open pdf in webbrowser control c# : Delete text pdf acrobat Library software class asp.net winforms wpf ajax hostwin18-part218

SHARE
is the shared volume on the server.
FOLDER
is one of the directories on the shared volume.
FILEPATH
is a continuation of the file path, which might reference one or more subdirectories.
For example, the following command includes a file from the network file server 
ZAPHOD:
include "\\zaphod\universe\galaxy\stars.sas";
Listing Fileref Assignments
If you have assigned several filerefs during a SAS session and need to refresh your 
memory as to which fileref points where, you can use either the SAS Explorer window 
or the FILENAME statement to list all the assigned filerefs.
To use the SAS Explorer window to list the active filerefs, double-click File Shortcuts. 
The Explorer window lists all the filerefs active for your current SAS session. Any 
environment variables that you have defined as filerefs are listed, provided you have 
used them in your SAS session. If you have defined an environment variable as a fileref 
but have not used it yet in a SAS program, the fileref is not listed in the Explorer 
window.
You can use the following FILENAME statement to write the active filerefs to the SAS 
log:
filename _all_ list;
Clearing Filerefs
You can clear a fileref by using the following syntax of the FILENAME statement:
FILENAME fileref|_ALL_ <CLEAR>;
If you specify a fileref, only that fileref is cleared. If you specify the keyword _ALL_, all 
the filerefs that you have assigned during your current SAS session are cleared.
To clear filerefs using the SAS Explorer File Shortcuts:
1. select the File Shortcuts that you want to delete. To select all File Shortcuts, select 
Edit 
ð
Select All
2. press the Delete key or select Edit 
ð
Delete
3. Click OK in the message box to confirm deletion of the File shortcuts.
Note: You cannot clear a fileref that is defined by an environment variable. Filerefs that 
are defined by an environment variable are assigned for the entire SAS session.
SAS automatically clears the association between filerefs and their respective files at the 
end of your job or session. If you want to associate the fileref with a different file during 
the current session, you do not have to end the session or clear the fileref. SAS 
automatically reassigns the fileref when you issue a FILENAME statement for the new 
file.
Understanding How Concatenated Directories Are Accessed
When you associate a fileref with more than one physical directory, which file is 
accessed depends on whether it is being accessed for input or output.
Referencing External Files
161
Delete text pdf acrobat - delete, remove text from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# developers to use mature APIs to delete and remove text content from PDF document
remove text from pdf reader; how to erase in pdf text
Delete text pdf acrobat - VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File
pdf editor delete text; delete text pdf file
Input
If the file is opened for input or update, the first file found that matches the member 
name is accessed. For example, if you submit the following statements, and the file 
PHONE.DAT exists in both the C:\SAMPLES and C:\TESTPGMS directories, the one 
in C:\SAMPLES is read:
filename test ("c:\samples","c:\testpgms");
data sampdat;
infile test(phone.dat);
input name $ phonenum $ city $ state $;
run;
Output
When you open a file for output, SAS writes to the file in the first directory listed in the 
FILENAME statement, even if a file by the same name exists in a later directory. For 
example, suppose you input the following FILENAME statement:
filename test ("c:\sas","d:\mysasdir");
Then, when you issue the following FILE command, the file SOURCE.PGM is written 
to the C:\SAS directory, even if a file by the same name exists in the D:\MYSASDIR 
directory:
file test(source.pgm);
Understanding How Concatenated Files Are Accessed
When you associate a fileref with more than one physical file, the behavior of SAS 
statements and commands depends on whether you are accessing the files for input or 
output.
Input
If the file is opened for input, data from all files are input. For example, if you issue the 
following statements, the %INCLUDE statement submits four programs for execution:
filename mydata ("qtr1.sas","qtr2.sas",
"qtr3.sas","qtr4.sas");
%include mydata;
Output
If the file is opened for output, data are written to the first file in the concatenation. For 
example, if you issue the following statements, the PUT statement writes to 
MYDAT1.DAT:
filename indata "dogdat.dat";
filename outdata ("mydat1.dat","mydat2.dat",
"mydat3.dat","mydat4.dat");
data _null_;
infile indata;
input name breed color;
file outdata;
put name= breed= color=;
run;
162
Chapter 5 • Using External Files under Windows
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Redact text content, images, whole pages from PDF file. Annotate & Comment. Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file. Print.
remove text from pdf online; how to delete text from pdf
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Allow users to convert PDF to Text (TXT) file. can manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
how to delete text from a pdf; how to delete text from a pdf reader
Using a Quoted Windows Filename
Overview of Using a Quoted Windows Filename
Instead of using a fileref to refer to external files, you can use a quoted Windows 
filename. For example, if the file C:\MYDIR\ORANGES.SAS contains a SAS program 
that you want to invoke, you can issue the following statement:
%include "c:\mydir\oranges.sas";
When you use a quoted Windows filename in a SAS statement, you can omit the drive 
and directory specifications if the file that you want to reference is located in the 
working directory. For example, if in the previous example the working directory is C:
\MYDIR, you can submit this statement:
%include "oranges.sas";
Using a File in Your Working Directory
If you store the external files that you need to access in your working directory and they 
have the expected file extensions (see Table 5.1 on page 158 ), you can simply refer to 
the filename, without quotation marks or file extensions, in a SAS statement. For 
example, if a filename ORANGES.SAS is stored in your working directory and 
ORANGES is not defined as a fileref, you can submit the file with the following 
statement:
%include oranges;
Remember, though, that using this type of file reference requires that
• the file is stored in the working directory
• the file has the correct file extension
• the filename is not also defined as a fileref.
For more information about how to determine and change the SAS working directory, 
see “Determining the Current Folder When SAS Starts” on page 20 and “Changing the 
SAS Current Folder” on page 49 .
Running External LUA Files
You can run external scripts written in the LUA programming language from the SAS 
command line. For more information, see “Running External Lua Files” in SAS 
Companion for UNIX Environments.
Accessing External Files with SAS Statements
Overview of Accessing External Files with SAS Statements
This section presents simple examples of using the FILE, INFILE, and %INCLUDE 
statements to access external files. For more complex examples of using these statements 
under Windows, see “Advanced External I/O Techniques” on page 168 .
• “Using the FILE Statement” on page 164
Accessing External Files with SAS Statements
163
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
delete text from pdf online; how to delete text in pdf converter professional
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
how to delete text from pdf reader; delete text from pdf
• “Using the INFILE Statement” on page 165
• “Using the %INCLUDE Statement” on page 165
Using the FILE Statement
The FILE statement enables you to direct lines that are written by a PUT statement to an 
external file.1
Here is an example using the FILE statement. This example reads the data in the SAS 
data set MYLIB.TEST and writes only those scores greater than 95 to the external file C:
\MYDIR\TEST.DAT:
filename test "c:\mydir\test.dat";
libname mylib "c:\mydata";
data _null_;
set mylib.test;
file test;
if score ge 95 then
put score;
run;
The previous example illustrates writing the value of only one variable of each 
observation to an external file. The following example uses the _ALL_ option in the 
PUT statement to copy all variables in the current observation to the external file if the 
variable REGION contains the value west.
libname us "c:\mydata";
data west;
set us.pop;
file "c:\sas\pop.dat";
where region="west";
put _all_;
run;
This technique of writing out entire observations is particularly useful if you need to 
write variable values in a SAS data set to an external file so that you can use your data 
with another application that cannot read data in a SAS data set format.
Note: This example uses the _ALL_ keyword in the PUT statement. This code generates 
named output, which means that the variable name, an equal sign (=), and the 
variable value are all written to the file. For more information about named output, 
see the description of the PUT statement in SAS Statements: Reference.
The FILE statement also accepts several options. These options enable you to control the 
record format and length. Some of these options are illustrated in “Advanced External 
I/O Techniques” on page 168 . For the complete syntax of the FILE statement, see 
“FILE Statement: Windows” on page 453 .
The default record length that is used by the FILE statement is 32767 characters. If the 
data that you are saving contains records that are longer than 32767 characters, you must 
use the FILENAME statement to define a fileref and either use the LRECL= option in 
the FILENAME statement to specify the correct logical record length or specify the 
LRECL= option in the FILE statement. For details about the LRECL= option, see 
LRECL= in “FILE Statement: Windows” on page 453 .
1
You can also use the FILE statement to direct PUT statement output to the SAS log or to the same destination as procedure output. 
For more information, see SAS Statements: Reference.
164
Chapter 5 • Using External Files under Windows
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
create a watermark that consists of text or image (such And with our PDF Watermark Creator, users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat.
how to delete text in pdf using acrobat professional; how to delete text in pdf converter
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
how to delete text in pdf preview; acrobat delete text in pdf
You can also specify a different value, instead of the default 32767, for LRECL= in an 
OPTIONS statement or in your configuration file. This value stays in effect during the 
entire session. If you want to specify a different LRECL= value for a specific step, then 
you must specify the value in a FILENAME, FILE, or INFILE statement.
Using the INFILE Statement
Use the INFILE statement to specify the source of data that is read by the INPUT 
statement in a SAS DATA step. The INFILE statement is always used in conjunction 
with an INPUT statement, which defines the location and type of data being read.
Here is a simple example of the INFILE statement. This DATA step reads the specified 
data from the external file and creates a SAS data set named SURVEY:
filename mydata "c:\mysasdir\survey.dat";
data survey;
infile mydata;
input fruit $ taste looks;
run;
You can use a quoted Windows filename instead of a fileref:
data survey;
infile "c:\mysasdir\survey.dat";
input fruit $ taste looks;
run;
The INFILE statement also accepts other options. These options enable you to control 
the record format and length. Some of these options are illustrated in “Advanced 
External I/O Techniques” on page 168 . For the complete syntax of the INFILE 
statement, see “INFILE Statement: Windows” on page 465 .
The default record length that is used by the INFILE statement is 32767 characters. If 
the data that you are reading has records longer 32767 characters, you must use the 
FILENAME statement to define a fileref and either use the LRECL= option in the 
FILENAME statement to specify the correct logical record length or specify the 
LRECL= option in the INFILE statement. For details about the LRECL= option, see 
LRECL= in “INFILE Statement: Windows” on page 465 .
You can also specify a different value, instead of the default 32767, for LRECL= in an 
OPTIONS statement or in your configuration file. This value stays in effect during the 
entire session. If you want to specify a different LRECL= value for a specific step, then 
you would need to specify the value in a FILENAME, FILE, or INFILE statement.
Using the %INCLUDE Statement
When you submit an %INCLUDE statement, it reads an entire file into the current SAS 
program that you are running and submits that file to SAS immediately. A single SAS 
program can have as many individual %INCLUDE statements as necessary, and you can 
nest up to ten levels of %INCLUDE statements. Using the %INCLUDE statement makes 
it easier for you to write modular SAS programs.
Here is an example that submits the statements that are stored in C:\SAS\MYJOBS
\PROGRAM1.SAS using the %INCLUDE statement and member-name syntax:
filename job "c:\sas\myjobs";
%include job(program1);
The %INCLUDE statement also accepts several options. These options enable you to 
control the record format and length. Some of these options are illustrated in “Advanced 
Accessing External Files with SAS Statements
165
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
Excel documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion.
pull text out of pdf; delete text from pdf preview
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS free hand, free hand line, rectangle, text, hotspot, hotspot more plug-ins needed like Acrobat or Adobe
delete text pdf acrobat; pdf editor online delete text
External I/O Techniques” on page 168 . For the complete syntax of the %INCLUDE 
statement, see “%INCLUDE Statement: Windows” on page 463 .
The default record length used by the %INCLUDE statement is 32767 characters. If the 
program that you are reading has records longer than 32767 characters, you must use the 
FILENAME statement to define a fileref and either use the LRECL= option in the 
FILENAME statement to specify the correct logical record length or specify the 
LRECL= option in the %INCLUDE statement. For details about the LRECL= option, 
see LRECL= in “%INCLUDE Statement: Windows” on page 463 .
You can also specify a different value, instead of the default 32767, for LRECL= in an 
OPTIONS statement or in your configuration file. This value stays in effect during the 
entire session. If you want to specify a different LRECL= value for a specific step, then 
you would need to specify the value in a FILENAME, FILE, or INFILE statement.
Accessing External Files with SAS Commands
Overview of Accessing External Files with SAS Commands
This section illustrates how to use the FILE and INCLUDE commands to access external 
files. Commands provide the same service as the Save As and Open dialog boxes. The 
method that you use to access external files depends on the needs of your SAS 
application and your personal preference.
Using the FILE Command
The FILE command has a different use than the FILE statement; the FILE command 
writes the current contents of a window to an external file rather than merely specifying 
(for example, a destination for PUT statement output in a DATA step).
For example, if you want to save the contents of the LOG window to an external 
filename C:\SASLOGS\TODAY.LOG, you can issue the following FILE command from 
the Command dialog box. However, the LOG window must be active:
file "c:\saslogs\today.log"
If you have already defined the fileref LOGS to point to the SASLOGS directory, you 
can use the following FILE command:
file logs(today)
In this case, the file extension defaults to .log, as shown in Table 5.1 on page 158.
If you use the FILE command to attempt to write to an already existing file, a dialog box 
enables you to replace the existing file, append the contents of the window to the 
existing file, or cancel your request.
If you issue the FILE command with no arguments, the contents of the window are 
written to the file that is referenced in the last FILE command. This action is useful if 
you are editing a program and want to save it often. However, the dialog box that 
prompts you about replacing or appending appears only the first time you issue the FILE 
command. Thereafter, unless you specify the filename in the FILE command, it uses the 
parameters that you specified earlier (replace or append) without prompting you.
Choosing Save As from the SAS main window File menu displays the Save As dialog 
box. This dialog box performs the same function as the FILE command, but it is more 
flexible in that it gives you more choices and is more interactive than the FILE 
166
Chapter 5 • Using External Files under Windows
command. For more information, see “Saving Files” in “Saving Files” on page 92 and 
“Using the Program Editor” on page 117.
The FILE command also accepts several options. These options enable you to control 
the record format and length. Some of these options are illustrated in “Advanced 
External I/O Techniques” on page 168. For the complete syntax of the FILE command, 
see “FILE Command: Windows” on page 344.
Using the INCLUDE Command
The INCLUDE command, like the %INCLUDE statement, can be used to copy an entire 
external file into the Editor window, the NOTEPAD window, or whatever window is 
active. In the case of the INCLUDE command, however, the file is simply copied to the 
window and is not submitted.
For example, suppose you want to copy the file C:\SAS\PROG1.SAS into the Editor 
window. If you have defined a fileref SAMPLE to point to the correct directory, you can 
use the following INCLUDE command from the Command dialog box (if the Editor is 
the active window) to copy the member PROG1 into the Editor window:
include sample(prog1);
Another way to copy files into your SAS session is to use the Open dialog box. In 
addition to copying files, the Open dialog box gives you other choices, such as invoking 
the program that you are copying. The Open dialog box is the most flexible way for you 
to copy files into the Editor window. For more information, see “Opening Files” in 
“Saving Files” on page 92 and “Using the Program Editor” on page 117.
The INCLUDE command also accepts several arguments. These arguments enable you 
to control the record format and length. Some of these arguments are illustrated in 
“Advanced External I/O Techniques” on page 168. For the complete syntax of the 
INCLUDE command, see “INCLUDE Command: Windows” on page 349.
Issuing the INCLUDE command with no arguments includes the that is file referenced in 
the last INCLUDE command. If no previous INCLUDE command exists, you receive an 
error message.
Using the GSUBMIT Command
The GSUBMIT command can be used to submit SAS statements that are stored in the 
Windows clipboard. To submit SAS statements from the clipboard, use the following 
command:
gsubmit buffer=default;
You can also use the GSUBMIT command to submit SAS statements that are specified 
as part of the command. For more information about the GSUBMIT command, see the 
SAS Help and Documentation.
Note: SAS statements in the Windows clipboard are not submitted using the GSUBMIT 
command if a procedure that you submitted using the Enhanced Editor is still 
running. You can copy the SAS statements to a new Enhanced Editor window and 
then submit them.
Accessing External Files with SAS Commands
167
Advanced External I/O Techniques
Overview of Advanced External I/O Techniques
This section illustrates how to use the FILENAME, FILE, and INFILE statements to 
perform more advanced I/O tasks, such as altering the record format and length, 
appending data to a file, using the DRIVEMAP device-type keyword to determine which 
drives are available.
• “Altering the Record Format” on page 168
• “Appending Data to an External File” on page 168
• “Determining Your Drive Mapping” on page 169
• “Reading External Files with National Characters” on page 170
Altering the Record Format
Using the RECFM= option in the FILENAME, FILE, %INCLUDE, and INFILE 
statements enables you to specify the record format of your external files. The following 
example shows you how to use this option.
Usually, SAS reads a line of data until a carriage return and line feed combination 
('0D0A'x) are encountered or until just a line feed ('0A'x) is encountered. However, 
sometimes data do not contain these carriage–control characters but do have fixed-length 
records. In this case, you can specify RECFM=F to read your data.
To read such a file, you need to use the LRECL= option to specify the record length and 
the RECFM= option to tell SAS that the records have fixed-length record format. Here 
are the required statements:
data test;
infile "test.dat" lrecl=60 recfm=f;
input x y z;
run;
In this example, SAS expects fixed-length records that are 60 bytes long, and it reads in 
the three numeric variables X, Y, and Z.
You can also specify RECFM=F when your data contains carriage returns and line feeds, 
but you want to read these values as part of your data instead of treating them as 
carriage-control characters. When you specify RECFM=F, SAS ignores any carriage 
controls and line feeds and simply reads the record length that you specify.
Appending Data to an External File
Occasionally, you might not want to create a new output file, but rather append data to 
the end of an existing file. In this case, you can use the MOD option in the FILE 
statement as in the following example:
filename myfile "c:\sas\data";
data _null_;
infile myfile(newdata);
input sales expenses;
168
Chapter 5 • Using External Files under Windows
file myfile(jandata) mod;
put sales expenses;
run;
This example reads the variables SALES and EXPENSES from the external data file C:
\SAS\DATA\NEWDATA.DAT and appends records to the existing data file C:\SAS
\DATA\JANDATA.DAT.
If you are going to append data to several files in a single directory, you can use the 
MOD option in the FILENAME statement instead of in the FILE statement. You can 
also use the FAPPEND function or the PRINTTO procedure to append data to a file. For 
more information, see the SAS functions section in SAS Functions and CALL Routines: 
Reference and the PRINTTO procedure in Base SAS Procedures Guide.
Determining Your Drive Mapping
You can use the DRIVEMAP device-type keyword in the FILENAME statement to 
determine which drives are available for use.
You might use this technique in SAS/AF applications, where you could build selection 
lists to let a user choose a hard drive. You could also use the DRIVEMAP keyword to 
enable you to assign macro variables to the various available hard drives.
Using the DRIVEMAP device-type keyword in the FILENAME statement implies you 
are using the fileref for read-only purposes. If you try to use the fileref associated with 
the DRIVEMAP device-type keyword in a write or update situation, you receive an error 
message indicating you do not have sufficient authority to write to the file.
Here is an example using this keyword:
filename myfile drivemap;
data mymap;
infile myfile;
input drive $;
put drive;
run;
The information written to the SAS log looks similar to the information in Output 5.1 on 
page 170 .
Advanced External I/O Techniques
169
Output 5.1 Drive Mapping Information
50   filename myfile drivemap;
51
52   data mymap;
53      infile myfile;
54      input drive $;
55      put drive;
56   run;
NOTE: The infile MYFILE is:
FILENAME=DRIVEMAP,
RECFM=V,LRECL=32767
A:
C:
D:
J:
K:
L:
M:
N:
R:
S:
T:
U:
NOTE: 12 records were read from the infile MYFILE.
The minimum record length was 2.
The maximum record length was 2.
NOTE: The data set WORK.MYMAP has 12 observations 
and 1 variables.
NOTE: The DATA statement used 2.04 seconds.
Reading External Files with National Characters
SAS under Windows, like most Windows applications, reads and writes character data 
using ANSI character codes. Currently, SAS does not provide the option to read or write 
files using OEM character sets.
Characters such as the Â are considered national characters. Windows represents each 
character with a hexadecimal number. If your external file was created with a Windows 
editor (including applications such as Word) or in SAS, you do not need to do anything 
special. Simply read the file using the FILENAME or FILE statements, as you would 
normally do.
170
Chapter 5 • Using External Files under Windows
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested