the autoexec file. For example, you can specify the following option after the path 
specification for the SAS.EXE file in the Target field of the SAS Windows shortcut:
-autoexec c:\mysasfiles\init.sas
If the specified autoexec file is not found, an error message is displayed, and SAS 
terminates.
Uses for the Autoexec File
The autoexec file is a convenient way to execute a standard set of SAS program 
statements each time you invoke SAS. You can include OPTIONS, LIBNAME, or 
FILENAME statements, or any other SAS statements and system options that you want 
the system to execute each time you invoke a SAS session. For example, if you want to 
specify a script file for SAS/CONNECT software, you can place the following statement 
in the AUTOEXEC.SAS file:
filename rlink 'c:\program files\SASHome\SASFoundation\9.4\connect\saslink\
startSession.scr';
Or you can use the OPTIONS statement to set the page size and line size for your SAS 
output and use several FILENAME statements to set up filerefs for commonly accessed 
network drives, as in the following example:
options linesize=80 pagesize=60;
filename saledata 'f:\qtr1';
filename custdata 'l:\newcust';
filename invoice 'o:\billing';
Other system options, in addition to the AUTOEXEC system option, provide ways to 
send SAS information as it is initializing. These options are listed below in the order in 
which they are processed:
1. CONFIG (at SAS invocation only) 
2. AUTOEXEC
3. INITCMD
4. INITSTMT
5. SYSIN
For more information about the CONFIG, AUTOEXEC, INITSTMT, and SYSIN system 
options, see “SAS System Options under Windows” on page 481 . For more information 
about the INITCMD system option, see SAS System Options: Reference.
Suppressing the Autoexec File
If you have an AUTOEXEC.SAS file in your current folder, but you want to suppress it, 
specify the NOAUTOEXEC option in the SAS command, as in the following example:
c:\program files\SASHome\SASFoundation\9.4\sas.exe -noautoexec
Profile Catalog
Introduction to the Profile Catalog
Each time you invoke a SAS session, SAS checks the Sasuser data library for your user 
Profile catalog (named Sasuser.Profile), which defines the start-up profile for your SAS 
session, including key definitions, display configurations, and other personal 
Files Used by SAS
31
How to erase text in pdf - delete, remove text from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# developers to use mature APIs to delete and remove text content from PDF document
how to delete text in pdf preview; delete text pdf preview
How to erase text in pdf - VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File
how to delete text in pdf using acrobat professional; how to delete text from pdf reader
customizations. If you invoke SAS without accessing an existing Profile catalog, SAS 
creates one with the default key definitions and window configuration.
If Sasuser.Profile does not exist and Sashelp.Profile (in the Sashelp data library) does 
exist, SAS copies Sashelp.Profile to Sasuser.Profile before invoking a SAS session.
The Profile catalog is not re-created if it already exists. Any customizations (such as key 
definitions or color modifications) that are defined during subsequent sessions are stored 
in your Profile catalog in the specified folder.
The Default Profile Catalog
The default configuration file for SAS specifies the SASUSER system option as follows:
Table 1.1 The Default SASUSER Locations for the Windows Operating Environment
Windows 7 and 8, Windows Server 2008 and 2012
-sasuser "c:\Users\user-ID\Documents\My SAS Files\9.4"
Changing the Location of the Profile Catalog
Use the SASUSER system option to specify a location for the Profile catalog other than 
the default (which is a folder named \My SAS Files\9.4). This option is useful if 
you want to customize your SAS sessions when sharing a machine with other users or if 
users are accessing SAS from a network.
The SASUSER system option takes the following form:
-SASUSER ("library-specification")
Parentheses () are used to specify multiple library-specifications, and quotation marks (") 
are used when special characters and spaces are used in the library-specification.
If library-specification (which specifies a valid Windows pathname) does not exist, SAS 
attempts to create it. For example, if you specify the following option, a Profile catalog 
is created in a folder named MYUSER that resides in the root folder of the C: drive:
-sasuser "c:\myuser"
For more information, see “SASUSER System Option: Windows” on page 569 .
Deleting the Profile Catalog
When you delete your Profile catalog, you lose the key definitions, window 
configurations, and option settings that you might have defined, as well as any other 
entries that you saved to your Profile catalog. In addition, any text that you stored in 
NOTEPAD windows is erased. For this reason, it is a good idea to make a backup copy 
of your Profile catalog after making significant modifications to your SAS session 
settings.
Work Data Library
Introduction to the Work Data Library
SAS requires some temporary disk space during a SAS session. This temporary disk 
space is called the Work data library. By default, SAS stores SAS files with one-level 
names in the Work data library, and these files are deleted when you end your SAS 
32
Chapter 1 • Getting Started under Windows
C# PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from PDF
Free online C# source code to erase text from adobe PDF file in Visual Studio. How to Use C# Code to Erase PDF Text in C#.NET. Add necessary references:
pdf editor online delete text; remove text from pdf reader
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Draw PDF markups. PDF Protection. • Sign PDF document with signature. • Erase PDF text. • Erase PDF images. • Erase PDF pages. Miscellaneous.
pdf text watermark remover; how to remove highlighted text in pdf
session. You can change the Work data library in which SAS files that have one-level 
names are stored. For more information, see “Using the User Libref” on page 141 .
The Default Work Folder
The default configuration file for SAS specifies the WORK system option to be a folder 
in your system's designated temporary area (as defined by the TEMP environment 
variable). For example: !TEMP\SAS Temporary Files.
To determine TEMP environment variable, refer to the System Properties dialog box 
that you access from the Control Panel.
For more information about using the Work data library and overriding the default 
location, see “Using the Work Data Library” on page 140 .
Specifying the Location of the Work Data Library
The WORK system option controls the location of the Work data library. You can 
specify the WORK option in your SAS configuration file or when you invoke SAS. 
Usually, you use the WORK option that is specified in the default configuration file.
Distributing Work Directories
SAS can make the distribution of Work libraries dynamic by distributing Work libraries 
across several directories. This functionality eliminates the potential problem of filling 
up a single volume with all of the Work directories. The WORK system option requires 
an argument, which must specify a .txt file that contains a list of directories that SAS 
uses for allocating Work libraries. Individual Work libraries reside in a single directory. 
The WORK system option is used in the sas9.cfg configuration file or on the command 
line. When the argument WORK is a list of directories in a file, specify the method for 
choosing which directory to use for WORK. If you specify METHOD=RANDOM, then 
SAS chooses a directory from the list of available directories. If you specify 
METHOD=SPACE, then SAS chooses the directory that has the most available space.
For more information, see the “WORK System Option: Windows” on page 599 .
Temporary Subfolders
Because you can run multiple SAS sessions at one time, SAS creates temporary 
subfolders under the folder that you specify with the WORK option. These temporary 
subfolders are created in the unique form _TDnnnnnnnnnn, where TD means temporary 
folder and nnnnnnnnnn is the process ID and nodename is the name of the host of the 
machine that created the folder. These subfolders enable multiple SAS sessions to be 
invoked, each using the same configuration file, and they prevent the Work folder from 
being shared. SAS creates any temporary files that are required within each temporary 
folder. As with all temporary files that are created in the Work data library during a SAS 
session, these temporary folders are deleted when you end the SAS session. If SAS 
terminates abnormally, you might need to delete the temporary files.
Deleting the Work Folder
If SAS terminates abnormally, determine whether the Work library was deleted. If not, 
remove it by using Windows commands.
Note: Do not attempt to delete the Work folder while SAS is running.
You can verify the location of the current Work folder by opening the Libraries folder in 
the SAS Explorer window. Click the right mouse button on the Work folder and select 
Properties from the pop-up menu.
Files Used by SAS
33
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Draw markups to PDF document. PDF Protection. • Add signatures to PDF document. • Erase PDF text. • Erase PDF images. • Erase PDF pages. Miscellaneous.
how to edit and delete text in pdf file online; remove text from pdf
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Redact tab on viewer empower users to redact and erase PDF text, erase PDF images and erase PDF pages online. Miscellaneous. • RasterEdge XDoc.
acrobat delete text in pdf; how to delete text in pdf file online
SAS Registry Files
The SAS registry files are used to store information about the SAS session applications. 
The registry entries can be customized by using the SAS registry editor or by importing 
the registry files. To invoke the SAS registry editor, select Solutions 
ð
Accessories 
ð 
Registry Editor.
CAUTION:
Incorrect registry entries can corrupt your SAS registry.
Registry customization 
is generally performed by more advanced users who have experience and knowledge 
of SAS and their operating environment.
SAS Default Folder Structure
The SAS Setup program creates a number of subfolders during the installation process. 
Understanding the organization of the SAS folders can help you use SAS more 
efficiently.
The root folder of SAS is the folder in which you install SAS. Within SAS, this folder 
has the logical name !SASHOME. SAS Foundation products are installed in a folder 
structure under SASHOME called SASROOT. If you use the default provided by SAS, 
the SASHOME folder is c:\Program Files\SASHOME\SASFoundation\9.4
(The examples in this document assume the !SASHOME folder is called c:\Program 
Files\SASHOME\SASFoundation\9.4.)
The 32-bit content on an X64 system is installed in c:\program files\SASHome
\x86\SASFoundation\9.4
SAS creates a folder for shared components, such as the Enhanced Editor and images, 
that are used by other SAS products. For SAS 8, the default path for shared components 
is c:\Program Files\SAS Institute\Shared Files. For SAS 9 through 9.4, 
the default path for shared files, if shared components are installed, is c:\Program 
Files\SAS\Shared Files. If shared components are not installed, the default path 
is c:\Program Files\SAS\SharedFiles. There is no blank space in the spelling 
of SharedFiles.
One important subfolder of the !SASROOT folder is the CORE subfolder. The CORE 
subfolder contains many subfolders, three of which are described here:
!SASROOT\CORE\RESOURCE
contains SAS resources such as fonts and images.
!SASROOT\CORE\SAMPLE
contains the SAS sample programs.
!SASROOT\CORE\SASINST
contains the installation process software.
For each SAS product that is installed, the following subfolders might be created (not all 
products contain all of these folders):
!SASROOT\product\SASEXE
contains the SAS executable files.
!SASROOT\product\SASHELP
contains many specialized catalogs and files.
!SASROOT\product\SASMACRO
contains SAS autocall macro files.
34
Chapter 1 • Getting Started under Windows
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
setting PDF file permissions. Help C# users to erase PDF text content, images and pages online in ASP.NET. RasterEdge C#.NET HTML5
how to copy text out of a pdf; how to delete text in pdf acrobat
C# PDF Image Redact Library: redact selected PDF images in C#.net
redaction API to redact PDF images. Same as text redaction, you can specify custom text to appear over the image redaction area. How to Erase PDF Images in
how to delete text from pdf; how to delete text in a pdf file
!SASROOT\product\SASMSG
contains the SAS message files.
!SASROOT\product\SAMPLE
contains the Sample Library programs.
!SASROOT\product\SASTEST
contains Test Stream programs.
!SASROOT\product\SASMISC
contains miscellaneous external files shipped with the product.
Some products, such as SAS/CONNECT software, also have other subfolders that are 
associated with them. For details about each product's structure, see the specific SAS 
product documentation.
For more information about how the SAS folders are configured at your site, contact 
your on-site SAS support personnel.
Submitting SAS Code
Introduction to Submitting SAS Code
SAS under Windows provides several methods for you to submit your SAS programs for 
processing. SAS supports a variety of work strategies, whether you run SAS 
interactively or in batch, and in conjunction with other Windows programs or as a stand-
alone application.
Submitting Code from the Enhanced Editor or Program Editor
To submit SAS code that you have entered into the Enhanced Editor or Program Editor 
window, you issue the SUBMIT command. SAS provides several ways to do this:
• Press F3 or F8 when the editor window is active.
• Click the Submit toolbar button.
• Enter submit in the command bar.
• Select Run 
ð
Submit.
You can use the SUBTOP command from either the command line or the Run menu to 
submit one or more lines of your SAS code. For more information, see “SUBTOP 
Command: Windows” on page 352 .
Note: If you insert tabs while entering data in the DATALINES statement, you might get 
unexpected results when using columnar input. This issue exists when you use the 
SAS Enhanced Editor or SAS Program Editor. To avoid the issue, do one of the 
following:
• Replace all tabs in the data with single spaces.
• Use the %INCLUDE statement from the SAS editor to submit your code.
• If you are using the SAS Enhanced Editor, select Tools 
ð
Options 
ð
Enhanced 
Editor to change the tab size from 4 to 1.
Submitting SAS Code 
35
How to C#: Special Effects
Erase. Set the image to current background color, the background color can be set by:ImageProcess.BackgroundColor = Color.Red. Encipher.
delete text in pdf file online; acrobat remove text from pdf
Customize, Process Image in .NET Winforms| Online Tutorials
Include crop, merge, paste images; Support for image & documents rotation; Edit images & documents using Erase Rectangle & Merge Block function;
erase pdf text online; how to remove text watermark from pdf
Submitting Code from the SAS NOTEPAD Text Editor
SAS enables you to submit SAS code that you have entered into the SAS NOTEPAD 
text editor. NOTEPAD can be invoked by selecting Tools 
ð
Text Editor when the 
Enhanced Editor is disabled. SAS provides several ways to submit the code in 
NOTEPAD:
• Click the Submit toolbar button.
• Enter submit in the command bar.
• From the menu, select Run 
ð
Submit.
Submitting Code from the Clipboard
Using the Enhanced Editor or the Program Editor, you can submit SAS code that you 
copied from another Windows application (such as an editor or word processor) or from 
SAS Help and Documentation. When you copy text from another Windows application, 
that text is stored in the Windows clipboard.
From the Run menu in the Enhanced Editor or from the Program Editor window, select 
Submit clipboard. The code is submitted from the clipboard directly to SAS (without 
appearing in the Enhanced Editor or in the Program Editor window).Notes and results 
are sent to the SAS Log and to the Output window, respectively. The notes and results 
are displayed in the Results Viewer if it is active. You can still issue the RECALL 
command (or press F4) to recall the submitted program into the Enhanced Editor or into 
the Program Editor window.
You can also use the GSUBMIT command to submit SAS code that is stored in the 
clipboard. For more information, see “GSUBMIT Command: Windows” on page 347 .
Submitting Code By Dragging and Dropping
Introduction to Submitting Code By Dragging and Dropping
You can drag SAS programs from other Windows applications onto an open SAS session 
and submit them. You can also drag files that contain SAS code and drop them onto an 
open SAS session to submit them.
Dragging Text from Other Windows
If you drag text from another Windows application or SAS window to the Enhanced 
Editor or the Program Editor window, that text is moved to the window by default. It is 
not submitted until you use one of the submit processes. See “Submitting Code from the 
Clipboard” on page 36.
If the application supports nondefault dragging of text, you can right-click the text to 
select it and then drop the text in the editor. When you drop the selection onto the 
Enhanced Editor or the Program Editor window, a menu appears and you can choose 
between moving the code or copying the code. The menu for the Program Editor also 
enables you to submit the code.
Dragging Files in an Interactive Session
By using the My Favorite Folders window, you can access files that exist outside the 
SAS environment. Files that contain SAS code can be dragged into your interactive SAS 
session for execution. Access the My Favorite Folders window by using the View menu.
36
Chapter 1 • Getting Started under Windows
.NET Imaging Processing SDK | Process, Manipulate Images
Provide basic transformation functions, like Crop, Rotate, Resize, Flip and more; Basic image edit function support, such as Erase Rectangle, Merge Block, etc.
how to erase in pdf text; how to delete text in pdf converter professional
If you drop a file that contains SAS code onto the Enhanced Editor window or on the 
Program Editor window, that code is included in the window (but not submitted). If you 
drop the file onto the Log or Output window or on a minimized SAS session, the code is 
automatically submitted.
When you minimize a SAS session, its icon appears on the Windows taskbar. You cannot 
drop a file onto the taskbar. Instead, you can drag the file to the SAS icon on the taskbar 
and hold it there, without releasing the mouse button. After about one second, the SAS 
window resumes its normal size. Then you can drop the file onto the open SAS session.
Dropping the file C:\MYPROG.SAS onto a window (other than the Enhanced Editor or 
Program Editor windows) of an open SAS session is the same as issuing this command:
gsubmit "%include 'c:\myprog.sas'";
You can submit more than one file at a time by selecting a group of files that contain 
SAS programs and then dropping them onto the open SAS session. The order in which 
the programs are run when they are submitted as a group is determined by Windows. 
Therefore, if order is important, you should drop each program file separately.
If SAS is busy when you drop a SAS program icon, the dropped file is ignored. The only 
indication that the dropped file was ignored is a warning beep.
Submitting Code Stored in Registered SAS File Types
During installation, the SAS Setup procedure registers certain file types with Windows 
to invoke specified actions when you double-click those types of objects. For example, 
files that have a file extension of .SAS are registered as SAS programs. These registered 
file types are displayed in Windows with a special icon, as shown here: 
When you double-click a file that has this extension (or that has this icon), SAS is 
invoked and the contents of the file are included in the Enhanced Editor or Program 
Editor window. The SAS code that is contained in the file is not processed until you 
submit it (for example, by pressing F8 or by clicking the Submit tool). If you already 
have a SAS session running, double-clicking a file begins a second SAS session; it does 
not use the already-existing session.
SAS uses the default configuration file if you start SAS by double-clicking a registered 
SAS file type, such as .sas or .sas7bpgm.
Interrupting Your SAS Session
You can click the circled exclamation point 
in the toolbar or press CTRL+BREAK 
to interrupt processing in your SAS session. Depending on what tasks SAS is performing 
at the time of the interrupt, you can cancel submitted statements or cancel an upload or 
download request. SAS prompts you with various choices (such as to continue the 
interrupt or cancel it) in a dialog box.
Note: Depending on what tasks are in progress when you interrupt your session, SAS 
can require several seconds to stop processing.
SAS also supports the common Windows methods of issuing interrupts: you can click 
the Control menu icon and choose to close the application, or you can select Close from 
the pop-up menu for SAS on the Windows Taskbar (or End Task from within the 
Windows Task Manager). If you use either of these methods, SAS displays a dialog box 
Interrupting Your SAS Session
37
to enable you to verify your selection. Note that the task might not close until SAS has 
completed processing.
Running Windows or MS-DOS Commands from 
within SAS
Overview of Running Windows or MS-DOS Commands from within 
SAS
You can execute Windows or MS-DOS commands from within SAS by using the X 
statement or the X command. You can also use the CALL SYSTEM statement or the 
SYSTASK statement from within a DATA step. Windows or MS-DOS commands can be 
issued either asynchronously or synchronously. When you run a command as an 
asynchronous task, the command executes independently of all other tasks that are 
currently running. When you run a command as a synchronous task, the command must 
complete before another task can run.
To issue a command asynchronously, use either the SYSTASK statement with the 
NOWAIT option or specify the NOXSYNC system option. To issue a command 
synchronously, use either the SYSTASK statement with the WAIT option or specify the 
XSYNC system option. For more information about running asynchronous commands 
using the SYSTASK statement, see “SYSTASK Statement: Windows” on page 471 .
Running Windows Commands Using the X Statement or the X 
Command
You can use the X statement or the X command to run Windows commands. The X 
statement can be run outside of a DATA step. You can enter the X command in the 
command bar or any SAS command line.
The X statement is similar to the X command in the SAS windowing environment. The 
major difference between the two is that the X statement is submitted like any SAS 
statement. However, the X command is issued as a windowing environment command. 
This section uses the X statement in its examples, but the information applies to the X 
command as well.
When you submit the X statement, you exit your SAS session temporarily and gain 
access to the Windows command processor. The X statement has the following syntax:
X < 'command ' >;
The optional command argument is used either to issue an operating system command or 
to invoke a Windows application such as Notepad. This discussion concentrates on using 
the X statement to issue operating system commands. However, you should be aware 
that the X statement can also be used to invoke Windows applications.
If you want to run only one operating system command, include the command as an 
argument to the X statement. When you submit the X statement, the command is 
executed, and you cannot issue any additional commands.
If you want to run several operating system commands, submit the X statement without 
an argument. A command prompt appears where you can issue an unlimited number of 
operating system commands. Remember, any environment variables that you define are 
not available to SAS. If you submit an X statement or command without an argument 
command, type EXIT to return to your SAS session.
38
Chapter 1 • Getting Started under Windows
The X command is a global SAS statement. Therefore, it is important to realize that you 
cannot conditionally execute the X command. For example, if you submit the following 
code, the X statement is executed:
data _null_;
answer='n';
if upcase(answer)='y' then
do;
x 'md c:\extra';
end;
run;
In this case, the C:\EXTRA folder is created regardless of whether the value of 
ANSWER is equal to 'n' or 'y'.
Using a DATA Step to Issue Conditional Operating System 
Commands Conditionally
If you want to issue operating system commands conditionally, use the CALL SYSTEM 
routine, as in the following example:
options noxwait;
data _null_;
input flag $ name $8.;
if upcase(flag)='Y' then
do;
command='md c:\'||name;
call system(command);
end;
datalines;
Y mydir
Y junk2
N mydir2
Y xyz
;
This example uses the value of the variable FLAG to conditionally create folders. After 
the DATA step executes, three folders have been created: C:\MYDIR, C:\JUNK2, and 
C:\XYZ. The C:\MYDIR2 folder is not created because the value of FLAG for that 
observation is not Y.
For more information about the CALL SYSTEM routine, see “CALL SYSTEM 
Routine: Windows” on page 391 and the section on the CALL SYSTEM routine in SAS 
System Options: Reference.
XWAIT System Option
The XWAIT system option controls whether you have to type EXIT to return to your 
SAS session after an X statement or X command has finished executing an MS-DOS 
command. (The XWAIT system option is not used if an X statement is issued without a 
command argument or if the X statement invokes a Windows application such as 
Notepad.) This option and its negative form operate in the following ways:
XWAIT
specifies that you must type EXIT to return to your SAS session. This is the default 
value.
Running Windows or MS-DOS Commands from within SAS 
39
NOXWAIT
specifies that the command processor automatically returns to the SAS session after 
the specified command is executed. You do not have to type EXIT.
If you issue an X statement or X command without a command argument, you must type 
EXIT to return to your SAS session, even if NOXWAIT is in effect.
When a window created by an X statement is active, reactivating SAS without exiting 
from the command processor causes SAS to issue a message box containing the 
following message:
The X command is active. Enter EXIT at
the prompt in the X command window to
reactivate this SAS session.
If you receive this message box, click Command Prompt on the Windows Taskbar. 
Enter the EXIT command from the prompt to close the window and return to your SAS 
session.
XSYNC System Option
The XSYNC system option specifies whether the operating system command that you 
submit executes synchronously or asynchronously with your SAS session. This option 
and its negative form operate in the following ways:
XSYNC
specifies that the operating system command execute synchronously with your SAS 
session. That is, control is not returned to SAS until the command has completed. 
You cannot return to your SAS session until the command prompt session spawned 
by the CALL SYSTEM statement, the X command, or the X statement is closed. 
This is the default.
NOXSYNC
specifies that the operating system command execute asynchronously with your SAS 
session. That is, control is returned immediately to SAS and the command continues 
executing without interfering with your SAS session. With NOXSYNC in effect, you 
can execute a CALL SYSTEM statement, an X command, or an X statement and 
return to your SAS session without closing the window spawned by the X command 
or X statement.
Specifying NOXSYNC can be useful if you are starting applications such as Notepad or 
Excel from your SAS session. For example, suppose you submit the following X 
statement:
x notepad;
If XSYNC is in effect, you cannot return to your SAS session until you close the 
Notepad. But if NOXSYNC is in effect, you can switch back and forth between your 
SAS session and the Notepad. The NOXSYNC option breaks any ties between your SAS 
session and the other application. You can even end your SAS session; the other 
application stays open until you close it.
Comparison of the XWAIT and XSYNC System Options
The XWAIT and XSYNC system options have very different effects. An easy way to 
remember the difference is the following:
XWAIT
means that the command prompt session waits for you to type EXIT before you can 
return to your SAS session.
40
Chapter 1 • Getting Started under Windows
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested