open pdf file in c# windows application : How to add text to pdf document Library software API .net wpf asp.net sharepoint 28-4.FAIRMAN4-part989

2007] 
FUCK 
1751 
aired a 2004 episode of CBS’s “Without a Trace” allegedly depicting a 
teen  orgy.
291
 In  the  wake  of  this  record  fine,  the  four  broadcast 
networks petitioned for judicial review of the order directly challenging 
the  FCC’s  arbitrary  and  inconsistent  indecency  regulation.    This 
coordinated  counter-offensive  seeks  to  overturn  indecency  rulings 
against  CBS’s  “The  Early  Show,”  Fox’s  “Billboard  Music  Awards,” 
and ABC’s “N.Y.P.D. Blue” based on use of the words fuck  and shit.
292
NBC joined the other broadcasters seeking  reversal  of Golden Globe 
II.
293
In addition to challenges to the FCC’s arbitrariness, the networks 
are also challenging the underlying relevancy of indecency rules where 
most  viewers  receive  paid  programs  from  cable,  satellite,  and  the 
internet—all mediums afforded greater First Amendment protection.
294
In  essence,  new  technology  has  undermined  the  basis  for  indecency 
doctrine.  The network strategy is designed to muzzle the Commission.   
The networks scored  a  temporary  victory in July 2006  when the 
Commission asked  the Second  Circuit for  a  voluntary remand  of the 
case.
295
The Commission sought the remand to allow the broadcasters 
and  other  interested  parties  an  opportunity  to  file  responses  before 
imposing  forfeiture liability—a  detail  the  Commission ignored in  the 
original order.
296
The Second Circuit granted the Commission’s motion 
on September 7, 2006, remanding for sixty days for the entry of a final 
or  appealable  order  of  the  FCC.    The  Commission  immediately 
announced a two-week window for comments.
297
On  November  6,  2006,  the  Commission  released  its  new  order 
dwelling  chiefly  on  an  incident  at the  2003  Billboard Music Awards 
where Nicole Richie exclaimed—“Have you ever tried to get cow shit 
out of a Prada purse? It’s not so fucking  simple.”
298
The Commission 
reaffirmed its commitment to both the troublesome indecency analysis, 
291
Stephen Labaton, TV Networks, With Few Friends in Power, Sue to Challenge F.C.C.’s 
Indecency Penalties, N.Y. T
IMES
, Apr. 17, 2006, at C3. 
292
Id. 
293
Id. 
294
See id. (noting the changed circumstances argument caused by the proliferation of cable, 
internet, and satellite programming); Hilden, supra note 263 (arguing new accessible technology 
makes special broadcasting rules obsolete). 
295
Fox and CBS filed a joint petition in the United States Court of Appeals for the Second 
Circuit.  ABC  filed  in  the  United  States  Court of  Appeals  for  the  D.C.  Circuit  which  was 
subsequently transferred and consolidated in the Second Circuit.  Complaints Regarding Various 
Television  Broadcasts  Between  February  2,  2002  and  March  8,  2005,  FCC  06-166,  39 
Communications Reg. (P & F) 1065, ¶ 8 (Nov. 6, 2006).
296
Id. ¶ 9. 
297
Id. ¶ 10 
298
Id. ¶ 13; see id. ¶¶ 12-54 (discussing 2003 incident).  The order also addresses the 2002 
Billboard Music Awards  incident involving Cher’s  “fuck ‘em” comment, finding a  violation 
under similar analysis.  Id. ¶¶ 55-66.  In addition to the Early Show incident discussed infra  notes 
302-304, the order also dismisses various NYPD Blue complaints for procedural irregularities.  
Id. ¶¶ 74-77. 
How to add text to pdf document - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
adding text to pdf; add text box to pdf file
How to add text to pdf document - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to insert text into a pdf with acrobat; adding text to pdf online
1752 
CARDOZO LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 28:4 
including  the  per  se  sexual  nature  of fuck   and  reversal  of  fleeting 
utterance  doctrine,  and  the  new  profanity  analysis.
299
 In  this  order, 
however, the Commission expanded its control on language and found 
shit—the S-Word—to also be indecent and profane.
300
 Further,  the 
Commission  rejected  the  networks’  preventative  delay  measures  as 
inadequate attempts and any notion that it might ignore the first blow.  
Finding the broadcast media to be uniquely accessible to children, the 
Commission also rejected the networks’ position that cable and satellite 
technologies have diluted the importance of broadcast media  and that 
V-chip technology changes the community standard.
301
While Richie can’t say shit, a Survivor finalist can on The Early 
Show.    Twila  Tanner,  one  of  the  four  finalists  from  “Survivor: 
Vanuatu,”  described  another  player  as  a  “bullshitter.”
302
 While  the 
Commission  speculated  that  the  segment  aired  by  CBS  was  merely 
promotional,  it  deferred  to  the  network’s  characterization  of  the 
comment  as  part  of  a  bona  fide  news  interview.    It  concluded  that 
“regardless of whether such language would be actionable in the context 
of an entertainment program” it was not in this context.
303
Given this 
finding, the Commission intends to continue the uncertainty spawned by 
the Golden Globe and Saving Private Ryan decisions.
304
There  is,  however,  at  least  one  broadcast  with  which  the 
Commission  will  not  have  to  struggle.    On December  11, 2006,  the 
Second Circuit agreed to allow C-SPAN to broadcast the oral arguments 
in the appeal of this order.
305
Given the major networks’ involvement, 
we  might  even  hear fuck   on  the  evening  news.    With  the  ultimate 
resolution of these legal challenges still pending, it’s difficult to predict 
where indecency  law will end up.  However, one thing  is sure.   The 
networks will continue to face a hostile Commission, vocal minorities, 
and a nonsupportive Congress—all influenced by word taboo. 
C.     Genderspeak and Fuck in the Workplace 
The  use  of fuck   in  the  workplace  impacts  the  law  in  some 
299
See id. ¶¶ 15-18 (indecency); id. ¶¶ 19-27 (fleeting utterance); id. ¶¶ 40-41 (profanity). 
300
See id. ¶¶ 14, 17, 20, 22, 23 (shit and indecency); id. ¶ 40 (shit and profanity). 
301
See id. ¶¶ 32-38 (delay systems); id. ¶¶ 46-52 (technology and community standards). 
302
Id. ¶ 67. 
303
See id. ¶¶ 69-73. 
304
In  a  separate  statement  concurring  and  dissenting,  Commissioner  Jonathan  Adelstein 
chastises his fellow commissioners for failing to develop a “consistent and coherent indecency 
enforcement policy.”  Id. (Statement of Commissioner Jonathan S. Adelstein Concurring in Part, 
Dissenting in Part). 
305
See John Eggerton, Court Says Profanity Arguments Can Be Televised, B
ROADCASTING 
&
C
ABLE
, Dec. 12, 2006, http://www.broadcastingcable.com/article/CA6399397.html. 
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
how to add text to pdf file; how to enter text in pdf
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
in C#.NET framework. Support to add password to PDF document online or in C#.NET WinForms for PDF file protection. Able to create a
add text boxes to pdf document; adding text pdf
2007] 
FUCK 
1753 
interesting ways.  Quite  simply,  men swear more than women.  This 
means,  of  course,  men  say fuck   more—especially  on  the  job.  
Depending upon the variant of fuck  that is used, anti-discrimination law 
can be implicated.   This  leads  to a potential  legal conflict:  protected 
speech versus protecting workers.  Just as with the uncertainty created 
by the FCC’s fuck  regulation, ambiguity over Title VII’s reach risks our 
language rights being diluted by word taboo. 
Men  and  women  communicate  differently.    Analyzing  these 
differences has produced a flurry of contemporary literature focusing on 
so-called  “genderspeak”
306
and  sociolinguistic  research  into  language 
and gender.
307
Some genderspeak differences are subtle.
308
Others, like 
the use of taboo language, are hard to ignore.  Genderly speaking, men 
use more taboo language than women.
309
Research conducted among 
Midwest college students yields this non-stunning conclusion: “Female 
students  recognize  fewer  obscenities,  use  fewer  obscenities,  and  use 
them less frequently than males.”
310
In particular, men use fuck  more 
than women—significantly more.
311
There was a 32% greater use of 
fuck by men and 39% greater use of motherfucker.
312
Women, however, 
306
See  generally D
IANA 
K.
I
VY 
&
P
HIL 
B
ACKLUND
,
G
ENDER
S
PEAK
:
P
ERSONAL 
E
FFECTIVENESS  IN 
G
ENDER 
C
OMMUNICATION
(3d  ed.  2004);  S
UZETTE 
H
ADEN 
E
LGIN
,
G
ENDERSPEAK
:
M
EN
,
W
OMEN AND THE 
G
ENTLE 
A
RT OF 
V
ERBAL 
S
ELF
-D
EFENSE 
(1993). 
307
Language and gender research is often referred to as “LGR” in linguistics literature.  As 
feminist approaches to the study of  law have greatly enriched our discipline, recent feminist 
approaches  to LGR demonstrate  the complexity of the language-gender relationship.  Karyn 
Stapleton, Gender and Swearing: A Community Practice, W
OMEN 
&
L
ANGUAGE
, Fall 2003, at 
22, 22. 
308
For example, research shows that women are more tentative in their communication than 
men, often through the use of intonation, tag questions, qualifiers, and disclaimers.  See I
VY 
&
B
ACKLUND
supra note 306, at 184-86. 
309
See Stapleton, supra note 307, at 22-23 (surveying linguistic literature and noting general 
belief that women swear less as well as more recent studies exploring “the complex and situation-
specific nature of ‘women-swearing’”); Jean-Marc Dewaele, The Emotional Force of Swearwords 
and Taboo Words in the Speech of Multilinguals, 25 J.
M
ULTILINGUAL 
&
M
ULTICULTURAL 
D
EV
204, 206 (2004) (reporting research on “S-T words” (swearwords and taboo words) finding males 
and those under thirty-five used more taboo words); Robert A. Kearney, The Coming Rise of 
Disparate Impact Theory, 110 P
ENN 
S
T
.
L.
R
EV
. 69, 89-90 (2005) (“Men, in fact, simply may be 
more vulgar and profane than women.  In all-male work environments, men often use sexual 
profanity as a means of emasculating each other.  In other words, sexuality is the language of 
insult.”);
I
VY 
&
B
ACKLUND
supra note 306, at 171 (summarizing research from 2000 showing 
that men in the study (college students) were more likely than women to use highly aggressive 
terms to refer to sexual intercourse). 
310
Wayne  J.  Wilson, Five Years and 121 Dirty Words Later,  5  M
ALEDICTA
243,  248 
(Reinhold Aman ed., 1981). 
311
See Noveck, supra note 65 (reporting thirty-two percent of men use fuck at least a few 
times a week compared to only twenty-three percent of women); Blount, supra note 60, at xiv-v 
(“Women use fuck . . . a lot more than they used to, but men still use it more often.”). 
312
See Wilson, supra note 310, at 252 tbl.1 (Frequency of Using Dirty Words Expressed in 
Percentages).  Wilson conducted two surveys, one in 1975 and another in 1980, where he asked 
college students to rate their personal use of certain taboo words.  Id. at 244. 
Male use of fuck was 84% in 1975 and 82% in 1980 compared to female use of fuck at 47% 
in 1975 and 50% in 1980.  Male use of motherfucker was constant at 67% in both 1975 and 1980; 
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Create high resolution PDF file without image quality losing in ASP.NET application. Add multiple images to multipage PDF document in .NET WinForms.
how to insert text box in pdf file; how to enter text into a pdf
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
allowed. passwordSetting.IsCopy = True ' Allow to assemble document. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
add text field pdf; how to add text to pdf document
1754 
CARDOZO LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 28:4 
find fuck and motherfucker far more offensive than men do.
313
The explanation  for  this  gender  difference  is  harder to  pinpoint.  
One proffered reason is a link to  the  military.   Professor Allen Read 
linked the disorganization of modern life caused by World War I to the 
explosion in the use of fuck by soldiers.
314
“[T]he unnatural way of life, 
and the  imminence  of  a  hideous  death,  the  soldier  could  find  fitting 
expression only in terms that according to teaching from his childhood 
were foul and disgusting.”
315
Gender  identity  and  male  power  have  also  been  linked  to  men 
using more  taboo language.
316
 While women are expected to exhibit 
control  over  their  thoughts,  men  are  free  to  “exhibit  hostile  and 
aggressive speech habits.”
317
As sociolinguist Robin Lakoff suggested 
in her landmark work, Language and Woman’s Place, “the ‘stronger’ 
expletives are reserved for men, and the ‘weaker’ ones for women.”
318
More  recent  research  confirms  the  link  between  gender  identity  and 
language—with a twist: there is an increasing tendency for professional 
women  in  male-dominated  professions  to adopt “men’s  language”  or 
cursing to  help  secure  acceptance  as  a professional  and  a  woman.
319
Despite this  research,  there remains a significant gender  difference in 
the use of fuck .  Whatever the ultimate reason for the gender difference, 
it impacts the workplace. 
Title  VII  of  the Civil  Rights  Act of  1964  makes  it  an unlawful 
employment  practice  for  an  employer  “to  discriminate  against  any 
individual  with  respect  to  his  compensation,  terms,  conditions,  or 
privileges  of  employment,  because  of  such  individual’s  race,  color, 
female use was similarly constant, but at 26% in 1975 and 28% in 1980.  By way of comparison, 
cunt clearly came out the more taboo word in these surveys.  Male use of cunt dropped from 1975 
to 1980 from 53% to 45% whereas female use of cunt rose slightly from a mere 5% to 7%.  Id. at 
252 tbl.1. 
313
See M
ILLWOOD
-H
ARGRAVE
supra note 3, at 10 (reporting the results of ranking the “very 
severe” words from the British study). 
314
Read, supra note 2, at 274; see D
OOLING
supra note 3, at 9 (describing increased use 
stems from military and WWI); S
AGARIN
,
supra note
70,
at 142 (“In all-male circles, and in the 
armed services,  the  number  of  times  in  which the  word  [fucking]  could  be worked  into  a 
conversation would be the criterion by which one would judge the masculinity, the sophistication, 
or the freedom from taboos, of the speaker.”). 
315
Read, supra note 2, at 275. 
316
J
AY
supra  note 71, at 165 (“Ultimately, cursing depends on both gender  identity and 
power; males tend to have more power to curse in public than females.”); Stapleton, supra note 
307, at 22 (“Given that taboos play an important role in maintaining the status quo of a society, 
women have traditionally been more fully subject to their effects than have men.”). 
317
J
AY
supra note 71, at 165; see E
LGIN
,
supra note
306,
at 219 (noting “decent women” 
would never soil their lips with such foul words); Stapleton, supra note 307, at 22 (“Firstly, 
swearing, or use of expletives, is perceived as an intrinsically forceful or aggressive activity.”). 
318
R
OBIN 
L
AKOFF
,
L
ANGUAGE AND 
W
OMAN
P
LACE
44 (1975).   
319
See Judith Mattson Bean & Barbara Johnstone, Gender, Identity, and “Strong Language” 
in  a  Professional  Woman’s  Talk in L
ANGUAGE  AND 
W
OMAN
P
LACE
:
T
EXT  AND 
C
OMMENTARIES
237-38 (Mary Bucholtz ed., 2004). 
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
PDF document file, edit selected text content, and export extracted text with customized format. How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary
adding text pdf file; how to add text to a pdf document
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats
adding a text field to a pdf; how to add text to a pdf document using acrobat
2007] 
FUCK 
1755 
religion,  sex, or  national  origin.”
320
 Interestingly,  the  statute  doesn’t 
expressly  prohibit  sexual  (or  racial)  harassment.    However,  with  its 
landmark decision in Meritor Savings Bank v. Vinson,
321
the Supreme 
Court  recognized  that  a  hostile  or  abusive  work  environment  could 
establish a Title VII violation of discrimination based on sex.
322
Title 
VII is violated when “the workplace is permeated with ‘discriminatory 
intimidation,  ridicule,  and  insult,’  that  is  ‘sufficiently  severe  or 
pervasive to alter the conditions of the victim’s employment and create 
an abusive working environment.’”
323
Further attempts by the Court to 
precisely  define  the parameters  of  a  hostile  work  environment  claim 
have proved problematic.  Nonetheless, from Meritor on, a conceptual 
model of sexual harassment emerges of male workforce domination and 
female vulnerability to harassment.
324
This is where fuck  comes into play.  Hostile environment claims 
under  Title  VII  often  include  allegations  of  use  of  taboo  words.  
Because  men  use  the  word fuck   more  often  than  women,  hostile 
environment  allegations  involving fuck   and  its  variants  follow  a 
standard  model:  a  male  harasser  directs fuck   comments  at  a  female 
employee.
325
Title VII, however, is not the “Clean Language Act”
326
“designed to purge the workplace of vulgarity.”
327
How then do courts 
treat claims  of verbal sexual  harassment involving fuck?   In  general, 
three different doctrines are used by the federal courts to determine if 
words amount  to actionable  conduct: a  gender-specific/gender-neutral 
test,  a  sexual/nonsexual  test,  and  a  specifically-directed/generally-
directed test.
328
320
42 U.S.C. § 2000e-2(a)(1) (2000). 
321
477 U.S. 57 (1986). 
322
Id. at 64-65. 
323
Harris v. Forklift Sys., Inc., 510 U.S. 17, 21 (1993) (citations omitted). 
324
See Linda Kelly Hill, The Feminist Misspeak of Sexual Harassment, 57 F
LA
.
L.
R
EV
. 133, 
145-49 (2005) (describing MacKinnon’s role in advancing sexual harassment theory and law and 
influence on the Court).  Even the Supreme Court’s decision in Oncale v. Sundowner Offshore 
Servs., Inc., 523 U.S. 75 (1998), that recognizes the potential for same-sex discrimination, raises 
the standard of proof in same-sex cases effectively destroying their viability.  See Hill, supra, at 
159-62. 
325
See Kearney, supra note 309, at 89-90 (“Though the evidence is anecdotal, the difference 
in the way men and women use language is hard to ignore.  The  legal consequence is also 
significant.  If women are less likely than men to use profanity in the workplace (at least for the 
reason that they do not choose to use it as the language of insult), is it such a stretch to say that 
they are also more likely to be offended by it when they witness it?”). 
326
Katz v. Dole, 709 F.2d 251, 256 (4th Cir. 1983). 
327
Baskerville v. Culligan Int’l Co., 50 F.3d 428, 430 (7th Cir. 1995) (Posner, J.). 
328
See Kingsley R. Browne, Title VII as Censorship: Hostile-Environment Harassment and 
the First Amendment, 52 O
HIO 
S
T
.
L.J. 481, 492-92 (1991) (noting the use of “gender-specific 
terms” and “general sexual terms”); Jamie Lynn Cook, Comment, Bitch v. Whore: The Current 
Trend to Define the Requirements of an Actionable Hostile Environment Claim in Verbal Sexual 
Harassment Cases, 33 J. M
ARSHALL 
L.
R
EV
. 465, 475-83 (2000) (identifying the “gender relation 
test,” a “sexual nature test,” and a “personal animosity test”). 
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Protect. Password: Set File Permissions. Password: Open Document. Edit Digital Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work with
add text fields to pdf; add text to pdf file reader
C# PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in C#.net, ASP
Using C# Programming Language. A best PDF annotation SDK control for Visual Studio .NET can help to add text to PDF document using C#.
how to enter text in pdf form; add text to pdf acrobat
1756 
CARDOZO LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 28:4 
The gender-specificity test focuses on whether an offensive verbal 
statement is gender specific.  That is, the comment must be targeted at 
one  gender.    If  the  comment  is  capable  of  being  directed  at  either 
gender, no harassment claim is stated.  For example, if a female plaintiff 
is called a whore or cunt, such terms are gender-specific and could fall 
in the actionable category.
329
In contrast, offensive words that could be 
targeted at either  men or women,  such as asshole, are gender-neutral 
and would not support a sexual harassment claim.
330
The sexual/nonsexual test focuses on the sexual nature  of verbal 
harassment.  In this sense, sexual does not equate with gender.  Rather, 
it means sexual activity.
331
If the statements were of a nonsexual nature, 
such as “dumbass” or “get your head out of your ass,” the nonsexual 
nature  would  render  them  nonactionable.
332
 Conversely,  suggestions 
that a female employee was in the habit of having oral sex for money, 
comments about her anatomy, or expressing a desire to have sex with 
her fall into the sexual nature category and could support a harassment 
claim.
333
The third test used by some courts focuses not on the nature of the 
statement,  but  to  whom  it  is  directed.    Offensive  comments  that  are 
generally  directed  reflect  at  best  a  vulgar  and  mildly  offensive 
environment;  statements  must  be  personally  directed  to  create  an 
actionable claim.
334
Even after a finding under the gender-specific or 
sexual-nature test that statements could rise to the level of verbal sexual 
harassment, a court might still inquire into whether the statements were 
specifically directed in order to deny a claim.
335
When  these  tests  are  applied  specifically  to  pure  verbal  sexual 
harassment  claims—that  is,  where  there  is  no  other  contaminating 
harassing  contact—fuck   fares  well.    Given  what  we  know  from 
linguistics,  the  general absence of  a  sexual meaning  in all Fuck
and 
many Fuck
1
situations should shield much use of the word from Title 
329
See Burns v. McGregor Elec. Indus., Inc., 989 F.2d 959, 964 (8th Cir. 1993) (finding 
obscene name-calling including bitchslut, and cunt was based on gender); Illinois v. Human 
Rights Comm’n, 534 N.E.2d 161, 170 (Ill. App. Ct. 1989) (finding cunt, twat, and bitch were 
gender specific terms).  But see Galloway v. General Motors Serv. Parts Operations, 78 F.3d 
1164, 1167 (7th Cir. 1996) (finding repeated “sick bitch” comment not gender-related term). 
330
See Browne, supra note 328, at 492-93 (providing examples of gender neutral and gender 
specific language). 
331
See Cook, supra note 328, at 479-80 (describing sexual nature test). 
332
See Hardin v. S.C. Johnson & Sons, Inc., 167 F.3d 340, 345 (7th Cir. 1999). 
333
See Torres v. Pisano, 116 F.3d 625, 632-33 (2d Cir. 1997). 
334
Spencer v. Commonwealth Edison Co., No. 97 C 7718, 1999 WL 14486, at *8-9 (N.D. Ill. 
Jan. 6, 1999). 
335
See, e.g., Ptasnik v. City of Peoria, 93 F.App’x 904, 908-09 (7th Cir. 2004) (failing to reach 
question of whether foul language and sexual comments were offensive when it was not directed 
at plaintiff but other women).  But see Torres, 116 F.3d at 633 (noting that the fact that statements 
were not made in plaintiff’s presence was of no matter because an employee who knows that her 
boss is saying things behind her back may reasonably fund the working environment hostile). 
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Protect. Password: Set File Permissions. Password: Open Document. Edit Digital Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work with
adding text pdf files; add text to pdf without acrobat
2007] 
FUCK 
1757 
VII  claims.
336
 This  is  the  case.    Those  courts  applying  the  gender-
specific test hold that fuck  and motherfucker are general expletives that 
are gender-neutral.
337
 Uses of Fuck
2
such  as “fucking  idiot,” “stupid 
motherfucker,” and “dumb motherfucker” are neutral, verbal abuse and 
nondiscriminatory.
338
 Even  when fuck -based,  gender-specific  insults 
are found, such as “fat fucking bitch,” if the alleged harasser also refers 
to  men  with fuck -based, gender-specific insults,  such  as the  “fucking  
new  guy,”  the  complained-of  language  does  not  establish  a  sex 
harassment claim.
339
The use of foul language in front of both men and 
women is not discrimination based on sex.
340
However, comments such 
as  “fucking  bitch,”  “dumb fucking  broads,” and  “fucking  cunts”  were 
gender-specific.
341
 As  Judge  Fletcher  of  the  Ninth  Circuit  wrote  in 
Steiner v. Showboat Operating Company,
342
“[i]t is one thing to call a 
woman ‘worthless,’ and another to call her a ‘worthless broad.’”
343
Application  of the sexual/nonsexual  test to fuck  also tends to be 
favorable.  For example, the use of fuck and “dumb motherfucker” are 
not  considered  inherently  sexual.
344
 Recognizing  that fuck   is  used 
frequently,  one district  court concluded  that the fact the plaintiff was 
offended  was indicative  of  her  sensibilities  not  sexual  harassment.
345
Use of “offensive profanities” that have no sexual connotation such as 
“you’re a fucking  idiot,” “can’t you fucking  read,” “fuck  the goddamn 
memo,”  and “I want to  know where  your fucking   head  was at,”  as a 
336
See supra notes 54-58 and accompanying text (describing difference in Fuck
1
and Fuck
2
). 
337
See Angier v. Henderson, No. Civ.00-215(DSD/JMM), 2001 WL 1629518, at *2 (D. Minn. 
Aug. 3, 2001) (fuck, shit, and asshole are gender-neutral profanity); Illinois v. Human Rights 
Comm’n, 534  N.E.2d 161,  170 (Ill. App. Ct. 1989)  (finding fuck and motherfucker general 
expletives); cf. Rose v. Son’s Quality Food Co., No. AMD 04-3422, 2006 WL 173690, at *4 (D. 
Md. Jan. 25, 2006) (motherfucker and “fuck her up” were not racially hostile).  But see Hocevar v. 
Purdue Frederick Co., 223 F.3d 721, 727, 729 & n.10 (8th Cir. 2000) (Lay, J., dissenting) (stating 
that  using  f-word  in virtually  every sentence, calling  clients fuckers, routinely  using fuck in 
meetings was offensive enough to state a claim). 
338
See Ferraro v. Kellwood, No. 03 Civ. 8492(SAS), 2004 WL 2646619, at *10 (S.D.N.Y. 
Nov. 18, 2004) (“fucking  idiot” and “stupid motherfucker” are neutral and nondiscriminatory); 
Naughton v. Sears, Roebuck & Co., No. 02 C 4761, 2003 WL 360085, at *7 (N.D. Ill. Feb. 18, 
2003) (citing Hardin, 167 F.3d at 345-46, as holding that “dumb motherfucker and “when the 
fuck are you going to get the product” were neutral verbal abuse). 
339
See Hocevar, 223 F.3d at 736-37 (“Offensive language was used to describe both men and 
women.”). 
340
Id. 
341
See Steiner v. Showboat Operating Co., 25 F.3d 1459, 1464 (9th Cir. 1994); Bradshaw v. 
Golden Road Motor Inn, 885 F. Supp. 1370, 1380-81 (D. Nev. 1995) (stating “fucking bitch” was 
a gender-based insult). 
342
25 F.3d 1459 (9th Cir. 1994). 
343
Id. at 1464.  As Judge Fletcher’s anecdote implies, it is being called a bitch, broad, or cunt 
that is the actionable gender-specific language; fuck merely intensifies it. 
344
See  Hardin, 167 F.3d at 345-46 (identifying coarse language including “dumb 
motherfucker” and “when the fuck are you going to get the product” as not being inherently 
sexual comments). 
345
See Alder v. Belcan Eng’g Servs., Inc., No. C-1-90-700, 1991 WL 494528 (S.D. Ohio Nov. 
27, 1991) (comments, including fuck, were not of a sexual nature). 
1758 
CARDOZO LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 28:4 
matter of law cannot make a prima facie case for sexual harassment.
346
Even  the  phrase  to  “go fuck   himself”  is  not  evidence  of  a  sexual 
criticism.
347
Similarly, in the same-sex context, the harassing comment 
fuck  me” when  uttered  by men to men, more  often  than  not  has no 
connection whatsoever to the sexual acts referenced.
348
Irrespective  of  whether  the  allegation  may  be  gender-related  or 
sexual  in  nature,  courts  routinely  require  offensive  comments  to  be 
made “to her face or within earshot.”
349
Consequently, “fucking  bitch” 
may  be  considered  a  gender-based  insult  but  would  not  support  a 
plaintiff’s claim where the evidence  showed  that term was used by a 
supervisor  only  when  talking  with  others,  not  to  the  plaintiff.
350
Similarly, the statement that an employee looked so good he “could fuck  
her” did not support a hostile work environment claim because it was 
directed at others, not the plaintiff.
351
Neither fuck  nor motherfucker 
would support  a  claim either  if  the  complained  of language  was not 
specifically directed, even if the plaintiff overheard it.
352
Considering men use the word fuck  more in the workplace, it is not 
surprising that hostile work environment claims based on fuck  involve 
male fuck -sayers  with  female fuck -complainants.    Nonetheless, fuck  
statements as a basis for Title VII claims are routinely rejected using the 
methods described above.  By itself, fuck  falls into the category of an 
“offensive  profanity”  or  “vulgar”  language.
353
 Verbal  sexual 
harassment claims, however, can’t be used to “purge the workplace of 
vulgarity.”
354
Even when fuck  is used persistently, it doesn’t rise to the 
level of sexual harassment.  As the Supreme Court notes, Title VII is 
not a “general civility code for the American workplace.”
355
In fact, 
346
See Stewart v. Evans, 275 F.3d 1126, 1131-34 (D.C. Cir. 2002). 
347
See Gross v. Burggraf Constr. Co., 53 F.3d 1531, 1544-46 (10th Cir. 1995).  The court also 
found the comments not gender specific.  Id. at 1546.  In contrast, a supervisor who repeatedly 
refers to an employee as a “dumb cunt” is making a sexual remark and is subject to a hostile 
environment claim.  See Torres v. Pisano, 116 F.3d 625, 632 (2d Cir. 1997). 
348
See Johnson v. Hondo, Inc., 125 F.3d 408, 412 (7th Cir. 1997) (“Most unfortunately, 
expressions such as ‘fuck me,’ ‘kiss my ass,’ and ‘suck my dick,’ are commonplace in certain 
circles, and more often than not, when these expressions are used (particularly when uttered by 
men speaking to other men), their use has no connection whatsoever with the sexual acts to which 
they make reference-even when they are accompanied, as they sometimes were here, with a 
crotch-grabbing gesture.”); Lack v. Wal-Mart Stores, Inc., 240 F.3d 255, 261 n.8 (4th Cir. 2001) 
(accord). 
349
See Bradshaw v. Golden Road Motor Inn, 885 F. Supp. 1370, 1381 (D. Nev. 1995). 
350
Id. at 1380-81. 
351
See Ptasnik v. City of Peoria, 93 F.App’x 904, 909 (7th Cir. 2004). 
352
See Spencer v. Commonwealth Edison Co., No. 97 C 7718, 1999 WL 14486, at *8-9 (N.D. 
Ill. Jan. 6, 1999) (noting that profanities and crudities were generally directed and not actionable). 
353
See  id. (“Although vulgar and boorish, the use of foul and offensive language and 
comments  without  more  does  not  create  an  actionable  hostile  environment  under  present 
authority.”). 
354
Baskerville v. Culligan Int’l Co., 50 F.3d 428, 430 (7th Cir. 1995). 
355
Oncale v. Sundowner Offshore Servs., Inc., 523 U.S. 75, 80 (1998). 
2007] 
FUCK 
1759 
only when fuck   is  used  as  a  modifier  for  gender-specific  statements, 
such as “fucking  cunt,” does it appear to be actionable.
356
Of course, 
such  gender-specific  harassing  statements  could  form  the  basis  of  a 
Title VII claim with or without the fucking  adjective. 
Even  though fuck  is  not  typically  actionable  under  Title  VII, 
employers’  reactions  to  Title  VII,  such  as  the  adoption  of  voluntary 
anti-harassment plans, provide another example of word taboo at work.  
Despite the dearth of empirical support that taboo words like fuck cause 
any  harm  to  the  listener,
357
employers  can—and  do—adopt  policies 
designed  to  curb  workplace  harassment  that  are  overly  broad  and 
unnecessarily  and  improperly  restrict  free  speech  rights  in  the 
workplace.
358
 Employers  who  adopt  overly  restrictive  workplace 
speech policies engage in self-censorship and impose these restrictions 
on others  just  as  broadcasters avoiding  programming  containing fuck  
do.
359
Much  law  review  ink  has  already  been  spilled  detailing  the 
potential conflict between the First Amendment and Title VII.
360
The 
pages of the Federal Reporters, however, remain amazingly light on the 
subject.
361
I can add little to this conversation
362
except to say, as to 
356
See Steiner v. Showboat Operating Co., 25 F.3d 1459, 1461 (9th Cir. 1994). 
357
See J
AY
supra note 71, at 233 (“Secular-legal decisions implicate curse words as doing 
psychological  and  physical  harm  to  listeners,  even  though  these  decisions  lack  empirical 
support.”). 
358
Professor Volokh explains.  We start with Title VII law grounded in vague words like 
severe and pervasive.  To comport with this, employers necessarily err on the safe side. Some 
employers “consequently suppress any speech that might possibly be seen as harassment, even if 
you and I would agree that it’s not severe or pervasive enough that a reasonable person would 
conclude that it creates a hostile environment.”  Eugene Volokh, What Speech Does “Hostile 
Work Environment” Harassment Law Restrict?, 85 G
EO
.
L.J. 627, 635-37 (1997).  These zero-
tolerance policies are not hypothetical.  “Employers are in fact enacting such broad policies and 
are indeed suppressing individual incidents of offensive speech.”  Id. at 642.  Kingsley Browne 
also develops the thesis that vagueness in Title VII law leads employers to adopt overbroad 
speech regulation  in  contravention of  the First Amendment.  See Kingsley R.  Browne, Zero 
Tolerance for the First Amendment: Title VII’s Regulation of Employee Speech, 27 O
HIO 
N.U.
L.
R
EV
. 563, 580-97 (2001). 
359
See Debra D. Burke, Workplace Harassment: A Proposal for a Bright Line Test Consistent 
with the First Amendment, 21 H
OFSTRA 
L
AB
.
&
E
MP
.
L.J. 591, 621 (2004) (describing how 
employers can regulate workplace speech yet in the process censor both employee and employer 
viewpoints). 
360
See Browne, supra note 358, at 575 n.77 (collecting dozens of citations to law reviews as a 
“partial list of articles devoted specifically to the First Amendment and workplace speech”); 
Burke, supra note 359, at 612 nn.142-43  (collecting authorities addressing First Amendment 
violations with Title VII and those showing the lack thereof). 
361
Kingsley Browne and Eugene Volokh have “[t]he most thorough catalogue of cases in 
which verbal expression formed all or part of a finding of liability under Title VII.”  D
OOLING
supra note 3, at 94;  see Browne,  supra note 358, at 574-80 (explaining the dearth of First 
Amendment analysis in Title VII case law).  See generally Eugene Volokh, Comment, Freedom 
of Speech and Workplace Harassment, 39 UCLA L. R
EV
. 1791 (1992). 
362
Professor Browne makes one suggestion on the future of hostile environment theory that I 
can’t let go without comment.  He calls for the use of heightened pleading requirements similar to 
1760 
CARDOZO LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 28:4 
fuck, the doctrines of fighting words, obscenity, captive audience, and 
the  like  have  been  explored  and  rejected.
363
 Nothing  in  Title  VII 
changes  this.    Only  the  category  of  lesser-protected  indecent  speech 
(now  bastardized  by  the  FCC)  remains  as  a  constitutional  option.
364
However, none of the original Pacifica justifications—parental control, 
child access, and home privacy—have any vitality in the workplace.
365
A better alternative is to simply leave fuck  alone.
366
The treatment of fuck  in the workplace provides two lessons.  First, 
Title VII law recognizes the varied uses of fuck  and the key linguistic 
distinction  between Fuck
1
and Fuck
2
  The  tests  that the  courts  have 
developed to determine actionable verbal sexual harassment, such as the 
sexual/nonsexual test, treat fuck  according to its intended use.  Calling 
an employee a fucking  idiot, an obvious nonsexual use of Fuck
2
, would 
not  meet  the  harassment  standard.    Conversely,  the  statement  by  a 
supervisor to an employee that “I want to fuck  you,” an equally obvious 
use of Fuck
1
, would at a minimum meet the sexual use test.  Hence, the 
federal  courts  demonstrate facility in  recognizing  varied  uses  of fuck  
and take that into account.  This stands in stark contrast to the broadcast 
regulation  by  the  FCC  where  every  use  of fuck  is  deemed  per  se 
sexual—turning a blind eye to the linguistic distinction and a model for 
its legal application.    
While fuck-based claims under Title VII show at least the capacity 
for law to accommodate valuable lessons from linguistics, the multiple 
those in defamation cases where the precise defaming language must be pleaded or risk dismissal.  
Conclusory allegations should be insufficient.  The rationale is to allow defendants to quickly and 
cheaply extricate themselves from meritless litigation.  See Browne, supra note 328, at 545-46.  
This is a particularly bad idea—already rejected by the Supreme Court in Swierkiewicz v. Sorema, 
N.A., 534 U.S. 506 (2002).  I have been roundly critical of the use of heightened pleading whether 
it is judicially-imposed, statutorily-mandated, and most recently as required under Federal Rule of 
Civil Procedure 9(b).  See generally Christopher M. Fairman, Heightened Pleading, 81 T
EX
.
L.
R
EV
. 551  (2002) (criticizing judicially-imposed heightened pleading in civil rights cases and 
statutory heightened pleading under the PSLRA and Y2K  Act); Christopher  M. Fairman, An 
Invitation to the Rulemakers—Strike Rule 9(b), 38 U.C. D
AVIS 
L.
R
EV
. 281 (2004) (advocating an 
end to Rule 9(b)).  If you care to read more about the subject of heightened pleading in the 
defamation context (or any other), see Christopher M. Fairman, The Myth of Notice Pleading, 45 
A
RIZ
.
L.
R
EV
. 987 (2003). 
363
See Browne, supra note 328, at 510-31 (applying and rejecting First Amendment doctrines 
as a basis for Title VII speech suppression including, labor speech, captive audience, time-place-
manner regulation, defamation, fighting words, obscenity, and privacy); see also Volokh, supra 
note 361, at 1819-43 (detailing why harassment law is not defensible under the existing First 
Amendment exceptions). 
364
In 1991, Professor Browne wrote that indecency theory couldn’t be used to contain fuck.  
See Browne, supra note 328, at 528-29.  Unfortunately, the recent maneuvers by the FCC 
certainly provide a doctrinal basis for restricting fuck by labeling it as per se sexual and patently 
offensive as they did in Golden Globe II.  See supra notes 214-44 and accompanying text.  Of 
course, I don’t think this is any wiser for sexual harassment than for broadcasting. 
365
See supra notes 197-200 and accompanying text (discussing Pacifica rationale). 
366
See, e.g., Burke, supra note 359, at 605-07 (questioning judicial decisions recognizing a 
hostile environment based upon words alone). 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested