open pdf file in c# windows application : Add text to pdf file reader control software system azure windows web page console 28-4.FAIRMAN3-part988

2007] 
FUCK 
1741 
The statement was  delivered live on  the  East Coast, but was bleeped 
later on the West Coast.
216
Initially, there were few complaints to the 
FCC.    Of  the  234  total  complaints  received,  217  were  part  of  an 
organized  campaign  launched  by  the  Parents  Television  Council 
(PTC).
217
 FCC  Enforcement  Bureau  Chief  David  Solomon  issued  a 
decision  of  no  liability  on  the  part  of  the  broadcasters  because  the 
Policy  Statement,  as  a  threshold  matter,  requires  indecent  speech  to 
describe sexual or excretory organs or activities.
218
Solomon concluded 
that Bono used fucking  as an adjective.
219
His use did not describe sex 
or  excretory  matters,  but  was  a  use  of Fuck
2
having  no  intrinsic 
definition at all.
220
Moreover, a fleeting use of fuck —even if intended 
in  a  sexual  way—was  considered  nonactionable  under  FCC 
precedent.
221
Despite the reasonableness of Solomon’s decision, special interest 
groups like the PTC lobbied the Commissioners to reverse the opinion 
and  cleanse  the  airwaves  of  this  type  of  taboo  language.    The  PTC 
quickly had the ear of FCC Chairman Michael Powell.
222
Powell made 
repeated  public  statements  that fuck   was  coarse,  abhorrent,  and 
profane.
223
On March  18, 2004—over a  year after the incident—the 
215
See Susan Crabtree, Banning the F-Bomb, D
AILY 
V
ARIETY
, Jan. 14, 2004, at 66 (quoting 
Bono). 
216
See Jim Rutenberg, Few Viewers Object as Unbleeped Words Spread on Network TV, N.Y. 
T
IMES
, Jan. 25, 2003, at B7. 
217
Id.;  see Complaints Against Various Broad. Licensees Regarding Their Airing of the 
“Golden Globe  Awards”  Program, 18 F.C.C.R. 19,859 (2003)  [hereinafter Golden Globe I] 
(memorandum opinion and order).  The PTC is a perfect example of the way word taboo is 
perpetuated.  The group’s own irrational word fetish—which they try to then impose on others—
fuels unhealthy attitudes toward sex that then furthers the taboo status of the word.  See supra 
notes 125-130 and accompanying text (describing this taboo effect).  The PTC has even created a 
pull-down, web-based form that allows people to file an instant complaint with the FCC about 
specific broadcasts, apparently without regard to whether you actually saw the program or not. 
FCC  Indecency  Complaint  Form,  https://www.parentstv.org/ptc/action/sweeps/main.asp  (last 
visited Feb. 10, 2006) (allowing instant complaints to be filed against episodes of NCIS (CBS 
television broadcast Oct. 25, 2005), Family Guy (FOX television broadcast Nov. 6, 2005) and/or 
The Vibe Awards (UPN television broadcast Nov. 15, 2005).  This squeaky wheel of a special 
interest group literally dominates FCC complaints.  Consider this data.  In 2003, the PTC was 
responsible for filing 99.86% of all indecency complaints.  In 2004, the figure was up to 99.9%.  
Calvert, supra note 207, at 330. 
218
See Golden Globe Isupra note 217, at 19,860-61, ¶ 5. 
219
Solomon’s characterization of Bono’s use of fucking as an adjective may not be right.  
Grammarians with a more careful eye might label this use as that of an adverb, that is, as a word 
used to modify an adjective, verb, or another adverb. Regardless of how you classify the part of 
speech, the use was clearly not sexual. 
220
Id.see supra notes 54-58 and accompanying text (describing Fuck
1
and Fuck
2
). 
221
Golden Globe Isupra note 217, at 19,861, ¶ 6. 
222
See Clay Calvert, Bono, The Culture Wars, and a Profane Decision: The FCC’s Reversal 
of Course on Indecency Determinations and its New Path on Profanity, 28 S
EATTLE 
U.
L.
R
EV
.
61,
71
(2004)  (describing personal correspondence between Powell and PTC President  Brent 
Bozell). 
223
See,  e.g., Susan Crabtree, You Say  It,  You Pay, D
AILY 
V
ARIETY
 Jan. 15,  2004, at 8 
Add text to pdf file reader - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add text to a pdf file in acrobat; adding a text field to a pdf
Add text to pdf file reader - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to add text to pdf document; add text fields to pdf
1742 
CARDOZO LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 28:4 
Commission granted  the  PTC’s application  for review and  concluded 
that Bono’s use of fucking  was not only indecent, but also profane.
224
In 
reaching  both  conclusions,  the  Commissioners  reversed  former  FCC 
determinations further mucking up indecency law. 
In order to find Bono’s statement indecent, the Commissioners had 
to find that the phrase “really fucking  brilliant” both described sexual 
activities and  was patently offensive.
225
 On  both these elements, the 
Commissioners do an about-face from previous FCC rulings.  First, they 
find that any use of the word fuck is per se sexual: “[W]e believe that, 
given  the  core  meaning  of  the  ‘F-Word,’  any  use  of  that  word  or  a 
variation,  in  any  context,  inherently  has  a  sexual  connotation,  and 
therefore  falls  within  the  first  prong  of  our  indecency  definition.”
226
This conclusion is—of course—per se wrong.  Given the research by 
linguists  distinguishing between Fuck
1
and Fuck
2
, the conclusion that 
the  sentence—This  is  really,  really fucking  brilliant—“depict[s]  or 
describe[s]  sexual  activities”
227
is  simply  not  credible.
228
 It  does, 
however, reflect psycholinguists’ contention that the taboo status of fuck  
is linked at a subconscious level to buried feelings about sex, regardless 
of how the word is actually used.
229
Nonetheless, having cleared the first part of their own definition of 
indecency, the Commissioners turned to the second part of indecency 
and to  a  finding  that  based  on  three  factors,  the  use  of fucking   was 
patently offensive.
230
First,  the description  was “explicit  or  graphic” 
(quoting Michael Powell: “‘I personally believe that it is abhorrent to use profanity at a time 
when we are very likely to know that children are watching TV’ . . .   ‘It is irresponsible for our 
programmers to continue to try to push the envelope on a reasonable set of policies that try to 
legitimately balance the interests of the First Amendment with a need to protect our kids.’”); 
Levinson, supra note 1, at 1383 (according to Powell, “if the F-word isn’t profane, I don’t know 
what word in the English language is”). 
224
Complaints Against Various  Broad.  Licensees  Regarding Their Airing of the “Golden 
Globe Awards” Program, 19 F.C.C.R. 4975 (2004) [hereinafter Golden Globe II]. 
225
Id. at 4977, ¶ 6. 
226
Id. at 4978, ¶ 8. 
227
Id. 
228
See supra notes 54-58 and accompanying text (describing Fuck
1
and Fuck
2
). When courts 
have faced the identical question as to the use of fuck, they have little difficulty discerning the 
patently  nonsexual  meaning  of fuck.   See, e.g., supra  note  15 (describing  Judge  Pearson’s 
explanation of the “Fuck Michigan” bumper sticker).  In a recent blog posting, Eugene Volokh 
also argues that a state statute targeting obscene and patently offensive bumper stickers could not 
be applied to fuck where its use is nonsexual (as in Fuck Bush or Fuck You) and where the statute 
defines both obscene and patently offensive in terms of sexual conduct.  See Posting of Eugene 
Volokh  to  The Volokh  Conspiracy, Offensive Bumper Stickers—and  Seemingly More Legal 
Error  on  the  Part  of  Law  Enforcement,  http://volokh.com/archives/archive_2006_04_16-
2006_04_22.shtml (Apr. 19, 2006, 13:47). 
229
See supra notes 103-106 and accompanying text (explaining psycholinguists’ position that 
fuck is taboo because of subconscious feelings about sex). 
230
Three principal factors govern a finding of patent offensiveness: (1) the explicit or graphic 
nature of the description or depiction of sexual or excretory organs or activities; (2) whether the 
material dwells or repeats at length description or depiction; and (3) whether the material appears 
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
position and save existing PDF file or output a new PDF file. Insert images into PDF form field. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo, scanned
how to insert pdf into email text; how to add text box in pdf file
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
how to add text to pdf; add text to pdf document in preview
2007] 
FUCK 
1743 
apparently  by  the  Commissioners’  fiat: “The  ‘F-Word’ is  one of  the 
most vulgar, graphic and explicit descriptions of sexual activity in the 
English language.”
231
How Chairman Powell can say this when Justice 
Harlan said the opposite in Cohen is nothing short of amazing.
232
Such 
a conclusion is also at odds with the Fuck
1
and Fuck
2
distinction since 
most use of fuck—including Bono’s—was patently nonsexual.    
But  there  was  no  need  for  wordsmithing  on  the  second  factor, 
whether the use was repeated.  The Commission simply reversed itself: 
“While prior Commission and staff action have indicated that isolated 
or fleeting broadcasts of the ‘F-Word’ such as that here are not indecent 
or  would  not  be  acted  upon,  consistent  with  our  decision  today  we 
conclude that any such interpretation is no longer good law.”
233
Having 
eviscerated its own law of indecency, the FCC finding that the use of 
fucking was “shocking”—the final element of patent offensiveness—is 
not.
234
The permanent damage inflicted to the already shaky foundation of 
indecency  law  remains  to  be  seen.    Whatever  its  reach,  the 
Commissioners were so determined to stop people from saying fuck on 
TV  that  they  applied  a  whole  new,  independent  ground  for 
punishment—profanity.
235
This misapplication is inconsistent with our 
understanding  of  both  language  and  law.    According  to  linguistics, 
profanity  is  a  special  category  of  offensive  speech  that  means  to  be 
secular or indifferent to religion as in “Holy shit,” “God damned,” or 
“Jesus Christ!”
236
The Commissioners even recognized that their own 
“limited case law on profane speech has focused on what is profane in 
the context of blasphemy.”
237
Nonetheless, the Commissioners found 
to pander, titillate, or be presented for shock value.  Golden Globe IIsupra note 224, at 4978-79, 
¶ 7. 
231
Id. at 4979, ¶ 9. 
232
See Cohen v. California, 403 U.S. 15, 25 (1971) (“[I]t is nevertheless often true that one 
man’s vulgarity is another’s lyric.”); see also text accompanying note 169. 
233
Golden Globe IIsupra note 224, at 4980, ¶ 12.  This is also a departure from the Court’s 
Pacifica holding that was limited to the Carlin monologue as broadcast.  In describing the 
characteristics and limitations of “as broadcast,” the Court turned to the Commission’s Pacifica 
order.   
Applying these considerations to the language used in the monologue as broadcast by 
respondent,  the  Commission  concluded  that  certain  words  depicted  sexual  and 
excretory activities in a patently offensive manner, noted that they “were broadcast at a 
time when children were undoubtedly in the audience (i. e., in the early afternoon),” 
and that the  prerecorded language, with  these  offensive words “repeated over and 
over,” was deliberately broadcast.” 
FCC v. Pacifica Foundation, 438 U.S. 726, 732 (1978).  Hence repeated use of the words was an 
essential limitation on the indecency doctrine from its very incarnation. 
234
Golden Globe IIsupra note 224, at 4979, ¶ 9. 
235
See id. at 4981-82, ¶¶ 14-16. 
236
See J
AY
supra note 71, at 191; Levinson, supra note 1, at 1389. 
237
Golden Globe IIsupra note 224, at 4981, ¶ 14; see also Statement of Chairman Michael 
K. Powell, id. at 4988 (noting this was the first time the profanity section was applied to fuck and 
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = true; // Add password to PDF file.
how to add text to a pdf file in reader; how to add text to a pdf document
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats through VB
how to insert text box on pdf; adding text box to pdf
1744 
CARDOZO LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 28:4 
fuck profane on the strength of common knowledge that profanity 
means  “vulgar,  irreverent,  or  coarse  language”
238
and  the  Seventh 
Circuit’s “most recent decision defining ‘profane,’” a 1972 pre-Pacifica 
case.
239
 Luckily,  the  Commissioners  threw  in  the  last  definition  of 
profane from Black’s Law Dictionary or one might have thought they 
were  stretching.
240
 While  there  are  many  definitions  for  profane, 
including the Commissioners’ choice, the decision to make a 180 degree 
turn  from  the  Commission’s  own  prior  treatment  of  profanity  as 
blasphemy is unwarranted on such a slim collection of authority.  From 
now  on,  however,    broadcasters  are  on  notice  that fuck  is  also 
profanity—at least between 6:00A.M. and 10:00 P.M.
241
There you have it.  Word taboo drives the FCC’s final conclusion 
that Bono’s single use of the phrase “really fucking  brilliant” is indecent 
because any  use of fuck  is per se  sexual and patently offensive;  it  is 
patently offensive because it is per se vulgar and shocking.  It is also 
profane  because  it  is  vulgar  and  coarse.    Luckily,  the  broadcasters, 
while subject to an enforcement action, escaped a penalty because of a 
lack of notice.
242
 But there is  nothing fortunate  about what is  really 
going on here.  To enforce their preference, the Commissioners engage 
in  bizarre  word-play.  “Indecent,”  “patently  offensive,”  “vulgar,”  and 
“profane” are loosely defined in an interlocking fashion that blurs any 
real distinction except the obvious one.
243
The Commissioners censor 
stating that “today’s decision clearly departs from past precedent”); Statement of Commissioner 
Kathleen Q. Abernathy, id. at 4989 (“Rather, ‘profane language’ has historically been interpreted 
in a legal sense to be blasphemy.”).  Because taboo has largely restricted  scholarly treatment of 
these issues, confusion around the  sub-categories is bound to happen.  See, e.g., Posting of 
Eugene  Volokh  to  The  Volokh  Conspiracy, Profanities on Bumper Stickers, 
http://volokh.com/posts/1143534242.shtml (Mar. 28, 2006, 2:24) (placing shit in the profane as 
opposed to lewd category of speech when commenting on Atlanta woman being ticketed for 
“BUSHit” sticker on her car). 
238
Id. at 4981, ¶ 13. 
239
See Tallman v. United States, 465 F.2d 282, 286 (7th Cir. 1972) (“‘Profane’ is, of course, 
capable of an overbroad interpretation encompassing protected speech, but it is also construable 
as denoting certain of  those  personally reviling  epithets naturally  tending to provoke violent 
resentment or denoting language which under contemporary community standards is so grossly 
offensive to members of the public who actually hear it as to amount to a nuisance.”).  That the 
Commissioners were compelled to dig up this stale definition of profane based on nuisance and 
offer it as authority is nothing short of amazing. 
240
See  Golden  Globe  II supra note 224, at 4981 n.34, ¶ 13 (citing B
LACK
L
AW 
D
ICTIONARY
1210 (6th ed. 1990) definition of profane).  Legitimate concerns about lack of fair 
notice could make the FCC’s new profanity definition subject to void-for-vagueness challenges.  
See Calvert, supra note 207, at 348. 
241
Golden Globe IIsupra note 224, at 4981, ¶ 14.  Professor Levinson kindly refers to the 
miscategorization of fuck as “profane” as a “mistake.”  See Levinson, supra note 1, at 1389.  
Professor Calvert finds it symptomatic of our broader culture wars and political opportunism.  See 
Calvert, supra note 222, at 75-85. 
242
Golden Globe IIsupra note 224, at 4981-82, ¶ 15. 
243
See Michael Botein, FCC’s Crackdown on Broadcast Indecency, N.Y.L.J., Sept. 13, 2005, 
at 4 (describing the FCC’s penchant for piling one inference upon another to imply indecency).  
With profanity in particular, there is also the danger that the category will sweep more broadly 
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; Add Image to PDF; VB.NET Protect: Add Password to VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word
acrobat add text to pdf; adding text fields to a pdf
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
add text to pdf file reader; adding text to a pdf document acrobat
2007] 
FUCK 
1745 
fuck because it’s a word that they don’t like to hear.
244
That is, unless 
it’s in a good movie or on cable. 
Compare Golden Globe II with  the  Commissioners’  recent 
treatment of fuck  in Saving Private Ryan
245
to see the arbitrariness in 
their decision-making and the chilling effect it generates.  On November 
11,  2004,  the  ABC  Television  Network  decided  to  air  the  award-
winning World War II film as a special Veterans Day presentation.
246
The movie’s realistic re-creation of a military mission to rescue a young 
soldier included violent visuals and many taboo words such as fuck .  In 
the  wake  of  the  Commission’s  reversal  on fuck ’s  treatment  at  the 
Golden Globe Awards, sixty-six ABC affiliates refused to broadcast the 
film because of the chilling effect of potential FCC penalties.
247
As  expected,  following  the  broadcast  the  American  Family 
Association  and  others  filed  complaints  with  the  FCC  about  the 
repeated use of fuck in the film.
248
This should have been a no-brainer 
given the Commissioners’ treatment of Bono’s fucking  slip less than a 
year before.  Applying Golden Globe II, the FCC found the complained-
of use of fuck  in Saving Private Ryan to be per se sexual and therefore 
within the scope of indecency regulation.
249
Fuck as used in the film 
was  also  patently  offensive  because  (1)  it  was per se  explicit  and 
graphic  (once again because the Commissioners say so) and  (2) fuck  
was  used  repeatedly.
250
 However, the  opinion  “saves” Private Ryan 
from  censorship  because  its  use  of fuck   did  not  pander,  titillate,  or 
than indecency given its link to vague terms such as “vulgar” and “coarse.”  See Calvert, supra 
note 222, at 87. 
244
As if this regulatory word play needs punctuation, consider this exclamation point.  Buried 
in footnote 22 of the Commissioners’ Opinion and Order is the statement: “we agree with the 
Bureau’s conclusion that the language was not obscene since it did not meet the three-prong test 
set forth  in [Miller] . . . (holding that . . . the  material must  depict  or describe, in  a patently 
offensive way, sexual conduct specifically defined by applicable law.”  Golden Globe IIsupra 
note 224, at 4978 n.22, ¶ 8.  Yet the Commissioners found fucking  “does depict or describe sexual 
activities” and was “patently offensive.”  The internal inconsistency is amazing.  Id. at 4978, ¶¶ 8-
9. 
245
S
AVING 
P
RIVATE 
R
YAN
(DreamWorks  SKG,  Paramount  Pictures  Corp.,  &  Amblin 
Entertainment, Inc. 1998). 
246
Complaints Against Various Television Licensees Regarding Their Broad. on November 
11, 2004, of the ABC Television Network’s Presentation of the Film “Saving Private Ryan,” 20 
F.C.C.R. 4507, at 4507, ¶ 1 (Feb. 28, 2005) [hereinafter Saving Private Ryan]. 
247
See id. at 4508-09, ¶ 4; Botein, supra note 243 (noting confusion from FCC decisions as 
the reason the sixty-six ABA affiliates decided not to show the movie); Calvert, supra note 207, 
at 350 (noting fear of fines and puritanical media environment as reason for dropping the film).  
Who could blame them?  With the Commissioners’ conclusion in Golden Globe II that any use of 
fuck was inherently descriptive of sexual activities and patently offensive as vulgar and shocking 
language, airing the film with its repeated use of fuck and other taboo words would literally be 
taunting the FCC to fine them. 
248
Saving Private Ryansupra note 246, at 4507, 4508-09, ¶¶ 1, 4. 
249
Id. at 4510 & n.23, ¶ 8 & n.23. 
250
Id. ¶13 (assuming arguendo that the first and second components of patently offensive test 
were met). 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Also able to uncompress PDF file in VB.NET programs. Offer flexible and royalty-free developing library license for VB.NET programmers to compress PDF file.
how to enter text in a pdf document; how to insert text box in pdf
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
add text to a pdf document; add text boxes to a pdf
1746 
CARDOZO LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 28:4 
reflect  shock  value.    Rather,  the  expletives  uttered  by  these 
actor/soldiers  were  in  the  context  of  realistic  reflections  of  their 
reactions  to  unspeakable  conditions  and  peril—or  so  said  the 
Commissioners.
251
Compelled to distinguish, the Commissioners wrote 
that the context of Bono’s utterance of the word fucking during a live 
awards show was  shocking,  while  the  same  language—only  more  of 
it—in Saving Private Ryan was not.
252
This  position  is  indefensible.    The  “shock”  factor  of  the  patent 
offensiveness inquiry is  already the most  subjective of the indecency 
elements and bound to yield differences of opinion.
253
Each of us who 
hears the word fuck  come out of a television or radio is either shocked 
or not shocked.
254
It shouldn’t matter whether fuck  is said by an activist 
or an actor, rock star or soldier, Grammy or Oscar winner, Bono or Tom 
Hanks.  And it shouldn’t matter whether it’s said on an awards show or 
in a war movie—fuck  should be treated the same.  Otherwise, it’s the 
five  FCC  Commissioners,  imposing  their  personal  tastes  and 
preferences, proclaiming when fuck  has value and  can  be  heard,  and 
when it doesn’t and is banned.  This type of arbitrary process is subject 
to abuse and should not be applied to protected speech.
255
If neither the type of speaker nor the type of programming justifies 
the  Commissioners’  distinction,  are  there  other  potentially  viable 
rationales  for  treating  the  same  words  differently?    One  possibility 
might be the source of the words.  Is the speaker using the word fuck  
directly by personal choice or is it an indirect, quoting use of the word?  
While that is a factual distinction between Bono’s direct use of fucking  
and  Tom  Hanks’  indirect  use  of fuck   read  from  a  script,  basing  a 
regulatory policy on this difference is unsound.  In the context of the 
FCC issuing fines against the broadcast of indecent language that must 
be paid by the station, it is not rational to punish a station for Bono’s 
outburst over which it had no control, yet not punish the station that has 
total control over whether to broadcast Saving Private Ryan
The FCC’s renewed interest in fuck  illustrated by Golden Globe II 
and Saving Private Ryan  also  illuminates  the  structural  problems  of 
speech  regulation.    A  single  informal  complaint—even  one  without 
251
See id. at 4512-13, ¶¶ 13-14. 
252
Id. at 4514, ¶ 18; see Botein, supra note 243 (describing FCC’s vague rationale). 
253
See Jacob T. Rigney,  Avoiding  Slim  Reasoning  and  Shady  Results:  A  Proposal  for 
Indecency and Obscenity Regulation in Radio and Broadcast Television, 55 F
ED
.
C
OMM
.
L.J. 
297, 324 (2003) (describing how the third offensiveness factor on pander, titillate, and shock is 
the most subjective of all). 
254
I think the answer here is “not.”  As others have noted, “common discourse in our society, 
for better or worse, has moved far beyond what the FCC indecency standard appears to require 
for television and radio.”  Garziglia & Caldwell, supra note 207. 
255
The arbitrariness of Saving Private Ryan only serves to further chill speech by increasing 
uncertainty as to when taboo language can be used.  See id. 
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
page of your defined page number which starts from 0. For example, your original PDF file contains 4 pages. C# DLLs: Split PDF Document. Add necessary references
add text pdf; add text pdf file
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
by directly tagging the second PDF file to the target one, this PDF file merge function VB.NET Project: DLLs for Merging PDF Documents. Add necessary references
how to add a text box to a pdf; adding text to pdf document
2007] 
FUCK 
1747 
supporting  documentation—triggers  the  process.
256
 After  forwarding 
the complaint to the broadcaster for response, the FCC then decides the 
indecency case without formal pleadings or hearings, based upon non-
record evidence.
257
Because there is no hearing requirement when the 
FCC imposes a fine, it can simply issue a notice of apparent liability; 
the broadcaster must either pay it or refuse to obey triggering the Justice 
Department to file a civil suit to collect the fine.
258
Given the explosion 
of  complaints  that  have  been  lodged  in  recent  years,
259
the litigation 
option is unattractive to both the FCC and broadcasters. 
Increasingly, the FCC relies on consent decrees with broadcasters 
after  issuing  a  notice  of  apparent  liability.
260
 However,  if  the 
Commissioners don’t like the  results,  as  in Golden Globe I, they can 
rehear  the  matter  and  reverse—along  with  long-standing  procedural 
precedents such as the fleeting utterance and live utterance doctrines, 
and  justified  reliance  on  previous  staff  precedents.
261
 The  long, 
expensive, and arbitrary process pressures broadcasters to settle rather 
than defend speech.
262
When the only potential defenders of fuck  and 
free speech engage in self-censorship, the intended balancing of speech 
interests  erodes.
263
 This  is  magnified  by  the  rise  of  special  interest 
groups  with word  fetish and  web platforms to  make  instant filing  of 
documented  complaints quick  and easy,  allowing a small  minority to 
impose their speech preferences on the rest of us.
264
There  is  also  a  glaring  underinclusiveness  with  any  attempt  at 
speech regulation by the FCC.  Its indecency regulations only apply to 
256
See Botein, supra note 243 (describing the simplicity of the process and the post-2004 
elimination of documentation requirement). 
257
See id. (“[I]n many situations [the FCC] simply relies upon the complaint—usually without 
a tape or transcript—and finds the material indecent or not, and enters an order.”). 
258
Id. 
259
The FCC received only 111 total indecency complaints in 2000 and a slightly higher 346 
complaints in 2001.  Then there was a dramatic upsurge in 2002 (13,922), 2003 (202,032) and in 
2004 an amazing 1,068,802 complaints.  Calvert, supra note 207, at 329. 
260
See Botein, supra note 243. 
261
See id. (describing recent erosion of recognized defenses); Golden Globe IIsupra note 
224, at 4980, ¶ 12 (fleeting and live utterances), id. at 2981-82 & n.40, ¶ 15 & n.40 (profanity 
precedents). 
262
Calvert, supra note 222, at 65 (“Broadcasters also may be more willing to rapidly settle 
disputes with the FCC over alleged instances of indecent broadcasts rather than contest and fight 
the charges in the name of the First Amendment’s protection of free speech.”); see Calvert, supra 
note 207, at 352-53 (describing Viacom’s capitulation to a $3.5 million dollar consent decree 
rather than fight the dispute for free speech); Botein, supra note 243 (noting settlement pressure). 
263
See Julie Hilden, Four Major Television Networks Challenge the FCC’s Regulation of 
Indecency:  Why  Modern  Technology  Has  Made  this  Always-Dicey  Area  of  Law  Obsolete
FindLaw’s Writ, Apr. 25, 2006, http://writ.news.findlaw.com/hilden/20060425.html (last visited 
May 5, 2006) (describing FCC’s current fine policy as striking at the heart of free speech by 
putting content at risk). 
264
See Calvert, supra note 207, at 328-35 (discussing at length the power of a vocal minority 
to flood the FCC with indecency complaints). 
1748 
CARDOZO LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 28:4 
free, broadcast media.
265
The rise of cable television and satellite radio 
provide  attractive  alternatives  to  broadcast  personalities  like  Howard 
Stern who want to be free of FCC harassment.
266
Given the dramatic 
number of new subscriptions to Sirius Satellite Radio
267
—Stern’s new 
media host—the FCC’s preoccupation with fuck is out of step with the 
perceptions  of  millions  of  Americans.    In  fact,  commentary  by  the 
Commissioners  themselves  identifying  increased  media  tolerance  of 
taboo  words  as  justification  for  increased  FCC  vigilance
268
further 
demonstrates  that  the  Commission  is  out  of  touch:  most  people  are 
simply not shocked by fuck  anymore.
269
The Commissioners, however, 
reject any allegation that they use contemporary community standards 
that merely reflect their own subjective tastes.  Rather, they rely on their 
“collective  experience  and  knowledge,  developed  through  constant 
interaction with lawmakers, courts, broadcasters, public interest groups, 
and ordinary citizens.”
270
Given contemporary usage and acceptance of 
fuck, one wonders to whom the Commissioners are talking. 
Even  as  the  FCC  continues  to  defend  its  censorship  based  on 
Pacifica’s twin rationales—the special importance of broadcast media 
(especially television) and child protection—a more realistic picture of 
the  broadcast  landscape  undermines  this  rationalization.    In  2003, 
98.2% of households had at least one television.
271
A commanding 86% 
of  households  with  a  television  subscribed  to  cable  or  satellite 
265
See Garziglia & Caldwell, supra note 207, at 54 (noting that competing media like cable, 
satellite,  and  Internet  are not subject to  indecency  regulation); see also  Denver Area  Educ. 
Telecomm. Consortium Inc. v. FCC, 518 U.S. 727 (1996). 
266
Stern reportedly left broadcasting subject to regulation for the new satellite radio domain to 
escape the FCC.  See Calvert, supra note 207, at 357.  The existence of these media alternatives 
may also contribute to the rise in fuck use.  University of Colorado Professor Lynn Schofield 
Clark argues that “in an era when many Americans receive all TV programming via cable, the 
wider  latitude  enjoyed  by  cable  TV  channels  has  ‘put  pressure’  on  broadcast  channels, 
contributing to the  word’s  spread.”   Don  Aucoin, Curses! ‘The Big One’ Once Taboo, The 
Ultimate Swear is Everywhere, and Losing its Power to Shock, B
OSTON 
G
LOBE
, Feb. 12, 2004, at 
B13.  Media flight, however, is the ultimate self-censorship. 
267
As of December 31, 2005, Sirius reported it had exceeded its target subscriptions with 3.3 
million, up from 1.1 million at the end of 2004.  Sirius Cash: Lots of Stock for Shock Jock, 
N
EWSDAY
, Jan. 5, 2006, at A13. 
268
See, e.g.See Broadcast Decency Enforcement Act of 2004: Hearing on H.R. 3717 Before 
the Senate Comm. on Commerce, Sci., and Transp., 108th Cong. (2004) (statement of Michael K. 
Powell, 
Chairman, 
Federal 
Communications 
Commission), 
available 
at 
http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DOC-243802A2.pdf.(citing the  coarseness of 
TV and radio creating public outrage thereby justifying “punishing those who peddle indecent 
broadcast programming”). 
269
Professor Lynn Schofield Clark  contends, “It  is  becoming more  common in everyday 
conversation.”  Aucoin, supra note 266.  Other commentators on American culture agree.  Lance 
Morrow contends that it is possible for fuck to become permissible.  The article quotes Morrow as 
saying, “I think that might happen . . . .  Somehow the whole sociology of [fuck] has changed.”  
Id. 
270
Infinity Radio License, Inc., 19 F.C.C.R. 5022, at 5026, ¶ 12 (2004). 
271
U.S.
C
ENSUS 
B
UREAU
,
S
TATISTICAL 
A
BSTRACT  OF THE 
U
NITED 
S
TATES
737, tbl.1117 
(2006), available at http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab. 
2007] 
FUCK 
1749 
service.
272
That  leaves only 14% of households relying  on broadcast 
media alone.
273
This data certainly suggests the dwindling importance 
of broadcast-only format to the media milieu.  
A similar trend erodes the notion that all parents want is  a  little 
help  from  the  government  in  protecting  their  kids.    The  V-chip 
innovation  and television rating  system,  while far  from  perfect,  offer 
tools  for parents to  use  if  they have  concern  over  exposure  to  harsh 
language.
274
I suspect the number of parents truly belaboring this issue 
is rather small given that 68% of children aged eight to eighteen have a 
television in their own bedroom.
275
Surely a parent overly concerned 
about  taboo  language  would  educate  themselves  about  the  current 
technological  tools  available  before  putting  a  television  in  Junior’s 
room—the most  difficult  place  to monitor  and control.
276
 They also 
have another self-help remedy—simply remove the set.  
The new speech vigilantism reflected in the FCC’s recent treatment 
of fuck  also finds friends in Congress.  After the Bono fuck  incident and 
initial Bureau opinion, Congressmen Doug Ose
277
(R-Cal.) and Lamar 
Smith (R-Tex.) introduced a bill that would define as profane, and give 
authority to the FCC to punish,  any use of the words shit, pissfuck , 
cunt, and asshole, and “phrases” cock  suckermother fucker, and ass 
hole.
278
 While  this  bill  never  emerged  from  committee,  the  FCC 
apparently decided to seize this power anyway—at least over fuck  and 
272
Annual Assessment of the Status of Competition in the Market for the Delivery of Video 
Programming, Twelfth Annual Report, 21 F.C.C.R. 2503, ¶ 8 (2006). 
273 
Id. at 2505, ¶ 12. 
274
See  Robert Corn-Revere, Can Broadcast Indecency Regulations Be Extended to Cable 
Television and Satellite Radio?, 30 S.
I
LL
. U. L.J. 243, 262-63 (2006) (discussing the role of the 
V-chip and ratings system in undermining the FCC indecency regime). 
275
See K
AISER 
F
AMILY 
F
OUNDATION
,
G
ENERATION 
M:
M
EDIA IN THE 
L
IVES OF 
8-18
Y
EAR
-
OLDS
77, app. 1 (2005), available at http://www.kff.org/entmedia/7251.cfm. 
276
I also don’t place much weight on the FCC’s position that regulation is justified because 
parents either don’t use the V-chip technology they have or know that they even have it.  The 
FCC should not jump in to protect children from language their own parents don’t find significant 
enough to use pre-existing measures to reduce. 
277
It is interesting that Ose only objects to the language when used in free broadcast media. 
“When I’m subscribing to cable, I get it, OK.  But when I watch free broadcast TV, me and my 
kids should not have to hear it.”  Crabtree, supra note 215 (quoting Ose). 
278
See H.R. 3687, 108th Cong. (2003) (defining profane to include: “‘shit’, ‘piss’, ‘fuck’, 
‘cunt’,  ‘asshole’,  ‘cock  sucker’,  ‘mother  fucker’,  and  ‘ass  hole’,  compound  use  (including 
hyphenated compounds) of such words and  phrases with  each  other or with other words or 
phrases,  and other grammatical forms  of  such  words  and phrases  (including  verb, adjective, 
gerund, participle, and infinitive forms”).  Interestingly, George Carlin’s list of filthy words at 
issue in Pacifica differs only in the inclusion of “tits.”  The so-called Clean Airwaves Act appears 
to have died in Congress—a fitting end to censorship—though not all would agree with me.  
Compare Stephanie L. Reinhart, Note, The Dirty Words You Cannot Say on Television: Does the 
First Amendment Prohibit Congress from Banning All Use of Certain Words?, 2005 U.
I
LL
.
L.
R
EV
. 989 (2005) (concluding Clean Airwaves Act is unconstitutional), with Jennifer L. Marino, 
Comment, More ‘Filthy Words’ But No ‘Free Passes’ for the ‘Cost of Doing Business’: New 
Legislation is the Best Regulation for Broadcast Indecency, 15 S
ETON 
H
ALL 
J.
S
PORTS 
&
E
NT
.
L. 
135 (2005) (taking the opposite position). 
1750 
CARDOZO LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 28:4 
motherfucker.
279
 While  the  role  of  censor  may  not  be  palatable  for 
Congress,  there  was  broad  support  for  last  year’s  legislation  that 
bumped  up  FCC  indecency  fine  capacity.
280
 The  power  to  impose 
increasingly crippling fines on broadcasters for even inadvertent use of 
fuck is yet another FCC tool to extort self-censorship.
281
What then does the law permit?  Fuck the Draft.
282
Fuck Hitler.
283
Fuck the ump.
284
Fucking  orders.
285
Fucking  brilliant.
286
Fucking 
genius.
287
Fuck  the  FCC.
288
 The  easier  question  is  what should  it 
protect—all of them.  However, the powerful effect of word taboo is at 
work.  While there is no perfect way to gauge where the public is on the 
scale  of  indecent  language,  the  finding  by  the  Associated  Press  that 
almost two-thirds of those surveyed use the word fuck  illustrates broad 
public  acceptance.
289
 Nonetheless,  five  unelected  FCC 
Commissioners—each individually affected by word taboo—police our 
radios and televisions supposedly in our interests.  They are empowered 
by a procedural system that exaggerates a handful of complaints into a 
frenzied mandate.  The FCC then institutionalizes the taboo through an 
arbitrary process that either censors fuck  outright or chills broadcasters 
into self-censorship.
290
What the regulators don’t appreciate is that fuck , 
as taboo, is only strengthened by their actions. 
Finally,  the  television  networks  have  decided  to  fight  back.    In 
March 2006, under the new leadership of Chairman Kevin J. Martin, the 
FCC announced a $3.6 million fine against 111 television stations that 
279
See supra notes 235-241 and accompanying text (discussing FCC extension of profanity 
definition to fuck). 
280
See Garziglia & Caldwell, supra note 207 (noting congressional support raising FCC fine 
to $500,000 per violation). 
281
See Calvert, supra note 207, at 351-52 (listing self-censorship examples induced by fear of 
FCC fines). 
282
Yes, says the Supreme Court in Cohen v. California, 403 U.S. 15 (1971). 
283
Yes, says the FCC in Saving Private Ryan, supra note 246.  Steamboat Willie has the line 
in the movie.  Internet Movie Database (IMDb), Memorable Quotes from Saving Private Ryan 
(1998), http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0120815/quotes (last visited Jan. 25, 2007). 
284
No, says the Supreme Court in Pacifica.  438 U.S. 726 (1978). 
285
Yes, says the FCC in Saving Private Ryansupra note 246.  Tom Hanks, a.k.a. Captain 
Miller, says:  “We’re not here to do  the  decent  thing, we’re here to follow fucking  orders!”  
Memorable Quotes, supra note 283. 
286
No, says the FCC in Golden Globe IIsupra note 224
287
Yes, says the FCC in Saving Private Ryansupra note 246.  Memorable Quotes, supra note 
283 (“Lt. Dewindt: Yeah, Brigadier General Amend, deputy commander, 101st.  Some fucking 
genius had the great idea of welding a couple of steel plates onto our deck to keep the general safe 
from ground fire.”). 
288
I certainly hope so. 
289
Noveck, supra note 65. 
290
Commentators who conclude that restrictions on the use of fuck do not amount to chill 
because “these words and phrases can be substituted with less offensive ones that still convey the 
intended message” or that “their use will not be ‘chilled’ because they are not used” commonly 
now on television, fundamentally misunderstand what chill is (and probably have a future on the 
FCC).  Marino, supra note 278, at 170-71. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested