open pdf file in iframe in asp.net c# : Add text boxes to pdf document application Library tool html asp.net wpf online 2900774_InfoGovernance_accv212-part995

124
Information: To share or not to share? The Information Governance Review
Recommendation 23 (section 13.3)
The health and social care system requires effective regulation to ensure the safe, 
effective, appropriate and legal sharing of personal confidential data. This process 
should be balanced and proportionate and utilise the existing and proposed duties 
within the health and social care system in England. The three minimum components of 
such a system would include:
• a Memorandum of Understanding between the CQC and the ICO;
• an annual data sharing report by the CQC and the ICO; and
• an action plan agreed through the Informatics Services Commissioning Group on any 
remedial actions necessary to improve the situation shown to be deteriorating in the 
CQC-led annual ‘data sharing’ report.
Recommendation 24 (section 14.1)
The Review Panel recommends that the Secretary of State publicly supports the redress 
activities proposed by this review and promulgates actions to ensure that they are 
delivered.
Recommendation 25 (section 14.2)
The Review Panel recommends that the revised Caldicott principles should be adopted 
and promulgated throughout the health and social care system.
Recommendation 26 (section 14.3)
The Secretary of State for Health should maintain oversight of the recommendations 
from the Information Governance Review and should publish an assessment of the 
implementation of those recommendations within 12 months of the publication of the 
review’s final report.
Add text boxes to pdf document - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text to pdf without acrobat; adding text pdf file
Add text boxes to pdf document - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text pdf reader; add text box to pdf file
125
Glossary
Aggregated data:
Statistical data about several individuals that has been combined to 
show general trends or values without identifying individuals within the data.
Anonymisation:
The process of rendering data into a form which does not identify 
individuals and where identification is not likely to take place.
Audit:
An audit is an official internal or external examination of an organisation. See 
‘Clinical audit’ and ‘Independent audit’.
Audit trail:
An audit trail (or audit log) is a record of everyone who has looked at or 
changed a record, why and when they did so and what changes they made.
Caldicott Guardian:
A senior person responsible for protecting the confidentiality of 
patient and service user information and enabling appropriate information sharing by 
providing advice to professionals and staff.
Care at home:
Social care services provided to a person who remains in their own home; 
also known as ‘domiciliary care’. This care is usually purchased by Social Services on behalf 
of an individual following an assessment of their needs or is bought directly by someone if 
they are funding their own care.
Care pathway:
A care pathway is anticipated care placed in an appropriate time frame, 
written and agreed by a multi-disciplinary team. It has locally agreed standards based on 
evidence where available to help a patient with a specific condition or diagnosis move 
progressively through the clinical treatment. ‘Whole care pathways’ refer to the end-to-
end process of care for particular conditions from the point of entry to the point of 
departure from care.
Carer:
An individual who provides unpaid care to a patient or service user, most commonly 
a member of their family or friend. For paid workers, the term ‘care worker’ should 
be used.
Care records:
Care records are personal records. They comprise documentary and other 
records concerning an individual (whether living or dead) who can be identified from them 
and relating:
• to the individual’s physical or mental health;
• to spiritual counselling or assistance given or to be given to the individual; or
• to counselling or assistance given or to be given to the individual, for the purposes of 
their personal welfare, by any voluntary organisation or by any individual who:
–  by reason of the individual’s office or occupation has responsibilities for their 
personal welfare; or
–  by an order of a court has responsibilities for the individual’s supervision.
This record may be held electronically or in a paper file or a combination of both.
VB.NET Image: Professional Form Processing and Recognition SDK in
reading (OMR) helpful for check/mark sense boxes and intelligent The form format and annotation text can all be your forms before using form printing add-on.
add text to pdf in acrobat; how to enter text in a pdf document
.NET JPEG 2000 SDK | Encode & Decode JPEG 2000 Images
Available as an add-on for RaterEdge .NET Imaging SDK; including IPTC, XMP, XML Box, UUID Boxes, etc RasterEdge.com is professional .NET Document Imaging SDK and
acrobat add text to pdf; add text to pdf online
126
Information: To share or not to share? The Information Governance Review
Care team:
The health and/or social care professionals and staff that directly provide or 
support care to an individual (see sections 3.6 and 3.7).
Care worker:
An individual who is paid to care for a service user. People who are not paid 
are referred to as carers.
Child protection:
The process of protecting individual children identified as either 
suffering, or likely to suffer, significant harm as a result of abuse or neglect. 
Children and young persons (or young people):
People under 18. ‘Young persons’ 
refers to young people where Fraser (Gillick) competency is a consideration (see Fraser 
Guidelines for Competency).
Clinical audit: 
Clinical audit is a tool for improving practice, patient care or services 
provided. It is used to measure current practice and care against a set of explicit standards 
or criteria, identify areas for improvement, make changes to practice and re-audit to 
ensure that improvement has been achieved. The findings of the clinical audit provide 
evidence of the quality of practice and care
117
.
Commissioning (and commissioners):
Commissioning is essentially buying care in line 
with available resources to ensure that services meet the needs of the population. The 
process of commissioning includes assessing the needs of the population, selecting service 
providers and ensuring that these services are safe, effective, people-centred and of high 
quality. Commissioners are responsible for commissioning services.
Common Assessment Framework:
Common Assessment Frameworks are shared, 
integrated approaches to assessing the health, social care and wider support needs of 
individuals. Separate Common Assessment Frameworks exist for both adults and for 
children and young people.
Confidential data or information:
See ‘Personal confidential data’.
Consent:
See section 3.2.
Continuing care:
Care provided over an extended period of time to a person aged 18 or 
over to meet physical or mental health needs which have arisen as the result of disability, 
accident or illness. It may involve both health and social care services. The healthcare 
services are funded by the NHS and the social care services are funded by the local 
authority and/or the service user.
117 NICE guidance.
127
Glossary
Data:
Qualitative or quantitative statements or numbers that are (or are assumed to be) 
factual. Data may be raw or primary data (e.g. direct from measurement), or derivative of 
primary data, but are not yet the product of analysis or interpretation other than 
calculation
118
.
Data breach:
Any failure to meet the requirements of the Data Protection Act, unlawful 
disclosure or misuse of personal confidential data and an inappropriate invasion of 
people’s privacy.
Data controller:
A person (individual or organisation) who determines the purposes for 
which and the manner in which any personal confidential data are or will be processed. 
Data controllers must ensure that any processing of personal data for which they are 
responsible complies with the Act
119
.
• Joint data controllers control how data is processed jointly i.e. they must agree and 
make such decisions together.
• Data controllers in common agree to pool data and are both responsible for how it is 
used but each may process the data independently for its own purposes. All of the data 
controllers in common are still responsible for ensuring it is adequately protected.
Data loss:
A breach of principle 7 of the DPA or an inappropriate breaking of 
confidentiality.
Data processor:
In relation to personal data, means any person (other than an employee 
of the data controller) who processes the data on behalf of the data controller. Data 
processors are not directly subject to the Data Protection Act. But the Information 
Commissioner recommends that organisations should choose data processors carefully and 
have in place effective means of monitoring, reviewing and auditing their processing and a 
written contract (detailing the information governance requirements) must be in place to 
ensure compliance with principle 7 of the Data Protection Act.
De-anonymisation:
See ‘Re-identification’.
De-identified data:
This refers to personal confidential data, which has been through 
anonymisation in a manner conforming to the ICO Anonymisation code of practice. There 
are two categories of de-identified data:
• De-identified data for limited access: this is deemed to have a high risk of 
re-identification if published, but a low risk if held in an accredited safe haven 
and subject to contractual protection to prevent re-identification.
• Anonymised data for publication: this is deemed to have a low risk of 
re-identification, enabling publication.
118 Royal Society (2012) Science as an open enterprise.
119 Taken from the Data Protection Act and Information Commissioner’s Office definitions.
128
Information: To share or not to share? The Information Governance Review
Demographic data:
Information relating to the general characteristics of an individual or 
population e.g. ethnicity, gender, geographical location, socio-economic status.
Direct care:
A clinical, social or public health activity concerned with the prevention, 
investigation and treatment of illness and the alleviation of suffering of individuals. It 
includes supporting individuals’ ability to function and improve their participation in life 
and society. It includes the assurance of safe and high quality care and treatment through 
local audit, the management of untoward or adverse incidents, person satisfaction 
including measurement of outcomes undertaken by one or more registered and regulated 
health or social care professionals and their team with whom the individual has a 
legitimate relationship for their care.
Epidemiology:
The study of the frequency, distribution and cause of disease in order to 
find ways of prevention and control. It includes social and environmental factors that 
influence a disease
120
.
Fraser Guidelines for Competency:
A set of guidelines used by clinicians to determine 
whether a young person is mature and capable of understanding the issues and 
consequences of a decision and being able to evaluate relevant information and make a 
reasoned decision for themselves. Also sometimes referred to as Gillick competency.
Genetic information:
Genetic information is information about the genotype, or 
heritable characteristics of individuals obtained by direct analysis of DNA, or by other 
biochemical testing. Genetic information in itself is not always identifiable; personal 
genetic information refers to information about the genetic make-up of an 
identifiable person
121
.
Genome:
The total genetic complement of an individual.
Health service body:
Organisations (or individuals) with specific functions, obligations 
and powers defined in law. In England, the health service bodies from 1 April 2013 are: the 
Secretary of State for Health (includes the Department of Health, and its Executive 
agencies such as Public Health England and the MHRA), the NHS Commissioning Board, 
clinical commissioning groups, NHS Trusts (including Foundation Trusts), special health 
authorities such as the NHS Business Services Authority, CQC, NICE, and the Health and 
Social Care Information Centre. Local authorities are not health service bodies.
Honorary/seconded staff:
Staff working in the one organisation e.g. a hospital, but 
employed by other organisations e.g. a university. Another example would be where social 
workers employed by the local authority are based in a hospital to work alongside health 
professionals. The agreement between the two organisations ensures that in the event that 
the individual breaches host organisation rules and procedures their employer will take 
appropriate disciplinary action on behalf of the host organisation.
120 http://genome.wellcome.ac.uk/resources/glossary
121 The Human Genetics Commission identified four categories of personal genetic information: observable or private information and sensitive 
or non-sensitive genetic information. The Commission concluded that not all personal genetic information should be treated in the same way 
in every set of circumstances. 
129
Glossary
Identifiable information:
See ‘Personal confidential data’.
Identifier:
An item of data, which by itself or in combination with other identifiers 
enables an individual to be identified. Examples are included in Appendix 5.
Independent audit:
An audit conducted by an external and therefore independent 
auditor to provide greater public assurance. See ‘Audit’ and ‘Clinical audit’.
Indirect care:
Activities that contribute to the overall provision of services to a 
population as a whole or a group of patients with a particular condition, but which fall 
outside the scope of direct care. It covers health services management, preventative 
medicine, and medical research. Examples of activities would be risk prediction and 
stratification, service evaluation, needs assessment, financial audit.
Individual funding request:
A request to a clinical commissioning group to fund 
healthcare for an individual which falls outside the range of services and treatments that 
the clinical commissioning group has agreed to commission.
Information:
Information is the “output of some process that summarises, interprets or 
otherwise represents data to convey meaning.” Data becomes information when it is 
combined in ways that have the potential to reveal patterns in the phenomenon
122
.
Information governance:
How organisations manage the way information and data are 
handled within the health and social care system in England. It covers the collection, use, 
access and decommissioning as well as requirements and standards organisations and their 
suppliers need to achieve to fulfil the obligations that information is handled legally, 
securely, efficiently, effectively and in a manner which maintains public trust.
Information governance specialist:
A staff member specifically appointed to provide 
advice, guidance and governance in relation to legal requirements such as the duty of 
confidence and data protection, the legal basis for information sharing, key requirements 
in relation to information security, record management, and freedom of information.
Legitimate relationship:
The legal relationship that exists between an individual and the 
health and social care professionals and staff providing or supporting their care.
Linkage:
The merging of information or data from two or more sources with the object of 
consolidating facts concerning an individual or an event that are not available in any 
separate record.
Never events:
‘Never events’ are very serious, largely preventable patient safety 
incidents that should not occur if the relevant preventative measures have been put in 
place
123
. The list is updated annually and includes for example wrong site surgery and 
wrong route administration of chemotherapy.
122 Taken from Royal Society (2012) ‘Science as an open enterprise’.
123 Taken from Department of Health, http://www.dh.gov.uk/en/Publicationsandstatistics/Publications/PublicationsPolicyAndGuidance/
DH_124552
130
Information: To share or not to share? The Information Governance Review
Personal confidential data:
This term describes personal information about identified or 
identifiable individuals, which should be kept private or secret. For the purposes of this 
review ‘Personal’ includes the DPA definition of personal data, but it is adapted to include 
dead as well as living people and ‘confidential’ includes both information ‘given in 
confidence’ and ‘that which is owed a duty of confidence’ and is adapted to include 
‘sensitive’ as defined in the Data Protection Act.
Personal data:
Data which relate to a living individual who can be identified from those 
data, or from those data and other information which is in the possession of, or is likely to 
come into the possession of, the data controller, and includes any expression of opinion 
about the individual and any indication of the intentions of the data controller or any other 
person in respect of the individual.
Personal information:
See ‘Personal confidential data’.
Personal record/personal health and wellbeing record:
See ‘Care records’.
Potentially identifiable:
See ‘De-identified data for limited access’.
Primary care:
Primary care refers to services provided by GP practices, dental practices, 
community pharmacies and high street optometrists.
Privacy impact assessment:
A systematic and comprehensive process for determining 
the privacy, confidentiality and security risks associated with the collection, use and 
disclosure for personal data prior to the introduction of or a change to a policy, process 
or procedure.
Processing:
Processing in relation to information or data, means obtaining, recording or 
holding the information or data or carrying out any operation or set of operations on the 
information or data, including:
• organisation, adaptation or alteration of the information or data;
• retrieval, consultation or use of the information or data;
• disclosure of the information or data by transmission, dissemination or otherwise making 
available; or
• alignment, combination, blocking, erasure or destruction of the information or data.
Pseudonymisation:
The process of distinguishing individuals in a data set by using a 
unique identifier, which does not reveal their ‘real world’ identity (see also 
‘Anonymisation’ and ‘De-identified’ data).
Public interest:
Something ‘in the public interest’ is something that serves the interests 
of society as a whole. The ‘public interest test’ is used to determine whether the benefit 
of disclosing sensitive information outweighs the personal interest of the individual 
concerned and the need to protect the public’s trust in the confidentiality of services.
131
Glossary
Re-identification:
The process of analysing data or combining it with other data with the 
result that individuals become identifiable. Also known as ‘de-anonymisation’.
Safeguarding:
The process of protecting children and vulnerable adults from abuse or 
neglect, preventing impairment of their health and development, and ensuring they live in 
circumstances consistent with the provision of safe and effective care. It enables children 
to have optimum life chances and enter adulthood successfully and adults to retain 
independence, wellbeing and choice and to access their human right to live a life that is 
free from abuse and neglect.
Safe haven:
An accredited organisation with a secure electronic environment in which 
personal confidential data and/or de-identified data can be obtained and made available 
to users, generally in de-identified form. An accredited safe haven will need a secure legal 
basis to hold and process personal confidential data. De-identified data can be held under 
contract with obligations to safeguard the data (see section 6.5).
Screening
Screening is a process of identifying apparently healthy people who may be at increased 
risk of a disease or condition. They can then be offered information, further tests and 
appropriate treatment to reduce their risk and/or any complications arising from the 
disease or condition.
Sensitive personal data: 
Data that identifies a living individual consisting of information 
as to his or her: racial or ethnic origin, political opinions, religious beliefs or other beliefs 
of a similar nature, membership of a trade union, physical or mental health or condition, 
sexual life, convictions, legal proceedings against the individual or allegations of offences 
committed by the individual. See also ‘Personal confidential data’.
Serious incident:
A serious event that has led, or may have led to harm to patients, 
service users or staff — this can apply to both clinical safety incidents and data incidents. 
Also called ‘serious untoward incidents’.
Service user:
An individual receiving social care services.
Specialist commissioning:
This relates to the purchasing and planning of specialised 
services for diseases and disorders. Specialised services are defined in law as those services 
with a planning population of more than one million people. The NHS Commissioning Board 
is responsible for commissioning specialised services.
Third party:
In relation to personal data, any person other than the subject of the data, 
the data controller, or a data processor.
Unborn:
Foetuses between 24 weeks gestation and birth. Different approaches are taken 
between health and social care in relation to record keeping relating to ‘the unborn’.
133
Appendix 1: 
Membership of the Information 
Governance Review
Review Panel Members
Dame Fiona Caldicott (Chair)
Chairman, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust
John Carvel
Former Social Affairs Editor, The Guardian
Member, Healthwatch England Committee
Professor Mike Catchpole
Head of Epidemiology and Surveillance, Health Protection Agency
Terry Dafter
Director of Adult Social Care, Stockport
Janet Davies
Director of Nursing and Service Delivery, Royal College of Nursing
Professor David Haslam
National Professional Adviser, Care Quality Commission
Co-Chair of NHS Future Forum Information work stream
Dr Alan Hassey
GP with informatics expertise and Academy of Medical Royal Colleges
Dawn Monaghan
Group Manager, Information Commissioner’s Office
Terry Parkin
Executive Director, Education and Care Services London Borough of Bromley
Sir Nick Partridge
CEO, Terrence Higgins Trust and Involve
Professor Martin Severs
School of Health Sciences and Social Work, University of Portsmouth
Caroline Tapster
Former CEO, Hertfordshire County Council
Jeremy Taylor
Chief Executive, National Voices 
Co-chair of NHS Future Forum Information work stream
Sir Mark Walport
Director, Wellcome Trust
Dr David Wrigley
Commissioning GP
134
Information: To share or not to share? The Information Governance Review
Review Support Team
Launa Broadley
Secretariat
Steve Collins
Department of Health lead
Jenny Craggs
Theme support
Wally Gowing
Theme lead
Suzanne Lea
Head of programme
David Lockwood
Head of drafting
Christina Munns
Theme lead
Karen O’Brien
Secretariat
Eileen Phillips
Media and communications lead
David Riley
Theme lead
Carole Sheard
Theme lead
Clive Thomas
Theme lead
Karen Thomson
Information governance lead
Richard Wild
Review director
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested