open pdf in word c# : Online pdf editor to delete text Library application component .net html winforms mvc hostwin67-part272

CAUTION:
Cleanwork searches and deletes _TD#### directories. The user should verify 
that no third-party applications use the same template for directories before 
running the cleanwork utility.
Syntax
cleanwork [/userlog] | [/alllogs] [/v volume(s)] [/d dir(s)] [/list] [/verbose]
Arguments
/userlog
Cleans SAS log files in current users AppData\Roaming\SAS\LOGS directory.
/alllogs
Cleans all users AppData\Roaming\SAS\LOGS directories.
CAUTION:
This option requires administrator privileges.
/v volume
specifies the volume to search for removal of SAS directories
Note: When specifying more than one volume separate them with spaces.
/d dir(s)
Cleans all SAS directories in the specified directory(s) where dir(s) are Windows or 
UNC paths to one or more directories.
Note: Paths need to be separated by a space, for example,. /d path1 path2...
/list
Lists files to be deleted. This option does not delete files or folders.
/verbose
Shows a trace of the program's activity.
Examples
Example 1
cleanwork /d c:\Temp
Cleans all SAS Work and Utility directories located in the c:\Temp directory 
hierarchy.
Example 2
cleanwork /d c:\Temp /userlog
Cleans all SAS Work and Utility directories located in the c:\Temp directory 
hierarchy and all log files in the \AppData\Roaming\SAS\LOGS directory.
Example 3
cleanwork /v c: u:
Cleans all SAS Work and Utility directories located on the c: and u: volumes.
Cleanwork
651
Online pdf editor to delete text - delete, remove text from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# developers to use mature APIs to delete and remove text content from PDF document
erase pdf text; online pdf editor to delete text
Online pdf editor to delete text - VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File
remove text from pdf preview; how to erase text in pdf
Example 4
cleanwork /alllogs
Scans all users for a SAS\LOGS directory and cleans all log files found. This 
option will require administrator privileges to remove other users’ files.
Example 5
cleanwork /d c:\Temp /list
List all SAS Work and Utility directories located in the c:\Temp directory 
hierarchy to be deleted.
Example 6
cleanwork /v c: >cleanwork.log
Cleans all SAS Work and Utility directories located on the c: volume and dumps 
the output to the file cleanwork.log instead of printing it out to the screen.
Note: Do not use this option with Windows task scheduler, instead write a script with 
the command and set the task scheduler to execute.
652
Appendix 5 • Cleanwork Utility
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
are able to set a password to PDF online directly in RaterEdge HTML5 PDF Editor for C#.NET allows users to C#.NET user can redact PDF text, PDF images and PDF
pdf editor online delete text; delete text pdf
VB.NET PDF- HTML5 PDF Viewer for VB.NET Project
ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# PDF Viewer; VB.NET: ASP.NET PDF Editor; VB.NET
acrobat delete text in pdf; delete text from pdf with acrobat
Appendix 6
Sasiotest Utility
Sasiotest Utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 653
Best Practices and Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 654
Acceptable SAS I/O Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 655
Dictionary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 655
SASIOTEST Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 655
Sasiotest Utility
When troubleshooting performance problems, you need to know the throughput rates of 
any file system that SAS uses. The Sasiotest utility performs the following actions:
• measures the I/O behavior of the system under defined loads
• opens files and reads and writes data, similar to SAS I/O
• creates and writes files to the file system that is being tested, and reads them to test 
Write and Read performance
• writes an output file that captures elapsed real time and I/O rate, expressed as 
megabytes per second
• reads random pages
• can run several I/O tests concurrently to overload the file system and determine its 
performance
The following information relates to how the Sasiotest utility operates on Windows:
• runs on 32-bit and 64-bit Windows systems
• is delivered with SAS and is installed in the SASHOME directory at \SASHome
\SASFoundation\9.4\sasiotest.exe
• is a stand-alone program, and can be launched from a command prompt window
• uses the Windows APIs Writefile(), Readfile(), and Closefile()
• supports the Readfilescatter() and Writefilescatter() APIs for Scatter-Gather I/O 
testing outside the file cache
• can be copied and used as a stand-alone executable on any system with or without 
SAS
• can be copied and used on a machine that has previous SAS releases
653
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Advanced component and library able to delete PDF page in both Visual C# .NET WinForms and ASP.NET WebForms project. Free online C# class source code for
how to delete text in pdf file; how to delete text from a pdf in acrobat
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Online source codes for quick evaluation in VB.NET class. If you are looking for a solution to conveniently delete one page from your PDF document, you can use
erase pdf text online; remove text from pdf acrobat
For information about how SAS performs I/O and the minimum I/O recommendations 
for SAS file systems, see the SAS papers available at http://support.sas.com/kb/
42/197.html. The papers outline recommended I/O metrics for file systems that support 
SAS deployments, and they identify guidelines that can help tune I/O characteristics for 
optimal SAS performance. If you are testing your file system throughput to solve an 
existing performance problem, see especially the following papers about performance-
problem resolution using SAS logs in combination with host monitors. Select 
Performance monitoring and troubleshooting to access the following papers:
• Solving SAS Performance Problems: Employing Host Based Tools
• A Practical Approach to Solving Performance Problems with SAS
• SAS Performance Monitoring - A Deeper Discussion
Best Practices and Considerations
Consider the following concepts before beginning I/O throughput tests:
• SAS performs the Write and Read operations with the Windows file cache. The file 
sizes for the Write and Read tests should be larger than your host system file cache. 
They can be larger than the RAM in your host system. For example, if you run your 
test with a 1GB file size, and your system has 5GB of cache, then the test processes 
limited disk I/O on the Read test. The file that is written remains in the system file 
cache, and the subsequent Read operation reads it from cache instead of from disk. If 
the Read tests are satisfied with cache instead of disks, the Read performance metrics 
are misleading, and you cannot generate consistent, repeatable results.
• An invocation of a single-instance test of either of these tools, one Write and Read 
test, shows how a single SAS job might perform at that time on the file system. If 
your system is already very busy with other users’ workloads, this action might be 
adequate.
• A multiple-instance invocation of the tests shows what a concurrent SAS working 
load might experience, and is recommended for systems that are experiencing no 
other current jobs, or that have a very light workload.
• Conduct several of these test sets at various times of the day, and over several busy 
days to get a comprehensive profile of I/O characteristics on systems that run a 
variety of workloads.
• Perform a test during the same time of day and on the same file system or systems.
• Specify a file that you want to create in the file system that you want to test. If you 
are using batch mode, you can use the redirection operator (>) to send the output to a 
different file system. Here is an example: a .bat file with sasiotest.exe […
arguments…] > test.txt.
• The output from this tool is the megabytes written per second and megabytes read 
per second. Use these metrics to help analyze and tune I/O for file systems that 
support SAS.
654
Appendix 6 • Sasiotest Utility
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to create PDF document from other file
ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# PDF Viewer; VB.NET: ASP.NET PDF Editor; VB.NET
delete text from pdf online; how to delete text in pdf converter
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
SharePoint. Able to add a single text character and text string to PDF files using online source codes in C#.NET class program. Insert
delete text from pdf acrobat; how to delete text in a pdf acrobat
Acceptable SAS I/O Performance
The test output from running the Sasiotest utility shows throughput results in MB per 
second. A minimum of 100MB per second per core is recommended for SAS file 
systems.
Dictionary
SASIOTEST Command
Writes and reads files that are similar to SAS files in order to measure file I/O throughput on Windows.
Requirements:
When you use the -sgio option, -pagesize must be a multiple of 4K on x86 systems 
and a multiple of 8K on x64 and IPF systems.
If the -sgio option is present, then -numpages is required.
The filename argument must be the first argument.
Syntax
SASIOTEST filename <options>
Required Argument
filename
specifies the filename that is read or written and can include the file system path.
Optional Argument
<options>
-w or -r
-w creates and writes the specified file.
-r reads the specified file.
Default
-w
-seq or -ran
-seq reads sequentially from the specified file.
-ran reads randomly from the specified file.
Default
-seq
-filesize n
specifies the size of the file to write or read. For example, n can be 800K, 512K, 
5MB, 2GB.
Default
If -filesize is not specified, the default is 1MB.
SASIOTEST Command
655
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Best VB.NET PDF text extraction SDK library and component for free download. Online Visual Basic .NET class source code for quick evaluation.
erase text from pdf; acrobat remove text from pdf
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Free online source code for extracting text from adobe PDF document in C#.NET class. Able to extract and get all and partial text content from PDF file.
delete text from pdf file; delete text in pdf file online
-pagesize <n>
specifies the size of the page for the I/O operation. For example, n can be 8K, 
64K, 128K.
Default
If -pagesize is not specified, the default is 8K.
-sgio
specifies whether Scatter Gather (SGIO) Read and SGIO Write APIs are used for 
I/O operations. The following options are specific to SGIO:
-numpages <n>
specifies the number of pages to read or write for each SGIO operation.
-unbuffered
specifies that the written pages bypass the file cache.
-writethru
specifies to write through any intermediate cache and go directly to disk.
Examples
Example 1
c:\m904_win>sasiotest test.out -w
SAS I/O Test Utility: v1.0
WARNING: Filesize option not specified. Defaulting to 1 MB filesize.
WARNING: Pagesize option not specified. Defaulting to 8K pagesize.
Sequentially writing 1048576 bytes to file: test.out with a 8192 pagesize.
Write Throughput: 71.100308 MB/Sec.
Example 2
c:\m904_win>sasiotest test.out -w -pagesize 64k
SAS I/O Test Utility: v1.0
WARNING: Filesize option not specified. Defaulting to 1 MB filesize.
Sequentially writing 1048576 bytes to file: test.out with a 65536 pagesize.
Write Throughput: 72.561777 MB/Sec.
Example 3
c:\m904_win>sasiotest test.out -w -pagesize 4k -filesize 2M
SAS I/O Test Utility: v1.0
Sequentially writing 2097152 bytes to file: test.out with a 4096 pagesize.
Write Throughput: 45.795315 MB/Sec.
Example 4
c:\m904_win>sasiotest test.out -r
SAS I/O Test Utility: v1.0
656
Appendix 6 • Sasiotest Utility
WARNING: Filesize option not specified. Defaulting to 1 MB filesize.
WARNING: Pagesize option not specified. Defaulting to 8K pagesize.
Sequentially reading 1048576 bytes from file: test.out with a 8192 pagesize.
Read Throughput: 258.301703 MB/Sec.
Note: Even though you are reading the file you just wrote, if you do not specify a 
PAGESIZE and FILESIZE argument, the sasiotest utility uses its default values of 
8K and 1MB. See Example 5 for the correct way to read the file that was created in 
Example 3.
Example 5
c:\m904_win>sasiotest test.out -r -pagesize 4k -filesize 2M -numpages 2
SAS I/O Test Utility: v1.0
Sequentially reading 2097152 bytes from file: test.out with a 4096 pagesize.
Read Throughput: 237.732948 MB/Sec.
Example 6
c:\m904_win>sasiotest test.out -w -sgio -pagesize 4k -filesize 2G -numpages 256
SAS I/O Test Utility: v1.0
Gather Writing 256 pages - 2 iterations to file: test.out with a 4096 pagesize.
Write Throughput: 18.363657 MB/Sec.
Example 7
c:\m904_win>sasiotest test.out -r -sgio -pagesize 4k -filesize 2G -numpages 256
SAS I/O Test Utility: v1.0
Scatter Reading 256 pages - 2 iterations from file: test.out with a 4096 
pagesize.
Read Throughput: 33.205119 MB/Sec.
SASIOTEST Command
657
658
Appendix 6 • Sasiotest Utility
Appendix 7
Using EBCDIC Data on ASCII 
Systems
About EBCDIC and ASCII Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 659
Overview of EBCDIC and ASCII Data Representation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 659
EBCDIC File Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 660
ASCII File Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 660
Numeric Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 661
Moving Data from EBCDIC to ASCII Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 661
Overview of Accessing EBCDIC Data on ASCII Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 661
Example of Incorrect Conversion of Packed-Decimal Numeric Data . . . . . . . . . . 662
Convert EBCDIC Files with Fixed-Length Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 663
Convert EBCDIC Files with Variable-Length Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 664
Read EBCDIC Data from Structured COBOL Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 666
Moving Data from ASCII to EBCDIC Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 667
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 667
Using FTP to Write Files Directly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 668
Using the dd Command to Convert and Copy a File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 669
Using the iconv Command to Convert a Text File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 670
About EBCDIC and ASCII Data
Overview of EBCDIC and ASCII Data Representation
Extended Binary Coded Decimal Interchange Code (EBCDIC) is an 8-bit character 
encoding method for IBM mainframe machines. American Standard Code for 
Information Interchange (ASCII) is a 7-bit character encoding method for most other 
machines, including Windows, UNIX, and Macintosh machines.
Hexadecimal characters are used to represent one byte or eight bits of data. In a binary 
system, each bit can have the value 0 or 1. An aggregation of four bits can therefore take 
on 16 (2
4
) possible values. This means that two hexadecimal characters can be used to 
represent one byte of data. In the EBCDIC and ASCII encoding methods, each character 
is represented by two hexadecimal characters. (This pertains primarily to Western 
language, single-byte encoding methods. There are other encoding methods that store a 
single character in two bytes of storage, such as encoding methods that are used for 
Japanese or Korean data.)
Each encoding method represents the same data differently, as shown in the following 
examples:
659
• On an EBCDIC system, the digit 4 is represented by the hexadecimal value 'F4'x. On 
an ASCII system, the digit 4 is represented by the hexadecimal value '34'x.
• On an EBCDIC system, the hexadecimal value '50'x represents the symbol &. On an 
ASCII system, the same hexadecimal value represents the letter P.
When SAS reads a file, it expects the data in the file to be in the encoding that matches 
the ENCODING= option for the SAS session. For example, on a Windows machine, the 
default encoding for a single-byte SAS session with a US English locale is LATIN1. 
SAS expects the data in a file on that Windows machine to use a LATIN1 encoding. 
However, if a file originates on an EBCDIC machine and it is stored on a Windows 
machine, then SAS would misinterpret the data from this file if no other encoding 
information is provided. For this reason, specific steps must be performed to convert 
data that originates on an EBCDIC system before it can be used on an ASCII system (for 
example, the Windows machine). Here are the two main methods to make EBCDIC data 
available on an ASCII system:
• On the ASCII system, read the data directly from the EBCDIC system.
• Use an FTP program to move the data, with or without any conversion of the data.
EBCDIC File Structures
When you decide how to move data from an EBCDIC system to an ASCII system, 
consider the structure of the EBCDIC source file. On EBCDIC systems, you might have 
files with fixed-length records or files with variable-length records. Either type of file 
contains a header with information about the file. The header includes a Record Format 
attribute that indicates whether the records are fixed length or variable length. The 
header for a file with fixed-length records includes a Logical Record Length attribute 
that indicates the length of each record in bytes.
In SAS, the Record Format attribute corresponds to the RECFM= option in a 
FILENAME statement. To access a file with fixed-length records, specify RECFM=F. 
To access a file with variable-length records, specify RECFM=V. Similarly, the Logical 
Record Length attribute corresponds to the LRECL= option.
The Logical Record Length attribute in the header for a file with variable-length records 
indicates the maximum record length. Each record in a file with variable-length records 
begins with a record descriptor word (RDW). The RDW is a 4-byte binary integer field. 
The first two bytes of the RDW indicate the length of the current record. The last two 
bytes of the RDW contain information that is used by the operating system. The length 
of the record includes the four bytes of the RDW at the beginning of the record. Because 
the length of each record is specified in an EBCDIC file (either in the header or in the 
RDW), there are no end-of-record indicators in EBCDIC files.
A file with variable-length records also contains block descriptor words (BDWs). Like 
the RDW, the BDW is a 4-byte, binary integer field. The first two bytes indicate the 
block size, and the last two bytes are used by the operating system. Each block can 
contain multiple records. If the block size is not specified when the file is created, the 
default block size is the logical record length plus 4. Otherwise, the size of a block is the 
number of bytes that are contained in the block. This value is the sum of the record 
lengths in the block (obtained from the RDWs) plus 4 (the length of the BDW).
ASCII File Structure
On ASCII systems, a file does not contain a header with information about the file, such 
as record format or lengths. The RECFM attribute for ASCII files is variable 
(RECFM=V), and the record length (LRECL) is unlimited. Instead of defining record 
660
Appendix 7 • Using EBCDIC Data on ASCII Systems
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested