open pdf file in new tab in asp.net c# : Delete text from pdf software SDK project winforms windows wpf UWP pdflib-manual-5_028-part1355

4.3  Font Embedding and Subsetting 81
>When the font has been configured as a FontAFM, FontPFM, or FontOutline resource via 
UPR file or at runtime the configured file name will be used.
>If no file could be found, the following suffixes will be added to the font name, and 
the resulting file names tried one after the other to find the font metrics (and outline 
in the case of TrueType and OpenType fonts):
.ttf .otf .afm .pfm .ttc
.TTF .OTF .AFM .PFM .TTC
>If embedding is requested for a PostScript font, the following suffixes will be added 
to the font name and tried one after the other to find the font outline file:
.pfa .pfb
.PFA .PFB
>All trial file names above will be searched for »as is«, and then by prepending all di-
rectory names configured in the SearchPath resource category.
This means that PDFlib will find a font without any manual configuration provided the 
corresponding font file consists of the font name plus the standard file name suffix ac-
cording to the font type, and is located in one of the SearchPath directories.
4.3.2 Font Embedding
The PDF core fonts. PDF viewers support a core set of 14 fonts which are assumed to be 
always available. Full metrics information for the core fonts is already built into the 
PDFlib binary so that no additional font files are required (unless the font is to be em-
bedded). The core fonts are the following:
Courier, Courier-Bold, Courier-Oblique, Courier-BoldOblique,
Helvetica, Helvetica-Bold, Helvetica-Oblique, Helvetica-BoldOblique,
Times-Roman, Times-Bold, Times-Italic, Times-BoldItalic,
Symbol, ZapfDingbats
In order to replace one of the core fonts with a font installed on the system (host font) 
you must configure the font in the HostFont resource category. For example, the follow-
ing line makes sure that instead of using the built-in core font data, the Symbol font 
will be taken from the host system:
PDF_set_parameter(p, "HostFont", "Symbol");
PDF supports fonts outside the set of 14 core fonts in several ways. PDFlib is capable of 
embedding font outlines into the generated PDF output. Font embedding is controlled 
via the embedding option of PDF_load_font( ), although in some cases PDFlib will en-
force font embedding (see below).
Alternatively, a font descriptor containing only the character metrics and some gen-
eral information about the font (without the actual glyph outlines) can be embedded. If 
a font is not embedded in a PDF document, Acrobat will take it from the target system if 
available, or construct a substitute font according to the font descriptor. Table 4.1 lists 
different situations with respect to font usage, each of which poses different require-
ments on the font and metrics files required by PDFlib.
When a font with font-specific encoding (a symbol font) or one containing glyphs 
outside Adobe’s Standard Latin character set is used, but not embedded in the PDF out-
Delete text from pdf - delete, remove text from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# developers to use mature APIs to delete and remove text content from PDF document
how to delete text from a pdf; remove text from pdf acrobat
Delete text from pdf - VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File
delete text pdf preview; how to delete text in pdf converter professional
82
Chapter 4:  Text Handling
put, the resulting PDF will be unusable unless the font is already natively installed on 
the target system (since Acrobat can only simulate Latin text fonts). Such PDF files are 
inherently nonportable, although they may be of use in controlled environments, such 
as intra-corporate document exchange.
Forced font embedding. PDF requires font embedding for certain combinations of 
font and encoding. PDFlib will therefore force font embedding (regardless of the embed-
ding option) in the following cases:
>Using glyphid or unicode encoding with a TrueType or OpenType font with TT out-
lines.
>Using a TrueType font or an OpenType font with TrueType outlines with an encod-
ing different from winansi and macroman.
Note that font embedding will not be enforced for OpenType fonts with PostScript out-
lines. The requirement for font embedding is caused by the internal conversion to a CID 
font, which can be disabled by setting the autocidfont parameter to false. Doing so will 
also disable forced embedding. Note that in this case not all Latin characters will be ac-
cessible, and characters outside the Adobe Glyph List (AGL) won’t work at all.
Legal aspects of font embedding. It’s important to note that mere possession of a font 
file may not justify embedding the font in PDF, even for holders of a legal font license. 
Many font vendors restrict embedding of their fonts. Some type foundries completely 
forbid PDF font embedding, others offer special online or embedding licenses for their 
fonts, while still others allow font embedding provided subsetting is applied to the font. 
Please check the legal implications of font embedding before attempting to embed 
fonts with PDFlib. PDFlib will honor embedding restrictions which may be specified in a 
TrueType or OpenType font. If the embedding flag in a TrueType font is set to no 
embedding
1
, PDFlib will honor the font vendor’s request, and reject any attempt at em-
bedding the font.
Table 4.1 Different font usage situations and required metrics and outline files
font usage
font metrics file required?
font outline file required?
one of the 14 core fonts
no
no
1
1. Font outlines may be supplied if embedding is desired
TrueType or OpenType font installed on the Mac, or 
TrueType, OpenType, or PostScript fonts installed on 
the Windows system (host fonts)
no
no
non-core PostScript fonts
PFM or AFM
PFB or PFA
(only for font embedding)
TrueType fonts
no
TTF
OpenType fonts with TrueType or PS outlines, 
including CJK TrueType and OpenType fonts
no
TTF or OTF
standard CJK fonts
2
2. See Section 4.7, »Chinese, Japanese, and Korean Text«, page 100 for more information on CJK fonts.
no
no
1. More specifically: if the fsType flag in the OS/2 table of the font has a value of 2.
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
›› VB.NET PDF: Delete PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - How to Delete PDF Document Page in VB.NET. Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in VB.NET Class.
erase pdf text; delete text pdf files
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Delete PDF Page. C#.NET PDF Library - Delete PDF Document Page in C#.NET.
delete text pdf document; remove text from pdf online
4.3  Font Embedding and Subsetting 83
4.3.3 Font Subsetting
In order to decrease the size of the PDF output, PDFlib can embed only those characters 
from a font which are actually used in the document. This process is called font subset-
ting. It creates a new font which contains fewer glyphs than the original font, and omits 
font information which is not required for PDF viewing. Note, however, that Acrobat’s 
TouchUp tool will refuse to work with text in subset fonts. Font subsetting is particular-
ly important for CJK fonts. PDFlib supports subsetting for the following types of fonts:
>TrueType fonts,
>OpenType fonts with PostScript or TrueType outlines.
When a font for which subsetting has been requested is used in a document, PDFlib will 
keep track of the characters actually used for text output. There are several controls for 
the subsetting behavior:
>The default subsetting behavior is controlled by the autosubsetting parameter. If it is 
true, subsetting will be enabled for all fonts where subsetting is possible. The default 
value is true.
>If the autosubsetting parameter is false, but subsetting is desired for a particular font 
nevertheless, the subsetting option must be supplied to PDF_load_font( ).
>The subsetlimit parameter contains a percentage value. If a document uses more than 
this percentage of glyphs in a font, subsetting will be disabled for this particular 
font, and the complete font will be embedded instead. This saves some processing 
time at the expense of larger output files:
PDF_set_value(p, "subsetlimit", 75); /* set subset limit to 75% */
The default value of subsetlimit is 100 percent. In other words, the subsetting option 
requested at PDF_load_font( ) will be honored unless the client explicitly requests a 
lower limit than 100 percent.
>The subsetminsize parameter can be used to completely disable subsetting for small 
fonts. If the original font file is smaller than the value of subsetminsize in KB, font 
subsetting will be disabled for this font. The default value is 100 KB.
Embedding and subsetting TrueType fonts. The dependencies for TrueType handling 
are a bit confusing due to certain requirements in PDF. The following is a summary of 
the information in previous paragraphs.
If a TrueType font is used with an encoding different from winansi and macroman it 
will be converted to a CID font for PDF output by default. For encodings which contain 
only characters from the Adobe Glyph List (AGL) this can be prevented by setting the 
autocidfont parameter to false. If the font is converted to a CID font, it will always be em-
bedded. Subsetting will be applied by default, unless the autosubsetting parameter is set 
to false, or the percentage of used glyphs is higher than the subsetlimit parameter, or the 
font file size is in KB smaller than the value of the subsetminsize parameter.
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Text. VB.NET PDF - Extract Text from PDF Using VB. How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application.
how to delete text in pdf acrobat; how to delete text in pdf using acrobat professional
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Text. C# PDF - Extract Text from PDF in C#.NET. Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File.
deleting text from a pdf; remove text from pdf reader
84
Chapter 4:  Text Handling
4.4 Encoding Details
4.4.1 8-Bit Encodings
Table 4.2 lists the predefined encodings in PDFlib, and details their use with several im-
portant classes of fonts. It is important to realize that certain scripts or languages have 
requirements which cannot be met by common fonts. For example, Acrobat’s core fonts 
do not contain all characters required for ISO 8859-2, while PostScript 3, OpenType Pro, 
and TrueType »big fonts« do.
Note The chartab example contained in the PDFlib distribution can be used to easily print character 
tables for arbitrary font/encoding combinations.
Notes on the macroman encoding. This encoding reflects the Mac OS character set, al-
beit with the old currency symbol at position 219 = 0xDB, and not the Euro glyph as re-
defined by Apple (this incompatibility is dictated by the PDF specification). Also, this 
encoding does not include the Apple glyph and the mathematical symbols as defined in 
the Mac OS character set. The macroman_euro encoding is identical to macroman except 
that position 219 = 0xDB holds the Euro glyph instead of the currency symbol.
Host encoding. The special encoding host does not have any fixed meaning, but will be 
mapped to another 8-bit encoding depending on the current platform as follows:
>on Mac OS 9 it will be mapped to macroman;
>on IBM eServer iSeries and zSeries with MVS or USS it will be mapped to ebcdic;
>on Windows, Linux, Mac OS X and all other systems it will be mapped to winansi;
Host encoding is primarily useful for writing platform-independent test programs (like 
those contained in the PDFlib distribution and other simple applications. Host encod-
ing is not recommended for production use, but should be replaced by whatever encod-
ing is appropriate.
Automatic encoding. PDFlib supports a mechanism which can be used to specify the 
most natural encoding for certain environments without further ado. Supplying the 
keyword auto as an encoding name specifies a platform- and environment-specific 8-bit 
encoding as follows:
>On Windows: the current system code page (see below for details)
>On Unix and Mac OS X: iso8859-1
>On Mac OS Classic: macroman
>On IBM eServer iSeries: the current job’s encoding (IBMCCSID000000000000)
>On IBM eServer zSeries: ebcdic (=code page 1047).
While automatic encoding is convenient in many circumstances, using this method will 
make your PDFlib client programs inherently non-portable.
Tapping system code pages. PDFlib can be instructed to fetch code page definitions 
from the system and transform it appropriately for internal use. This is very convenient 
since it frees you from implementing the code page definition yourself. Instead of sup-
plying the name of a built-in or user-defined encoding for PDF_load_font( ), simply use 
an encoding name which is known to the system. This feature is only available on se-
lected platforms, and the syntax for the encoding string is platform-specific:
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Text to PDF. C#.NET PDF SDK - Insert Text to PDF Document in C#.NET. Providing C# Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page with .NET PDF Library.
pull text out of pdf; delete text pdf file
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
Text: Search Text in PDF. C# Guide about How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information with .NET PDF Control.
how to remove text watermark from pdf; delete text from pdf online
4.4  Encoding Details 85
Table 4.2 Predefined encodings and their use with several classes of fonts
code page
supported languages
PS Level 1/2, 
Acrobat 4/5
1
PostScript 3
2
OpenType 
Pro Fonts
»Big Fonts«, 
e.g., Tahoma
winansi
identical to cp1252, a superset of 
ISO8859-1
yes
yes
yes
yes
macroman
Mac Roman encoding, i.e., the 
default Macintosh character set
yes
yes
yes
yes
macroman_
euro
similar to macroman, but includes 
the Euro glyph instead of currency
yes
yes
yes
yes
ebcdic
EBCDIC code page 1047
yes
yes
yes
yes
pdfdoc
PDFDocEncoding
yes
yes
yes
yes
iso8859-1 
(Latin-1)
Western European languages 
(implemented as winansi)
yes
yes
yes
yes
iso8859-2 
(Latin-2)
Slavic languages of Central Europe
no
yes
yes
yes
iso8859-3 
(Latin-3)
Esperanto and Maltese
no
no
yes
yes
iso8859-4 
(Latin-4)
Estonian, the Baltic languages, and 
Greenlandic
no
no
yes
yes
iso8859-5
Bulgarian, Russian, and Serbian
no
no
yes
yes
iso8859-6
Arabic
no
no
no
yes
iso8859-7
Modern Greek
no
no
1 missing
yes
iso8859-8
Hebrew and Yiddish
no
no
no
yes
iso8859-9 
(Latin-5)
Western European and Turkish
5 missing
yes
yes
yes
iso8859-10 
(Latin-6)
Nordic languages (variation of 
Latin-4)
no
no
1 missing
yes
iso8859-13 
(Latin-7)
Baltic languages
no
yes
yes
yes
iso8859-14 
(Latin-8)
Celtic
no
no
no
no
iso8859-15 
(Latin-9)
Adds the Euro and some French and 
Finnish characters to Latin-1
Euro missing
yes
yes
yes
iso8859-16 
(Latin-10)
Hungarian, Polish, Romanian, and 
Slovenian
no
yes
yes
yes
cp1250
Central European
no
yes
yes
yes
cp1251
Cyrillic
no
no
yes
yes
cp1252
Western European (implemented as 
winansi)
yes
yes
yes
yes
cp1253
Greek
no
no
1 missing
yes
cp1254
Turkish
5 missing
yes
yes
yes
cp1255
Hebrew
no
no
no
yes
cp1256
Arabic
no
no
no
5 missing
cp1257
Baltic
no
yes
yes
yes
cp1258
Viet Nam
no
no
no
yes
1. Original Adobe Latin character set (Type 1 Fonts since 1982)
2. Extended Adobe Latin character set (CE-Fonts) (Type 1 Fonts since PostScript 3)
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to Text in C#.NET. Integrate following RasterEdge C#.NET text to PDF converter SDK dlls into your C#.NET project assemblies;
erase text from pdf file; how to delete text from pdf with acrobat
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project. Remove and delete metadata from PDF file.
acrobat delete text in pdf; remove text from pdf
86
Chapter 4:  Text Handling
>On Windows the encoding name is cp<number>, where <number> is the number of 
any code page installed in the system:
PDF_load_font(p, "Helvetica", 0, "cp1250", "");
Single-byte code pages will be transformed into an internal 8-bit encoding, while 
multi-byte code pages will always be mapped to unicode. This means that all strings 
for page descriptions must be supplied in Unicode by the client programmer.
>On IBM eServer iSeries any Coded Character Set Identifier (CCSID) can be used. The 
CCSID must be supplied as a string, and PDFlib will apply the prefix IBMCCSID to the 
supplied code page number. PDFlib will also add leading 0 characters if the code page 
number uses fewer than 5 characters. Supplying 0 (zero) as the code page number 
will result in the current job’s encoding to be used:
PDF_load_font(p, "Helvetica", 0, "273", "");
>On IBM eServer zSeries with USS or MVS any Coded Character Set Identifier (CCSID) can 
be used. The CCSID must be supplied as a string, and PDFlib will pass the supplied 
code page name to the system literally without applying any change:
PDF_load_font(p, "Helvetica", 0, "IBM-273", "");
User-defined 8-bit encodings. In addition to predefined encodings PDFlib supports 
user-defined 8-bit encodings. These are the way to go if you want to deal with some 
character set which is not internally available in PDFlib, such as EBCDIC character sets 
different from the one supported internally in PDFlib. PDFlib supports encoding tables 
defined by PostScript glyph names, as well as tables defined by Unicode values.
The following tasks must be done before a user-defined encoding can be used in a 
PDFlib program (alternatively the encoding can also be constructed at runtime using 
PDF_encoding_set_char( )):
>Generate a description of the encoding in a simple text format.
>Configure the encoding in the PDFlib resource file (see Section 3.1.6, »Resource Con-
figuration and File Searching«, page 47) or via PDF_set_parameter( ).
>Provide a font (metrics and possibly outline file) that supports all characters used in 
the encoding.
The encoding file simply lists glyph names and numbers line by line. The following ex-
cerpt shows the start of an encoding definition:
% Encoding definition for PDFlib, based on glyph names
% name
code
Unicode (optional)
space
32
0x0020
exclam
33
0x0021
...
The next example shows a snippet from a Unicode code page:
% Code page definition for PDFlib, based on Unicode values
% Unicode
code
0x0020
32
0x0021
33
...
More formally, the contents of an encoding or code page file are governed by the follow-
ing rules:
4.4  Encoding Details 87
>Comments are introduced by a percent ’%’ character, and terminated by the end of 
the line.
>The first entry in each line is either a PostScript glyph name or a hexadecimal Uni-
code value composed of a 0x prefix and four hex digits (upper or lower case). This is 
followed by whitespace and a hexadecimal (0xoo–0xFF) or decimal (0–255) character 
code. Optionally, name-based encoding files may contain a third column with the 
corresponding Unicode value.
>Character codes which are not mentioned in the encoding file are assumed to be un-
defined. Alternatively, a Unicode value of 0x0000 or the character name .notdef can 
be provided for unused slots.
As a naming convention we refer to name-based tables as encoding files (*.enc), and Uni-
code-based tables as code page files (*.cpg), although PDFlib treats both kinds in the 
same way, and doesn’t care about file names. In fact, PDFlib will automatically convert 
between name-based encoding files and Unicode-based code page files whenever it is 
necessary. This conversion is based on Adobe’s standard list of PostScript glyph names 
(the Adobe Glyph List, or AGL
1
), but non-AGL names can also be used. PDFlib will assign 
free Unicode values to these non-AGL names, and adjusts the values when reading an 
OpenType font file which includes a mapping from glyph names to Unicode values.
The AGL is built into PDFlib, and contains more than 1000 glyph names. Encoding 
files are required for PostScript fonts with non-standard glyph names, while code pages 
are more convenient when dealing with Unicode-based TrueType or OpenType fonts.
4.4.2 Symbol Fonts and Font-specific Encodings
Since Symbol or logo fonts (also called pi fonts) do not usually contain standard charac-
ters they must use a different encoding scheme compared to text fonts.
The builtin encoding for PostScript fonts. The encoding name builtin doesn’t describe a 
particular character ordering but rather means »take this font as it is, and don’t mess 
with the character set«. This concept is sometimes called a »font-specific« encoding and 
is very important when it comes to non-text fonts (such as logo and symbol fonts). It is 
also widely used (somewhat inappropriately) for non-Latin text fonts (such as Greek 
and Cyrillic). Such fonts cannot be reencoded using one of the standard encodings since 
their character names don’t match those in these encodings. Therefore builtin must be 
used for all symbolic or non-text PostScript fonts, such as Symbol and ZapfDingbats. Non-
text fonts can be recognized by the following entry in their AFM file:
EncodingScheme FontSpecific
Text fonts can be reencoded (adjusted to a certain code page or character set), while 
symbolic fonts can’t, and must use builtin encoding instead.
The builtin encoding can not be used for user-defined (Type 3) fonts since these do 
not include any default encoding.
Note Unfortunately, many typographers and font vendors didn’t fully grasp the concept of font spe-
cific encodings (this may be due to less-than-perfect production tools). For this reason, there 
are many Latin text fonts labeled as FontSpecific encoding, and many symbol fonts incorrectly 
labeled as text fonts.
1. The AGL can be found at http://partners.adobe.com/asn/developer/type/glyphlist.txt 
88
Chapter 4:  Text Handling
Builtin encoding for TrueType fonts. TrueType fonts with non-text characters, such as 
the Wingdings font, must be used with builtin encoding. If a font requires builtin encod-
ing but the client requested a different encoding PDFlib will enforce builtin encoding 
nevertheless.
Builtin encoding for OpenType fonts with PostScript outlines (*.otf). OTF fonts with 
non-text characters must be used with builtin encoding. Some OTF fonts contain an in-
ternal default encoding. PDFlib will detect this case, and dynamically construct an en-
coding which is suited for this particular font. The encoding name builtin will be modi-
fied to builtin_<fontname>. Although this new encoding name can be used in future calls 
to PDF_load_font( ) it is only reasonable for use with the same font.
4.4.3 Glyph ID Addressing for TrueType and OpenType Fonts
In addition to 8-bit encodings, Unicode, and CMaps PDFlib supports a method of ad-
dressing individual characters within a font called glyph id addressing. In order to use 
this technique all of the following requirements must be met:
>The font is available in the TrueType or OpenType format.
>The font must be embedded in the PDF document (with or without subsetting).
>The developer is familiar with the internal numbering of glyphs within the font.
Glyph ids (GIDs) are used internally in TrueType and OpenType fonts, and uniquely ad-
dress individual glyphs within a font. GID addressing frees the developer from any re-
striction in a given encoding scheme, and provides access to all glyphs which the font 
designer put into the font file. However, there is generally no relationship at all be-
tween GIDs and more common addresssing schemes, such as Windows encoding or Uni-
code. The burden of converting application-specific codes to GIDs is placed on the 
PDFlib user.
GID addressing is invoked by supplying the keyword glyphid as the encoding parame-
ter of PDF_load_font( ). GIDs are numbered consecutively from 0 to the last glyph id val-
ue, which can be queried with the fontmaxcode parameter.
4.4.4 The Euro Glyph
The symbol denoting the European currency Euro raises a number of is-
sues when it comes to properly displaying and printing it. In this section 
we’d like to give some hints so that you can successfully deal with the 
Euro character. First of all you’ll have to choose an encoding which in-
cludes the Euro character and check on which position the Euro is located. 
Some examples:
>With unicode encoding use the character U+20AC.
>In winansi encoding the location is 0x80 (hexadecimal) or 128 (decimal).
>The common iso8859-1 encoding does not contain the Euro character. However, the 
iso8859-15 encoding is an extension of iso8859-1 which adds the Euro character at 
0xA4 (hexadecimal) or 164 (decimal).
>The original macroman encoding, which is still the same in PDF, does not contain the 
Euro character. However, Apple modified this encoding and replaced the old curren-
cy glyph which the Euro glyph at 0xDB (hexadecimal) or 219 (decimal). In order to 
use this modified Mac encoding use macroman_euro instead of macroman.
4.4  Encoding Details 89
Next, you must choose a font which contains the Euro glyph. Many modern fonts in-
clude the Euro glyph, but not all do. Again, some examples:
>The built-in fonts in PostScript Level 1 and Level 2 devices do not contain the Euro 
character, while those in PostScript 3 devices usually do.
>If a font does not contain the Euro character you can use the Euro from the Symbol 
core font instead, which is located at position 0xA0 (hexadecimal) or 160 (decimal). It 
is available in the version of the Symbol font shipped with Acrobat 4.0 and above, 
and the one built into PostScript 3 devices.
90
Chapter 4:  Text Handling
4.5 Unicode Support
PDFlib supports the Unicode standard
1
, almost identical to ISO 
10646, for a variety of features related to page content and hy-
pertext elements.
4.5.1 Unicode for Page Descriptions
Unicode strings can be supplied directly in page descriptions for 
use with the following kinds of fonts:
>PostScript fonts with unicode encoding. Up to 255 distinct Unicode values can be 
used. If more are requested they will be replaced with the space character. Since PFM 
metrics files support only winansi or builtin encoding, unicode encoding will always 
be mapped to winansi if a font with a PFM metrics file is used.
>TrueType and OpenType fonts with unicode encoding. For TrueType and OpenType 
fonts this will force font embedding.
>Standard CJK fonts with a Unicode-based CMap. Unicode-compatible CMaps are easi-
ly identified by the Uni prefix in their name (see Table 4.6). 
>Custom CJK fonts with unicode encoding.
In addition to unicode encoding PDFlib supports several other methods for selecting 
Unicode characters.
Unicode code pages for PostScript and TrueType fonts. PDFlib supports Unicode ad-
dressing for characters within the Adobe Glyph List (AGL). This kind of Unicode support 
is available for Unicode-based TrueType fonts and PostScript fonts with glyph names in 
the AGL.
This feature can be activating by using any of PDFlib’s internal code pages, or supply-
ing a suitable custom encoding or code page file (see Section 4.4.1, »8-Bit Encodings«, 
page 84).
8-Bit strings for addressing Unicode segments. PDFlib supports an abbreviated format 
which can be used to address up to 256 consecutive Unicode characters starting at an ar-
bitrary offset between U+0000 and U+FFFF. This can be used to easily access a small 
range of Unicode characters while still working with 8-bit characters.
This feature can be activated by using the string U+XXXX as the encoding parameter 
for PDF_load_font( ), where XXXX denotes a hexadecimal offset. The 8-bit character value 
will be added to the supplied offset. For example, using the encoding
U+0400
will select the Cyrillic Unicode section, and 8-bit strings supplied to the text functions 
will select the Unicode characters U+0400, U+0401, etc.
Proper Unicode values for cut-and-paste and find operations. PDFlib will include addi-
tional information (a ToUnicode CMap) in the PDF output which helps Acrobat in assign-
ing proper Unicode values for exporting text (e.g., via the clipboard) and searching for 
text. By default ToUnicode CMaps will be generated for all supported font types, but 
they can only be included if Unicode information is available for a given font/encoding 
1. See http://www.unicode.org 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested