open pdf in word c# : Remove text watermark from pdf control Library system azure asp.net winforms console IPN%2056.indd.def3-part384

31
I
n
t
e
r
n
a
t
i
o
n
a
l
P
r
e
s
e
r
v
a
t
i
o
n
N
e
w
s
N
o
.
5
6
M
a
y
2
0
1
2
Inkundla ya Bantu (1938-1951) under the leadership of Govan 
Mbeki and  Jordan  Ngubane,  was the only  major independent 
African nationalist newspaper left that played a signifi cant role 
in the alternative press. A prime example of African liberal jour-
nalism.  
As the potential market for African consumers expanded, and 
the  state  incr eased  its  ef forts  to  institutionalise  segr egation 
and retribalize the Africans, white business inter ests moved in 
to  take  over  surviving  African  publications.  By  1946  between 
250,000 and 500,000 Africans were reading newspapers. The 
vacuum created was fi lled by white entrepreneurs establishing 
 black commercial  press  with  publications  aimed at African 
readers. 
Bantu World was launched in 1932 by Bertram Paver. Published 
by Bantu Press, largely owned by the Argus, contr olled by the 
mining industry. It was allowed a considerable degr ee of free-
dom  to  attack  the  gover nment’s  racial  policies.  Bantu  Pr ess 
owned  10 African weekly newspapers by 1945. Bantu  World 
in some ways was a trend setter in the shift from an elite to a 
mass audience. Bantu World and its imitators  did  not have to 
compete with the independent African political press, because 
there were virtually no publications of this kind left by the mid-
1930s. Bantu World gave extensive  coverage  to  black nation-
alist  movements, even  though  it was  never  a  pr otest  organ. 
Black creative writing was offered an outlet in the newspaper, 
and virtually every member of the literary elite wrote for Bantu 
World at a time.
The  Guardian  (1937) represented  a new non-African genera-
tion  that  mobilized  the  r esistance  movementT. he  Guardian 
was  not  the offi  cial  mouthpiece of a  political  body .  But  the 
majority  of  staff  and  editors  wer e  probably  members of  the 
Communist Party of South Africa. The Guardian fi rst of all was 
a  mouthpiece for organized labour.  It was cited by Albert Lu-
thuli as ‘the fi ghting mouthpiece of African aspirations’. A sig-
nifi cant outlet for black grievances. Regarded as a platform for 
the  whole liberation movement. The newspaper was banned 
several times. All its contributors were banned, jailed or forced 
into exile. Ruth First was the most investigative journalist during 
the Guardian era. 
Digitisation at the NLSA
The NLSA was one of the founding members of DISA (Digital 
Innovation South Africa). DISA, which was established in 1997, 
aimed to implement digital technologies in libraries to enhance 
access  to  South  African  content of  high  socio-political inter -
est (especially related to the Freedom  Struggle). DISA became 
a centre  of digitisation expertise in South Africa and pr ovided 
training  and  support  acr oss  South and Souther n  Africa.  The 
NLSA contributed by way of digitising journals and other pub-
lications from its collections (e.g. Sechaba and Indian Opinion). 
As part of DISA Phase 2 the NLSA assisted with the scanning of 
archival collections that were published on microfi lm. 
The  NLSA  transformed  its  photographic  and  micro lfiming  fa-
cility  to a  fully  operational digital  services  unit.  Recently two 
large-format scanners were obtained with the purpose of scan-
ning historical maps and newspapers. Other equipment include 
fl atbed scanners, microfi lm  and fi lm negative scanners, digital 
cameras and digital video technology .  Staff  are  trained in the 
application of scanning technology and digital photography as 
well as multimedia and metadata.
Future  plans  for  digitisation  include  the  Library’ s  collection  of  
South African newspapers on microfi lm. The microfi lm collection 
consists of an estimated 7.5 million pages of newsprint. A selec-
tion of forty historical newspapers that represent the Black Press 
of South Africa of approximately 200 000 pages is considered. 
References
Switzer, Les and Switzer, Donna. 1979. The  Black Press in 
South  Africa and Lesotho:  a  descriptive  bibliographic 
guide  to  African,  Coloured  and  Indian  newspapers, 
newsletters and magazines 1936-1976. Boston, Mass.: 
G. K. Hall. 
Switzer,  Les  et  al.  1997. South  Africa’s  Alternative  Press. 
Voices  of  Protest  and  Resistance,  1880-1960.  Cam-
bridge: Cambridge University Press.
4. From left: Govan Mbeki; Ruth First.
5. NLSA equipment.
Remove text watermark from pdf - delete, remove text from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# developers to use mature APIs to delete and remove text content from PDF document
erase text in pdf document; how to delete text from a pdf in acrobat
Remove text watermark from pdf - VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File
how to delete text from pdf document; how to delete text in pdf file
32
I
n
t
e
r
n
a
t
i
o
n
a
l
P
r
e
s
e
r
v
a
t
i
o
n
N
e
w
s
N
o
.
5
6
M
a
y
2
0
1
2
Training Program for Handling and Preservation of Microfi lms 
and Photographs in Libraries and Archives Provided 
by the National Diet Library 
by Shigehito Hisanaga, Preservation Division, National Diet Library, Japan
Purpose of Training
On June 30, 2011, the National Diet Library (NDL) held a train-
ing session, “Handling and preservation of microfi lms and pho-
tographs in libraries and archives”. More than 100 people from 
libraries,  archives  and  museums  attended.  It  included  some 
participants from areas affl icted by the Great East Japan Earth-
quake. Microfi lms  are  great media for long-term storage, but 
it is necessary to maintain an appropriate storage environment 
to get full performance out of them. Librarians, as users as well 
as managers of materials, are required to evaluate comprehen-
sively what kind of measures are practical for long-term storage 
of microfi lms. The purpose of this training session was to sup-
port librarians so that they can actively handle individual prob-
lems with view to long-term storage of microfi lms by acquiring 
basic knowledge, understanding and lear ning  conditions nec-
essary for long-term storage, such as r ecommendations when 
producing microfi lms, daily handling, regular maintenance and 
storage environment. In this course Mr. Nobuhiro Kuroki gave 
 lecture  on  the  following items: 1) Deterioration cases  and 
mechanism and condition for long-term storage of microfi lms, 
and  2)  Rescue  project  for  photographs  affected  by  the  Great 
East  Japan Earthquake. Mr.  Nobuhiro  Kuroki,  member of the 
Qualifi cation  Program  Committee of the Japan Image and In-
formation Management Association is an expert on the struc-
ture and deterioration of microfi lms.
In addition, Mr. Shigehito Hisanaga, Preservation Division, Acqui-
sitions and Bibliography Department, NDL, made a presentation 
about the “Approach of the National Diet Library on the preser-
vation of microfi lm materials.” The following is a brief overview.
Deterioration Cases and Mechanism 
and Condition for Long-Term Storage of Microfi lms
Mr.  Kuroki  gave a lectur e  on deterioration cases and mecha-
nism  of microfi lms.  He explained the basic knowledge of the 
structure and handling of microfi lms and the mechanism of de-
terioration caused by them, and important conditions necessary 
for long-term storage with concrete examples of deterioration.
1. Structure and main component materials 
of microfi lms
Microfi  lm  is constructed  as the following fi  gure  shows: from 
the top, protective layer, emulsion layer (image layer), antihala-
tion layer, support (base) and backing layer.
If  the right conditions ar e  missing,  each component material 
can undergo change and this leads to deterioration.
2. Main deterioration cases of microfi lms
Microscopic blemishes and yellowing are cases of deterioration 
of  developed silver.  This occurs when oxidized developed sil-
ver transforms into silver ions which move within the emulsion 
layer and become minute yellow or reddish spots. This oxidiza-
tion  is caused by humidity and oxidized gas such as per oxide, 
ozone (O3), sulfi te gas (SO2), hydrogen sulfi de (H2S), nitrogen 
oxide (NO) and others in the air. Oxidized gas is considered to 
be derived from some sorts of building materials, plastics, gum, 
acid paper and emission gas as well as fi xing defects or lack of 
water washing during the image processing procedure. 
Crack, mold and sticking are cases of deterioration of gelatin. 
Humidity  is the key element for each case. Cracks may occur 
when  the  relative  humidity becomes  lower than 15%. Mold 
may  occur  when  the  relative  humidity  becomes  higher  than 
50%. Sticking may occur when the relative humidity becomes 
higher than 60%.
Deterioration  of support,  especially  a  cellulose  ester  base,  is 
well known as vinegar syndrome. Ingredients of a cellulose es-
ter base are cellulose triacetate itself and plasticizer for fl exibil-
ity.  Vinegar syndrome  is caused by acetic acid pr oduced  from 
hydrolyzing  of  the  cellulose  ester base,  and its  deterioration 
symptoms are seen going through the following process.
1. Hydrolysis occurs through incomplete drying of fi lms during 
image  processing  procedure, and moisture from  the humidity 
of the storage environment. 
2. Acetic acid of the base splits off by hydrolysis.
3. Acetic acid promotes resolution and deterioration proceeds. 
Deterioration which reaches a certain level increases in speed.
1. Structure and main component materials of microfi lms.
Protective layer: gelatin
Emulsion layer (image layer) silver, gelatin
Antihalation layer: gelatin
Support (base): polyester/cellulose ester/ nitrocellulose
Backing layer: gelatin
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
console application. Able to remove a single page from PDF document. Ability to remove a range of pages from PDF file. Free trial package
how to delete text in pdf preview; how to delete text in pdf file online
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" Remove.pdf"; // Remove password in the input file and output to a new file. int
pull text out of pdf; how to delete text from a pdf document
33
I
n
t
e
r
n
a
t
i
o
n
a
l
P
r
e
s
e
r
v
a
t
i
o
n
N
e
w
s
N
o
.
5
6
M
a
y
2
0
1
2
4.  At the same  time,  plasticizer separates.  Melted plasticizer 
crystallizes and when crystals get larger, they push the gelatin 
aside which leads to distortion and destruction of images and 
fi  nally  the  images become unr eadable.  Films which lost plas-
ticizer  lose  fl  exibility,  and shrinkage  and  ruffl  ing  of  the  base 
occurs.
5. When deterioration proceeds, the plasticizer resolves. Reso-
lution  of the  plasticizer pr oduces  acid materials, the pH level 
falls  and deterioration proceeds  faster.  Gelatin resolves  and it 
becomes a black mass exuding from the edge of fi lms together 
with plasticizer and developed silver,  or turns into black spots 
on  the  surface of the fi   lms.  Sometimes even spools  ar e  dis-
solved.
3. Storage conditions for microfi lms
What  is necessary to pr event  the kinds of deterioration men-
tioned above and to   store microfi lms for a long time? Micr o-
fi lms are recorded media with a long history and measur es for 
long-term storage are  defi ned  by standard. For this reason,  it 
is important to observe the standard for processing and storing 
microfi lms.
Proper control of temperature and humidity is an essential con-
dition to prevent deterioration of microfi lms and for long-term 
storage. In the Japanese Industrial Standards  (JIS), JIS  Z 6009-
1994 “Silver-gelatin type microfi lms – processing and storage” 
is defi ned as follows:
4. Condition of relative humidity and temperature.
Storage
conditions
Relative humidity (%)
Tempera-
ture (°C)
Maxi-
mum
Minimum
Maximum
Cellulose 
ester
Polyester
Conditions 
for 
medium 
storage
1
60
15
30
25
Conditions 
for perma-
nent stor-
age
2
40
15
30
21
Ideally,  temperature  shall not be over 25° for a long time and it 
should  be under 20°. The peak temperatur e  for short time shall 
not exceed 32°.
Considering that: 
1. The conditions of temperature and humidity shall be maintained 
24 hours a day.
2. For permanent storage of cellulose ester base fi lm and polyester 
base fi lm  in the same place, the r ecommended  relative humidity 
is 30%.
To meet these conditions, measures such as setting up special 
storage, using cabinets with a function to control temperature 
and humidity, or using humidity control materials can be taken.
In the International Standard, ISO 18911-2010, maximum tem-
perature for the cellulose ester base is set extremely low.
For  other  conditions,  it is  necessary to keep  down dust and 
gaseous impurities in the air and to pay attention to enclosures 
such as paper and plastics which are in contact with fi lms.
Mr. Kuroki concluded that deterioration of microfi lms is caused 
by three factors, materials factor, process factor and storage en-
vironment factor, and for long-term storage of microfi lms, it is 
necessary to remove completely these factors of deterioration.
2. Ruffl ing.
3. Melted spool.
1. JIS Z 6009-1994 defi nes term of medium storage as 10 years or over.
2. JIS Z 6009-1994 defi nes term of permanent storage as permanent.
C# PDF bookmark Library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.
Ability to remove and delete bookmark and outline entry.GetLocation()); Console.WriteLine("Text: " + entry.GetText NET Sample Code: Update PDF Document Outline
how to delete text in pdf file; how to delete text in pdf converter
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Add metadata to PDF document in C# .NET framework program. Remove and delete metadata from PDF file. Also a PDF metadata extraction control.
how to delete text in pdf converter professional; how to erase text in pdf online
34
I
n
t
e
r
n
a
t
i
o
n
a
l
P
r
e
s
e
r
v
a
t
i
o
n
N
e
w
s
N
o
.
5
6
M
a
y
2
0
1
2
Rescue Project for Photographs Affected 
by the Great East Japan Earthquake
This  training session  was  originally  scheduled  for  Mar ch  18, 
2011.  Since  the  Gr eat  East  Japan  Earthquake  occurr ed  on 
March 11, the session was postponed to the end of June. Mr . 
Kuroki gave a lecture about the rescue project for photographs 
conducted by a major fi lm manufacturer because there seemed 
to be urgent need for reconstruction from the earthquake and 
it would be of high interest among the participants of the train-
ing session. The following contents ar e as of the end of June 
when the training session was provided.
Many lives were lost in the tsunami caused by the Great East Ja-
pan Earthquake. Social infrastructure and buildings were swept 
up and reduced to piles of rubble. Cultural assets, books, docu-
ments, photographs and albums were also lost or damaged. In 
the case of cultural assets and documents, rescue projects have 
been  continued by specialized agencies in local ar eas,  neigh-
boring  prefectures  and around  the nation, and by volunteers 
technically supported by these agencies. The importance of res-
cuing photographs and albums has been recognized from early 
on, and the Self-Defense Forces and volunteers continue to re-
trieve  photographs and albums out of the rubble and r estore 
them based on the request from the government.
As there was a spate of inquiries to the customer service cen-
ter of the fi lm  manufacturer  after the earthquake about how 
to wash the muddy photograph, the technical department did 
research on deteriorated photographs contaminated by seawa-
ter and mud, and how to wash them off. They also conducted 
reproductive  experiments using seawater and mud as well as 
fi  guring  out the tools and disposables necessary for washing 
and checking the condition of the photographs by visiting vol-
unteers  who were  actually  collecting  and washing  damaged 
photographs in the disaster-affl icted area  to offer more effec-
tive and comprehensible information. They posted and are con-
tinually updating on their website the information on how to 
wash  the  photographs without  special tools  or  chemicals so 
that people in the affl icted area can clean their photographs. It 
was set up as a “Photo rescue project” and the following sup-
port activities are deployed.
One is a technical support activity of fering information on ap-
propriate washing methods depending on the condition of the 
photo print. Details of the technical support activity ar e as fol-
lows: -Summarizing the washing procedure which is practicable 
in  the affl  icted  area  and providing  it on a website and docu-
ments,  and  notifying  people  through  TV  and  radio  programs 
broadcast in the area (broadcast from April 23, 2011). Detailed 
information  with videos is pr ovided  in several cases such as a 
water-stained  and defaced photo, albums, negative fi lms and 
inkjet-printed photographs, and several photographs stuck to-
gether, etc. For example, the following procedure is described: 
(1) soak them in water, (2) wash out the stains gently using a 
brush, (3) rinse them and (4) dry them in the shade, all these 
procedures  with full attention to the safety .  It is necessary to 
note that this pr ocedure  is a temporary and emergency mea-
sure and it could remove the image depending on the condition 
of  the photo. This pr oject  also takes requests  from local gov-
ernments and volunteer organizations which ar e doing rescue 
activities for affected photos, offering its know-how of washing 
photos and giving advice.
The other is material support. Tools and disposables necessary 
for washing are provided to voluntary organizations, local gov-
ernments and evacuation centers which are conducting photo-
graph rescue work.
A contact point for photograph rescue projects was established 
to receive requests and deal with specifi c cases. It receives the 
inquiries via phone and the Internet and discusses the appropri-
ate way to deal with individual cases. In addition, these support 
activities  are  done in cooperation with people in the affl icted 
areas, volunteer groups,  photo studios, and various photo-r e-
lated organizations in the area. 
Over  one  hundred  company  staf f  members  ar e  cooperating 
with this project at weekends as volunteers, as well as 30 mem-
bers continuing to offer technical support taking turns on site.
Approach of the National Diet Library 
on the Preservation of Microfi lm Materials
At the end of the training session, Mr . Shigehito Hisanaga re-
ported the approach of the National Diet Library on the preser-
vation of microfi lm materials.
1. Collection of the NDL
The NDL holds 8.84 million microfi lms (as of the end of March 
2011).  There are 590,000 microfi lms, 7.95 million micro fiches 
and 300,000 micro  prints. Certain parts of them wer e micro-
fi lmed by the NDL and others wer e acquired  by legal deposit, 
purchase, donation and international exchange. The NDL makes 
both  negatives and positives at once and  basically ,  negatives 
are for preservation and positives are for use. It keeps the fi lms 
for preservation in a dedicated microfi lm storage. The temper-
ature  and relative  humidity  in  this storage ar e  maintained at 
18°C  and 25% in general with 24-hour air conditioning. The 
use of fi lms  for preservation  is limited to r ecreating  damaged 
positives, for digitization, etc. On the other hand, fi lms for use 
are stored in the usual stacks along with paper materials such 
as books and periodicals. The temperature and relative humid-
ity in the ordinary stacks are maintained at 22°C and 55%. 
2. Project of preservation measures for microfi lms
The NDL organized several preservation teams in 1983 by types 
of  materials and reasons of damage and each team tackled a 
specifi  c  problem  such  as  the  physical  damage  caused  by  the 
increase  of  copying,  the  acid  paper  pr oblem,  etc.  The  NDL 
has preserved microfi lms in the above-described environment, 
based on the results of discussion by the preservation team for 
microfi lms.
After that, the NDL conducted two big pr ojects for preserving 
microfi lms. One was the recreating project  of Japanese news-
paper microfi lms of 1990s. The other was the urgent counter-
measures against deteriorated microfi lm materials in fi scal years 
from 2004 to 2008.
C# PDF url edit Library: insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.
Able to insert and delete PDF links. Able to embed link to specific PDF pages. Easy to put link into specified position of PDF text, image and PDF table.
delete text from pdf acrobat; deleting text from a pdf
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
NET framework. Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF while compressing. C# class demo
remove text from pdf; delete text pdf preview
35
I
n
t
e
r
n
a
t
i
o
n
a
l
P
r
e
s
e
r
v
a
t
i
o
n
N
e
w
s
N
o
.
5
6
M
a
y
2
0
1
2
2.1. Recreating project of Japanese newspaper 
microfi lms of 1990s
Phenomenon such as acetic acid odor, deformation, tackiness, 
etc., was found in the Japanese newspaper microfi lms (created 
between 1950s to 60s) in 1989. The NDL established an inves-
tigation  committee including outside experts and investigated 
causes and discussed countermeasures. As a result, it was found 
that rapid deterioration, so-called “vinegar syndrome”, caused 
by an inadequate environment for preservation of cellulose es-
ter  based  fi  lms,  happened.  Therefore,  countermeasures  such 
as setting up the microfi lm storage as noted above, recreating 
polyester base fi lms, etc., were implemented. The target Japa-
nese  newspaper microfi lms  numbered  over 30,000, so it was 
impossible  to recreate  them all at once. In or der to delay the 
deterioration,  we changed the  metallic cases  used until then 
to cases made of acid-free paper, and wound the fi lms back to 
dissipate accumulated acetic acid.
2.2. Urgent countermeasures against deteriorated 
microfi lm materials
When the NDL staff prepared to transfer materials to the Kan-
sai-kan of the NDL when it opened in 2002, they found sticking 
microfi ches of science technology reports (they were stored in 
the  reading  room  where  the temperature  and humidity wer e 
not  controlled)  purchased  from  foreign  countries. Staff  of the 
NDL conducted a preliminary investigation to grasp the degree 
and dimension of deterioration. As the same phenomenon was 
confi rmed in other microfi lms, a fi ve-year plan from fi scal 2004 
to 2008 for urgent countermeasures against deterioration was 
decided upon. The target of this project was microfi lms acquired 
by March 1992, which were possibly cellulose ester based. The 
NDL changed the way it created microfi lm from cellulose ester 
base  to  polyester  base  in  April  1992,  and  it  was  considered 
that  there  was no fear of degradation in polyester base fi lm. 
The amount of the targeted microfi lms was estimated at about 
5,050,000.  At the beginning, the NDL pr oposed  to take the 
measures  for all of them, but in the middle the number was 
reduced to about 1,800,000 of cellulose ester base micr ofi lms 
for preservation. 
The urgent countermeasures were implemented in two stages 
depending on the type of materials (books, periodicals, science 
and  technology materials, rar e  books and old materials etc.). 
As  a  primary  measur e,  replacing  acid  paper cases  with acid-
free paper cases, dissipation of acid gas by winding fi lms back, 
and  research  of the deterioration level wer e  conducted. As a 
secondary  measure,  restoration,  recreation,  and separation of 
fi lms were conducted, based on the results of the primary mea-
sure.
After reporting the preservation measures of microfi lms in the 
NDL, it was restated that three factors, namely good materials, 
proper  handling and appr opriate  preservation  are  needed for 
long-term preservation of microfi lms. 
After  Mr.  Hisanaga’s  lecture,  Mr.  Kuroki  explained  the  basic 
treatment  of microfi lms  such as wearing gloves, and demon-
strated  the inspection and dif fusion  process  by winding films 
back. The NDL also displayed deteriorated microfi lms. The train-
ing session ended after an active question and answer session.
5.  Mr.  Kuroki  demonstrated  the inspection and 
diffusion process by winding fi lms  back, wearing 
gloves not so as to leave fi ngerprints on the micro-
fi lm, and a white mask on his face because of the 
acetic acid odor.
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
key. Quick to remove watermark and save PDF text, image, table, hyperlink and bookmark to Word without losing format. Powerful components
how to delete text in a pdf file; delete text pdf file
C# PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from PDF
Text: Delete Text from PDF. Text: Replace Text in PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste Edit, Delete Metadata. Watermark: Add Watermark to PDF
delete text from pdf with acrobat; pdf editor delete text
36
I
n
t
e
r
n
a
t
i
o
n
a
l
P
r
e
s
e
r
v
a
t
i
o
n
N
e
w
s
N
o
.
5
6
M
a
y
2
0
1
2
Events
and Training
Announcements
78
th
IFLA General Conference 
and Assembly, PAC Open Session, 
13 August 2012, Helsinki, Finland
At  the occasion  of the  78
th
IFLA  General 
Conference which will take place in Helsin-
ki, Finland, on the following topic: “Librar-
ies  Now!  – Inspiring,  Surprising,  Empow-
ering”,  the  IFL A-PAC  Core  Activity  will 
organize  a  two-hour  session  on “Storage 
and Repositories: New Preservation and 
Access Strategies” on August 13, 2012.
Programme
•   “The  Changing  F ace  of  S torage  at  the 
British Library”
by  Deborah  Novotny,  Head  of Collection 
Care, The British Library, London, UK
•  “Automated Storage and Retrieval System: 
a Time-tested Innovation”
by  Helen  Heinrich,  Chair  of  Technical 
Services,  and  Eric  Willis,  Library  Systems 
Administrator,  California S tate  University, 
Northridge, USA
•  “Moving to New Digital Storage: Migrat-
ing and Reloading Collections”
by  Tanja  de Boer,  Head  Collection Car e, 
and Matthijs van Otegem, Head of Opera-
tions, Koninklijke Bibliotheek, The Hague, 
The Netherlands
•  “The Creation and Upcoming Revision of 
Archival  and Special Collections Facilities: 
Guidelines for Archivists, Librarians, Archi-
tects, and Engineers, a National Standard of 
the Society of American Archivists.”
by Diane Vogt-O’Connor, Chief of Conser-
vation,  Library  of  Congr ess,  Washington, 
DC, USA
More  information on the  offi cial  website: 
http://conference.ifl a.org/ifl a78
International Council of Archives 
Congress, 20-24 August 2012, 
Brisbane, Australia
The National Archives of Australia will wel-
come  the ICA  Congr ess  in A ugust  2012, 
in  the city of Brisbane on the east coast of 
Australia.
The aim is to provide an environment that 
stimulates debate, encourages the exchange 
of  ideas and experience and ackno wledges 
the  challenges that face all ar chives  in the 
21
st
century.
The  congress  will  examine  our  ‘climate  of 
change’ through the themes:
•  Sustainability:  Archives  recognising  archi-
val  and  information  management  chal-
lenges  and working  together on strategies  
to ensure access, preservation, security, and 
longevity of evidence and information.
•  Trust: Archives supporting good governance 
and  accountability,  advocating  ethical  and  
professional processes, developing standards 
and gaining international acceptance.
•  Identity: Archives helping the community 
to  connect  with  their  heritage,  disco ver 
their  individual  stories  and  protect  their 
rights;  strengthening  the  v alue,  impact 
and  infl  uence  of archivists  and informa-
tion managers.
More  information on the confer ence  web-
site: http://www.ica2012.com/
Contact: info@ica2012.com
International Conference 
“The Memory of the World 
in the Digital Age: 
Digitization and Preservation”, 
26-28 September 2012, 
Vancouver, British Columbia, 
Canada
UNESCO’s  Memory  of  the  World  Pro-
gramme, in cooperation with the School of 
Library,  Archival  and I nformation  Studies 
and  with the Librar y  of the U niversity  of 
British  Columbia, and in par tnership  with 
IFLA,  ICA, ICOM,  WIPO,  Google,  Mi-
crosoft  and  others, is  sponsoring  a  thr ee-
day conference concerning the preservation 
of  documentary  heritage. This  Conference 
will  provide  a platform to sho wcase  major 
initiatives that could lead to synergies both 
in research and implementation. 
An  open, dedicated space will be soon es-
tablished on UNESCO’s CI website for this 
event which will provide a restricted area to 
share documents. 
The  Conference  will  be  opened  b y  UN-
ESCO’s Director-General in the presence of 
the more than 500 participants who are ex-
pected  to attend. E nglish/French  interpre-
tation  will  be  pr ovided.  Participation  will 
be  open to all those inter ested  in heritage 
preservation:  government  decision-makers 
and policy planners, practitioners and pro-
fessionals,  as  well  as academics,  legal  spe-
cialists, information and digital technicians, 
representatives of the private sector, gradu-
ate students in the heritage disciplines, etc. 
Participants  from  developing  countries are 
strongly  encouraged  to  attend  and  some 
fi nancial  support  may be pr ovided  to par-
tially cover their expenses.
The ICOMOS Symposium, 
“Reducing Risks to Cultural 
Heritage from Natural 
and Human-Caused Disasters”, 
31 October 2012, Beijing, China
At  the  r ecent  ICOMOS  G eneral  Assem-
bly  in  P aris,  the  inter disciplinary  theme 
for  the Scientifi c Council Triennial Action 
Plan  for  2012-14  was  discussed.  Taking 
into consideration increasing risks to tangi-
ble  and  intangible  cultural  heritage  due to 
various  natural and human-caused factors, 
the  themes for the  scientifi  c  symposia for 
the  next three  Advisory  Committee meet-
ings will focus on risks resulting from natu-
ral  and  human-caused  disasters  (2012), 
globalization  and  uncontr olled  develop-
ment  (2013),  and  loss  of  traditions  and 
collective  memory  (2015).  Consideration 
of  risks also mar ks  a shift fr om  reactive  to 
a preventive approach for conservation that 
seeks to put emphasis on risk reduction and 
preparedness.
The  three  themes  will  bring  forward  the 
underlying  causes for risks to cultural her-
itage;  tools  and  methodologies  for  their 
assessment;  and  policies,  strategies  and 
techniques  for  r educing  potential  thr eats 
to  the future  of cultural heritage aimed at 
protecting  and managing our irr eplaceable 
cultural  resources  for  present  and  future 
generations.
Cultural  heritage  is  exposed  to numer ous 
disasters  resulting  from  natural  hazar ds 
such as earthquakes, fl oods, cyclones, as in-
creasingly human-induced hazards, such as 
arson, armed confl ict and civil unrest. The 
great  East J apan  Tohuko  Earthquake  and 
Tsunami  (2011);  Thailand  Floods  (2011); 
Haiti, Chile and Christchurch earthquakes 
(2010);  and  recent  civil  unrests  in  Libya, 
Egypt, Yemen and Syria have caused serious 
damage  to tangible and  intangible  attrib-
utes of cultural-heritage sites ranging fr om 
historic buildings, museums, historic settle-
ments, as well as cultural landscapes.
Undoubtedly  the  fr equency  and  intensity 
of  some  disasters  has  incr eased  recently 
due  to impact of G lobal  Climate Change, 
as  well  as  social,  economic  and  political 
changes. Considering these challenges, The 
ICOMOS  Symposium,  Reducing  Risks to 
Cultural  Heritage  from  Natural  and  H u-
man-Caused Disasters, aims to assess these 
risks  and formulate policies, strategies and 
techniques  for  reducing  risks  to  disasters, 
responding  to  emergencies and r ecovering 
from disasters. During the one-day sympo-
sium, position papers and case studies will 
be presented on the following themes:
1. Techniques and Strategies for Mitigating 
Risks  to  C ultural  Heritage  from  Natural 
and Human-Caused Disasters
 How  can  w e  develop  appropriate  tech-
C# PDF Text Highlight Library: add, delete, update PDF text
etc. Able to remove highlighted text in PDF document in C#.NET. Support to change PDF highlight color in Visual C# .NET class. Able
how to edit and delete text in pdf file online; how to delete text from a pdf
37
I
n
t
e
r
n
a
t
i
o
n
a
l
P
r
e
s
e
r
v
a
t
i
o
n
N
e
w
s
N
o
.
5
6
M
a
y
2
0
1
2
niques for mitigating risks to cultural herit-
age from earthquakes and fl oods, cyclones/
hurricanes  and fi res  by  considering  factors 
of safety, as well as values?
-  What  are traditional materials, skills and 
knowledge  systems for  disaster mitigation 
of cultural heritage, and how can we utilize 
them in present context?
- Which maintenance and monitoring strat-
egies  can be adopted for r educing  risks to 
cultural heritage due to disasters?
- How can we enhance security of cultural-
heritage  sites to pr event  risks  of terr orism 
and theft?
2. Methodology and Tools for Undertaking 
Risk Assessment of Cultural Heritage
- What are various approaches and tools for 
assessing risks to cultural-heritage sites from 
natural and human-caused disasters?
 What  are  good  practices in documenta-
tion, inventorying and mapping for record-
ing  and analyzing risks due to natural and 
human-caused factors?
-  How can we  communicate these risks to 
decision makers?
3. Protecting Cultural Heritage in Times of 
Confl ict and Other Emergencies
 What  kind  of  policies,  techniques  and 
strategies can be adopted for protecting cul-
tural-heritage sites in the times of confl icts 
and other emergencies?
-  How can we  effectively  use international 
legal  instruments  and coordinate  with  or-
ganizations such as Blue Shield?
4.  Planning  for  Post-Disaster  Recovery  of 
Cultural Heritage
 How  do  we  avoid  hasty  destruction  of 
vulnerable  materials  and str uctures  (earth, 
stone  and  wood)  of  ar chitectural  heritage 
located in disaster-prone areas?
- How do we undertake post-disaster dam-
age assessment of cultural heritage?
- How can we develop monitoring and eval-
uation  strategies for post-disaster inter ven-
tions and reconstruction?
- How do we evaluate costs of post-disaster 
recovery and rehabilitation of cultural herit-
age?
-  How  do we  engage various  international 
and  national stakeholders for post-disaster 
recovery of cultural heritage?
 How  can intangible  heritage  be utiliz ed 
effectively for post-disaster recovery and re-
habilitation?
5.  Awareness-Raising  and  Capacity-Build-
ing for Managing Disaster Risks to Cultural 
Heritage
- How do we engage communities for dis-
aster-risk  management of cultural-heritage 
sites?
 How  do we  build the capacity of crafts-
men, professionals and decision makers for 
managing  risks  to  cultural  heritage  fr om 
natural and human-caused factors?
In the fi rst session, open to the general pub-
lic, selected papers will be presented. Posters 
will be accepted as space and the blind peer-
review process permits.
Part of the second session will be devoted to 
breakout groups for ISC members wherein 
each working group will be asked to refl ect 
on  specifi c  topics and ho w  they relates  to 
their ISCs.
The breakout groups will return for a fi nal 
plenary session to present each group’s rec-
ommendations  which will then be synthe-
sized  into formal  r ecommendations  to be 
distributed  and discussed b y  the Advisory 
Committee  and e-published for do wnload 
on  the  ICOMOS  website  along  with  se-
lected papers.
Call for Abstracts: “Reducing 
Risks to Heritage – International 
Meeting 2012”, 28-30 November 
2012, Cultural Heritage Agency 
of the Netherlands, Amersfoort, 
the Netherlands
Since 2005 ICCROM, Canadian Conserva-
tion Institute (CCI) and Cultural Heritage 
Agency of the Netherlands (RCE) (formerly 
ICN) have worked on developing and dis-
seminating  the risk management appr oach 
for  cultural  heritage  and  hav e  organized 
six  joint  courses.  The  most  r ecent  course 
included,  for  the  fi   rst  time,  a  substantial 
distance-learning component to enable par-
ticipants to apply the risk management ap-
proach  in their o wn  working  and cultural 
context.  The  method  and  tools  that  hav e 
been developed for the course proved to be 
applicable for all types of heritage, ranging 
from  single wall painting and large collec-
tions to historic buildings and ar chaeologi-
cal sites.
At the end of this year the successful coop-
eration will be concluded with a meeting in 
which  the  experiences  and gained  kno wl-
edge  from  all  these  y ears  will  be  shar ed 
among former course participants and with 
anyone else interested in risk management.
Background
Today,  preventive  conservation  is  widely 
recognized as a priority line of action. How-
ever,  decision-makers  ar e  confronted  with 
diffi  cult  choices  in  planning  conser vation 
strategies  with  limited  resources.  Should 
we  put all our r esources  in a sophisticated 
environmental  control  system,  or  should 
we upgrade the fi re control system instead? 
What exactly will happen to this collection 
of costumes and basketry if they remain ex-
posed to this level of light? And in the long 
term, how will this damage compare to that 
caused by the increasing number of visitors? 
The risk management approach, which in-
forms and guides decision makers in many 
other  fi  elds,  offers  a  sound  methodology 
to  incorporate the most r ecent  knowledge 
into current practice. It allows an integrated 
identifi  cation  and  analysis  of  all  expected 
damages and losses to cultural property and 
a mitigation strategy to reduce these risks. It 
thus provides a useful tool for the design of 
more effi cient conservation strategies.
Aim of the meeting and Program
The  aim  of  the  meeting  is  to  synthesiz
and  share  knowledge  and  experience  with 
former participants of the ICCROM-CCI-
RCE international courses and  exchange it 
with others who are interested in risk man-
agement. The  meeting aims to consolidate 
and  expand  the  risk  networ k  and explore 
new directions for the future. The three-day 
program will contain presentations, discus-
sions,  and  social  activities.  The  program 
will be made available by summer.
Location: Amersfoort
The  meeting  will  take  place  at  the  C
ul-
tural  Heritage  Agency of the N etherlands 
in Amersfoort. The building which houses 
the Ministry of Culture’s centre of expertise 
and  support  for  preservation  and  manage-
ment of moveable, built, archeological and 
landscape  heritage  in the N etherlands  is a 
showpiece of modern architecture in a his-
toric setting. 
Registration and Abstract submission
You are invited to register for the meeting. 
There  is  a  limited  number  of seats  av ail-
able and acceptance will be done on a fi rst 
come,  fi rst serve basis. The registration  fee 
of  300€  includes a book of extended ab-
stracts, coffee, tea, lunch each day and din-
ner on Thursday. For former participants of 
the  ICCROM-CCI-ICN/RCE  ‘Reducing 
Risks’  courses the fee is 150€.  Details  for 
payment will be made available later.
To  register  and submit 150 wor d abstracts 
in  English  please  use  the  r egistration/ab-
stract  submission  form  (http://fd7.form-
desk.com/archis/reducing_risks). Deadline 
for  submission  is 30  J une  2012.  The  or-
ganizing  partners  may make a selection or 
give  suggestions before  fi nal  acceptance in 
the  program.  For  questions  about the ab-
stracts  you  can contact B art  Ankersmit at: 
b.ankersmit@cultureelerfgoed.nl
Travel grants
Former participants of the ‘Reducing Risks’ 
courses  can apply for an ICCR OM  grant. 
Contact iv@iccrom.org for details.
Travel and Accommodation
Participants  will  need  to  make  their  o wn 
38
I
n
t
e
r
n
a
t
i
o
n
a
l
P
r
e
s
e
r
v
a
t
i
o
n
N
e
w
s
N
o
.
5
6
M
a
y
2
0
1
2
arrangements  for trav el,  visas  and accom-
modation. Amersfoort can easily be reached 
from  the  international airpor t  Amsterdam 
Schiphol by train in 35 minutes (2nd class 
single  ticket €10,00).  Amersfoort  offers 
 variety  of  hotels with r ooms  for two at 
€100-150 per night. A list of hotels will be 
made available soon.
Organising partners
Cultural  Heritage  Agency  of  the  N ether-
lands (RCE): www.cultureelerfgoed.nl
International  Centre  for  the  study  of  the 
Preservation  and  R estoration  of  C ultural 
Property (ICCROM): www.iccrom.org
Canadian  Conservation  Institute  (CCI-
ICC): www.cci-icc.gc.ca
Contact:
Dr Bart Ankersmit
Senior Researcher   | Research
Rijksdienst voor het Cultureel Erfgoed 
Cultural Heritage Agency
Smallepad 5 | 3811 MG Amersfoort
Postbus 1600 | 3800 BP Amersfoort
Tel. 033 – 421 7421 
Fax 033 – 421 7799
La biblioteca nacional 
de Venezuela ofrece residencias 
en preservación y conservación 
documental
La Biblioteca Nacional de la República Bo-
livariana  de  Venezuela  y  el  Archivo  Gen-
eral de la Nación, ofrecen estudios teórico-
prácticos  en  pr eservación  y  conser vación 
documental,  dirigidos  a  los  r esponsables 
de  la  pr eservación  y conservación  de  fon-
dos  documentales,  bajo  la  modalidad  de 
residencias,  con la fi nalidad  de preservar  y 
conservar  la  memoria  documental  de  los 
pueblos.
Estas residencias tendrán dos ediciones anu-
ales.  La  primera  cohorte  inició  actividades 
el  10 de abril del pr esente  año en  la sede 
del Centro Nacional de Preservación Docu-
mental  de  la  B iblioteca  Nacional  de  Ven-
ezuela.  Este Centro,  pionero  en el ár ea  de 
la preservación y la conservación, es recono-
cido  como  Centr o  Regional  IFLA/PAC 
(Programa de Conservación  y Preservación 
(PAC))  de  la F ederación  Internacional  de 
Instituciones  y  Asociaciones  B ibliotecarias 
(IFLA)  para  América  Latina  y  el  Caribe 
desde  1988,  y  tiene  entr e  sus  principales 
objetivos fortalecer el conocimiento técnico 
en esta área a nivel regional. 
Es por ello que estas residencias tienen una 
convocatoria abierta e internacional para la 
segunda  cohorte  que tendrá lugar durante 
el  segundo semestre  de 2012 con una du-
ración  de  ocho  semanas  distribuidas  en 
cuatro módulos: I. Principios Teóricos de la 
Preservación  Documental,  II. Preservación 
en  sitio, III. P reservación  de colecciones y 
IV. Conservación de colecciones. Es impor-
tante  resaltar  que  la metodología  utilizada 
en estas residencias supone el acompañami-
ento personalizado por parte de expertos en 
el área, lo cual facilita el proceso de aprendi-
zaje.
Los  participantes  van  rotando  por los dis-
tintos módulos, a medida que van desarrol-
lando  el  trabajo,  con  el  acompañamiento 
del tutor asignado en cada una de las tareas 
propias de la preservación y la conservación 
documental;  desde  el diagnóstico  hasta la 
restauración;  considerando que cada docu-
mento  debe tratarse de manera  par ticular, 
de acuerdo con el daño que presente.
Los  interesados,  pueden  visitar  la  página 
web de la Biblioteca Nacional de Venezue-
la, www.bnv.gob.ve  en  donde  encontrarán 
un  link con  toda la  información  necesar-
ia,  o comunicarse  a través de la dir ección 
electrónica comite.academico@bnv.gob.ve 
 por  los  númer os  telefónicos  (58)(212) 
5059341/5059018.
Report
IFLA International Newspaper 
Conference, 11-13 April 2012, 
Bibliothèque nationale de France, 
Paris, France
The  Bibliothèque  nationale de  France, the 
IFLA  Newspaper  Section  and  the  IFL A-
PAC  Core  Activity  organized  in  Paris  the 
IFLA International Newspaper Conference 
2012,  in the  BnF  G rand  Auditorium,  on 
April 11-13, 2012. The  topic was: “News-
paper  Digitization  and  Preservation:  New 
prospects,  Stakeholders,  Practices,  Users 
and Business Models.”
The Conference was aimed at assessing ma-
jor  ongoing  mass  digitization  pr ojects  in 
Europe  and  throughout  the world under-
taken  by  libraries and ar chives  but also b y 
press  groups,  while  dealing  with  the  pres-
ervation strategies inherently linked to gen-
eral digitization policies. 
The  Conference  was opened  by  two  key-
note  speakers, Emmanuel Hoog,  President 
of Agence France-Presse, and Patrick Eveno, 
Media Historian, Pantheon-Sorbonne Paris 
1 University, France. 
The fi rst day was dedicated to the very chal-
lenging  task public institutions and ne ws-
paper groups have to face in order to store, 
preserve  and  provide  access  to  their  huge 
newspaper  collections.  N ewspapers  such 
as Le Monde, Corriere della Sera and Ouest-
France presented their strategies in terms of 
digitization  and all raised the same issues, 
including:
- the diffi culty to manage the great number 
of editions.
1.  Opening  of  the  Confer ence:  Jacqueline  Sanson, 
Director  General,  BnF,  Emmanuel  Hoog,  President, 
Agence  France-Presse, Frederick Zarndt, Chair, IFLA 
Newspaper Section, and Patrick Eveno, Media Histo-
rian, Pantheon-Sorbonne Paris 1 University. © David 
Paul Carr/BnF
39
I
n
t
e
r
n
a
t
i
o
n
a
l
P
r
e
s
e
r
v
a
t
i
o
n
N
e
w
s
N
o
.
5
6
M
a
y
2
0
1
2
 the  scanning  sour ce  issue: micr  ofim  or 
original  paper  pages,  kno wing  that  scan-
ning  from  microfi lm  is faster and cheaper , 
but  can  raise  some  quality  pr oblems.  In-
deed, some microfi lm pages may not fi t the 
quality level expected, causing errors in ar-
ticle texts after the OCR process. Neverthe-
less, in most cases, rescanning from original 
paper page does not solve the quality issue, 
the paper itself being the problem.
Public institutions also presented their own 
digitization  programmes,  such as the BnF , 
and  all  agr eed  that,  to  fund  the  digitiza-
tion  of a gr owing  and at-risk collection, a 
business  model  has  to  be  found.  O
ne  of 
the solutions proposed is the private/public 
sector partnership. The most representative 
case is the British Library’s partnership with 
brightsolid which at their own cost and own 
risk invest to digitize millions of pages and 
establish a business model that will enable 
them to get a return on their investment.
The second day focused on Collecting and 
Access. Two different perspectives were pre-
sented:  public  institutions  thr ough  legal 
deposit  (the  BnF  pr esented  its deposit of 
online Newspapers) and private aggregators 
such  as  Europresse.com,  both  facing  ne w 
challenges  due to  the dev elopment  of on-
line  press  (particularly  “pure  players”)  and 
the  increasing  fl  ow  of  information, which 
force  to rethink  the way of pr ocessing and 
storing.  The  other  morning  pr esentations 
dealt with  recent  developments  of  libraries 
in  terms of access and ne w users practices, 
particularly crowdsourcing.
The afternoon session was completely dedi-
cated to the archiving of Press Photographs, 
in  public  institutions  such  as  the  BnF  and 
the National Library of Austria, and in agen-
cies such as AFP and Getty Images. It is the 
same  problem  as for ne wspaper  collection: 
the size of the collections to digitize (for in-
stance,  regarding  the Getty  Images  Hulton 
Archive, only 0,6% of the collection is digi-
tized), the importance of metadata, the issue 
of long-term preservation of digital fi les and 
storage  capacities, to which must be added  
specifi c  copyright  issues, r einforced  by  the 
Internet revolution which leads to a growing 
use  of images. O nce  again, a ne w  business 
model  has to be defi ned.  For  instance, the 
Austrian  National  Library  chose  to  coop-
erate  with the Austrian  Press  Agency (APA 
PictureDesk). The goal of this cooperation is 
to give access to the APA Press Photography 
to  students and r esearchers  at the A ustrian 
National Library and to exploit internation-
ally  the rich historical photographic collec-
tions  of  the A ustrian  National  Library  via 
APA PictureDesk.
The third day was dedicated to the pr eser-
vation of original and digital newspaper col-
lections.  Stress  was put on the  preparation 
of  the  paper  originals  befor e  digitization 
and  on the tr eatment  of the  physical col-
lections, such as deacidifi cation. The British 
Library showed that they chose to invest on 
the storage facilities with lo w-oxygen more 
than on mass deacidifi cation treatment.
2.  Shalev  Vayness,  ISAKO,  Claudio Albanese, IDM, 
Walter  Colombo,  D igitalizzazione  ArchivioC orriere 
della  Sera,  Jacek  Brzezinski, Ouest-France,  Sebastien 
Carganico, Le Monde,  and Philippe Mezzasalma, De-
partment Law, Economics, Politics, BnF. © David Paul 
Carr/BnF
The  last session focused on the long-term 
preservation  of  digitiz ed  and  born-digital 
newspaper  collections,  which  raises  tech-
nical  challenges,  par ticularly  about  the 
volume to manage, the v ariability and het-
erogeneity  of the data, formats  and obso-
lescence issues, storage capacities and costs. 
The BnF presented its scalable preservation 
and archiving repository, SPAR.
The  conference  attendees  also  had  the 
opportunity  to  visit  a  major  exhibition 
dedicated  to the histor y  of Newspapers  in 
France untitled “La Presse à la Une”. A visit 
of  the  BnF  Technical  Centre  in B ussy  St 
Georges was also proposed on Friday after-
noon, on registration. Moreover, during the 
whole  conference,  sponsors  displayed  their 
materials in the Auditorium foyer.
Christiane  Baryla  would like to thank the 
Newspaper  Section,  the  Confer ence  Sci-
entifi c  Committee, the BnF dir ection  and 
staff  who helped with the organization of 
the  event  and  the  Confer ence  Sponsors: 
Zeutschel,  CCS, Isako,  Diadeis,  I2S Digi-
book, Planman Technologies, Cedrom-Sni, 
Bookkeeper and Stouls.
The speakers’ presentations are available on 
IFLA-PAC webpage at:
www.ifl a.org/en/node/5932
PA C   C O R E   A C T I V I T Y
USA
and CANADA
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
101 Independence Avenue, S. E.
Washington, D. C. 20540-4500 USA
Director: Mark SWEENEY
Tel: + 1 202 707 7423
Fax: + 1 202 707 3434
E-mail: mswe@loc.gov
http://marvel.loc.gov
http://www.loc.gov/index.html
LATIN AMERICA
and THE CARIBBEAN
NATIONAL LIBRARY 
AND INFORMATION
SYSTEM AUTHORITY (NALIS)
PO Box 547
Port of Spain - 
Trinidad and Tobago
Director: Lucia PHILLIP
Tel: + 868 624 4466
Fax: + 868 625 6096
E-mail: lphillip@nalis.gov.tt
www.nalis.gov.tt/
BIBLIOTECA NACIONAL
DE VENEZUELA
Apartado Postal 6525
Carmelitas Caracas 1010 - Venezuela
Director: Ramón SIFONTES
Tel: + 58 212 505 90 51
E-mail: ramon87s@hotmail.com
www.bnv.bib.ve/
FUNDAÇAO BIBLIOTECA NACIONAL DE BRASIL
Av. Rio Branco 219/39
20040-0008 Rio de Janeiro - RJ - Brasil
Director: Jayme SPINELLI
Tel: + 55 21 2220 1973
Fax: + 55 21 2544 8596
E-mail: jspinelli@bn.br
www.bn.br
BIBLIOTECA NACIONAL DE CHILE
Av. Libertador Bernardo O’higgins N
o
651
Santiago - Chile
Director: Maria Antonieta PALMA VARAS
Tel: + 56-2 360 52 39
Fax: + 56-2 638 04 61
E-mail: antonieta.palma@bndechile.cl
www.bibliotecanacional.cl/
PAC INTERNATIONAL FOCAL POINT
AND REGIONAL CENTRE FOR
WESTERN EUROPE,
NORTH AFRICA AND MIDDLE EAST
BIBLIOTHÈQUE NATIONALE DE FRANCE
Quai François-Mauriac
75706 Paris cedex 13 - France
Director: Christiane BARYLA
Tel: + 33 (0) 1 53 79 59 70
Fax: + 33 (0) 1 53 79 59 80
E-mail: christiane.baryla@bnf.fr
http://www.ifla.org/en/pac
EASTERN
EUROPE and THE CIS
LIBRARY FOR FOREIGN LITERATURE
Nikoloyamskaya str. 1
Moscow 109 189 - Russia
Director: Rosa SALNIKOVA
Tel: + 7 495 915 3696
Fax: + 7 495 915 3637
E-mail: rsalnikova@libfl.ru
http://www.libfl.ru/index-eng.shtml
NATIONAL LIBRARY 
OF THE REPUBLIC OF KAZAKHSTAN
Almaty 0500B, Abai av. 14 - 
Republic of Kazakhstan
Director: Gulissa BALABEKOVA
Tel: +7 727 267 2886
Fax: +7 727 267 2883
E-mail: worldbooks@nlrk.kz
http://www.nlrk.kz/
Director: 
NATIONAL DIET LIBRARY
10-1, Nagatacho 1-chome,
Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, 100-8924 - Japan
Naoko KOBAYASHI
Tel: + 81 3 3581 2331
Fax: + 81 3 3592 0783
E-mail: pacasia@ndl.go.jp
www.ndl.go.jp/
NATIONAL LIBRARY
OF KOREA
KRILI/Preservation office
Banpo-Ro 664, Seocho-gu
Seoul 137-702 - Korea
Director: Guiwon LEE
Tel: + 82-02-535-4142
E-mail: leegw@mail.nl.go.kr
ASIA
NATIONAL LIBRARY OF CHINA
33 Zhongguancun Nandajie
Beijing 100081 - China
Director: Zhang Zhiqing
Fax: + 86 10 6841 9271
E-mail: interco@nlc.gov.cn
http://www.nlc.gov.cn/en/services/
iflapac_chinacenter
FRENCH-SPEAKING AFRICA
BIBLIOTHÈQUE NATIONALE DU BÉNIN
BP 401
Porto Novo - Bénin
Director: Francis Marie-José ZOGO
Tel/Fax: + 229 20 22 25 85
E-mail: derosfr@yahoo.fr
www.bj.refer.org/benin_ct
SOUTHERN AFRICA
NATIONAL LIBRARY 
OF SOUTH AFRICA
Private Bag X990
Pretoria - South Africa
OCEANIA
and SOUTH EAST ASIA
NATIONAL LIBRARY
OF AUSTRALIA
Parkes Place
Canberra Act 2600 - Australia
Director: Pam GATENBY
Tel: + 61 2 6262 1672
Fax: + 61 2 6273 2545
E-mail: pgatenby@nla.gov.au
Director: Douwe DRIJFHOUT
Tel: + 27 21 424 6320 ext 5642
Fax: + 27 21 423 3359
E-mail: douwe.drijfhout@nlsa.ac.za
www.nla.gov.au/
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested