open pdf in webbrowser control c# : How to delete text from pdf reader Library application component asp.net windows web page mvc hostwin30-part232

program must be contained in the Windows PATH environment variable. This 
argument can also contain program options. For example, you can specify the 
following argument to indicate you want to invoke the STOCKMKT program on all 
stocks:
'stockmkt.exe -all'
option-list
can be any of the options valid in the FILENAME statement, such as the LRECL= or 
RECFM= options. For a complete list of options available for the FILENAME 
statement under Windows, see “FILENAME Statement: Windows” on page 456 .
Using Redirection Sequences
Any Windows application that accommodates standard input, output, and error 
commands can use the unnamed pipe feature. Because many Windows system 
commands use standard input, output, and error commands, you can use these 
commands with unnamed pipes within SAS. Unless you specify otherwise, an unnamed 
pipe directs STDOUT and STDERR to two different files. To combine the STDOUT and 
STDERR into the same file, use redirection sequences. The following is an example that 
redirects STDERR to STDOUT for the Windows DIR command:
filename listing pipe 'dir *.sas 2>&1';
In this example, if any errors occur in performing this command, STDERR (2) is 
redirected to the same file as STDOUT (1). This example demonstrates SAS ability to 
capitalize on operating environment capabilities. This feature of redirecting file handles 
is a function of the Windows operating system rather than of SAS.
Unnamed Pipe Example
In the following example, you use the unnamed pipes feature of SAS under Windows to 
produce some financial reports. The example assumes you have a stand-alone program 
that updates stock market information from a financial news bureau. You need SAS to 
invoke a stock market report with the most recently created data from the stock market 
program. The following is how you create and use the pipe within your SAS session:
filename stocks pipe 'stockmkt.exe -all' console=min;
data report;
infile stocks;
input stock $ open close change;
run;
proc print;
var stock open close change;
sum change;
title 'Stock Market Report';
run;
In this example, the PIPE device-type keyword in the FILENAME statement indicates 
that the fileref STOCKS is an unnamed pipe. The STOCKMKT.EXE reference is the 
name of the stand-alone program that generates the stock market data. The host-option 
CONSOLE=MIN indicates that the command prompt window that is opened to run the 
STOCKMKT.EXE program is opened minimized. The INFILE statement causes SAS to 
invoke the STOCKMKT.EXE program and read the data in the pipe from it. The 
STOCKMKT.EXE program completes without you being aware that it has been 
implemented (except for the command prompt window button on the Windows taskbar). 
Because the fileref STOCKS has already been defined as an unnamed pipe, the standard 
Using Unnamed Pipes 
281
How to delete text from pdf reader - delete, remove text from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# developers to use mature APIs to delete and remove text content from PDF document
how to erase text in pdf; how to copy text out of a pdf
How to delete text from pdf reader - VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File
how to erase text in pdf file; delete text from pdf with acrobat
output from STOCKMKT.EXE is redirected to SAS and captured through the INFILE 
statement. The SAS program reads in the variables and uses the PRINT procedure to 
generate a printed report. Any error messages generated by STOCKMKT.EXE appear in 
the SAS log.
Using Named Pipes
Introduction to Named Pipes
The named pipes capability is one of the most powerful tools available in SAS under 
Windows for communicating with other applications. The named pipes feature enables 
bidirectional data or message exchange between applications on the same machine or 
applications on separate machines across a network. The following figure illustrates 
these two methods of communication.
Figure 12.1 Communication Using Named Pipes
Single Workstation
Machine 1
Machine 2
Network
First
Application
Second
Application
First
Application
Second
Application
Multiple Workstations
across a Network
The applications can be SAS sessions or other Windows applications. For example, you 
can use the PRINTTO procedure to direct the results from SAS procedures to another 
Windows application, using a named pipe. Therefore, you have the choice of having 
multiple SAS sessions that communicate with each other or one SAS session 
communicating with another Windows application.
Whether you are communicating between multiple SAS sessions or between a SAS 
session and another Windows application that supports named pipes, the pipes are 
defined in a client/server relationship. One process is defined as the server. One or 
multiple processes are defined as clients. In this configuration, you can have multiple 
clients send data to the server or the server send data to the various clients. Named pipes 
enable you to coordinate processing between the server and clients using various 
options.
Named Pipe Syntax
You can use a named pipe anywhere you use a fileref in SAS. To use a named pipe, issue 
a FILENAME statement with the following syntax:
FILENAME fileref NAMEPIPE 'pipe-specification' <named-pipe-options>;
You can use the following arguments with this syntax of the FILENAME statement:
fileref
is any valid fileref as described in “Referencing External Files” on page 154 .
NAMEPIPE
is the device-type keyword that tells SAS that you want to use a named pipe.
282
Chapter 12 • Using Unnamed and Named Pipes under Windows
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
›› VB.NET PDF: Delete PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - How to Delete PDF Document Page in VB.NET. Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in VB.NET Class.
erase text from pdf; how to delete text from pdf document
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Delete PDF Page. C#.NET PDF Library - Delete PDF Document Page in C#.NET.
erase text in pdf document; delete text from pdf preview
pipe-specification
is the name of the pipe.
This argument has two mutually exclusive syntaxes:
\\.\PIPE\pipe-name
indicates you are establishing a pipe on a single PC or defining a server pipe 
across a network. The pipe-name argument specifies the name of the pipe.
\\server-name\PIPE\pipe-name
indicates you are establishing a client pipe over a network named-pipe server. 
Remember to include the double backslash (\\) in this situation. The pipe-name 
argument specifies the name of the client pipe. The server-name argument 
specifies the name of the named-pipe server.
named-pipe-options
can be any of the following. The default value is listed first:
SERVER | CLIENT
indicates the mode of the pipe. SERVER is the default.
BLOCK | NOBLOCK
indicates whether the client or server is to wait for data to be read if no data are 
currently available. BLOCK indicates to wait and is the default. NOBLOCK 
indicates not to wait. Control is returned immediately to the program if no data 
are available in the pipe. Writing to the pipe always implies BLOCK.
BYTE | MESSAGE
indicates the type of pipe. BYTE is the default. The difference between a BYTE 
pipe and a MESSAGE pipe is that a MESSAGE pipe includes an encoded record 
length, whereas a BYTE pipe does not.
RETRY=seconds
indicates the amount of time the client or server is to wait to establish the pipe. 
The minimum value for seconds is 10. This option allows time for 
synchronization of the client and server. The default waiting period is 10 
seconds.
There are two values for the seconds argument that indicate special cases:
-2 indicates that the client is to wait the amount of time defined by the server's 
RETRY= option. If this option is used, the SERVER must always be active or the 
pipe connection fails.
-1 indicates that the client or the server is to wait indefinitely for the pipe 
connection.
EOFCONNECT
is valid only when defining the server and indicates that if an end-of-file (EOF) is 
received from a client, the server is to try to connect to the next client.
All of these options are consistent with terminology used in Windows programmers' 
reference guides such as those options provided with the Microsoft Win32 SDK.
Using the CALL RECONNECT Routine
A special SAS CALL routine, CALL RECONNECT, enables the server to disconnect 
the current client and try to connect to the next available client. Normally, a pipe 
terminates when the client side of the pipe sends an end-of-file to the server. To break 
the pipe connection at any time, the server SAS session can issue a CALL 
Using Named Pipes 
283
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Text. VB.NET PDF - Extract Text from PDF Using VB. How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application.
erase pdf text; remove text from pdf
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Text. C# PDF - Extract Text from PDF in C#.NET. Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File.
acrobat delete text in pdf; delete text pdf preview
RECONNECT statement. For an illustration of this routine, see “The CALL 
RECONNECT Routine” on page 289 .
Using Named Pipes in SCL
To establish named pipes using SCL code, you must use the FOPEN function to open a 
file (or pipe) before you can access it. In doing so, you must specify the appropriate 
Open mode for both the client and server applications so that the two can communicate 
over the pipe. Here is a summary of the different nodes that you can use:
Table 12.2 Nodes When Using SCL Code
If the server accesses the pipe as...
then the client must access it as...
I (input)
O (output)
O (output)
S (sequential)
U (update)
O (output) or S (sequential)
Named Pipe Examples
Overview of Named Pipe Examples
The best way to understand named pipes is to examine several examples illustrating their 
use. In most of the examples in this section, the named pipe is established between two 
SAS sessions. However, named pipes work between SAS and other applications that 
support named pipes.
Simple Named Pipes: One Client Connected to One Server
The simplest named pipe configuration is one server connected to one client, as shown in 
Figure 12.2 on page 284 .
Figure 12.2 One Server Connected to One Client
Server
Application
Client
Application
In the following example, a named pipe called WOMEN is established between two 
SAS sessions. The server SAS session selectively sends data to the client SAS session. 
You can start the server or the client first; one waits 30 seconds for the other to connect.
In the first SAS session, create a named pipe as a server:
/* Creates a pipe called WOMEN, acting */
/* as a server. The server waits 30    */
/* seconds for a client to connect.    */
filename women namepipe '\\.\pipe\women' 
server retry=30;
/* This code writes three records into */
284
Chapter 12 • Using Unnamed and Named Pipes under Windows
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Supports adding text to PDF in preview without adobe reader installed in ASP.NET. Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text.
delete text from pdf online; remove text from pdf acrobat
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
Text: Search Text in PDF. C# Guide about How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information with .NET PDF Control.
how to remove highlighted text in pdf; erase pdf text online
/* the named pipe called WOMEN.        */
data class;
input name $ sex $ age;
file women;
if upcase(sex)='F' then
put name age;
datalines;
MOORE M 15
JOHNSON F 16
DALY F 14
ROBERTS M 14
PARKER F 13
;
In the second SAS session, you can use SAS statements to exchange data between the 
two SAS sessions. For example, you can submit the following program from the client 
session:
/* Creates a pipe called WOMEN, acting */
/* as a client.  The client waits 30   */
/* seconds for a server to connect.    */
filename in namepipe '\\.\pipe\women' client 
retry=30;
data female;
infile in;
input name $ age;
proc print;
run;
The following program is another example of a single client and server. This example 
illustrates using the PRINTTO procedure to direct results from the SUMMARY 
procedure to another Windows application, using a named pipe called RESULTS:
filename results namepipe '\\.\pipe\results'
server retry=60;
proc printto print=results new;
run;
proc summary data=monthly;
run;
One Server Connected to Several Clients
You can choose one server to be connected to several clients. In this case, the named 
pipe configuration looks like the configuration shown in Figure 12.3 on page 286 .
Using Named Pipes 
285
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to Text in C#.NET. Integrate following RasterEdge C#.NET text to PDF converter SDK dlls into your C#.NET project assemblies;
how to remove text watermark from pdf; how to delete text in pdf file
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project. Remove and delete metadata from PDF file.
deleting text from a pdf; how to delete text in a pdf file
Figure 12.3 One Server Connected to Several Clients
Client
Application
1
Client
Application
2
Server
Application
Client
Application
3
Client
n
.
.
.
In this configuration, the data connection is initially between the server and the first 
client. When this connection is terminated, the server connects to the second client, and 
so on. The connection can return to the first client after the last client's connection is 
broken if your program is set up to do so.
You must use the EOFCONNECT option to cause the connection to move properly from 
one client to the next. Here is an example of using the EOFCONNECT option with one 
server SAS session and two clients. The clients can be on the same PC or on a PC 
connected across a network.
In the first SAS session, submit the following statements:
/* Creates a pipe called SALES, acting  */
/* as a server. The server waits 30     */
/* seconds for a client to connect.     */
/* After the client has disconnected,   */
/* this server SAS session tries to     */
/* connect to the next available client */
filename daily namepipe '\\.\pipe\sales' 
server eofconnect retry=30;
/* This program reads in the daily     */
/* sales figures sent from each client.*/
data totsales;
infile daily;
input dept $ item $ total;
run;
286
Chapter 12 • Using Unnamed and Named Pipes under Windows
In the second SAS session, submit the following statements:
/* Creates a pipe called SALES, acting   */
/* as a client. The client waits forever */
/* for a server to connect. After the    */
/* first client has disconnected, the    */
/* second client connects with the server.*/
/* The first client is the TOYS dept.    */
filename dept1 namepipe '\\.\pipe\sales' 
client retry=-1;
data toys;
input item $ total;
dept='TOYS';
file dept1;
put dept item total;
datalines;
DOLLS 100
MARBLES 10
BLOCKS 50
GAMES 60
CARS 40
;
/* The second client is the SPORTS dept.*/
/* These data could come from a separate */
/* SAS session.                          */
filename dept2 namepipe '\\.\pipe\sales' 
client retry=-1;
data sports;
input item $ total;
dept='SPORTS';
file dept2;
put dept item total;
datalines;
BALLS 30
BATS 65
GLOVES 15
RACKETS 75
FISHING 20
TENTS 115
HELMETS 45
;
The NOBLOCK Option
In the following example, the NOBLOCK option is used to specify that if no data are 
available when the pipe is read, then the program should continue performing. If the 
default value of BLOCK had been used, then the pipe would wait indefinitely until data 
were found in the pipe. The EOFCONNECT option is used to tell the server that when a 
client sends an end-of-file, the server can connect with a new client. The RETRY= 
option tells the server to look for any new clients for 20 seconds while the client waits 
indefinitely on a server. The clients can be on the same PC or on a PC connected across a 
network. A server connects to one client at a time, and the clients queue in a serial order 
waiting to connect to the server.
In the first SAS session, submit the following statements:
/* Defines a named pipe called LINE.   */
/* Use the NOBLOCK option to specify   */
Using Named Pipes 
287
/* that if no data are available when  */
/* the read is performed, then continue.*/
/* Use the EOFCONNECT option to tell   */
/* the server to try to connect with a */
/* new client if an end-of-file is     */
/* encountered. Use the RETRY= option  */
/* to tell the server to look for any  */
/* new clients for 20 seconds.         */
filename data namepipe '\\.\pipe\line' server 
noblock eofconnect retry=20;
/* This DATA step reads in all data  */
/* from any clients connected to the */
/* named pipe called LINE.           */
data all;
infile data length=len;
input @;
/* If the length of the incoming  */
/* record is 0, then no data were */
/* found in the pipe; otherwise,  */ 
/* read the incoming data.        */
if len ne 0 then
do;
input machine $ width weight;
output;
end;
run;
proc print;
run;
Each of the following DATA steps below can be carried out on several PCs connected 
across a network:
/* Defines a named pipe called LINE.  */
/* The RETRY= option is set such that */
/* the clients wait forever until a   */
/* server is available                */
/* (that is, RETRY=-1).               */
filename data namepipe '\\.\pipe\line'
client retry=-1;
/* This is information from the */
/* first machine/client.        */
data machine1;
file data;
input width weight;
machine='LINE_1';
put machine width weight;
datalines;
5.3 18.2
3.2 14.3
4.8 16.9
6.4 20.8
4.3 15.4
6.1 19.5
5.6 18.9
;
/* This is information from the */
/* second machine/client.       */
288
Chapter 12 • Using Unnamed and Named Pipes under Windows
filename data namepipe '\\.\pipe\line' 
client retry=-1;
data machine2;
file data;
input width weight;
machine='LINE_2';
put machine width weight;
datalines;
4.3 17.2
5.2 18.4
6.8 19.9
3.4 14.5
5.3 18.6
4.1 17.1
6.6 19.5
;
The CALL RECONNECT Routine
The following example demonstrates how to set up a named pipe server to establish a 
connection with two clients. (For this example, you need three active SAS sessions.) In 
this example, the CALL RECONNECT routine is used to reconnect to the next client on 
the named pipe if it has been at least 30 seconds since the previous client has sent any 
data. Each client is a data entry operator, sending data to the server SAS session.
In the server SAS session, submit the following statements:
filename data namepipe '\\.\pipe\orders' 
server noblock eofconnect retry=30;
data all;
infile data length=len missover;
input @;
/* If the length of the incoming  */
/* record is 0, then no data were */
/* found in the pipe; otherwise,  */
/* read the incoming data         */
if len ne 0 then
do;
input operator $ item $ quantity $;
if item='' or quantity='' then
delete;
else
output;
put operator= item= quantity=;
end;
/* If no data are being transmitted,*/
/* try reconnecting to the next     */
/* available client.                */
else
do;
/* Use the named pipe fileref */
/* as the argument of */
/* CALL RECONNECT. */
call reconnect('data');
end;
run;
Using Named Pipes 
289
In the second SAS session, which is the first data entry operator, submit the following 
statements:
filename data namepipe '\\.\pipe\orders' 
client retry=-1;
data entry1;
if _n_=1 then
do;
window entry_1
#1 @2 'ENTER STOP WHEN YOU ARE FINISHED'
#3 @5 'ITEM NUMBER - ' item $3.
#5 @5 'QUANTITY - ' quantity $3.;
end;
do while (upcase(_cmd_) ne 'STOP');
display entry_1;
file data;
put 'ENTRY_1' +1 item quantity;
item='';
quantity='';
end;
stop;
run;
In the third SAS session, which is the second data entry operator, submit the following 
statements:
filename data namepipe '\\.\pipe\orders' 
client retry=-1;
data entry2;
if _n_=1 then
do;
window entry_2 
#1 @2 'ENTER STOP WHEN YOU ARE FINISHED'
#3 @5 'ITEM NUMBER - ' item $3.
#5 @5 'QUANTITY - ' quantity $3.;
end;
do while (upcase(_cmd_) ne 'STOP');
display entry_2;
file data;
put 'ENTRY_2' +1 item quantity;
item='';
quantity='';
end;
stop;
run;
290
Chapter 12 • Using Unnamed and Named Pipes under Windows
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested