open pdf in webbrowser control c# : How to copy text out of a pdf Library control class asp.net azure .net ajax hostwin17-part217

filename sascode temp;
data _null_; set new; file sascode;
if formatd > formatl then do;
revision=cat(format,formatl,'.2');
put 'format' +1 name +1 revision ';' ;
end;
run;
data temp; set abc._all_;
%inc sascode/source2;
run;
Note: The OPTIONS NOFMTERR statement does not allow SAS to use a data set that 
has a DATA step or the table viewer. You must reformat numeric variables that have 
a larger decimal space value than their width before you can use a DATA step or the 
table viewer.
Transferring SAS Files between Operating 
Environments
For more information about transferring SAS files between operating environments, see 
“Deciding to Move a SAS File between Operating Environments” in Moving and 
Accessing SAS Files.
Accessing Database Files with SAS/ACCESS 
Software
SAS/ACCESS software provides an interface between SAS and several database 
management systems (DBMS) that run under Windows. The interface consists of three 
procedures and an interface view engine, which can perform the following tasks:
LIBNAME statement
by assigning the engine to a specific database engine, the LIBNAME statement lets 
you reference a DBMS object directly in a DATA step or SAS procedure, enabling 
you to read from and write to a DBMS object as if it were a SAS data set.
SQL Procedure pass-through facility
accesses data from several relational DBMSs, including Oracle and SQLServer.
interface view engine
enables you to use descriptor files in SAS programs to access DBMS data directly 
and enables you to specify descriptor files in SAS programs to update, insert, or 
delete DBMS data directly.
For more information about using SAS/ACCESS software under Windows, consult 
SAS/ACCESS Interface to PC Files: Reference and other available SAS/ACCESS 
documentation.
Accessing Database Files with SAS/ACCESS Software
151
How to copy text out of a pdf - delete, remove text from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# developers to use mature APIs to delete and remove text content from PDF document
how to erase pdf text; how to delete text from a pdf
How to copy text out of a pdf - VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File
remove text from pdf online; how to edit and delete text in pdf file
Using the SAS ODBC Driver to Access SAS Data 
from Other Applications
The SAS ODBC driver is an implementation of the open database connectivity (ODBC) 
standard that enables you to access, manipulate, and update SAS data sources. These 
data sources can include SAS data sets, flat files, VSAM files, as well as data from any 
database management system (DBMS) for which you have licensed SAS/ACCESS 
software. For information about how to access data from other Windows applications 
that comply with the ODBC standard, see the SAS Help and Documentation.
The SAS ODBC Driver accesses data by communicating with either a local or remote 
(SAS/SHARE) SAS server session using the TCP/IP protocol. The TCP/IP protocol 
enables users to access remote SAS servers on a variety of host platforms. A SAS server 
is a SAS procedure (either PROC SERVER or PROC ODBCSERV) that runs in its own 
SAS session; it accepts input and output requests from other SAS sessions and from the 
SAS ODBC driver on behalf of the ODBC-compliant application. For remote access to 
SAS data, a SAS server must be installed on the server machine, but not on the client 
machine.
The SAS ODBC Driver is included with Base SAS. Remote server configurations that 
use the SAS ODBC driver require that these SAS products be installed:
• Base SAS
• SAS/SHARE.
For details about installing and configuring the SAS ODBC Driver, see the installation 
documentation for SAS under Windows. For more information about configuring and 
using the SAS ODBC Driver, see SAS Drivers for ODBC: User's Guide.
152
Chapter 4 • Using SAS Files under Windows
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF Support to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
acrobat delete text in pdf; online pdf editor to delete text
VB.NET PDF replace text library: replace text in PDF content in vb
PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text out of selected PDF page or all PDF document in VB.NET. Support .NET WinForms, ASP
remove text from pdf acrobat; how to delete text in pdf document
Chapter 5
Using External Files under 
Windows
About External Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Referencing External Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
Accessing External Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
Using a Fileref . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
Using a Quoted Windows Filename . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Using a File in Your Working Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Running External LUA Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Accessing External Files with SAS Statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Overview of Accessing External Files with SAS Statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Using the FILE Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
Using the INFILE Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
Using the %INCLUDE Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
Accessing External Files with SAS Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
Overview of Accessing External Files with SAS Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
Using the FILE Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
Using the INCLUDE Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
Using the GSUBMIT Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
Advanced External I/O Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
Overview of Advanced External I/O Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
Altering the Record Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
Appending Data to an External File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
Determining Your Drive Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
Reading External Files with National Characters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
About External Files
External files are files that contain data or text, such as SAS programming statements, 
records of raw data, or procedure output. SAS can use these files, but they are not 
managed by SAS.
SAS Language Reference: Concepts contains basic, platform-independent information 
about external files.
For information about how to access external files containing transport data libraries, 
see the SAS Customer Support Center Web page, http://support.sas.com.
153
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Support to zoom in and zoom out PDF page. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document.
how to erase text in pdf; deleting text from a pdf
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Select. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V. Rotation (Ⅲ) & Zoom (Ⅳ) Tabs. Click to zoom out current PDF document page. 5.
pdf editor delete text; delete text pdf document
Referencing External Files
Accessing External Files
To access external files, you must tell SAS how to find the files. Use the following 
statements to access external files:
FILENAME
associates a fileref with an external file that is used for input or output.
FILE
opens an external file for writing data lines. Use the PUT statement to write lines.
INFILE
opens an external file for reading data lines. Use the INPUT statement to read lines.
%INCLUDE
opens an external file and reads SAS statements from that file. (No other statements 
are necessary.)
These statements are discussed in the section “SAS Statements under Windows” on page 
451 , and in the SAS statements section in SAS Statements: Reference.
You can also specify external files in various SAS dialog box entry fields (for example, 
as a file destination in the Save As dialog box), the FILENAME function, and in SAS 
commands, such as FILE and INCLUDE.
Depending on the context, SAS can reference an external file by using:
• a fileref assigned with the FILENAME statement or function
• an environment variable defined with either the SET system option or the Windows 
SET command
• a Windows filename enclosed in quotation marks
• member-name syntax (also called aggregate syntax)
• a single filename within quotation marks (a file in the working directory).
The following sections discuss these methods of specifying external files.
Because there are several ways to specify external files in SAS, SAS uses a set of rules 
to resolve an external file reference and uses this order of precedence:
1. Check for a standard Windows file specification enclosed in quotation marks.
2. Check for a fileref defined by a FILENAME statement or function.
3. Check for an environment variable fileref.
4. Assume that the file is in the working directory.
In other words, SAS assumes that an external file reference is a standard Windows file 
specification. If it is not, SAS checks to determine whether the file reference is a fileref 
(defined by either a FILENAME statement, FILENAME function, or an environment 
variable). If the file reference is none of these filerefs, SAS assumes it is a filename in 
the working directory. If the external file reference is not valid for one of these choices, 
SAS issues an error message indicating that it cannot access the external file.
154
Chapter 5 • Using External Files under Windows
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
Select. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V. Rotation (Ⅲ) & Zoom (Ⅳ) Tabs. Click to zoom out current PDF document page. 5.
how to delete text from pdf; delete text from pdf acrobat
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Ability to extract highlighted text out of PDF document. it is feasible for users to extract text content from source PDF document file with a copy-and-paste
how to delete text in a pdf file; how to delete text from pdf with acrobat
Using a Fileref
Overview of Using a Fileref
One way to reference external files is with a fileref. A fileref is a logical name associated 
with an external file. You can assign a fileref with a File Shortcut in the SAS Explorer 
window, the My Favorite Folders window, the FILENAME statement, the FILENAME 
function, or you can use a Windows environment variable to point to the file. This 
section discusses the different ways to assign filerefs and also shows you how to obtain a 
listing of the active filerefs and clear filerefs during your SAS session.
Assigning File Shortcuts
In an interactive SAS session, you can use the SAS Explorer window or the My Favorite 
Folders window to create filerefs. The SAS Explorer File Shortcuts folder contains a 
listing of active filerefs. To create a new fileref from SAS Explorer:
1. Select the File Shortcuts folder and then select File 
ð
New
2. In the File Shortcut Assignment window, enter the name of the shortcut (fileref) and 
the path to the SAS file that the shortcut represents.
3. You can also check Enable at Start up to reassign the shortcut for all subsequent 
SAS sessions.
To assign a file shortcut using the My Favorite Folders window:
1. Open the folder that contains the file.
2. Position the cursor over the file, right mouse click and select Create File Shortcut.
3. In the Create File Shortcut dialog box, type the name of the file shortcut and press 
Enter or click OK.
You can then use these file shortcuts in your SAS programs.
Note: File Shortcuts are active only during the current SAS session.
Using the FILENAME Statement
The FILENAME statement provides a means to associate a logical name with an 
external file or directory.
Note: The syntax of the FILENAME function is similar to the FILENAME statement. 
For information about the FILENAME function, see SAS Functions and CALL 
Routines: Reference.
The simplest syntax of the FILENAME statement is as follows:
FILENAME fileref “external-file”;
For example, if you want to read the file C:\MYDATA\SCORES.DAT, you can issue the 
following statement to associate the fileref MYDATA with the file C:\MYDATA
\SCORES.DAT:
filename mydata "c:\mydata\scores.dat";
Then you can use this fileref in your SAS programs. For example, the following 
statements create a SAS data set named TEST, using the data stored in the external file 
referenced by the fileref MYDATA:
data test;
Referencing External Files
155
C# PDF Image Redact Library: redact selected PDF images in C#.net
file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF NET control allows users to black out image in
delete text pdf acrobat professional; how to delete text in pdf file online
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Image text extraction control provides text extraction from PDF images and image files.
pdf text remover; how to edit and delete text in pdf file online
infile mydata;
input name $ score;
run;
Note: The words AUX, CON, NUL, PRN, LPT1 - LPT9, and COM1 - COM9 are 
reserved words under Windows. Do not use these words as filerefs.
You can also use the FILENAME, FILE, and INFILE statements to concatenate 
directories of external files and to concatenate multiple individual external files into one 
logical external file. These topics are discussed in “Assigning a Fileref to Concatenated 
Directories” on page 159 and “Assigning a Fileref to Concatenated Files” on page 160 .
The * and ? wildcards can be used in either the external filename or file extension for 
matching input filenames. Use * to match one or more characters and the ? to match a 
single character. Wildcards are supported for input only in the FILENAME and INFILE 
statements, and in member-name syntax (aggregate syntax). Wildcards are not valid in 
the FILE statement. The following filename statement reads input from every file in the 
current directory that begins with the string wild and ends with .dat:
filename wild 'wild*.dat';
data;
infile wild;
input;
run;
The following example reads all files in the current working directory:
filename allfiles '*.*';
data;
infile allfiles;
input;
run;
The FILENAME statement accepts various options that enable you to associate device 
names, such as printers, with external files and to control file characteristics, such as 
record format and length. Some of these options are illustrated in “Advanced External 
I/O Techniques” on page 168 . For the complete syntax of the FILENAME statement, 
refer to “FILENAME Statement: Windows” on page 456 .
Using Environment Variables
Just as you can define an environment variable to serve as a logical name for a SAS 
library (see “Assigning SAS Libraries Using Environment Variables” on page 136 ), you 
can also use an environment variable to refer to an external file. You can choose either to 
define a SAS environment variable using the SET system option or to define a Windows 
environment variable using the Windows SET command. Alternatively, you can define 
environment variables using the System dialog box, accessed from the Control Panel.
Note: The words AUX, CON, NUL, PRN, LPT1 - LPT9 - and COM1 - COM9 are 
reserved words under Windows. Do not use these words as environment variables.
The availability of environment variables makes it simple to assign resources to SAS 
before invocation. However, the environment variables that you define (using the SET 
system option) for a particular SAS session are not available to other applications.
Using the SET System Option
For example, to define a SAS environment variable that points to the external file C:
\MYDATA\TEST.DAT, you can use the following SET option in your SAS configuration 
file:
-set myvar c:\mydata\test.dat
156
Chapter 5 • Using External Files under Windows
Then, in your SAS programs, you can use the environment variable MYVAR to refer to 
the external file:
data mytest;
infile myvar;
input name $ score;
run;
It is recommended that you use the SET system option in your SAS configuration file if 
you invoke SAS using the Windows Start menu.
Using the SET Command
An alternative to using the SET system option to define an environment variable is to 
use the Windows SET command. For example, the Windows SET command that equates 
to the previous example is
SET MYVAR=C:\MYDATA\TEST.BAT
. You can also define SET commands by using System Properties dialog box that you 
access from the Control Panel.
You must issue all the SET commands that define your environment variables before you 
invoke SAS. If you define an environment variable in an MS-DOS window, and then 
start SAS from the Start menu, SAS does not recognize the environment variable.
Assigning a Fileref to a Directory
You can assign a fileref to a directory and then access individual files within that 
directory using member-name syntax (also called aggregate syntax).
For example, if all your regional sales data for January are stored in the directory C:
\SAS\MYDATA, you can issue the following FILENAME statement to assign the fileref 
JAN to this directory:
filename jan "c:\sas\mydata";
Now you can use this fileref with a member name in your SAS programs. In the 
following example, you reference two files stored in the JAN directory:
data westsale;
infile jan(west);
input name $ 1-16 sales 18-25
comiss 27-34;
run;
data eastsale;
infile jan(east);
input name $ 1-16 sales 18-25
comiss 27-34;
run;
When you use member-name syntax, you do not have to specify the file extension for the 
file that you are referencing, as long as the file extension is the expected one. For 
example, in the previous example, the INFILE statement expects a file extension 
of .DAT. The following table lists the expected file extensions for the various SAS 
statements and commands:
Referencing External Files
157
Table 5.1 Default File Extensions for Referencing External Files with Member-Name Syntax
SAS Command or Statement
SAS Window
File Extension
FILE statement
EDITOR
.DAT
%INCLUDE statement
EDITOR
.SAS
INFILE statement
EDITOR
.DAT
FILE command
EDITOR
.SAS
FILE command
LOG
.LOG
FILE command
OUTPUT
.LST
FILE command
NOTEPAD
none
INCLUDE command
EDITOR
.SAS
INCLUDE command
NOTEPAD
none
For example, the following program submits the file C:\PROGRAMS\TESTPGM.SAS to 
SAS:
filename test "c:\programs";
%include test(testpgm);
SAS searches for a filename TESTPGM.SAS in the directory C:\PROGRAMS.
If your file has a file extension different from the default file extension, you can use the 
file extension in the filename, as in the following example:
filename test "c:\programs";
%include test(testpgm.xyz);
If your file has no file extension, you must enclose the filename in quotation marks, as in 
the following example:
filename test "c:\programs";
%include test("testpgm");
To further illustrate the default file extensions SAS uses, here are some more examples 
using member-name syntax. Assume that the following FILENAME statement has been 
submitted:
filename test "c:\mysasdir";
The following example opens the file C:\MYSASDIR\PGM1.DAT for output:
file test(pgm1);
The following example opens the file C:\MYSASDIR\PGM1.DAT for input:
infile test(pgm1);
The following example reads and submits the file C:\MYSASDIR\PGM1:
%include test("pgm1");
158
Chapter 5 • Using External Files under Windows
These examples use SAS statements. SAS commands, such as the FILE and INCLUDE 
commands, also accept member-name syntax and have the same default file extensions 
as shown in Table 5.1 on page 158 .
Another feature of member-name syntax is that it enables you to reference a subdirectory 
in the working directory without using a fileref. For example, suppose you have a 
subdirectory named PROGRAMS that is located beneath the working directory. You can 
use the subdirectory name PROGRAMS when referencing files within this directory. For 
example, the following statement submits the program stored in working-directory 
\PROGRAMS\PGM1.SAS:
%include programs(pgm1);
The next example uses the FILE command to save the contents of the active window to 
working-directory \PROGRAMS\TESTPGM.DAT:
file programs(testpgm);
Note: If a directory name is the same as a previously defined fileref, the fileref takes 
precedence over the directory name.
Assigning a Fileref to Concatenated Directories
Member-name syntax is also handy when you use the FILENAME statement to 
concatenate directories of external files. For example, suppose you issue the following 
FILENAME statement:
filename progs ("c:\sas\programs",
"d:\myprogs");
This statement tells SAS that the fileref PROGS refers to all files stored in both the C:
\SAS\PROGRAMS directory and the D:\MYPROGS directory. When you use the fileref 
PROGS in your SAS program, SAS looks in these directories for the member that you 
specify. When you use this concatenation feature, you should be aware of the protocol 
SAS uses, which depends on whether you are accessing the files for read, write, or 
update. For more information, see “Understanding How Concatenated Directories Are 
Accessed” on page 161 .
Summary of Rules for Resolving Member-Name Syntax
SAS resolves an external file reference that uses member-name syntax by using a set of 
rules. For example, suppose your external file reference in a SAS statement or command 
is the following:
progs(member1)
SAS uses the following set of rules to resolve this external file reference. This list 
represents the order of precedence:
1. Check for a fileref named PROGS defined by a FILENAME statement.
2. Check for a SAS or Windows environment variable named PROGS.
3. Check for a directory named PROGS beneath the working directory.
The member name must be a valid physical filename. If no extension is given (as in the 
previous example), SAS uses the appropriate default extension, as given in Table 5.1 on 
page 158 . If the extension is given or the member name is quoted, SAS does not assign 
an extension, and it looks for the filename exactly as it is given.
Referencing External Files
159
Assigning a Fileref to Concatenated Files
You can specify concatenations of files when reading external files from within SAS. 
Concatenated files consist of two or more file specifications (which might contain 
wildcard characters) separated by blanks or commas. Here are some examples of valid 
concatenation specifications:
• filename allsas ("one.sas", "two.sas", "three.sas");
• filename alldata ("test1.dat" "test2.dat" "test3.dat");
• filename allinc "test*.sas";
• %include allsas;
• infile alldata;
• include allinc;
When you use this concatenation feature, you should be aware of the protocol SAS uses, 
which depends on whether you are accessing the files for read, write, or update. For 
more information, see “Understanding How Concatenated Files Are Accessed” on page 
162 .
Note: Do not confuse concatenated file specifications with concatenated directory 
specifications, which are also valid and are illustrated in “Assigning a Fileref to 
Concatenated Directories” on page 159 .
Referencing External Files with Long Filenames
SAS supports the use of long filenames. (For more information about valid long 
filenames, see your Windows operating environment documentation.) You can use long 
filenames whenever you specify a filename as an argument to a dialog box, command, or 
any aspect of the SAS language.
When specifying external filenames with the SAS language, such as in a statement or 
function, you should enclose the filename in double quotation marks to reduce ambiguity 
(since a single quotation mark is a valid character in a long filename). When you need to 
specify multiple filenames, enclose each filename in double quotation marks and delimit 
the names with a blank space.
Here are some examples of valid uses of long filenames within SAS:
• libname abc "My data file";
• filename myfile "Bernie's file";
• filename summer ("June sales" "July sales" "August sales");
• include "A really, really big SAS program";
Referencing Files Using UNC Paths
SAS supports the use of the Universal Naming Convention (UNC) paths. UNC paths let 
you connect your computer to network devices without having to refer to a network 
drive letter. SAS supports UNC paths to the extent that Windows and your network 
software support them. In general, you can refer to a UNC path anywhere in SAS where 
you would normally refer to a network drive.
UNC paths have the following syntax:
\\SERVER\SHARE\FOLDER\FILEPATH
where
SERVER
is the network file server name.
160
Chapter 5 • Using External Files under Windows
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested