open pdf in webbrowser control c# : How to delete text from pdf software control dll windows azure web page web forms hostwin43-part246

Required Argument
MCI-string-command
is any valid SAS string; a character variable, a character literal enclosed in quotation 
marks, or other character expression.
Details
The MCIPISTR function submits an MCI (Media Control Interface) string command.
You can use MCI to control many types of multimedia equipment, such as CD players, 
mixers, videodisc players, and so on. Windows provides MCI support. For more 
information about valid MCI string commands, refer to the Windows multimedia SDK 
documentation in the MSDN Library and your MCI-compliant device documentation.
The return value is a string that contains return information from the MCI string 
command. Examples of return information include "invalid instance" and "1".
Note: Not all MCI commands supply return codes that are usable from SAS.
The MCIPISTR function can be used in the DATA step and in SCL code.
Example
To use a CD player, you could submit the following statements in your DATA step:
msg=mcipistr("open cdaudio alias cd");
msg=mcipistr("play cd");
msg=mcipistr("stop cd");
msg=mcipistr("close cd");
See Also
“MCIPISLP Function: Windows” on page 409
MODULE Function: Windows
Calls a specific routine or module that resides in an external dynamic link library (DLL).
Category:
External Routines
Windows 
specifics:
all
CAUTION:
Be sure to use the correct arguments and attributes. Using incorrect arguments or 
attributes for a DLL function can cause SAS, and possibly your operating system, to fail.
Syntax
CALL MODULE(<control string>,module,argument-1, ..., argument-n);
num=MODULEN(<control-string>,module,argument-1, ..., argument-n);
char=MODULEC(<control-string> ,module,argument-1, ..., argument-n);
CALL MODULEI(<control-string> ,moduleargument-1, ..., argument-n);
num=MODULEIN(<control-string> ,module,argument-1, ..., argument-n)
char=MODULEIC(<control-string> ,module,argument-1, ..., argument-n);
MODULE Function: Windows
411
How to delete text from pdf - delete, remove text from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# developers to use mature APIs to delete and remove text content from PDF document
how to delete text in pdf preview; remove text from pdf online
How to delete text from pdf - VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File
erase text from pdf file; delete text pdf
Required Arguments
control-string
is an optional control string whose first character must be an asterisk (*), followed by 
any combination of the following characters:
I
prints the hexadecimal representations of all arguments to the MODULE 
function and to the requested DLL routine before and after the DLL 
routine is called. You can use this option to help diagnose problems that 
are caused by incorrect arguments or attribute tables. If you specify the 
option, the E option is implied.
E
prints detailed error messages. Without the E option (or the I option, 
which supersedes it), the only error message that the MODULE function 
generates is "Invalid argument to function," which is usually not enough 
information to determine the cause of the error.
Sx
uses x as a separator character to separate field definitions. You can then 
specify x in the argument list as its own character argument to serve as a 
delimiter for a list of arguments that you want to group together as a single 
structure. Use this option only if you do not supply an entry in the 
SASCBTBL attribute table. If you do supply an entry for this module in 
the SASCBTBL attribute table, you should use the FDSTART option in the 
ARG statement in the table to separate structures.
H
provides brief help information about the syntax of the MODULE routines, 
the attribute file format, and the suggested SAS formats and informats.
For example, the control string '*IS/' specifies that parameter lists be printed and 
that the string '/' is to be treated as a separator character in the argument list.
module
is the name of the external module to use, specified as a DLL name and the routine 
name or ordinal value, separated by a comma. The module must reside in a dynamic 
link library (DLL) and it must be externally callable. For example, the value 
'KERNEL32,GetProfileString' specifies to load KERNEL32.DLL and to 
invoke the GetProfileString routine. Note that while the DLL name is not case 
sensitive, the routine name is based on the restraints of the routine's implementation 
language, so the routine name is case sensitive.
If the DLL supports ordinal-value naming, you can provide the DLL name followed 
by a decimal number, such as 'XYZ,30'.
You do not need to specify the DLL name if you specified the MODULE attribute 
for the routine in the SASCBTBL attribute table, as long as the routine name is 
unique (that is, no other routines have the same name in the attribute file).
You can specify module as a SAS character expression instead of as a constant; most 
often, though, you pass it as a constant.
argument
are the arguments to pass to the requested routine. Use the proper attributes for the 
arguments (numeric arguments for numeric attributes and character arguments for 
character attributes).
Details
The MODULE functions execute a routine module that resides in an external (outside 
SAS) dynamic link library with the specified arguments arg-1 through arg-n.
412
Chapter 18 • SAS Functions and CALL Routines under Windows
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
›› VB.NET PDF: Delete PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - How to Delete PDF Document Page in VB.NET. Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in VB.NET Class.
how to delete text in pdf using acrobat professional; how to delete text in pdf converter
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Delete PDF Page. C#.NET PDF Library - Delete PDF Document Page in C#.NET.
how to erase text in pdf file; pdf editor delete text
The MODULE call routine does not return a value. The MODULEN and MODULEC 
functions return a number num or a character char, respectively. Which routine you use 
depends on the expected return value of the DLL function that you want to execute.
MODULEI, MODULEIC, and MODULEIN are special versions of the MODULE 
functions that permit vector and matrix arguments. Their return values are still scalar. 
You can invoke these functions only from PROC IML.
Other than this name difference, the syntax for all six routines is the same.
The MODULE function builds a parameter list by using the information in arg-1 to arg-
n and by using a routine description and argument attribute table that you define in a 
separate file. Before you invoke the MODULE routine, you must define the fileref of 
SASCBTBL to point to this external file. You can name the file whatever you want when 
you create it.
You can use SAS variables and formats as arguments to the MODULE function and 
ensure that these arguments are properly converted before being passed to the DLL 
routine.
CALL MODULEI, MODULEIN, and MODULEIC permit vector and matrix arguments; 
you can use them within the IML procedure.
See Also
“The SASCBTBL Attribute Table” on page 292 
PEEKLONG Function: Windows
Stores the contents of a memory address in a numeric variable on 32-bit and 64-bit platforms.
Category:
Special
Interaction:
When a SAS server is in a locked-down state, the PEEKLONG function does not 
execute. For more information, see “SAS Processing Restrictions for Servers in a 
Locked-Down State” in SAS Language Reference: Concepts.
Windows 
specifics:
all
See:
“PEEKLONG Function” in SAS Functions and CALL Routines: Reference and 
“PEEKCLONG Function” in SAS Functions and CALL Routines: Reference
CAUTION:
The PEEKLONG functions can directly access memory addresses. Improper 
use of the PEEKLONG functions can cause SAS, and your operating system, 
to fail. Use the PEEKLONG functions only to access information that is returned by one 
of the MODULE functions.
Syntax
PEEKLONG(address<,length)>
Required Argument
address
specifies a character expression that is the memory address.
PEEKLONG Function: Windows
413
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Text. VB.NET PDF - Extract Text from PDF Using VB. How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application.
erase pdf text; delete text from pdf with acrobat
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Text. C# PDF - Extract Text from PDF in C#.NET. Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File.
how to remove highlighted text in pdf; how to delete text from a pdf
Optional Argument
length
specifies the length of the character data.
Details
The PEEKLONG function returns a value of length length that contains the data that 
start at memory address address.
The variations of the PEEKLONG functions are
PEEKCLONG
accesses character strings.
PEEKLONG
accesses numeric values.
Usually, when you need to use one of the PEEKLONG functions, you use 
PEEKCLONG to access a character string.
RANK Function: Windows
Returns the position of a character in the ASCII collating sequence.
Category:
Character
Windows 
specifics:
Uses the ASCII sequence
See:
“RANK Function” in SAS Functions and CALL Routines: Reference
Syntax
RANK(x)
Required Argument
x
is a character expression that contains a character in the ASCII collating sequence. If 
the length of x is greater than 1, you receive the rank of the first character in the 
expression.
Details
Because Windows uses the ASCII character set, the RANK function returns an integer 
that represents the position of a character in the ASCII collating sequence.
Note: Any program that uses the RANK function with characters above ASCII 127 (the 
hexadecimal notation is '7F'x) is not portable because these characters are national 
characters and they vary from country to country.
SLEEP Function: Windows
Suspends execution of a SAS DATA step for a specified period of time.
Category:
Special
414
Chapter 18 • SAS Functions and CALL Routines under Windows
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Text to PDF. C#.NET PDF SDK - Insert Text to PDF Document in C#.NET. Providing C# Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page with .NET PDF Library.
how to erase text in pdf online; erase pdf text online
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
Text: Search Text in PDF. C# Guide about How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information with .NET PDF Control.
how to delete text from a pdf document; deleting text from a pdf
Windows 
specifics:
all
See:
“SLEEP Function” in SAS Functions and CALL Routines: Reference
Syntax
SLEEP(n<,unit>)
Required Argument
n
specifies the number of seconds that you want to suspend execution of a DATA step. 
The n argument is a numeric constant that must be greater than or equal to 0. 
Negative or missing values for n are invalid.
Optional Argument
unit
specifies the unit of seconds, as an exponent of 10, which is applied to n. For 
example, 1 corresponds to a second, and .001 to a millisecond. The default value is 
1.
Details
The SLEEP function suspends execution of a DATA step for a specified number of 
seconds. When the SLEEP function uses the default unit value, a pop-up window 
appears that indicates how long SAS is going to sleep.
The return value of the n argument is the number of seconds slept. The maximum sleep 
period for the SLEEP function is 46 days.
When you submit a program that calls the SLEEP function, the SLEEP window appears, 
telling you when SAS is going to wake up. You can inhibit the SLEEP window by 
starting SAS with the NOSLEEPWINDOW system option. Your SAS session remains 
inactive until the sleep period is over. To cancel the call to the SLEEP function, use the 
CTRL+BREAK attention sequence.
You should use a null DATA step to call the SLEEP function; follow this DATA step 
with the rest of the SAS program. Using theSLEEP function in this manner enables you 
to use the CTRL+BREAK attention sequence to interrupt the SLEEP function and to 
continue with the execution of the rest of your SAS program.
Example
The following example tells SAS to delay the execution of the program for 12 hours and 
15 minutes:
data _null_;
/* argument to sleep must be expressed in seconds */
slept= sleep((60*60*12)+(60*15));
run;
data monthly;
/*... more data lines */
run;
SLEEP Function: Windows
415
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to Text in C#.NET. Integrate following RasterEdge C#.NET text to PDF converter SDK dlls into your C#.NET project assemblies;
acrobat delete text in pdf; delete text from pdf file
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project. Remove and delete metadata from PDF file.
delete text pdf acrobat; remove text watermark from pdf online
See Also
“SLEEPWINDOW System Option: Windows” on page 573
TRANSLATE Function: Windows
Replaces specific characters in a character expression.
Category:
Character
Windows 
specifics:
Required syntax; pairs of to and from arguments are optional
See:
“TRANSLATE Function” in SAS Functions and CALL Routines: Reference
Syntax
TRANSLATE(source,to-1,from-1 <,…to-n,from-n>)
Syntax Description
source
specifies the SAS expression that contains the original character value.
to
specifies the characters that you want TRANSLATE to use as substitutes.
from
specifies the characters that you want TRANSLATE to replace.
Details
Under Windows, you do not have to provide pairs of to and from arguments. However, if 
you do not use pairs, you must supply a comma as a place holder.
WAKEUP Function: Windows
Specifies the amount of time a SAS DATA step continues execution.
Category:
Special
Windows 
specifics:
This function runs only on Windows.
Uses the ASCII code sequence.
Syntax
WAKEUP(until-when)
Required Argument
until-when
specifies the time at which the WAKEUP function allow execution to continue.
416
Chapter 18 • SAS Functions and CALL Routines under Windows
Details
Use the WAKEUP function to specify the amount of time a DATA step continues to 
execute. The return value is the number of seconds slept.
The until-when argument can be a SAS datetime value, a SAS time value, or a numeric 
constant, as explained in the following list:
• If until-when is a datetime value, the WAKEUP function sleeps until the specified 
date and time. If the specified date and time have already passed, the WAKEUP 
function does not sleep, and the return value is 0.
• If until-when is a time value, the WAKEUP function sleeps until the specified time. 
If the specified time has already passed in that 24-hour period, the WAKEUP 
function sleeps until the specified time occurs again.
• If the value of until-when is a numeric constant, the WAKEUP function sleeps for 
that many seconds before or after the next occurring midnight. If the value of until-
when is a positive numeric constant, the WAKEUP function sleeps for until-when 
seconds past midnight. If the value of until-when is a negative numeric constant, the 
WAKEUP function sleeps until until-when seconds before midnight.
Negative values for the until-when argument are allowed, but missing values are not. 
The maximum sleep period for the WAKEUP function is approximately 46 days.
When you submit a program that calls the WAKEUP function, the SLEEP window 
appears, telling you when SAS is going to wake up. You can inhibit the SLEEP window 
by starting SAS with the NOSLEEPWINDOW system option. Your SAS session 
remains inactive until the waiting period is over. If you want to cancel the call to the 
WAKEUP function, use the Ctrl + BREAK attention sequence.
You should use a null DATA step to call the WAKEUP function; follow this DATA step 
with the rest of the SAS program. Using the WAKEUP function in this manner enables 
you to use the CTRL+BREAK attention sequence to interrupt the waiting period and 
continue with the execution of the rest of your SAS program.
Examples
Example 1: Delaying Program Execution until a Specified Date or 
Time
The code in this example tells SAS to delay execution of the program until 1:00 p.m. on 
January 1, 2004:
data _null_;
slept=wakeup('01JAN2004:13:00:00'dt);
run;
data compare;
/* ...more data lines */
run;
The following example tells SAS to delay execution of the program until 10:00 p.m.:
data _null_;
slept=wakeup("22:00:00"t);
run;
data compare;
/* ...more data lines */
run;
WAKEUP Function: Windows
417
Example 2: Delaying Program Execution until a Specified Time 
Period after Midnight
The following example tells SAS to delay execution of the program until 35 seconds 
after the next occurring midnight:
data _null_;
slept=wakeup(35);
run;
data compare;
/* ...more data lines */
run;
Example 3: Using a Variable as an Argument to the WAKEUP 
Function
This example illustrates using a variable as the argument of the WAKEUP function:
data _null_;
input x;
slept=wakeup(x);
datalines;
1000
;
data compare;
input article1 $ article2 $ rating;
/* ...more data lines */
run;
Because the instream data indicate that the value of X is 1000, the WAKEUP function 
sleeps for 1,000 seconds past midnight.
See Also
“SLEEPWINDOW System Option: Windows” on page 573
418
Chapter 18 • SAS Functions and CALL Routines under Windows
Chapter 19
SAS Informats under Windows
SAS Informats under Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 419
Overview of SAS Informats under Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 419
Reading Binary Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 420
Converting User-Written Informats from Earlier Releases to SAS 9.4 . . . . . . . . . 420
Introduction to Converting User-Written Informats from 
Earlier Releases to SAS 9.4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 420
Converting Version 6 User-Written Informats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 421
Converting Version 5 User-Written Informats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 421
Dictionary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 421
HEXw. Informat: Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 421
$HEXw. Informat: Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 422
IBw.d Informat: Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 423
PDw.d Informat: Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 424
PIBw.d Informat: Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 425
RBw.d Informat: Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 426
ZDw.d Informat: Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 427
SAS Informats under Windows
Overview of SAS Informats under Windows
A SAS informat is an instruction or template that SAS uses to read data values into a 
variable. Most SAS informats are described completely in SAS Formats and Informats: 
Reference. The informats that are described here have behavior that is specific to SAS 
under Windows.
Many of the SAS informats that have details specific to the Windows operating 
environment are used to read binary data. In using these informats, it is important that 
you understand the concepts that are presented in “Reading Binary Data” on page 420 .
If you have informats that you created for use in earlier releases of SAS, see “Converting 
User-Written Informats from Earlier Releases to SAS 9.4” on page 420 for information 
about how to convert those informats for use with SAS 9.4.
419
Reading Binary Data
IBM mainframes, Hewlett Packard 9000, and most other UNIX systems store bytes in 
one order, called big-endian. Those that are based on Intel, or IBM compatible 
microcomputers and the VAX and Alpha computers manufactured by Compaq store 
bytes in a different order called byte-reversed, or little-endian.
Binary data stored in one order cannot be read by a computer that stores binary data in 
the other order without additional processing taking place. When you are designing SAS 
applications, try to anticipate how your data reads and chooses your formats and 
informats accordingly.
SAS provides two sets of informats for reading binary data and corresponding formats 
for writing binary data.
• The IBw.d, PDw.d, PIBw.d, and RBw.d informats and formats read and write in 
native mode, that is, using the byte-ordering system that is standard for the machine.
• The S370FIBw.d, S370FPDw.d, S370FRBw.d, and S370FPIBw.d informats and 
formats read and write according to the IBM 370 standard, regardless of the native 
mode of the machine. These informats and formats enable you to write SAS 
programs that can be run in any SAS environment, regardless of how numeric data 
are stored.
If a SAS program that reads and writes binary data runs on only one type of machine, 
you can use the native mode informats and formats. However, if you want to write SAS 
programs that can be run on multiple machines using different byte-storage systems, use 
the IBM 370 formats and informats. The purpose of the IBM 370 informats and formats 
is to enable you to write SAS programs that can be run in any SAS environment, no 
matter what standard you use for storing numeric data.
For example, suppose you have a program that writes data with the PIBw.d format. You 
execute the program on a microcomputer so that the data are stored in byte-reversed 
mode. Then on the microcomputer that you run another SAS program that uses the 
PIBw.d informat to read the data. The data are read correctly because both the programs 
are run on the microcomputer using byte-reversed mode. However, you cannot upload 
the data to a Hewlett Packard 9000-series machine and read the data correctly because 
they are stored in a form native to the microcomputer but foreign to the Hewlett Packard 
9000. To avoid this problem, use the S370FPIBw.d format to write the data; even on the 
microcomputer, this causes the data to be stored in IBM 370 mode. Then read the data 
using the S370FPIBw.d informat. Regardless of what type of machine you use when 
reading the data, they are read correctly.
Converting User-Written Informats from Earlier 
Releases to SAS 9.4
Introduction to Converting User-Written Informats from Earlier 
Releases to SAS 9.4
You must convert Release 6.04, Release 6.06, and Release 6.08 user-written informats 
and formats to their SAS 9.4 counterparts before you can use them in a SAS 9.4 
program. The only exception to this rule is user-written informats and formats created by
420
Chapter 19 • SAS Informats under Windows
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested