open pdf file in c# windows application : How to enter text in pdf file SDK software project winforms wpf azure UWP 28-4.FAIRMAN5-part990

2007] 
FUCK 
1761 
tests  used  by  varying  jurisdictions  can  also  generate  uncertainty.  
Uncertainty,  can  in  turn  lead  to  employer  development  of  overly 
restrictive anti-harassment policies with the predictable chilling effect 
consequences.    Whether  motivated  by  a  desire  to  avoid  liability  or 
impose a more sanitized version of workplace speech, taboo continues 
to have power. 
D.     Fuck in Education  
Having  spent  most  of  my  life  in  school—either  attending  or 
teaching—I know that fuck  gets plenty of use in educational settings.  
Fuck finds its way into a public school through the mouths of either 
students  or  teachers.    Given  the  law’s  reaction  to  the  presence  of 
children in earshot of taboo language,
367
if there is one area to predict 
harsh treatment for offensive language, this is it.  Whether based on in 
loco  parentis or some other modern need to maintain educational 
process,
368
schools  seek  to  protect  children  from  taboo  language.  
Surprisingly, there’s some unexpected judicial tolerance in this area—
but only if you’re the teacher. 
1.     Tinker’s Armband but Not Cohen’s Coat?
369
It’s  axiomatic  that  public  school  students  don’t  “shed  their 
constitutional  rights  to  freedom  of  speech  or  expression  at  the 
schoolhouse gate.”
370
At the same time, “the First Amendment rights of 
students in the public schools ‘are not automatically coextensive with 
the rights of adults in other settings,’ and must be ‘applied in light of the 
special characteristics of the school environment.’”
371
There are several 
different taxonomies used by commentators to describe the universe of 
school  speech.
372
 Where fuck   is  concerned,  I  find  most  useful  a 
367
For example, the presence of children drove the Court, FCC, and complainant in Pacifica 
and still plays a role in indecency regulation.  Similarly, the Michigan statute used to convict Tim 
Boomer, the cursing canoeist, required the presence of children as well. 
368
See Jonathan Pyle, Speech in Public Schools: Different Context or Different Rights?, 4 U. 
P
A
.
J.
C
ONST
. L. 586, 601-03 (2002) (describing bases for state parenting power). 
369
Credit goes to Chief Justice Burger who credits Second Circuit Judge Jon Newman for this 
line: “‘[T]he First Amendment gives a high school student the classroom right to wear Tinker’s 
armband, but not Cohen’s jacket.’”  Bethel Sch. Dist. No. 403 v. Fraser, 478 U.S. 675, 682-83 
(1986) (quoting Thomas v. Bd. of Educ., Granville Cent. Sch. Dist., 607 F.2d 1043, 1057 (2d Cir. 
1979) (Newman, J., concurring)). 
370
Tinker v. Des Moines Indep. Cmty. Sch. Dist., 393 U.S. 503, 506 (1969). 
371
Hazelwood Sch. Dist. v. Kuhlmeier, 484 U.S. 260, 266 (1988) (quoting Fraser, 478 U.S. at 
675, and Tinker, 393 U.S. at 506). 
372
See Andrew D.M. Miller, Balancing School Authority and Student Expression, 54 B
AYLOR 
How to enter text in pdf file - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text to pdf in preview; adding text to pdf in reader
How to enter text in pdf file - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text pdf; add text to pdf document online
1762 
CARDOZO LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 28:4 
categorization  dividing  school  speech  into  three  types: Tinker-type, 
Fraser-type, and  Kuhlmeier-type—based on the trilogy of leading 
Supreme Court cases in the area.
373
There  is  student  speech  or  expression  that  happens to  occur  on 
school premises.
374
This type of speech is like a student wearing a black 
armband in protest to participation in the Vietnam War as they did in 
Tinker.
375
 A  school  must  tolerate Tinker-type-black-armband  speech 
unless it can reasonably forecast that the expression will lead to material 
and substantial interference with school activities.
376
A second type of 
speech in the school setting is school-sponsored speech.  This is speech 
that a school affirmatively promotes as opposed to speech that it merely 
tolerates,  like  the  school-supported  student  newspaper  at  issue  in 
Kuhlmeier.
377
 Expressive  activities  delivered  through  a  school-
sponsored  medium  (what  I  call Kuhlmeier-type-school-sponsored-
student-newspaper speech) can be regulated so long as the regulation is 
rationally related to a legitimate pedagogical concern.
378
The  third  type  of  school  speech  is  vulgar,  lewd,  and  offensive 
speech.   Unlike the core political speech in Tinker, sexual  innuendo, 
lewd,  or  vulgar  speech  can  be  constitutionally  punished  because  the 
offensive speech is contrary to the school’s basic educational mission.
379
Fuck seemingly falls into this expansive and ambiguous Fraser-type-
lewd-and-vulgar speech category.  Fraser involved the suspension of a 
high school student for giving an election nominating speech that was 
filled with pervasive, “plainly offensive,” sexual innuendo.
380
Despite 
the  opportunity  to  clarify  the  boundaries  of  offensive  language,  the 
L.
R
EV
. 623, 643-44 & n.149 (2002) (describing various taxonomies stemming from the trilogy).  
According to Miller:  
The Tinker trilogy has established three different categories of speech.  One category is 
lewd or obscene student speech, and Fraser governs this category.  Another category is 
school-sponsored  speech,  over  which Kuhlmeier  reigns.    Does Tinker  apply  to 
everything else?  While the courts have not reached an agreement on the issue, [Miller] 
argues that it does.  If student expression is neither lewd nor school-sponsored, then the 
school cannot regulate it without satisfying Tinker’s substantial and material disruption 
test. 
Id. at 653-55. 
373
See Tinker, 393 U.S. at 503; Bethel Sch. Dist., 478 U.S. 675; Kuhlmeier, 484 U.S. at 260. 
374
See Tinker, 393 U.S. at 514; Axson-Flynn v. Johnson, 356 F.3d 1277, 1285 (10th Cir. 
2004). 
375
In 1969, the Court in Tinker upheld the right of middle school students to wear black 
armbands in protest of the Vietnam War.  Tinker, 393 U.S. at 510-11. 
376
See id. at 509. 
377
See Kuhlmeier, 484 U.S. at 276. 
378
In Kuhlmeier, the Court allowed the school to exercise editorial control over a school-
sponsored student newspaper so long as the regulation was legitimately related to an educational 
concern.  484 U.S. at 273. 
379
In Fraser, the Court upheld the right of the school to punish a student for making an 
elaborate, graphic, explicit, sexual metaphor.  See 478 U.S. at 685. 
380
See id. at 683. 
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on DotNetNuke Site
Select “DNN Platform” in App Frameworks, and enter a Site Name. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF. HTML5Editor.dll. Copy following file and folders to DNN Site project:
adding text to a pdf document acrobat; how to insert text box on pdf
C#: XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET Online Help Manual
Enter the URL to view the online document. Office 2003 and 2007, PDF, DICOM, Gif, Png, Jpeg, Bmp Click to OCR edited file (one for each) to plain text which can
adding text fields to pdf; adding text box to pdf
2007] 
FUCK 
1763 
Court failed to carefully define the speech at issue.  It called the speech 
“offensively  lewd  and  indecent,”  “vulgar  and  lewd,”  and  “sexually 
explicit” all in the same opinion.
381
What then is the difference between the Fraser-speech subsets of 
lewd, indecent,  vulgar, offensive,  or  sexually explicit?   For example, 
“lewd”  is  often  defined  as  “obscene.”
382
 However,  under  a Miller 
definition of obscenity
383
the word fuck  is not obscene because the word 
is neither erotic  nor contains the essential  element  of  sexuality  to be 
prurient.
384
 Consequently, fuck   is  not  likely  covered  by  the  lewd 
subcategory.  As to indecency, we must return to Pacifica and the FCC 
to  understand its contours.
385
As far as fuck  is  concerned,  indecency 
applies only if one makes  the erroneous  connection to per se  sexual 
activity and patent offensiveness.
386
The only remaining subcategories 
to  apply  to fuck   are  offensive  or  vulgar  speech,  yet  confusion  also 
abounds  as  to  what  these  terms  means.
387
 In  the  end,  neither 
classification is helpful in predicting how fuck  would be treated. 
While I am sure fuck  is used by many a student, few reported cases 
explore a student’s speech right in this context.  Given the outcome with 
even  non-taboo  speech,  I  see  little  chance  that fuck   would  find 
protection under the current state of the law However, if fuck  were 
student-originated, today it would be on a t-shirt.  All the recent student 
action  surrounds  t-shirt  speech  and  illustrates  the  difficulty  of 
“offensive” or “vulgar” as useful tools for speech regulation.  
For  example,  the  Sixth  Circuit  recently  held  that  an  Ohio  high 
school could ban Marilyn Manson t-shirts as vulgar or offensive speech 
under Fraser.
388
 The t-shirt  starting the  brouhaha depicted  a “three-
faced Jesus” and the words “See No Truth.  Hear No Truth.  Speak No 
Truth.”  On the reverse was the word “BELIEVE” with the L, I, and E 
highlighted.
389
After being told by the principal to change or go home, 
the  student  went  home.    Defiant,  he  returned  the  next  three  days 
donning  a  different  Marilyn  Manson  shirt;  each  day  he  was  sent 
381
Id. at 684-85. 
382
See Miller, supra note 372, at 655. 
383
Under Miller, obscenity requires (a) the average person, applying community standards, 
would find the work, taken as a whole, appeals to the prurient interest; (b) the work depicts or 
describes in a patently offensive way sexual conduct specifically defined by the applicable state 
law; and (c) whether the work, taken as a whole, lacks serious  literary, artistic, political, or 
scientific value.  Miller v. California, 413 U.S. 15, 24 (1973). 
384
See D
OOLING
supra note 3, at 61 (“Because of the well-established ‘prurient’ requirement, 
foul language and profanity are almost never considered obscene . . . .”). 
385
See supra notes 225-34 and accompanying text (discussing FCC and indecency definition). 
386
This  necessarily  requires  the  finding  that  the  material  is  patently  offensive—that  is, 
explicit, graphic, repeated, and shocking.  See supra notes 224-35and accompanying text
387
See Miller, supra note 372, at 646-49 (discussing confusion and calling for more precise 
definitional categories in order to create a more workable and understandable framework). 
388
See Boroff v. Van Wert City Bd. of Educ., 220 F.3d 465 (6th Cir. 2000). 
389
Id. at 467. 
VB.NET Image: Image Rotator SDK; .NET Document Image Rotation
which allows VB.NET developers to enter the rotating Q 2: As the source image file (which I provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
how to insert text into a pdf; add text to pdf
VB.NET TWAIN: TWAIN Image Scanning in Console Application
WriteLine("---Ending Scan---" & vbLf & " Press Enter To Quit & automatic scanning and stamp string text on captured to scan multiple pages to one PDF or TIFF
how to insert text in pdf using preview; how to add a text box to a pdf
1764 
CARDOZO LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 28:4 
home.
390
A split panel of the Sixth Circuit held that under Fraser the 
school  could  ban  merely  offensive  speech  without  having  to  apply 
Tinker’s substantial and material interference test.
391
What is most troubling is the court’s methodology.  Rather than 
explaining why the t-shirts themselves  were offensive—where all the 
court  had  to  offer  was that  Marilyn Manson appeared “ghoulish  and 
creepy”—the  court  focused  on  the  “destructive  and  demoralizing 
values”  promoted  by  the  band  through  its  lyrics  and  interviews.
392
Using a judicial version of the transitive property, the court found that 
the band promoted ideas contrary to the school’s mission and the t-shirts 
promoted the band.  Ergo the t-shirts were offensive.
393
Because they 
were offensive, the school could ban them.
394
This type of application 
of Fraser leaves virtually no speech off limits as long as it can be traced 
back  to  an  ultimate  offensive  origin.
395
 No  speech—except  the 
Confederate flag that is.  Within months of the Marilyn Manson case, 
the Sixth Circuit held that a Kentucky high school that suspended two 
students  for  wearing  t-shirts  with  the  Confederate  flag  had  to  meet 
Tinker’s substantial and material interference test before it could 
prohibit wearing them to school.
396
This type of inconsistent, if not downright bizarre, application of 
Fraser isn’t isolated.  Just as the FCC declares nonsexual uses of fuck as 
per  se  sexual,  courts  often  sexualize  other  nonsexual  language    to 
enforce a prohibition against the speech.  For example, a federal district 
court upheld the suspension of a middle school student for wearing a t-
shirt  that  said  “Drugs  Suck!”  because  the  message  was  vulgar  and 
offensive.
397
 The court found “suck” had sexual connotations.  After 
admitting that “suck” was also a general expression of disapproval, the 
court found that meaning derivative and “likely evolved from its sexual 
390
Id. 
391
Id. at 470-71. 
392
Id. at 467 (ghoulish and creepy); id. at 469-71 (lyrics and interviews). 
393
Following this reasoning, the band’s offensive lyrics include fuck so I suppose the t-shirts 
promote fuck so they could be banned as if they said fuck.  Giving credit where credit is due, it is 
the high school principal William Clifton, who propounds this bonehead argument. See id. at 469-
70.  The federal district court and two of the Sixth Circuit panelists buy into it unfortunately. 
394
Id. at 471. 
395
The court rejected the argument that the t-shirt itself wasn’t offensive in comparison to 
other t-shirts that promoted bands like Megadeath and Slayer, each with equally explicit lyrics.  
See id. at 470; Miller, supra note 372, at 647-48 & n.169 (discussing case).  Only the dissenter, 
Judge Gilman, seems to recognize the folly of the majority opinion.  Judge Gilman points out the 
obvious: even if the band’s lyrics are vulgar or offensive, nothing on the t-shirts was.  Boroff, 220 
F.3d at 472, 473-74 (Gilman, J., dissenting).  Unfortunately for fuck, Gilman defines vulgar and 
offensive in terms of Pacifica speech and says that if the t-shirts contained those words, the 
school could ban them.  Id
396
See Castorina v. Madison County Sch. Bd., 246 F.3d 536, 540 (6th Cir. 2001). 
397
See Broussard v. Sch. Bd. of Norfolk, 801 F. Supp. 1526 (E.D. Va. 1992). 
C# TWAIN - Scan Multi-pages into One PDF Document
true; device.Acquire(); Console.Out.WriteLine("---Ending Scan---\n Press Enter To Quit also illustrates how to scan many pages into a PDF or TIFF file in C#
add text to pdf document in preview; adding text to a pdf in reader
VB.NET TIFF: .NET TIFF Splitting Control to Split & Disassemble
Developers can enter the page range value in this VB Data Imports System.Drawing Imports System.Text Imports System use TIFDecoder open a pdf file Dim baseDocs
how to add text box to pdf document; adding text to a pdf file
2007] 
FUCK 
1765 
meaning  only  as  recently  as  the  1970s.”
398
 Consequently,  “Drugs 
Suck!” had a prurient element subjecting it to prohibition.
399
The same 
sort of reasoning led another federal district court to uphold prohibition 
of an anti-drunk driving t-shirt that proclaimed “See Dick drink.  See 
Dick drive.  See Dick die.  Don’t be a Dick.”
400
The court found that 
the  word  “Dick”  came  within  a  vulgarity  exception  to  the  First 
Amendment.
401
This type of sexualization of nonsexual language serves 
as a good predictor of how fuck  might be banned by blurring the Fuck
1
and Fuck
2
distinction.  Given this level of confusion among the courts 
on  both  linguistics  and  the  legal  standard  of  vulgar  and  offensive 
speech, student-initiated use of fuck  as free speech seems doomed. 
2.     Fuck in Teacher Speech 
We  might see a different outcome if a teacher  used the word  in 
class.    Justice  Fortas’s  famous Tinker  line  about  not  shedding 
constitutional  rights at  the  schoolhouse gate  applied  to both students 
and teachers.
402
Surely teachers, cloaked with the tolerance afforded by 
academic freedom,
403
must have a safe haven for the use of fuck .  I am, 
of  course,  banking  on  some  modicum  of  personal  protection—
especially in the context of legal education.  As Professor Levinson put 
it,  it  would  be  “especially  problematic  to  say  that  any  speech  is  off 
limits when addressing the question of which speech, if any, speech can 
ever be ruled off limits.”
404
Unfortunately, teacher speech exists in a 
murky First Amendment environment.  As the Second Circuit recently 
lamented: “Neither the Supreme Court nor this Circuit has determined 
what  scope  of  First  Amendment  protection  is  to  be  given  a  public 
398
Id. at 1537. 
399
Id
400
See Pyle v. S. Hadley Sch. Comm., 861 F. Supp. 157, 158 (D. Mass. 1994). 
401
See id. at 159.  The state court ultimately struck down the vulgarity clause of the school’s 
code on state statutory grounds.  See Pyle v. S. Hadley Sch. Comm., 667 N.E.2d 869 (Mass. 
1996); see also  Pyle, supra  note  368,  at  586-89  (discussing  firsthand  involvement  in  the 
litigation). 
402
Tinker v. Des Moines Ind. Cmty. Sch. Dist., 393 U.S. 503, 506 (1969) (“It can hardly be 
argued that either students or teachers shed their constitutional rights to freedom of speech or 
expression at the schoolhouse gate.”) 
403
Academic freedom is a concept used to defend a variety of speech and conduct activities.   
Academic freedom encompasses a professor’s freedom to teach, freedom to research, 
and freedom to publish opinions on issues of public concern.  Academic freedom is 
rooted  in European  traditions and  in  our society’s recognition that “institutions of 
higher education are conducted for the common good . . . which depends upon the free 
search for truth and its free exposition.”  
Stacy E. Smith, Note, Who Owns Academic Freedom?: The Standard for Academic Free Speech 
at Public Universities, 59 W
ASH
.
&
L
EE 
L.
R
EV
. 299, 307-08 (2002). 
404
Levinson, supra note 1, at 1381. 
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Planet Barcode Generator for Image, Picture &
REFile.SaveDocumentFile(doc, "c:/planet.pdf", New PDFEncoder()). type barcode.Data = "01234567890" 'enter a 11 Color.Black 'Human-readable text-related settings
how to add text fields to a pdf; how to add text to a pdf file
1766 
CARDOZO LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 28:4 
college  professor’s  classroom  speech.”
405
Public  school  teachers 
traverse the same uncertain terrain. 
Where  teacher  speech  is  involved,  the Tinker  trilogy  is  often 
supplanted  by Pickering v. Board of Education.
406
 Public  school 
teacher  Marvin  Pickering  criticized  the  board  of  education  for  its 
handling  of fiscal matters in  a  letter  to  the local  newspaper;  he  was 
fired.
407
The Supreme Court held that Pickering’s speech was protected 
by the First Amendment because it was of “public concern.”
408
Because 
Pickering so squarely rests on the “interests of the teacher, as a citizen, 
in  commenting  upon  matters  of  public  concern,”
409
it  might  appear 
inapplicable  to  in-class,  taboo  language,  by  a  school  employee.  
Nonetheless,  five  federal appellate  circuits apply Pickering to the  in-
class  speech  of  teachers  to  exclude  that  speech  from  any  First 
Amendment protection whatsoever.
410
 In  these  jurisdictions,  teachers 
are obviously stripped of any ability to use First Amendment academic 
freedom arguments to protect curricular decisions to use fuck  in class.
411
In  contrast,  five  other  circuits  apply Kuhlmeier  and  require  a 
reasonable  relationship  to  a  legitimate  pedagogical  concern  before 
permitting  schools  to  silence  teacher  curricular  choice.
412
 However, 
even  before Kuhlmeier provided an  alternative  to Pickering,  the  First 
Circuit recognized the academic freedom of high school teachers to use 
the word fuck  as a curricular decision in Keefe v. Geanakos.
413
A senior 
English teacher assigned a reading from Atlantic Monthly that contained 
an  “admittedly  highly  offensive . . .  vulgar  term  for  an  incestuous 
son”—motherfucker.
414
 He  was  suspended,  risked  discharge,  and 
sought  injunctive  relief  which  was denied  by  the  district court.   The 
First  Circuit  reversed after conducting its own independent review of 
the  article  and  finding  it  “scholarly,  thoughtful  and  thought-
provoking.”
415
 Chief  Judge  Aldrich  also  included  the  following 
assessment: 
405
Vega v. Miller, 273 F.3d 460, 467 (2d Cir. 2001) (quoting Cohen v. San Bernadine Valley 
Coll., 92 F.3d 968, 971 (9th Cir. 1996)). 
406
391 U.S. 563 (1968). 
407
Id. at 564. 
408
Id. at 568. 
409
Id
410
See Merle H. Weiner, Dirty Words in the Classroom: Teaching the Limits of the First 
Amendment, 66 T
ENN
.
L.
R
EV
. 597, 625-27 (1999) (discussing the circuit split and identifying the 
Third, Fourth, Fifth, Ninth, and D.C. circuits as applying Pickering). 
411
Professor Weiner makes a persuasive argument for a new legal standard to protect social 
studies teachers who use sexually explicit material in the context of government or legal system 
lessons.  See id. at 675-83. 
412
See id. at 626-27 (identifying the First, Second, Seventh, Eighth, and Tenth Circuits as 
applying Kuhlmeier). 
413
418 F.2d 359 (1st Cir. 1969). 
414
See id. at 361. 
415
Id. 
2007] 
FUCK 
1767 
With regard to the word itself, we cannot think that it is unknown to 
many students in the last year of high school, and we might well take 
judicial notice of its use by young radicals and protesters from coast 
to coast.  No doubt its use genuinely offends the parents of some of 
the students—therein, in part, lay its relevancy to the article.
416
Judge Aldrich recognized the value of studying fuck because of its taboo 
status. 
The First Circuit revisited the issue again in Mailloux v. Kiley
417
where  another  high  school  English  teacher  taught  a  lesson  on  taboo 
words  that  included  writing fuck   on  the  blackboard.    Following  a 
parent’s complaint, he was fired for “conduct unbecoming a teacher.”
418
While the district court seemed to agree with the testifying experts that 
the way Mailloux used the word fuck was “appropriate and reasonable 
under the circumstances and served a serious educational purpose,”
419
divided opinion on the issue compelled the court to fashion a test for 
such  situations.
420
 Ultimately,  the  district  court  held  that  it  was  a 
violation of due process to discharge Mailloux because he did not know 
in advance that his curricular decision to teach about fuck would be an 
affront to school policies.
421
The First Circuit, after rejecting the route 
taken by the district court and opting instead for a case-by case analysis, 
nonetheless  affirmed  the  result  because  the  teacher’s  conduct  was 
within reasonable, although not universally accepted, standards and he 
acted in good  faith and without notice that  the school  was not of the 
same view.
422
Despite these positive outcomes of reason over taboo, don’t draw 
the  wrong  conclusion.    Courts  that  apply  the Kuhlmeier  test  to  a 
teacher’s in-class use of fuck  might well come out the other way.  In 
Krizek v.  Board  of  Education,
423
the district court denied preliminary 
injunctive relief to an English teacher whose contract was not renewed 
416
Id. (footnote omitted); see also Parducci v. Rutland, 316 F. Supp. 352 (M.D. Ala. 1970). 
417
448 F.2d 1242 (1st Cir. 1971), aff’g 323 F. Supp. 1387 (D. Mass. 1971). 
418
Mailloux v. Kiley, 323 F. Supp. 1387, 1389 (D. Mass. 1971). 
419
Id.  Experts from both Harvard School of Education and MIT testified as to appropriateness 
of Mailloux’s conduct.  Additionally, the district court found that: fuck was relevant to discussion 
of taboo words; eleventh graders had sufficient sophistication to treat the word from a serious 
educational viewpoint; and students were not disturbed, embarrassed, or offended.  Id. 
420
Id. at 1392.  The district court crafted the following test: 
[W]hen a secondary school teacher uses a teaching method which he does not prove 
has the support of the preponderant opinion of the teaching profession . . . which he 
merely  proves  is  relevant  to  his  subject  and  students,  is  regarded  by  experts  of 
significant standing as serving a serious educational purpose, and was used by him in 
good faith the state may suspend or discharge a teacher for using that method but it 
may not resort to such drastic sanctions unless the state proves he was put on notice 
either by a regulation or otherwise that he should not use that method. 
Id. 
421
Id. at 1393. 
422
See Mailloux, 448 F.2d at 1243. 
423
713 F. Supp. 1131 (N.D. Ill. 1989). 
1768 
CARDOZO LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 28:4 
after showing the movie About Last Night to  her eleventh  graders.
424
The court described the film as containing “a great deal of vulgarity” 
including “swear words” and quoted the dialogue at length illustrating a 
liberal  use  of fuckin ’, fucking ,  and fuck .
425
 Applying  the Kuhlmeier 
standard, the court found that the school had a legitimate concern over 
vulgarity  and  could  find  the  film  with  its  frequent  vulgarity 
inappropriate  for  high  school  students.
426
 Consequently,  the  court 
rejected  a  preliminary  injunction  because  the  teacher  was  unlikely  to 
prevail on the merits of her First Amendment claim.
427
 
Similarly,  in Vega v. Miller,
428
the  Second  Circuit  found  that 
college administrators had qualified immunity from  First Amendment 
claims by a college teacher who had been disciplined for permitting a 
classroom  exercise,  initiated  for  legitimate  pedagogical  purposes,  to 
continue  to  the  point  where  students  were  calling  out  a  series  of 
sexually explicit words and phrases.  The in-class exercise was a word 
association lesson known as clustering in which students select a topic, 
then call out words related to the topic, and finally group related words 
together into “clusters.”
429
The students selected “sex” as the topic for 
the clustering exercise.  Vega then invited the students to call out words 
or phrases related to the topic, and he wrote many of their responses on 
the  blackboard  including clusterfuckfist fucking ,  and  other  taboo 
words.
430
 To  determine  whether  qualified  immunity  existed  for  the 
college administrators, the court explored what the clearly established 
rights  were  in  this  context.    While  the  court  reserved  the  ultimate 
question of the constitutionality of the discipline, it had little difficulty 
concluding that no decision  had clearly established  that dismissal  for 
Vega’s conduct violated a teacher’s First Amendment rights.
431
Hence, 
qualified immunity was available to the college administrators. 
While  these  courts  purport  to  use  the  same  legal  test  for 
determining the First Amendment academic freedom of teachers, they 
reveal  much  inconsistency.    An  indirect  use  of fuck   from  a  popular 
magazine is okay, but an indirect use of fuck  from a popular film is not.  
Mailloux’s English lesson using fuck  as an example is protected while 
Vega’s English lesson using clusterfuck is not.  Eleventh graders need 
protection but twelfth graders don’t (but college students might).  This 
is hardly  the  consistency  we would hope for  in constitutional  speech 
424
Id. at 1132. 
425
Id. at 1133-35. 
426
Id. at 1139.  The court also considered and rejected the standards used in both Mailloux and 
Keefe.  Id. at 1140-41. 
427
Id. at 1144. 
428
273 F.3d 460 (2d Cir. 2001). 
429
Id. at 462-63. 
430
Id. at 463. 
431
Id. at 468-70. 
2007] 
FUCK 
1769 
protection. 
If there is uncertainty in the application of the Kuhlmeier standard, 
the courts that apply  the Pickering analysis don’t fair much  better as 
they strip educators of constitutional protection for in-class speech.  For 
example, the Fifth Circuit used Pickering to reverse the district court’s 
reinstatement  of  a  university teaching  assistant  who spoke  to  an  on-
campus student group and referred to the Board of Regents as a “stupid 
bunch  of motherfuckers  and  said  “how  the  system fucks  over  the 
student.”
432
In so doing, the Fifth Circuit panel gave credence to the 
testimony of other English professors that “it shows lack of judgment to 
use four letter words to any group of people” and that one who used 
such language was “ill fit for my profession.”
433
This is acquiescence to 
the power of taboo language.
434
In  a  more  recent  example  of Pickering  application,  English 
professor John Bonnell openly and frequently used vulgar language in 
the classroom including fuck , pussy, and cunt.
435
After being accused of 
creating a hostile environment, Bonnell defended his use of language on 
the grounds that none of the terms were directed to a particular student 
and  they  were  only  used  to  make  an  academic  point  concerning 
chauvinistic degrading attitudes toward women as sexual objects.
436
female student ultimately filed a sexual harassment complaint based on 
his offensive comments; Bonnell responded by copying the complaint 
and distributing a redacted version to all of his students.
437
This led to a 
disciplinary  suspension  for  routinely  using  vulgar  and  obscene 
language, disruption of the educational process, and insubordination.
438
Bonnell sued and ultimately the district court granted his injunction. 
The  Sixth  Circuit,  however,  reversed  finding  that  the classroom 
profanity  was  not  germane  to  the  subject  matter  taught  and  was 
therefore  unprotected  speech.
439
“Plaintiff  may  have  a  constitutional 
right to use words such as ‘pussy,’ ‘cunt,’ and ‘fuck,’ but he does not 
432
See Duke v. N. Tex. St. Univ., 469 F.2d 829, 832, 836-38 (5th Cir. 1973).  In the published 
opinion,  the  court  refrained  from printing  the  words  motherfucking  and fucks and used  the 
asterisk euphemisms instead.  The district court had held that the Constitution protected her use of 
profanity because to prohibit particular words substantially increases the risk that ideas will also 
be suppressed in the process.  Id. at 838. 
433
Id. at 839. 
434
Not only does it reflect the power of taboo in the English professors’ comment and court’s 
credence given it, but the misapplication of Pickering may also be influenced by taboo.  At least 
two critical questions seem to be answered the wrong way.  First, the teacher was not in class but 
rather was outside of class when the comments were made.  Second, she was commenting on 
topics not germane to her coursework, but of interest to the teacher, as a citizen, in commenting 
upon matters of public concern. 
435
See Bonnell v. Lorenzo, 241 F.3d 800, 802-03 (6th Cir. 2001). 
436
Id. at 803. 
437
Id. at 804-05. 
438
Id. at 808. 
439
Id. at 820-21. 
1770 
CARDOZO LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 28:4 
have a constitutional right to use them in a classroom setting where they 
are not germane to the subject matter, and in contravention of College’s 
harassment policy.”
440
The court left open the possibility that in-class 
use of taboo language that was germane to the subject matter might be 
permissible.
441
What then does this survey of faculty fuck  use show?  First, the 
federal appellate courts are divided on how to treat teacher use of taboo 
words, with half of the circuits choosing the rule from Kuhlmeier and 
the other half applying older Pickering.  This decision in itself directly 
charts  the  course  of  tolerance  for  the  use  of fuck  because Pickering 
analysis would not provide protection for in-class use.  While the courts 
using Kuhlmeier could extend First Amendment protection to teachers’ 
curricular decisions to use fuck , as Krizek illustrates, that doesn’t always 
occur
While others have tried to synthesize the judicial treatment of fuck  
used by teachers in the classroom, the results are unsatisfactory.  For 
example, Professor Robert Richards, of the Pennsylvania Center for the 
First Amendment and Penn State University, contends that the key is 
whether  the  speech  is  germane  to  the  subject  matter.    According  to 
Richards, “if  I was  teaching a media law  class I  could use the word 
‘fuck’ when discussing the Cohen v. California case . . . [i]t would be 
germane to the subject matter.  However, if I used the term repeatedly in 
math  class,  that  would  not  be  germane.”
442
 Unfortunately, 
“germaneness”  doesn’t  explain  why  relevant  techniques  used  for 
legitimate pedagogical purposes (and hence germane) as found in Vega 
were not protected.  Similarly, trying to make sense of the treatment of 
faculty use of fuck  can’t be explained by direct and indirect uses of the 
word.  Direct uses of fuck  as in Mailloux are protected while indirect 
uses of fuck  as in Vega and Krizek are not—exactly the opposite of what 
we would expect.  
Word taboo, however, helps explain the vastly different treatment 
afforded  teachers’  in-class  use  of fuck .    I  see  the  influence  of  word 
taboo on the parents who often initiate the complaints.  Administrators 
and school boards allow fear of the word fuck  to serve as a litmus test 
440
Id.  The court relied on Hill v. Colorado, 530 U.S. 703, 716 (2000) (“[T]he protection 
afforded to offensive messages does not always embrace offensive speech that is so intrusive that 
the unwilling audience cannot avoid it.”) and Martin v. Parrish, 805 F.2d 583, 584-85 (5th Cir. 
1995) (college professor’s captive audience does not allow denigration of students with profanity 
such as bullshit, hell, damn, God damn, and sucks). 
441
One glimmer of hope comes from Hardy v. Jefferson Community College, 260 F.3d 671 
(6th Cir. 2001).  In Hardy, a Sixth Circuit panel (including Judge Gilman) affirmed the denial of a 
motion  to  dismiss  a  community  college  instructor’s claim that  he  was dismissed  for  using 
“nigger” and “bitch” in the context of a class discussion on social deconstructivism. 
442
David L. Hudson, Free Speech on Public Campuses: Sexual Harassment, Jan. 15, 2005, 
http://www.firstamendmentcenter.org/speech/pubcollege/topic.aspx?topic=sexual_harassment 
(quoting Professor Richards). 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested