open pdf form itextsharp c# : How to erase text in pdf online SDK application service wpf html web page dnn R-admin5-part1662

46
Appendix B Configuration on a Unix-alike
B.1 Configuration options
configure has many options: running
./configure --help
willgive a list. Probably the most important ones not coveredelsewhereare (defaults inbrackets)
--with-x use the X Window System [yes]
--x-includes=DIR
Xinclude files are in DIR
--x-libraries=DIR
Xlibrary files are in DIR
--with-readline
use readline library (if available) [yes]
--enable-R-profiling
attempt to compile support for Rprof() [yes]
--enable-memory-profiling
attempt to compile support for Rprofmem() and tracemem() [no]
--enable-R-shlib
build R as a shared/dynamic library [no]
--enable-BLAS-shlib
build the
BLAS
as a shared/dynamic library [yes, except on AIX]
You can use --without-foo or --disable-foo for the negatives.
You will want to use --disable-R-profiling if you are building a profiled executable of R
(e.g. with ‘-pg)’.
Flag --enable-R-shlib causes the make process to build R as a dynamic (shared) library,
typically called libR.so, and link the main R executable R.bin against that library. This can
only be done if all the code (including system libraries) can be compiled into a dynamic library,
and there may be a performance
1
penalty. So you probably only want this if you will be using
an application which embeds R. Note that C code in packages installed on an R system linked
with --enable-R-shlib is linked against the dynamic library and so such packages cannot be
used from an R system built in the default way. Also, because packages are linked against R
they are on some OSes also linked against the dynamic libraries R itself is linked against, and
this can lead to symbol conflicts.
For maximally effective use of valgrind, R should be compiled withvalgrindinstrumentation.
The configure option is --with-valgrind-instrumentation=level, where level is 0, 1 or 2.
(Level 0 is the default and does not add anything.) The system headers for valgrind can
be requested by option --with-system-valgrind-headers: they will be used if present (on
Linux they may be in a separate package such as valgrind-devel). Note though that there is no
guarantee that the code in R will be compatible with very old
2
or future valgrind headers.
If you need to re-configure R with different options you may need to run make clean or even
make distclean before doing so.
The configure script has other generic options added by autoconf and which are not sup-
ported for R: in particular building for one architecture on a different host is not possible.
1
We have measured 15–20% on ‘i686’ Linux and around 10% on ‘x86_64’ Linux.
2
We believe that versions 3.4.0 to 3.10.1 are compatible.
How to erase text in pdf online - delete, remove text from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# developers to use mature APIs to delete and remove text content from PDF document
how to delete text from pdf with acrobat; delete text from pdf
How to erase text in pdf online - VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File
erase text from pdf file; how to delete text in pdf converter
Appendix B: Configuration on a Unix-alike
47
B.2 Internationalization support
Translation of messages is supported via
GNU
gettext unless disabled by the configure option
--disable-nls. The configure report will show NLS as one of the ‘Additional capabilities’
if support has been compiled in, and running in an English locale (but not the C locale) will
include
Natural language support but running in an English locale
in the greeting on starting R.
B.3 Configuration variables
If you need or want to set certain configure variables to something other than their default, you
can do that by either editing the file config.site (which documents many of the variables you
might want to set: others can be seen in file etc/Renviron.in) or on the command line as
./configure VAR=value
If you are building in a directory different from the sources, there can be copies of config.site
in the source and the build directories, and both will be read (in that order). In addition, if
there is a file ~/.R/config, it is read between the config.site files in the source and the build
directories.
There is also a general autoconf mechanism for config.site files, which are read before any
of those mentioned in the previous paragraph. This looks first at a file specified by the environ-
ment variable CONFIG_SITE, and if not is set at files such as /usr/local/share/config.site
and /usr/local/etc/config.site in the area (exemplified by /usr/local) where R would be
installed.
These variables are precious, implying that they do not have to be exported to the environ-
ment, are kept in the cache even if not specified on the command line, checked for consistency
between two configure runs (provided that caching is used), and are kept during automatic
reconfiguration as if having been passed as command line arguments, even if no cache is used.
See the variable output section of configure --help for a list of all these variables.
If you find you need to alter configure variables, it is worth noting that some settings may
be cached in the file config.cache, and it is a good idea to remove that file (if it exists)
before re-configuring. Note that caching is turned off by default: use the command line option
--config-cache (or -C) to enable caching.
B.3.1 Setting paper size
One common variable to change is R_PAPERSIZE, which defaults to ‘a4’, not ‘letter’. (Valid
values are ‘a4’, ‘letter’, ‘legal’ and ‘executive’.)
This is used both when configuring R to set the default, and when running R to override the
default. It is also used to set the paper size when making PDF manuals.
The configure default will most often be ‘a4’ if R_PAPERSIZE is unset. (If the (Debian Linux)
program paperconf is found or the environment variable PAPERSIZE is set, these are used to
produce the default.)
B.3.2 Setting the browsers
Another precious variable is R_BROWSER, the default
HTML
browser, which should take a value
of an executable in the user’s path or specify a full path.
Its counterpart for PDF files is R_PDFVIEWER.
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Redact tab on viewer empower users to redact and erase PDF text, erase PDF images and erase PDF pages online. Miscellaneous. • RasterEdge XDoc.
pdf text remover; delete text pdf acrobat professional
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Draw PDF markups. PDF Protection. • Sign PDF document with signature. • Erase PDF text. • Erase PDF images. • Erase PDF pages. Miscellaneous.
how to remove text watermark from pdf; remove text from pdf
Appendix B: Configuration on a Unix-alike
48
B.3.3 Compilation flags
If you have libraries and header files, e.g., for
GNU
readline, in non-system directories, use the
variables LDFLAGS (for libraries, using ‘-L’ flags to be passed to the linker) and CPPFLAGS (for
header files, using ‘-I’ flags to be passed to the C/C++ preprocessors), respectively, to specify
these locations. Thesedefault to ‘-L/usr/local/lib’ (LDFLAGS,‘-L/usr/local/lib64’onmost
64-bit Linux OSes) and ‘-I/usr/local/include’ (CPPFLAGS) to catch the most common cases.
If libraries are still not found, then maybe your compiler/linker does not support re-ordering of
-L and -l flags (this has been reported to be a problem on HP-UX with the native cc). In this
case, use a different compiler (or a front end shell script which does the re-ordering).
These flags can also be used to build a faster-running version of R. On most platforms
using gcc, having ‘-O3’ in CFLAGS and FFLAGS produces worthwhile performance gains with
gcc and gfortran, but may result in a less reliable build (both segfaults and incorrect nu-
meric computations have been seen). On systems using the
GNU
linker (especially those using
R as a shared library), it is likely that including ‘-Wl,-O1’ in LDFLAGS is worthwhile, and
‘’-Bdirect,--hash-style=both,-Wl,-O1’’ is recommended at https://lwn.net/Articles/
192624/. Tuning compilation to a specific
CPU
family (e.g. ‘-mtune=native’ for gcc) can give
worthwhile performance gains, especially on older architectures such as ‘ix86’.
B.3.4 Making manuals
The default settings for making the manuals are controlled by R_RD4PDF and R_PAPERSIZE.
B.4 Setting the shell
By default the shell scripts such as R will be ‘#!/bin/sh’ scripts (or using the SHELL chosen by
configure). This is almost always satisfactory, but on a few systems /bin/sh is not a Bourne
shell or clone, and the shell to be used can be changed by setting the configure variable R_SHELL
to a suitable value (a full path to a shell, e.g. /usr/local/bin/bash).
B.5 Using make
To compile R, you will most likely find it easiest to use
GNU
make, although the Sun make works
on Solaris. The native make has been reported to fail on SGI Irix 6.5 and Alpha/OSF1 (aka
Tru64).
To build in a separate directory you need a make that supports the VPATH variable, for
example
GNU
make and Sun make.
dmake has also been used. e.g, on Solaris 10.
If you want to use a make by another name, for example if your
GNU
make is called ‘gmake’,
you need to set the variable MAKE at configure time, for example
./configure MAKE=gmake
B.6 Using FORTRAN
To compile R, you need a FORTRAN compiler. The default is to search for f95, fort, xlf95,
ifort, ifc, efc, pgf95 lf95, gfortran, ftn, g95, f90, xlf90, pghpf, pgf90, epcf90, g77, f77,
xlf, frt, pgf77, cf77, fort77, fl32, af77 (in that order)
3
,and use whichever is found first; if
none is found, R cannot be compiled. However, if CC is gcc, the matching FORTRAN compiler
(g77 for gcc 3 and gfortran for gcc 4) is used if available.
The search mechanism can be changed using the configure variable F77 which specifies the
command that runs the FORTRAN 77 compiler. If your FORTRAN compiler is in a non-
3
On HP-UX fort77 is the
POSIX
compliant FORTRAN compiler, and comes after g77.
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Draw markups to PDF document. PDF Protection. • Add signatures to PDF document. • Erase PDF text. • Erase PDF images. • Erase PDF pages. Miscellaneous.
how to delete text from a pdf; deleting text from a pdf
C# PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from PDF
application. Free online C# source code to erase text from adobe PDF file in Visual Studio. NET class without adobe reader installed.
erase text from pdf; delete text from pdf preview
Appendix B: Configuration on a Unix-alike
49
standard location, you should set the environment variable PATH accordingly before running
configure, or use the configure variable F77 to specify its full path.
If your FORTRAN libraries are in slightly peculiar places, you should also look at LD_
LIBRARY_PATH or your system’s equivalent to make sure that all libraries are on this path.
Note that only FORTRAN compilers which convert identifiers to lower case are supported.
You must set whatever compilation flags (if any) are needed to ensure that FORTRAN
integer is equivalent to a C int pointer and FORTRAN double precision is equivalent to a
Cdouble pointer. This is checked during the configuration process.
Some of the FORTRAN code makes use of COMPLEX*16 variables, which is a Fortran 90
extension. This is checked for at configure time
4
,but you may need to avoid compiler flags
asserting FORTRAN 77 compliance.
Compiling the version of LAPACK in the R sources also requires some Fortran 90 extensions,
but these are not needed if an external LAPACK is used.
It might be possible to use f2c, the FORTRAN-to-C converter (http://www.netlib.org/
f2c), via a script. (An example script is given in scripts/f77_f2c: this can be customized by
setting the environment variables F2C, F2CLIBS, CC and CPP.) You will need to ensure that the
FORTRAN type integer is translated to the C type int. Normally f2c.h contains ‘typedef
long int integer;’, which will work on a 32-bit platform but needs to be changed to ‘typedef
int integer;’ on a 64-bit platform. If your compiler is not gcc you will need to set FPICFLAGS
appropriately. Also, the included LAPACK sources contain constructs that f2c is unlikely to
be able to process, so you would need to use an external LAPACK library (such as CLAPACK
from http://www.netlib.org/clapack/).
B.7 Compile and load flags
Awide range of flags can be set in the file config.site or as configure variables onthe command
line. We have already mentioned
CPPFLAGS header file search directory (-I) and any other miscellaneous options for the C and
C++ preprocessors and compilers
LDFLAGS
path (-L), stripping (-s) and any other miscellaneous options for the linker
and others include
CFLAGS
debugging and optimization flags, C
MAIN_CFLAGS
ditto, for compiling the main program
SHLIB_CFLAGS
for shared objects
FFLAGS
debugging and optimization flags, FORTRAN
SAFE_FFLAGS
ditto for source files which need exact floating point behaviour
MAIN_FFLAGS
ditto, for compiling the main program
SHLIB_FFLAGS
for shared objects
MAIN_LDFLAGS
additional flags for the main link
4
as well as its equivalence to the Rcomplex structure defined in R_ext/Complex.h.
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
setting PDF file permissions. Help C# users to erase PDF text content, images and pages online in ASP.NET. RasterEdge C#.NET HTML5
how to delete text in a pdf acrobat; delete text in pdf file online
C# PDF Image Redact Library: redact selected PDF images in C#.net
call our image redaction API to redact PDF images. as text redaction, you can specify custom text to appear How to Erase PDF Images in .NET Using C# Class Code.
how to erase pdf text; how to delete text from a pdf in acrobat
Appendix B: Configuration on a Unix-alike
50
SHLIB_LDFLAGS
additional flags for linking the shared objects
LIBnn
the primary library directory, lib or lib64
CPICFLAGS
special flags for compiling C code to be turned into a shared object
FPICFLAGS
special flags for compiling Fortran code to be turned into a shared object
CXXPICFLAGS
special flags for compiling C++ code to be turned into a shared object
FCPICFLAGS
special flags for compiling Fortran 95 code to be turned into a shared object
DEFS
defines to be used when compiling C code in R itself
Library paths specified as -L/lib/path in LDFLAGS are collected together and prepended to
LD_LIBRARY_PATH (or your system’s equivalent), so there should be no need for -R or -rpath
flags.
Variables such as CPICFLAGS are determined where possible by configure. Some systems
allows two types of PIC flags, for example ‘-fpic’ and ‘-fPIC’, and if they differ the first allows
only a limited number of symbols in a shared object. Since R as a shared library has about 6200
symbols, if in doubt use the larger version.
To compile a profiling version of R, one might for example want to use ‘MAIN_CFLAGS=-pg’,
‘MAIN_FFLAGS=-pg’,‘MAIN_LDFLAGS=-pg’on platforms where ‘-pg’cannot be used withposition-
independent code.
Beware: it may be necessary to set CFLAGS and FFLAGS in ways compatible with the libraries
to be used: one possible issue is the alignment of doubles, another is the way structures are
passed.
On some platforms configure will select additional flags for CFLAGS, CPPFLAGS, FFLAGS,
CXXFLAGS and LIBS in R_XTRA_CFLAGS (and so on). These are for options which are always
required, for example to force
IEC
60559 compliance.
B.8 Maintainer mode
There are several files that are part of the R sources but can be re-generated from their own
sources by configuring with option --enable-maintainer-mode and then running make in the
build directory. This requires other tools to be installed, discussed in the rest of this section.
File configure is created from configure.ac and the files under m4 by autoconf and
aclocal. There is a formal version requirement on autoconf of 2.62 or later, but it is un-
likely that anything other than the most recent versions have been thoroughly tested.
File src/include/config.h is created by autoheader.
Grammar files *.y are converted to C sources by an implementation of yacc, usually bison
-y: these are found in src/main and src/library/tools/src. It is known that earlier versions
of bison generate code which reads (and in some cases writes) outside array bounds: bison
2.6.1 was found to be satisfactory.
The ultimate sources for package compiler are in its noweb directory. To re-create the sources
from src/library/compiler/noweb/compiler.nw, the command notangle is required. This
is likely to need to be installed from the sources at https://www.cs.tufts.edu/~nr/noweb/
(and can also be found on CTAN). The package sources are only re-created even in maintainer
mode if src/library/compiler/noweb/compiler.nw has been updated.
How to C#: Special Effects
Erase. Set the image to current background color, the background color can be set by:ImageProcess.BackgroundColor = Color.Red. Encipher.
remove text from pdf preview; delete text from pdf acrobat
Customize, Process Image in .NET Winforms| Online Tutorials
Include crop, merge, paste images; Support for image & documents rotation; Edit images & documents using Erase Rectangle & Merge Block function;
how to delete text in pdf file; how to delete text in pdf file online
Appendix B: Configuration on a Unix-alike
51
It is likely that in future creating configure will need the GNU ‘autoconf archive’ installed.
This can be found at https://www.gnu.org/software/autoconf-archive/ and as a package
(usually called autoconf-archive) in most packaged distributions, for example Debian, Fedora,
OpenCSW, Homebrew and MacPorts.
.NET Imaging Processing SDK | Process, Manipulate Images
Basic image edit function support, such as Erase Rectangle, Merge Block, etc Go to our Online Tutorials to find detailed user guide and check out how much they
how to delete text from a pdf reader; pdf editor delete text
52
Appendix C Platform notes
This section provides some notes on building R on different Unix-alike platforms. These notes
are based on tests run on one or two systems in each case with particular sets of compilers and
support libraries. Success in building R depends on the proper installation and functioning of
support software; your results may differ if you have other versions of compilers and support
libraries.
Older versions of this manual (for R < 2.10.0) contain notes on platforms such as HP-UX,
IRIX and Alpha/OSF1 for which we have had no recent reports.
Cmacros to select particular platforms can be tricky to track down (there is a fair amount
of misinformation on the Web). The Wiki (currently) at http://sourceforge.net/p/predef/
wiki/Home/ can be helpful. The R sources currently use
AIX: _AIX
Cygwin: __CYGWIN__
FreeBSD: __FreeBSD__
HP-UX: __hpux__, __hpux
IRIX: sgi, __sgi
Linux: __linux__
OS X: __APPLE__
NetBSD: __NetBSD__
OpenBSD: __OpenBSD__
Solaris: __sun, sun
Windows: _WIN32, _WIN64
C.1 X11 issues
The ‘X11()’ graphics device is the one started automatically on Unix-alikes when plotting. As
its name implies, it displays on a (local or remote) X server, and relies on the services provided
by the X server.
The ‘modern’ version of the ‘X11()’ device is based on ‘cairo’ graphics and (in most im-
plementations) uses ‘fontconfig’ to pick and render fonts. This is done on the server, and
although there can be selection issues, they are more amenable than the issues with ‘X11()’
discussed in the rest of this section.
When X11 was designed, most displays were around 75dpi, whereas today they are of the
order of 100dpi or more. If you find that X11() is reporting
1
missing font sizes, especially larger
ones, it is likely that you are not using scalable fonts and have not installed the 100dpi versions
of the X11 fonts. The names and details differ by system, but will likely have something like
Fedora’s
xorg-x11-fonts-75dpi
xorg-x11-fonts-100dpi
xorg-x11-fonts-ISO8859-2-75dpi
xorg-x11-fonts-Type1
xorg-x11-fonts-cyrillic
and you need to ensure that the ‘-100dpi’ versions are installed and on the X11 font path (check
via xset -q). The ‘X11()’ device does try to set a pointsize and not a pixel size: laptop users
may find the default setting of 12 too large (although very frequently laptop screens are set to
afictitious dpi to appear like a scaled-down desktop screen).
More complicated problems can occur in non-Western-European locales, so if you are using
one, the first thing to check is that things work in the C locale. The likely issues are a failure to
1
for example, X11 font at size 14 could not be loaded.
Appendix C: Platform notes
53
find any fonts or glyphs being rendered incorrectly (often as a pair of
ASCII
characters). X11
works by being asked for a font specification and coming up with its idea of a close match. For
text (as distinct from the symbols used by plotmath), the specification is the first element of
the option "X11fonts" which defaults to
"-adobe-helvetica-%s-%s-*-*-%d-*-*-*-*-*-*-*"
If you are using a single-byte encoding, for example ISO 8859-2 in Eastern Europe or KOI8-R
in Russian, use xlsfonts to find an appropriate family of fonts in your encoding (the last field
in the listing). If you find none, it is likely that you need to install further font packages, such
as ‘xorg-x11-fonts-ISO8859-2-75dpi’ and ‘xorg-x11-fonts-cyrillic’ shown in the listing
above.
Multi-byte encodings (most commonly UTF-8) are even more complicated. There are few
fonts in ‘iso10646-1’, the Unicode encoding, and they only contain a subset of the available
glyphs (and are often fixed-width designed for use in terminals). In such locales fontsets are
used, made up of fonts encoded in other encodings. If the locale you are using has an entry
in the ‘XLC_LOCALE’ directory (typically /usr/share/X11/locale, it is likely that all you need
to do is to pick a suitable font specification that has fonts in the encodings specified there. If
not, you may have to get hold of a suitable locale entry for X11. This may mean that, for
example, Japanese text can be displayed when running in ‘ja_JP.UTF-8’ but not when running
in ‘en_GB.UTF-8’ on the same machine (although on some systems many UTF-8 X11 locales are
aliased to ‘en_US.UTF-8’ which covers several character sets, e.g. ISO 8859-1 (Western Euro-
pean), JISX0208 (Kanji), KSC5601 (Korean), GB2312 (Chinese Han) and JISX0201 (Kana)).
On some systems scalable fonts are available covering a wide range of glyphs. One source is
TrueType/OpenType fonts, and these can provide high coverage. Another is Type 1 fonts: the
URW set of Type 1 fonts provides standard typefaces such as Helvetica with a larger coverage
of Unicode glyphs than the standard X11 bitmaps, including Cyrillic. These are generally not
part of the default install, and the X server may need to be configured to use them. They might
be under the X11 fonts directory or elsewhere, for example,
/usr/share/fonts/default/Type1
/usr/share/fonts/ja/TrueType
C.2 Linux
Linux is the main development platform for R, so compilation from the sources is normally
straightforward with the standard compilers.
Remember that some package management systems (suchas
RPM
anddeb) make adistinction
between the user version of a package and the developer version. The latter usually has the same
name but withtheextension‘-devel’or ‘-dev’: youneedbothversions installed. So please check
the configure output to see if the expected features are detected: if for example ‘readline’
is missing add the developer package. (On most systems you will also need ‘ncurses’ and its
developer package, although these should be dependencies of the ‘readline’ package(s).) You
should expect to see in the configure summary
Interfaces supported:
X11, tcltk
External libraries:
readline, zlib, bzlib, lzma, PCRE, curl
Additional capabilities:
PNG, JPEG, TIFF, NLS, cairo, ICU
When R has been installed from a binary distribution there are sometimes problems with
missing components such as the FORTRAN compiler. Searching the ‘R-help’ archives will
normally reveal what is needed.
It seems that ‘ix86’ Linux accepts non-PIC code insharedlibraries, but this is not necessarily
so on other platforms, in particular on 64-bit
CPU
s such as ‘x86_64’. So care can be needed
with
BLAS
libraries and when building R as a shared library to ensure that position-independent
Appendix C: Platform notes
54
code is used in any static libraries (such as the Tcl/Tk libraries, libpng, libjpeg and zlib)
which might be linked against. Fortunately these are normally built as shared libraries with the
exception of the ATLAS
BLAS
libraries.
The default optimization settings chosen for CFLAGS etc are conservative. It is likely that
using -mtune will result in significant performance improvements on recent CPUs (especially
for ‘ix86’): one possibility is to add -mtune=native for the best possible performance on the
machine on which R is being installed: if the compilation is for a site-wide installation, it
may still be desirable to use something like -mtume=core2.
2
It is also possible to increase the
optimization levels to -O3: however for many versions of the compilers this has caused problems
in at least one
CRAN
package.
For platforms with both 64- and 32-bit support, it is likely that
LDFLAGS="-L/usr/local/lib64 -L/usr/local/lib"
is appropriate since most (but not all) software installs its 64-bit libraries in /usr/local/lib64.
To build a 32-bit version of R on ‘x86_64’ with Fedora 21 we used
CC="gcc -m32"
CXX="g++ -m32"
F77="gfortran -m32"
FC=${F77}
OBJC=${CC}
LDFLAGS="-L/usr/local/lib"
LIBnn=lib
Note the use of ‘LIBnn’: ‘x86_64’ Fedora installs its 64-bit software in /usr/lib64 and 32-bit
software in /usr/lib. Linking will skip over inappropriate binaries, but for example the 32-bit
Tcl/Tk configure scripts are in /usr/lib. It may also be necessary to set the pkg-config path,
e.g. by
export PKG_CONFIG_PATH=/usr/local/lib/pkgconfig:/usr/lib/pkgconfig
64-bit versions of Linux are built with support for files > 2Gb, and 32-bit versions will be if
possible unless --disable-largefile is specified.
To build a 64-bit version of R on ‘ppc64’ (also known as ‘powerpc64’) with gcc 4.1.1, Ei-ji
Nakama used
CC="gcc -m64"
CXX="gxx -m64"
F77="gfortran -m64"
FC="gfortran -m64"
CFLAGS="-mminimal-toc -fno-optimize-sibling-calls -g -O2"
FFLAGS="-mminimal-toc -fno-optimize-sibling-calls -g -O2"
the additional flags being needed to resolve problems linking against libnmath.a and when
linking R as a shared library.
C.2.1 Clang
Rhas been built with Linux ‘ix86’ and ‘x86_64’ C and C++ compilers (http://clang.llvm.
org) based onthe Clangfront-ends, invokedby CC=clang CXX=clang++,together with gfortran.
These take very similar options to the corresponding GCC compilers.
This has to be used in conjunction with a Fortran compiler: the configure code will remove
-lgcc from FLIBS, which is needed for some versions of gfortran.
The current default for clang++ is to use the C++ runtime from the installed g++. Using the
runtime from the libc++ project (http://libcxx.llvm.org/) has also been tested: for some
Rpackages only the variant using libcxxabi was successful.
2
or -mtune=corei7 for Intel Core i3/15/17 with gcc >= 4.6.0.
Appendix C: Platform notes
55
Most builds of clang have no OpenMP support. Builds of version 3.7.0 or later may.
3
C.2.2 Intel compilers
Intel compilers have been used under ‘ix86’ and ‘x86_64’ Linux. Brian Ripley used version 9.0
of the compilers for ‘x86_64’ on Fedora Core 5 with
CC=icc
CFLAGS="-g -O3 -wd188 -ip -mp"
F77=ifort
FLAGS="-g -O3 -mp"
CXX=icpc
CXXFLAGS="-g -O3 -mp"
FC=ifort
FCFLAGS="-g -O3 -mp"
ICC_LIBS=/opt/compilers/intel/cce/9.1.039/lib
IFC_LIBS=/opt/compilers/intel/fce/9.1.033/lib
LDFLAGS="-L$ICC_LIBS -L$IFC_LIBS -L/usr/local/lib64"
SHLIB_CXXLD=icpc
configure will add ‘-c99’ to CC for C99-compliance. This causes warnings with icc 10 and
later, so use CC="icc -std=c99" there. The flag -wd188 suppresses a large number of warnings
about the enumeration type ‘Rboolean’. Because the Intel C compiler sets ‘__GNUC__’ without
complete emulation of gcc, we suggest adding CPPFLAGS=-no-gcc.
To maintain correct
IEC
60559 arithmetic you most likely need add flags to CFLAGS, FFLAGS
and CXXFLAGS such as -mp (shown above) or -fp-model precise -fp-model source, depending
on the compiler version.
Others
have
reported
success
with
versions
10.x
and
11.x.
%
https://stat.ethz.ch/pipermail/r-devel/2015-September/071717.html
Bj
~
A¸rn-Helge
Mevik reported success with version 2015.3 of the compilers, using (for a SandyBridge CPU on
Centos 6.x)
fast="-fp-model precise -ip -O3 -opt-mem-layout-trans=3 -xHost -mavx"
CC=icc
CFLAGS="$fast -wd188"
F77=ifort
FFLAGS="$fast"
CXX=icpc
CXXFLAGS="$fast"
FC=$F77
FCFLAGS=$F77FLAGS
C.2.3 Oracle Solaris Studio compilers
Brian Ripley tested the Sun Studio 12 compilers, since renamed to Oracle Solaris Studio. On
‘x86_64’ Linux with
CC=suncc
CFLAGS="-xO5 -xc99 -xlibmil -nofstore"
CPICFLAGS=-Kpic
F77=sunf95
FFLAGS="-O5 -libmil -nofstore"
FPICFLAGS=-Kpic
CXX="sunCC -library=stlport4"
3
This also needs the OpenMP runtime, which is usually distributed separately, e.g. at http://llvm.org/
releases.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested