open pdf in word c# : Delete text pdf document software SDK dll windows wpf html web forms hostwin68-part273

lengths like EBCDIC files do, ASCII files use end-of-record indicators to flag the end of 
a record. On a Windows machine, the end-of-record indicators are the carriage return 
(CR) and line feed (LF) characters. On a UNIX machine, an LF indicates the end of a 
record. On a Macintosh machine, a CR indicates the end of a record. Other types of 
machines use different combinations of characters to identify the end of record. For all 
ASCII machines, the hexadecimal value for CR is '0D'x, and the hexadecimal value for 
LF is '0A'x.
When SAS reads a file from disk on an ASCII machine, default values for some file 
attributes must be used because these attributes are not defined. The default RECFM 
value is V (variable-length record), and the default LRECL value is 32767. This means 
that SAS scans the input from an ASCII file, parses the data into variable values based 
on the INPUT statement, and looks for an end-of-record indicator. If the end of a record 
is not found within the specified number of characters (based on LRECL), then SAS 
truncates the record and prints a message in the log. For example, suppose LRECL is set 
to 256, and there is a record that is 300 characters. SAS reads the first 256 characters 
based on the INPUT statement, and then discards the last 44 characters. A message in 
the log states that “One or more lines have been truncated.” You can override the current 
LRECL value using the LRECL= option in the INFILE statement.
Numeric Values
When stored as character data, the decimal digits 0 through 9 each occupy one byte of 
storage. One 8-bit byte includes two 4-bit nibbles. Each nibble can have 16 (2
4
) possible 
values. The first nibble is the high-order nibble, and the second is the low-order nibble. 
In EBCDIC and ASCII systems, the high-order nibble has a standard value. Decimal 
digits are represented in EBCDIC with a high-order nibble of F. Decimal digits are 
represented in ASCII with a high-order nibble of 3. This means that in an EBCDIC 
system, the digits 0 through 9 are represented by the hexadecimal values 'F0'x through 
'F9'x. In an ASCII system, the digits 0 through 9 are represented by the hexadecimal 
values '30'x through '39'x. This encoding method treats decimal digits as characters.
As an alternative to storing decimal digits as characters, there are other encoding 
methods that can be used on an EBCDIC system. For example, a packed-decimal 
encoding method represents two decimal digits in one byte of storage. A zoned-decimal 
encoding method represents one decimal digit in one byte of storage, and the sign of the 
entire value is included within one byte of storage. (The byte that stores the decimal digit 
and the sign of the entire value can be either the first byte or the last byte, depending on 
the type of machine.)
You must know the numeric encoding that is used on the source EBCDIC system so that 
the source data is interpreted correctly on the ASCII system. For SAS, this means that 
you must specify the correct informats to use for numeric data.
Moving Data from EBCDIC to ASCII Systems
Overview of Accessing EBCDIC Data on ASCII Systems
There are several ways to access EBCDIC data on an ASCII system. For example, some 
ASCII machines have peripheral devices that can read 3480 or 3490 cartridge tapes that 
are created on an EBCDIC system. These devices can read the data directly from a tape 
into an application on an ASCII machine. Alternatively, these devices can copy data 
from a tape and store it on the ASCII machine’s hard drive.
Moving Data from EBCDIC to ASCII Systems
661
Delete text pdf document - delete, remove text from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# developers to use mature APIs to delete and remove text content from PDF document
how to erase pdf text; delete text pdf document
Delete text pdf document - VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File
pull text out of pdf; pdf text remover
A more common method of moving and converting data is to use an FTP program to 
transfer the data. By default, most FTP programs convert EBCDIC data into ASCII 
when transferring data. If the source data contains only character data (including digits 
that are encoded as characters), this is the recommended method. During the conversion 
process, the FTP program creates the appropriate end-of-record indicators for the ASCII 
system. After conversion, you can use an INFILE statement to access the newly created 
file on the ASCII system. Use an INPUT statement to specify the correct informat values 
to use when reading the data in the file.
Note: Even when all of the EBCDIC source data is encoded as character data, there 
might be some characters that are not interpreted correctly during conversion. The 
correct interpretation of these characters depends on the encoding method that is 
used on the EBCDIC machine. As a best practice, verify that your data was 
converted correctly by viewing the data that SAS reads from a converted file.
When an EBCDIC file contains numeric data that is not encoded as character data, such 
as when a packed-decimal or zoned-decimal encoding method is used, the default FTP 
conversion does not work correctly. Some numeric data can resemble standard character 
data. In this case, FTP conversion incorrectly assigns ASCII characters to EBCDIC 
numeric data. For more information, see “Example of Incorrect Conversion of Packed-
Decimal Numeric Data”.
Note: There is no way to correctly convert packed-decimal encoded data from EBCDIC 
into ASCII. Other methods to convert the data must be used if a packed-decimal, 
zoned-decimal, or other numeric encoding method is used on the EBCDIC system. 
For more information, see “Convert EBCDIC Files with Variable-Length Records” 
on page 664.
In some instances, a byte of EBCDIC data might be interpreted in ASCII as an end-of-
line flag or end-of-file flag. If SAS is reading a file with variable-length records when 
one of these hexadecimal values is encountered, then you might observe unintended 
results. Depending on the expected data values based on specified informats, you might 
observe anything from invalid data errors to unexpected termination of the DATA step.
Example of Incorrect Conversion of Packed-Decimal Numeric Data
This example demonstrates the problems that can result when you convert packed-
decimal numeric data as if it were encoded as character data. Suppose an EBCDIC data 
file contains the numeric value 505, stored as a packed-decimal value ('505C'x). If you 
looked at the file with an EBCDIC file browser or editor, you would see the characters 
&*. This is because '50'x corresponds to & and '5C'x corresponds to *. The FTP program 
interprets the & character and converts it to the ASCII value '26'x. The FTP program 
converts the * character to the ASCII value '2A'x, and the resulting converted value is 
'262A'x. The correct packed-decimal value in ASCII should be '000505'x. Because the 
input data does not conform to the expected packed-decimal informat, SAS outputs an 
error to the log that states that the data is invalid. Each time invalid data is encountered, 
SAS writes an error to the log, and outputs the contents of the input buffer and the 
corresponding DATA step variables.
Table A7.1 Incorrect Conversion of Packed-Decimal Numeric Data
Step
Action
Value
1
FTP program reads the EBCDIC 
packed-decimal numeric value 
‘505’.
'505C'x
662
Appendix 7 • Using EBCDIC Data on ASCII Systems
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
VB.NET PDF - How to Delete PDF Document Page in VB.NET. Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in VB.NET Class. Free
how to remove text watermark from pdf; delete text pdf files
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
C#.NET PDF Library - Delete PDF Document Page in C#.NET. Provide C# Users in C#.NET. How to delete a single page from a PDF document.
remove text from pdf reader; deleting text from a pdf
Step
Action
Value
2
FTP program interprets the value as 
standard EBCDIC characters.
&*
3
FTP program converts to standard 
ASCII hexadecimal characters.
'262A'x
4
SAS flags the data as invalid 
because packed-decimal numeric 
data is expected (based on the 
specified informat value).
???
Convert EBCDIC Files with Fixed-Length Records
FTP the File in Binary
When you convert an EBCDIC file with fixed-length records, use FTP to transfer the file 
in binary. Then, with a FILENAME or INFILE statement, specify RECFM=F, and assign 
the same value to LRECL that the file has in the EBCDIC system. Use the formatted 
input style with the following informats:
• $EBCDICw. for character input data
• S370Fxxxw.d for numeric input data
Note: There are many S370Fxxxw.d informats. Select those informats that match the 
type of data that you have. For more information, see SAS Formats and 
Informats: Reference for SAS 9.3 and higher, or see SAS Language Reference: 
Dictionary for earlier versions of SAS.
Because you are transferring the source file in binary, there is no processing to add end-
of-record indicators. For this reason, you must specify the exact number of bytes that are 
specified for the source file in the EBCDIC system. If there are bytes in the source file 
that would be interpreted as end-of-record indicators or end-of-file indicators in an 
ASCII context, SAS treats those bytes simply as data.
Example: Convert an EBCDIC File with Fixed-Length Records into 
an ASCII File
The following code reads a file, fixed.txt, that was previously transferred via FTP in 
binary from an EBCDIC system to an ASCII system. The source file has fixed-length 
records that are 60 bytes long. Based on the informat in this example, the last three bytes 
in each record contain numeric data that was stored using the packed-decimal encoding 
method.
filename test1 'c:\fixed.txt' recfm=f lrecl=60;
data one;
infile test1;
input @1  name  $ebcdic20.
@21 addr  $ebcdic20.
@41 city  $ebcdic15.
@56 state $ebcdic2.
@58 zip   $s370fpd3.;
run;
Moving Data from EBCDIC to ASCII Systems
663
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Free online source code for extracting text from adobe PDF document in C#.NET class. Ability to extract highlighted text out of PDF document.
how to delete text from pdf with acrobat; delete text pdf preview
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
SharePoint. Extract text from adobe PDF document in VB.NET Programming. Extract file. Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Image
remove text from pdf online; erase text in pdf document
Convert EBCDIC Files with Variable-Length Records
Overview of Converting EBCDIC Files with Variable-Length Records
When you convert an EBCDIC file with variable-length records, you can use an FTP 
program. The FTP program removes BDWs and RDWs and adds end-of-record 
indicators that are expected by the ASCII system. The data in the file is converted from 
EBCDIC to ASCII. If all of the data in the EBCDIC file is encoded as characters, then 
this process typically works correctly.
Note: Even when all of the EBCDIC source data is encoded as character data, there 
might be some characters that are not interpreted correctly during conversion. The 
correct interpretation of these characters depends on the encoding method that is 
used on the EBCDIC machine. As a best practice, verify that your data was 
converted correctly by viewing the data that SAS reads from a converted file.
When an EBCDIC file contains numeric data that is not encoded as character data, such 
as when a packed-decimal or zoned-decimal encoding method is used, the default FTP 
conversion does not work correctly. For more information, see “Overview of Accessing 
EBCDIC Data on ASCII Systems” on page 661. To prevent misinterpretation of data 
during conversion, transfer the file in binary via FTP without converting the data to an 
ASCII encoding. When the data is transferred in binary and is not converted, be aware 
that the BDW and RDW information is removed automatically. This removes 
information that SAS needs to read the data successfully.
Read Files Directly from the EBCDIC System
If you have direct access between the ASCII machine and the EBCDIC machine, then 
the best practice is to read the file directly. Direct access is enabled via a peripheral 
device on the ASCII machine that can read an EBCDIC tape. You can access the file via 
the FTP access method in a FILENAME statement. There are several advantages to this 
method of accessing EBCDIC data:
• file preprocessing is not required
• copying the source file is not required
• FTP access method works for fixed-length and variable-length records
• DATA step processing works as expected
The main disadvantage is that this method requires more time for processing because 
you are accessing the data remotely.
This method of accessing EBCDIC data applies if you have a 3480 or 3490 cartridge 
tape reader attached to your ASCII machine. In this case, you do not need to preprocess 
the file on an EBCDIC machine. You can read it directly from the tape by setting 
RECFM=S370VB and using the $EBCDICw. and S370Fxxxw.d informats.
In a FILENAME statement, specify the FTP access method and the source filename, and 
provide values for the HOST=, USER=, and PASS= options. The HOST= option 
specifies the name of the EBCDIC machine, USER= specifies the user account that you 
use to log on, and PASS= specifies the password that you use to log on. The FTP access 
method uses an FTP program on the ASCII machine to open a connection between the 
ASCII machine and the EBCDIC machine. The SAS system connects to and logs on to 
the mainframe machine with the specified user account and password. The FTP program 
transfers the file.
Note: If you specify the PASS= option, the password is saved as text in your SAS 
program. The password is not visible in the SAS log. As an alternative to the PASS= 
664
Appendix 7 • Using EBCDIC Data on ASCII Systems
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Insert Text to PDF Document in C#.NET. This C# coding example describes how to add a single text character to PDF document. // Open a document.
how to delete text in a pdf file; how to delete text in pdf acrobat
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
All text content of target PDF document can be copied and pasted to .txt files by keeping original layout. C#.NET class source code
erase text from pdf file; delete text from pdf preview
option, you can specify the PROMPT option and provide a password at the prompt 
when you execute the SAS program.
For EBCDIC files with variable-length records, you must also specify the S370V and 
RCMD= options. The S370V option indicates that the records in the source file have 
variable lengths. For the RCMD= option, specify RCMD="SITE RDW" to indicate that 
the FTP process should keep the RDW information during the file transfer.
If you experience connection problems to the EBCDIC machine, you can add the 
DEBUG option to see the informational messages that are sent to and from the FTP 
server.
Example: Read an EBCDIC Source File Directly with the FTP Access 
Method
This example shows how to read an EBCDIC file with variable-length records directly 
from an EBCDIC machine using the FTP access method. The user is prompted for her 
MVS logon password. The ZIP code is input as a 5-digit EBCDIC number, represented 
by one digit per byte. The comments section is varying in length up to 200 characters. 
After the data is read, it is printed to verify the contents of the data set.
filename test1 ftp "'SASEBCDIC.VB.TEST1'" host='MVS' user='SASEBCDIC' PROMPT
s370v rcmd='site rdw';
data one;
infile test1;
input @1  name     $ebcdic20.
@21 addr     $ebcdic20.
@41 city     $ebcdic10.
@51 state    $ebcdic2.
@54 zip      s370ff5.
@60 comments :$ebcdic200.;
run;
proc print;
run;
Reformat an EBCDIC File with Variable-Length Records with 
IEBGENER
Suppose that you do not have direct access between the ASCII machine and the 
EBCDIC machine. That is, you do not have a peripheral device that reads EBCDIC data 
on the ASCII machine. In this situation, you can convert the data by reformatting the file 
on the mainframe machine. By changing the format of the file, you prevent the FTP 
program from removing the RDW information that SAS requires to read the data 
correctly. After you reformat the file, you can transfer the file in binary to the ASCII 
machine.
To reformat the source file, use the IEBGENER program on the EBCDIC machine. Use 
this program to make an exact copy of the file with altered header information. 
Specifically, use IEBGENER to change the RECFM value from V (variable-length 
records in blocks) to U (undefined record length and unblocked). After making this 
change, the FTP program no longer removes the RDW information during the file 
transfer.
When you run the IEBGENER program, in addition to the required arguments, specify 
the following overrides:
SYSUT1 DCB=(RECFM=U,BLKSIZE=32760)
SYSUT2 DCB=(RECFM=U,BLKSIZE=32760) DISP=(NEW,CATLG)
Moving Data from EBCDIC to ASCII Systems
665
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
C#.NET PDF SDK - Edit PDF Document Metadata in C#.NET. Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project.
erase pdf text online; delete text pdf
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
C#.NET. C# Guide about How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information with .NET PDF Control.
how to remove text watermark from pdf; how to delete text in a pdf acrobat
Note: Do not use the original values of RECFM and BLKSIZE for SYSUT1.
Transfer the new version of the file in binary using an FTP program on the ASCII 
machine. In SAS, use a FILENAME or INFILE statement to read the transferred file. Set 
the options appropriately.
• Set the RECFM= option to S370V if the record format for the original file was 
variable (RECFM=V). Set the RECFM= option to S370VB if the record format for 
the original file was variable and blocked (RECFM=VB). By specifying the 
RECFM= option as S370V or S370VB, you tell SAS to process the RDW 
information for each record and input the correct number of bytes for each record.
• Specify the same value for the LRECL= option that is in the original file. If you do 
not specify a value for the LRECL= option, SAS uses the default LRECL value 
(32767). Using the default value could cause SAS to truncate data records if they are 
longer than the default LRECL value.
Use the formatted input style with the informats that are described in “FTP the File in 
Binary” on page 663.
Example: Read a File with Modified Header Data
This example reads a file that was generated from an EBCDIC file with a header that 
was modified to change the file format. The modified file was transferred to an ASCII 
machine for SAS processing. For more information, see “Reformat an EBCDIC File 
with Variable-Length Records with IEBGENER” on page 665.
The TRUNCOVER option is included in the INFILE statement because the Comment 
variable can be up to 60 characters (but it is likely shorter). Without the TRUNCOVER 
option, the INPUT statement could attempt to read past the end of the record. Data from 
the next record would continue to be assigned to the Comment variable until the variable 
was full. The LRECL= option is not specified because the default value is sufficient to 
handle the longest record in the file. After the data is read, it is printed to output for 
verification.
filename test1 'c:\vbtest.xfr' recfm=s370vb;
data one;
infile test1 truncover;
input @1  name    $ebcdic14.
@15 addr    $ebcdic18.
@33 zip     s370ff5.
@38 comment $ebcdic60.;
run;
proc print;
run;
Read EBCDIC Data from Structured COBOL Files
About Structured COBOL Files
A structured COBOL file is generated using an OCCURS DEPENDING ON clause. 
This type of file has variable-length records. And, when the file is transferred via FTP in 
binary, there is no BDW or RDW information. Each record is divided into three parts: a 
record header (a fixed-length portion of the record), an index variable, and one or more 
data segments. The documentation for the file provides the length of the record header, 
the index variable, and a data segment. The record header is the same length for each 
record. It contains information that pertains to all of the data segments that follow. The 
666
Appendix 7 • Using EBCDIC Data on ASCII Systems
index variable provides the number of data segments for the current record. The 
remainder of the record contains the data segments.
Because of the structure of the records, SAS is able to read the data in these files. The 
length of a record is the sum of the header length, the index length, and the product of 
the index value and the size of each data segment. For each data segment, SAS reads the 
segment, and then outputs a copy of the header and the current data segment to a new 
observation in a SAS data set.
When you read a structured COBOL file, specify RECFM=N in your FILENAME 
statement. This tells SAS that you are reading a stream of data that does not conform to a 
typical file structure. Any restrictions to record length are ignored when SAS reads a 
data stream because SAS does not attempt to buffer the input. SAS writes a statement to 
the SAS log to notify you that SAS reads a data stream as unbuffered when RECFM=N.
SAS reads an entire structured COBOL file as a single, long record. Therefore, if you 
need to skip some data or move past a space, you must use relative column pointers in 
your INPUT statement. Line holders are ignored because the contents of the file are 
treated as a single input record. The @column pointers do not work for these files.
CAUTION:
Do not use @column pointers when you specify RECFM=N.
Using @column 
pointers initiates an infinite loop in which SAS reads and outputs the same data 
repeatedly until you halt the program or until no more disk space is available.
Example: Read Data from a Structured COBOL File
In this example, an EBCDIC file was transferred via FTP in binary without first 
processing the file using IEBGENER. The record header (fixed-length) portion of each 
record is 59 bytes in length and contains a combination of character and numeric data. 
The index variable is two bytes. There is another space (one byte) to separate the index 
variable from the remainder of the record. The data segment portion of the record 
consists of one or more repeats of 13 bytes in length. Each repeat contains a combination 
of character and numeric data.
filename test1 'c:\VB.TEST' recfm=n;
data one;
infile test1;
input name $ebcdic20. addr $ebcdic20. city $ebcdic10. st $ebcdic2. +1
zip s370ff5. +1 idx s370ff2. +1;
do i = 1 to idx;
input cars $ebcdic10. +1 years s370ff2. ;
output;
if i lt idx then input +1 ;
end;
run;
Moving Data from ASCII to EBCDIC Systems
Overview
There are several ways to transcode ASCII data to EBCDIC:
• Use FTP to write files (data) directly.
Moving Data from ASCII to EBCDIC Systems
667
• Use the dd command.
• Use the iconv command.
Using FTP to Write Files Directly
Overview of Using FTP to Write Files Directly
FTP automatically performs the conversion when the type of file is specified as text 
(instead of binary). When you have direct access between the ASCII machine and 
EBCDIC machine, the best practice is to read the file directly. Direct access is enabled 
via a peripheral device on the ASCII machine that can read an EBCDIC tape. You can 
access the file via the FTP access method in a FILENAME statement. There are several 
advantages to this method of accessing EBCDIC data:
• No file preprocessing is required.
• You do not need to copy the source file.
• The FTP access method works for fixed-length and variable-length records.
• DATA step processing works as expected.
This method of accessing EBCDIC data applies if you have a 3480 or 3490 cartridge 
tape reader attached to your ASCII machine. In this case, you do not need to preprocess 
the file on an EBCDIC machine. You can read it directly from the tape by setting 
RECFM=S370VB and using the $EBCDICw. and S370Fxxxw.d informats.
In a FILENAME statement, specify the FTP access method and the source filename, and 
provide values for the HOST=, USER=, and PASS= options. The HOST= option 
specifies the name of the EBCDIC machine, USER= specifies the user account that you 
use to log on, and PASS= specifies the password that you use to log on. The FTP access 
method uses an FTP program on the ASCII machine to open a connection between the 
ASCII machine and the EBCDIC machine. The SAS system connects to and logs on to 
the mainframe machine with the specified user account and password. The FTP program 
transfers the file.
Example: Reading an ASCII File from SAS on z/OS
1 filename unixin '/net/bin/u/leking/sample.txt' encoding=latin1; 
2 data _null_;                                       
      infile unixin;                                      
      input;                                                       
      put _infile_;                                 
  run;                                                                                                                        
NOTE: The infile UNIXIN is:                             
File Name=/net/bin/u/leking/sample.txt,   
Access Permission=-rwxr-xr-x,Number of Links=1,   
Owner Name=LEKING,Group Name=R@D,File Size=45,  
Last Modified=Jan 19  2000                                  
This is a test.                                               
Another line.                                                 
End of file.   
668
Appendix 7 • Using EBCDIC Data on ASCII Systems
Using the dd Command to Convert and Copy a File
About the dd Command
The dd command reads the InFile parameter or standard input, performs the specified 
conversion, and then copies the converted data to the OutFile parameter or standard 
output. The input block size and output block size can be specified to take advantage of 
raw physical I/O.
Use the cbs parameter value if you are specifying the block, unblock, ascii, ebcdic, or 
ibm conversion value. If an unblock or ascii value is specified, then the dd command 
performs a fixed-length to variable-length conversion. Otherwise, it performs a variable-
length to fixed-length conversion. The cbs parameter value determines the fixed length.
CAUTION:
If the specified cbs parameter value is smaller than the smallest input block, the 
converted block is truncated.
After it finishes, the dd command reports the number of whole and partial input and 
output blocks. For more information about the dd command, see the dd manual page on 
your system.
dd Command Exit Status
The dd command returns the following exit values:
Item
Description
0
The input file was copied successfully.
>0
An error occurred.
Examples: dd Command Conversion
Here are two simple examples:
• To convert an ASCII text file to EBCDIC, enter the following:
dd if=text.ascii of=text.ebcdic conv=ebcdic
This command converts the text.ascii file to EBCDIC representation and stores the 
EBCDIC version in the text.ebcdic file.
When you specify the conv=ebcdic parameter, the dd command converts the ASCII 
^ (circumflex) character to an unused EBCDIC character (9A hexadecimal) and the 
ASCII ~ (tilde) character to the EBCDIC ^ character (NOT symbol).
• To use the dd command as a filter, enter the following:
ls -l | dd  conv=ucase
This command displays a long listing of the current directory in uppercase.
The performance of the dd command and cpio command in the IBM 9348 
Magnetic Tape Unit Model 12 can be improved by changing the default block size. 
To change the block size, use the chdev command as follows:
chdev -l Device_name -a block_size=32k
Moving Data from ASCII to EBCDIC Systems
669
Using the iconv Command to Convert a Text File
About the iconv Command
Use the iconv command to convert the encoding of a text file. Use one the following 
examples of syntax:
iconv –f FromCode –t ToCode FileName
iconv –l
For more information about the syntax and parameters for the iconv command, see the 
iconv manual page on your system.
iconv Command Exit Status
The iconv command returns the following exit values:
Item
Description
0
Input data was successfully converted.
1
The specified conversions are not supported, 
the input file cannot be opened or read, or 
there is a usage-syntax error.
2
An unusable character was encountered in the 
input stream.
Examples: iconv Command Conversion
Here are two simple examples:
• To convert the contents of the mail.x400 file from code set IBM-850 and store the 
results in the mail.local folder, enter the following:
iconv –f IBM-850 –t ISO8859-1 mail.x400 > mail.local
• To convert the contents of a local file to the mail interchange format and send mail, 
enter the following:
iconv –f IBM-943 –t fold7 mail.local > mail.fxrojas
670
Appendix 7 • Using EBCDIC Data on ASCII Systems
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested