen complaints against a broadcast as a strong indicator that the contemporary 
community standard was breached by indecent material.  If a well-funded pro-censorship group, 
like  the Parents Television  Council,  churns  the  numbers  of  complaints  both  the  community 
standard and speech regulation are not truly representative.  For example, in an FCC action 
against Fox in 2004 based upon an episode of “Married by America,” the FCC specifically noted 
159 complaints against a single episode.  This large number, however, actually turned out to be 
only ninety because duplicates were sent to multiple staff members.  All but four of the ninety 
were identical.  Only one complaint mentioned actually seeing the program.  The vast remainder 
of the ninety was generated by a PTC email campaign.  See Calvert, supra note 207, at 332-33.  
In 2004, FCC Chairman Michael Powell publicly justified increased indecency enforcement due 
to growing concerns expressed by the large numbers of complaints filed.  See Broadcast Decency 
Enforcement Act of 2004: Hearing on H.R. 3717 Before the Senate Comm. on Commerce, Sci., 
and  Transp., 108th Cong. (2004) (statement of Michael K. Powell, Chairman, Federal 
Communications  Commission), available at  http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch 
/DOC-243802A2.pdf. 
214
The song was “The Hands That Built America.”  The film was G
ANGS OF 
N
EW 
Y
ORK 
(Miramax Films
2002). 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested