open pdf in webbrowser control c# : How to delete text from a pdf in acrobat Library SDK class asp.net .net winforms ajax hostwin15-part215

procedure, or SAS/ACCESS software. The use of SAS view engines is automatic 
because the name of the view engine is stored as part of the descriptor portion of the 
SAS data set.
Types of Library Engines
SAS has two types of library engines: native and interface. These engines support the 
SAS library model. Library engines perform several important functions, including 
determining fundamental processing characteristics. For a more detailed description of 
library engines, see SAS Language Reference: Concepts. For examples of using library 
engines, see “Using Data Libraries” on page 133 .
Native Library Engines
Native library engines are engines that access forms of a SAS file created and 
maintained by SAS. Native library engines include the default engine, the compatibility 
engine, and the transport engine. The following table lists the acceptable names (and 
nicknames) for these engines.
Table 4.2 Native Library Engines
Engine Type
Engine Names
Description
default
V9, BASE
accesses SAS System 9, 9.1, 9.2, 9.3, and SAS 
9.4 data files
Version 8 
compatibility
V8
accesses the Version 8 data files
Version 7 
compatibility
V7
accesses Version 7 data files
Release 6 
compatibility
V6
accesses any data file created by Release 6.08 
through Release 6.12. In 64-bit s, the V6 
engine can read only data.
Release 6.12 
compatibility
V612
accesses Release 6.12 data files
Release 6.03 and 
Release 6.04 
compatibility
V604
Read-Only access to data files created by 
Release 6.03 and Release 6.04
transport
XPORT
accesses transport files
When using the default engine, choose which name, V9, or BASE, that you use in your 
SAS jobs considering future releases. If your application is intended for SAS 9.4 only, 
and you do not want to convert it to later releases, use the name V9. If, however, you 
plan to convert your application to new releases of SAS, use the name BASE because 
that refers to the latest default engine. Using the name BASE makes your programs easy 
to convert. The engine name BASE does not refer to Base SAS software; it refers to the 
base, or primary, engine. The BASE engine can be used with more than the Base SAS 
software product.
This document uses the term default engine to refer to the V9 engine. The V9 engine is 
the default engine for accessing SAS files under SAS 9.4 unless the default engine is 
Multi Engine Architecture
131
How to delete text from a pdf in acrobat - delete, remove text from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# developers to use mature APIs to delete and remove text content from PDF document
how to delete text in pdf converter; how to delete text in pdf using acrobat professional
How to delete text from a pdf in acrobat - VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File
remove text watermark from pdf online; erase pdf text online
changed with the ENGINE system option. To see the value of the ENGINE system 
option, do one of the following:
• Submit
proc options option=engine;
run;
• select Tools 
ð
Options 
ð
System to open the System Options window. Then select 
Files 
ð
SAS Files. The ENGINE system option displays the default engine for SAS 
libraries.
Interface Library Engines
Interface library engines support access to other vendors' files. These engines allow 
Read-Only access to BMDP, OSIRIS, and SPSS files. You must specify as part of the 
LIBNAME statement or function the name of the interface library engine that you want. 
The following table lists the interface engine names:
Table 4.3 Interface Library Engines
Name
Description
BMDP
allows Read-Only access to BMDP files in a 32-bit operating
OSIRIS
allows Read-Only access to OSIRIS files
SPSS
allows Read-Only access to SPSS files
For more information about these engines, see “Reading BMDP, OSIRIS, and SPSS 
Files” on page 147 and “ENGINE System Option: Windows” on page 513 .
Rules for Determining the Engine
If you do not specify an engine name in a LIBNAME statement or function, SAS 
attempts to determine the engine (either the default engine or a compatibility engine) that 
should be assigned to the specified data library libref. Under Windows, SAS looks at the 
file extensions that exist in the given folder and uses the following rules to determine 
which engine should be assigned to the libref:
• If the folder contains SAS data sets from only one of the supported native library 
engines (not including XPORT), the libref is assigned to that engine.
• If there are no SAS data sets in the given folder, the libref is assigned to the default 
engine.
• If the folder contains SAS data sets from more than one engine, it is called a mixed 
mode library. The libref is then assigned to the default engine. A message is printed 
in the SAS log informing you the libref is assigned to a mixed mode library.
Note: It is always more efficient to specify the engine name than for SAS to determine 
the correct engine.
You can use the ENGINE system option to specify the default engine that SAS uses 
when it detects a mixed mode library or a library with no SAS files. By default, the 
ENGINE option is set to V9. For more information, see “ENGINE System Option: 
Windows” on page 513 .
132
Chapter 4 • Using SAS Files under Windows
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Redact text content, images, whole pages from PDF file. Annotate & Comment. Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file. Print.
how to copy text out of a pdf; acrobat remove text from pdf
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Allow users to convert PDF to Text (TXT) file. can manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
how to delete text in pdf acrobat; delete text from pdf online
Using Data Libraries
Data Libraries
The following sections provide information about data libraries, Librefs, Multi-Folder 
libraries, SAS user libraries, and Work data Libraries.
Specifying a Libref
The libref is a label or alias that is assigned to a folder so that the storage location (the 
full path, including drive and folder) is in a form that is recognized by SAS. It is a 
logical concept describing a physical location, rather than something physically stored 
with the file.
If a libref is created from within a SAS program, it exists only during the session in 
which it is created. If a libref is created interactively, by using the New Library dialog 
box, you can select Enable at Start up to make it a permanent libref.
A libref follows the same rules of syntax as any SAS name. See the SAS language rules 
section in SAS Language Reference: Concepts for more information about SAS naming 
conventions.
There are several ways to specify a libref:
• Use the New Library dialog box that is described in SAS Help and Documentation.
• Use the LIBNAME statement or function as described in “Assigning SAS Libraries 
Using the LIBNAME Statement or Function” on page 134 . 
• Define a variable as described in “Assigning SAS Libraries Using Environment 
Variables” on page 136 . 
Note: You can eliminate the LIBNAME statement by directly specifying the drive name 
and the DATA set name within quotation marks. An example follows:
data "d:\mydata";
Assigning SAS Libraries Using the Graphical User Interface
To assign librefs and specify engines using the graphical user interface (GUI), use either 
the New Library toolbar button 
, the LIBASSIGN command, or Explorer to open 
the New Library dialog box.
• From the toolbar, click the New Library icon.
• In the command bar, type either libassign or libname
When the LIBNAME window appears, click the New toolbar button.
• Within Explorer 
1. Select the Library folder.
2. Select File 
ð
New or right-click the Library folder and select New from the 
menu. 
Using Data Libraries
133
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
delete text from pdf file; delete text pdf acrobat
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
delete text pdf; delete text from pdf
Note: When a second Explorer window is open on the right side of the SAS 
workspace, you can open the New Library dialog box if you right-click the 
Libraries folder and select New.
For more information about the New Library dialog box and Explorer, see the SAS 
Help and Documentation.
Assigning SAS Libraries Using the LIBNAME Statement or Function
LIBNAME Statement Syntax
You can use the LIBNAME statement or function to assign librefs and engines to one or 
more folders, including the working folder. The examples in this section use the 
LIBNAME statement. For information about the LIBNAME function, see SAS 
Functions and CALL Routines: Reference.
The LIBNAME statement has the following basic syntax:
LIBNAME libref <engine-name> 'SAS-data-library'
An explanation of all the arguments in this statement can be found in SAS Statements: 
Reference.
Note: The words AUX, CON, NUL, LPT1 - LPT9, COM1 - COM9, and PRN are 
reserved words under Windows. Do not use these reserved words as librefs.
Assigning a Libref to a Single Folder
If SAS 9.4 data sets are stored in the C:\MYSASDIR folder, you can submit the 
following LIBNAME statement to assign the libref TEST to that folder:
libname test V9 'c:\mysasdir';
This statement indicates that the libref TEST accesses SAS 9.4 files stored in the folder 
C:\MYSASDIR. Remember that the engine specification is optional.
Assigning a Libref to the Working Folder
The current working folder is shown in the status bar of the main SAS window. If you 
want to assign the libref MYCURR to your current SAS working folder, use the 
following LIBNAME statement:
libname mycurr '.';
Assigning a Libref to Multiple Folders
If SAS files are located in multiple folders, you can treat these folders as a single SAS 
library by specifying a single libref and concatenating the folder locations, as in the 
following example:
libname income ('c:\revenue' 'd:\costs');
This statement indicates that the two folders, C:\REVENUE and D:\COSTS, are to be 
treated as a single SAS library. When you concatenate SAS libraries, SAS uses a 
protocol for accessing the libraries, depending on whether you are accessing the libraries 
for read, write, or update.
You can concatenate multiple libraries by specifying only their librefs, as in the 
following example:
libname sales (income revenue);
134
Chapter 4 • Using SAS Files under Windows
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
create a watermark that consists of text or image (such And with our PDF Watermark Creator, users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat.
pdf text watermark remover; how to remove highlighted text in pdf
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
delete text from pdf with acrobat; how to remove text watermark from pdf
This statement indicates that two libraries that are identified by librefs INCOME and 
REVENUE are treated as a single SAS library whose libref is SALES.
For more information, see “Understanding How Multi-Folder SAS Libraries Are 
Accessed” on page 139 .
Note: The concept of library concatenation also applies when specifying system options, 
such as the SASHELP and SASMSG options. For information about how to specify 
multiple folders by using system options, see “Syntax for Concatenating Libraries in 
SAS System Options” on page 484 .
Assigning Engines
If you want to use another access method, or engine, instead of the V9 engine, you can 
specify another engine name in the LIBNAME statement. For example, if you want to 
access only Version 6.12 SAS data sets from your SAS 9.4 session, you can specify the 
V612 engine in the LIBNAME statement, as in the following example:
libname oldlib V612 'c:\sas612';
Another example is if you plan to share SAS files between SAS 9.4 under Windows and 
Version 6 under Windows, use the V6 engine when assigning a libref to the SAS library. 
Here is an example of specifying the V6 engine in a LIBNAME statement:
libname lib6 V6 'c:\sas6';
Remember that while SAS 9.4 can read Version 6 SAS data sets, Release 6 cannot read 
SAS 9.4 data sets. For methods of regressing a SAS 9.4 data set to a version 6 data set, 
see information in the Migration focus area at http:\\support.sas.com
\migration\planning\files\regression.html.
For more information about using engine names in the LIBNAME statement, see “Using 
SAS Files from Other Versions with SAS 9.4 for Windows ” on page 143 and “Reading 
BMDP, OSIRIS, and SPSS Files” on page 147 . You can also see the LIBNAME 
statement in SAS Statements: Reference.
Making Librefs Available When SAS Starts
Instead of assigning the same librefs each time you start SAS, you can specify a libref 
each time that SAS starts. In the New Library dialog box, select Enable at start-up. 
The libref is available as soon as SAS initializes. Libraries that are enabled at start-up 
are stored in the SAS Registry under the entry [CORE\OPTIONS\LIBNAMES].
Assigning Multiple Librefs and Engines to a Folder
If a folder contains SAS files that were created by several engines, only those SAS files 
that were created with the V6 engine that is assigned to the given libref can be accessed 
by using that libref. SAS files created with the V7, V8, and V9 engines can all access 
each other, but those engines cannot access files created with the V6 engine. You must 
specify the V6 engine to see those files. You can assign multiple librefs with different 
engines to a folder. For example, the following statements are valid:
libname one V6 'c:\mydir';
libname two V9 'c:\mydir';
Data sets that are referenced by the libref ONE are created and accessed using the 
compatibility engine (V8), whereas data sets that are referenced by the libref TWO are 
created and accessed using the default engine (V9). You can also have multiple librefs 
(using the same engine) for the same SAS library. For example, the following two 
LIBNAME statements assign the librefs MYLIB and INLIB (both using the V9 engine) 
to the same SAS library:
Using Data Libraries
135
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
Excel documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion.
how to delete text from a pdf reader; how to delete text in pdf converter professional
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS free hand, free hand line, rectangle, text, hotspot, hotspot more plug-ins needed like Acrobat or Adobe
how to delete text from pdf document; delete text pdf files
libname mylib V9 'c:\mydir\datasets';
libname inlib V9 'c:\mydir\datasets';
Because the engine names and the Windows pathnames are the same, the librefs MYLIB 
and INLIB are identical and can be used interchangeably.
Assigning SAS Libraries Using Environment Variables
Types of Environment Variables
You can also assign a libref using variables instead of the LIBNAME statement or 
function. A variable equates one string to another within the Windows . SAS recognizes 
two types of variables:
• SAS variables
• Windows variables.
When you use a libref in a SAS statement, SAS resolves libref assignments in this order:
1. a libref assigned by a LIBNAME statement, a LIBNAME function, or by using the 
New Library dialog box, with the last assignment that takes precedence
2. a libref assigned by a SAS variable
3. a libref assigned by a Windows variable.
For example, if the Windows variable TEMP is assigned to C:\Windows\TEMP and you 
use the following LIBNAME statement:
libname temp c:\public
the LIBNAME resolves to c:\public.
There are two ways of defining a variable to SAS:
• Use the SET system option. This option defines a SAS (internal) variable.
• Issue a Windows SET command. This command defines a Windows (external) 
variable. Alternatively, under Windows, you can define variables using the System 
Properties dialog box accessed from the Control Panel, or by right-clicking My 
Computer and selecting Properties from the menu.
CAUTION:
You cannot assign engines to variables.
If you use variables as librefs, you must 
accept the default engine.
The availability of variables makes it simple to assign resources to SAS before 
invocation.
Using a SAS Environment Variable as a Libref
You can use the SET system option to define a SAS variable. For example, if you store 
your permanent SAS data sets in the C:\SAS\MYSASDATA folder, you can use the 
following SET option in the SAS command when you start SAS or in your SAS 
configuration file to assign the variable TEST to this SAS library:
-set test c:\sas\mysasdata
When you assign a variable, SAS does not resolve the reference until the variable name 
is actually used. For example, if the TEST variable is defined in your SAS configuration 
file, the variable TEST is not resolved until it is referenced by SAS. Therefore, if you 
make a mistake in your SET option specification, such as misspelling a folder name, you 
do not receive an error message until you use the variable in a SAS statement.
136
Chapter 4 • Using SAS Files under Windows
Because Windows filenames can contain spaces or single quotation marks as part of their 
names, you should enclose the name of the physical path in double quotation marks 
when specifying the SET option. If you use the SET option in an OPTIONS statement, 
you must use quotation marks around the filename. For complete syntax of the SET 
system option, see “SET System Option: Windows” on page 570 .
Any variable name that you use as a value for a system option in your SAS configuration 
file must be defined as a variable before it is used. For example, the following SET 
option must appear before the SASUSER option that uses the variable TEST:
-set test "d:\mysasdir"
-sasuser "!test"
In the following example, variables are used with concatenated libraries:
-set dir1 "c:\sas\base\sashelp"
-set dir2 "d:\sas\stat\sashelp"
-sashelp (!dir1 !dir2)
Note that when you reference variables in your SAS configuration file or in a 
LIBNAME statement in your SAS programs, you must precede the variable name with 
an exclamation point (!).
It is recommended that you use the SET system option in your SAS configuration file if 
you invoke SAS through a Windows shortcut.
Using Windows Environment Variables
You can execute a Windows SET command before invoking SAS to create a Windows 
variable. You must define the variable before invoking SAS; you cannot define variables 
for SAS use from a Command Prompt window from within a SAS session.
SAS can recognize variables only if they have been assigned in the same context that 
invokes the SAS session. You must define the variable in the Windows 
AUTOEXEC.BAT file that runs when Windows starts (thus creating a global variable), 
or define the variable in either a Command Prompt window from which you then start 
SAS or from the System Properties dialog box.
If you define a variable in a Command Prompt window, and then start SAS from the 
Start menu (or with another shortcut), SAS does not recognize the variable.
The variables that you define with the SET command can be used later within SAS as 
librefs. In the following example, the Windows SET command is used to define the 
variables PERM and BUDGET:
SET PERM=C:\MYSASDIR
SET BUDGET=D:\SAS\BUDGET\DATA
Listing Libref Assignments
Listing Librefs Using the Explorer Window
If you are running SAS interactively, use the Explorer window to view the active librefs. 
The Explorer window lists all the librefs that are active for your current SAS session, 
along with the engine and the physical path for each libref. Any variables that you have 
defined as librefs are listed, provided you have used them in your SAS session. If you 
have defined a variable as a libref but have not used it yet in a SAS program, the 
Explorer window does not list it.
Using Data Libraries
137
Listing Librefs Using the LIBNAME Command
In any SAS session, you can use the LIBNAME command to invoke the LIBNAME 
window. The Explorer window lists the active libraries. Using the LIBNAME window, 
you can view the contents of all your libraries.
Listing Librefs Using the LIBNAME Statement
The following LIBNAME statement writes the active librefs to the SAS log:
libname _all_ list;
Clearing Librefs
Overview of Clearing Librefs
You can clear a libref by using one of the following methods:
• “SAS Explorer Window” on page 138
• “LIBNAME Statement” on page 138
• “LIBNAME Function: Windows” on page 408
SAS automatically clears the association between librefs and their respective libraries at 
the end of your job or session. If you want to associate the libref with a different SAS 
library during the current session, you do not have to end the session or clear the libref. 
SAS automatically reassigns the libref when you use it to name a new library.
SAS Explorer Window
To clear a libref by using the Explorer window:
1. Right-click on the node of the libref that you want to clear.
2. Select Delete.
For more information about using the Explorer window to manage libraries, see The 
Little SAS Book or the SAS Help and Documentation.
LIBNAME Window
To clear a libref by using the LIBNAME window:
1. Issue the LIBNAME command in the command bar. The LIBNAME window 
appears.
2. Right-click on the node of the libref that you want to clear.
3. Select Delete.
LIBNAME Statement
To clear a libref by using the LIBNAME statement, submit a LIBNAME statement using 
this syntax:
LIBNAME libref|_all_ <clear>;
If you specify a libref, only that libref is cleared. If you specify the keyword _all_, all the 
librefs that you have assigned during your current SAS session are cleared. (Maps, 
Sasuser, Sashelp, and Work remain assigned.)
138
Chapter 4 • Using SAS Files under Windows
Note: When you clear a libref defined by a variable, the variable remains defined, but it 
is no longer considered a libref, and it is not listed in the Explorer window. You can 
use the variable in another LIBNAME statement to create a new libref.
LIBNAME Function
To clear a libref by using the LIBNAME function, the only argument to the function is 
the libref:
libname(libref);
Understanding How Multi-Folder SAS Libraries Are Accessed
Protocols for Accessing Folders
When you use the concatenation feature to specify more than one physical folder for a 
libref, SAS uses the following protocol for determining which folder is accessed:
• Input and Update access
• Output access
• Accessing data sets with the same name.
The protocol illustrated by the following examples applies to all SAS statements and 
procedures that access SAS files, such as the DATA, UPDATE, and MODIFY statements 
in the DATA step and the SQL and APPEND procedures.
Input and Update Access
When a SAS file is accessed for input or update, the first SAS file found by that name is 
the one that is accessed. For example, if you submit the following statements and the file 
OLD.SPECIES exists in both folders, the one in the C:\MYSASDIR folder is printed:
libname old ('c:\mysasdir','d:\saslib');
proc print data=old.species;
run;
The same would be true if you opened OLD.SPECIES for update with the FSEDIT 
procedure.
Output Access
If the data set is accessed for output, it is always written to the first folder, provided that 
the folder exists. If the folder does not exist, an error message is displayed. For example, 
if you submit the following statements, SAS writes the OLD.SPECIES data set to the 
first folder (C:\MYSASDIR), replacing any existing data set with the same name:
libname old ('c:\mysasdir','d:\saslib');
data old.species;
x=1;
y=2;
run;
If a copy of the OLD.SPECIES data set exists in the second folder, it is not replaced.
Accessing Data Sets with the Same Name
One possibly confusing case involving the access protocols for SAS files occurs when 
you use the DATA and SET statements to access data sets with the same name. For 
Using Data Libraries
139
example, suppose you submit the following statements and TEST.SPECIES originally 
exists only in the second folder, D:\MYSASDIR:
libname test ('c:\sas','d:\mysasdir');
data test.species;
set test.species;
if value1='y' then
value2=3;
run;
In this case, the DATA statement opens TEST.SPECIES for output according to the 
output rules. That is, SAS opens a data set in the first of the concatenated libraries (C:
\SAS). The SET statement opens the existing TEST.SPECIES data set in the second (D:
\MYSASDIR) folder, according to the input rules. Therefore, the original 
TEST.SPECIES data set is not updated; rather, two TEST.SPECIES data sets exist, one 
in each folder.
Using the Sasuser Data Library
SAS automatically creates a SAS library with the libref Sasuser. This library contains, 
among other SAS files, your user Profile catalog.
By default under Windows, the Sasuser libref points to the following folders: C:\Users
\user ID\Documents\My SAS Files\9.4
You can use the SASUSER system option to make the Sasuser libref point to a different 
SAS library. If a Sasuser folder does not exist, SAS creates one. If you use a folder other 
than the default folder, you can add the SASUSER system option to the sasv9.cfg 
configuration file.
SAS stores other files besides the Profile catalog in the Sasuser folder. For example, 
sample data sets are stored in this folder.
The Sasuser data library is always associated with the V9 engine. You cannot change the 
engine associated with the Sasuser data library. If you try to assign another engine to this 
data library, you receive an error message. Therefore, even if you have set the ENGINE 
system option to another engine, any SAS files that are created in the Sasuser data 
library are SAS 9.4 files.
For more information about your Profile catalog, see “Profile Catalog ” on page 31 . For 
more information about the SASUSER system option, see “SASUSER System Option: 
Windows” on page 569 .
Using the Work Data Library
Using Temporary Files
The Work data library is the storage place for temporary SAS files. By default under 
Windows, the Work data library is created as a subfolder of !TEMP\SAS Temporary 
Files folder. This subfolder is named _TDnnnnnnnnnn_nodename_, as discussed in 
“Work Data Library ” on page 32 . Temporary SAS files are available only for the 
duration of the SAS session in which they are created. At the end of that session, they 
are deleted automatically. If SAS terminates abnormally, you might need to delete the 
temporary files.
By default, any file that is not assigned a two-level name is automatically considered to 
be a temporary file. A special libref of Work is automatically assigned to any temporary 
SAS data sets created. For example, if you run the following SAS DATA step to create 
the data set Sports, a temporary data set named Work.Sports is created:
140
Chapter 4 • Using SAS Files under Windows
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested