50 
decisis, considering the Court cited three prior opinions in which it had reached a similar result 
ordering a party to tie Bates numbers to specific Requests. 
The Court reflected on its reasoning as enunciated from the bench: 
The Court said that it understood rule 34(b)(2)(E)(i) 
requiring a responding party to produce 
documents ³as they are kept in the usual course of business or .
. . organize and label them to 
correspond to the categories in the request´ —
to apply both to hard copy documents and to 
ESI, as both are subsets of the catchall term ³documents,´ and that rule 34(b)(2)(E)(ii) and (iii) 
are  additional  provisions  related 
only  to  the  production  of  ESI.  …  The  Court  expressed 
uncertainty regarding how a party would produce ESI ³in the usual course of business,´ and that, 
if  the  party  were  to  go  through  the  documents  and  remove  privileged  or  unresponsive 
documents before placing the files on a storage device, this production would not meet the 
³usual course of business´ requirement and the party would have to label the documents to 
correspond  to  the categories  in  the  request.  …  The  Court  compared hard  copy document 
storage to ESI and noted that it would be difficult to find an analog to allowing opposing counsel 
access to boxes of information kept in warehouses, because it would require the responding 
party to give the other party access to the responding party’s computer system
, or to place all of 
the files on a storage device without culling out any unresponsive or privileged files….
The Court, it appears, was less than supremely confident in its ruling.  Understandably, as these 
were not your usual, imperious “Let them eat TIFF” Defendants.
They approached the Plaintiffs 
and  inquired  about  preferred  forms  of  production.   They  supplied  native  files  in  native 
forms and paired same to particular requests.  They promised that the paper documents were 
ordered as in the usual course, notwithstanding their digitized format.  They graciously added 
searchability to unsearchable paper documents and furnished an index. 
I’ve seen worse…
much worse. 
A month later, the Court held a hearing on an unrelated matter and the defense asked the Court 
to reconsider its directive to pair the Bates numbers of the electrified paper with the requests to 
which they are responsive.  
It’s not clear from the opinion why the work hadn’t been done in the 
intervening month, and I expect Plaintiffs’ counsel couldn’t have passed a BB when the Court 
said it “was seriously rethinking its prior ruling” and that “some of the commentators and some of 
the cases conflate.”
I hope it wasn’t some blindsided young associate who had to comment and conflate all that back 
to the partners.  [Have you seen Breaking Bad?  
They don’t mess around in Albuquerque].
The Court made it easy for the defense, stating that, if the Defendants could prove that the ESI 
was produced as it was kept in the usual course of business, without litigation-related alteration, 
then the Court was inclined to rule that no labeling would be required.  But the Court added, 
“once you’ve set there and you had your paralegals go through it, you’ve decided that this is 
Pdf editor delete text - delete, remove text from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# developers to use mature APIs to delete and remove text content from PDF document
delete text pdf document; how to delete text from pdf document
Pdf editor delete text - VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File
how to delete text from pdf; delete text from pdf
51 
relevant, this is not relevant, we’re going to go through it for privilege, we’re going to Bates 
stamp it, I don’t think that’s . . . the usual course of business.”
Undaunted, the defense provided a declaration, and a damn fine one, too!  The Declaration 
establishes  that  the  only  documents  removed  from  production  were  privileged  ones,  and 
supplies a breakdown of contents by Bates number ranges and sources.  The affidavit also 
confirms my suspicion that the venerable Plaintiffs’ 
firm was trying to navigate e-discovery in an 
“old school” way, without benefit of basic e
-discovery tools. 
The Plaintiffs supplied no counter-declaration from anyone with any e-discovery expertise (or 
from anyone at all, insofar as PACER reveals). 
Reminder: Evidence is good.  Judges like evidence more than lawyer talk
At this juncture, the Court could have put this matter to bed in three ways, without muss, fuss or 
dicta: 
1.  The  Court  could  have  found  that  the  material  in  question  derived  from  hard-copy 
documents clearly subject to 34(b)(2)(E)(i) at the start of litigation, and the conversion of 
these paper documents to searchable electronic forms for use by counsel in discovery 
didn’t change their essential character for purposes of requiring that they be or
ganized as 
they are kept in the usual course of business or organized and labeled to correspond to 
the categories of a request.  Plaintiff prevails. 
2.  The Court could have found that the electronic counterparts of the paper documents had 
been produced in substantially the way they were kept in the usual course of business, 
making reasonable allowances for variations attendant to the parties’ agreement to scan 
and OCR the material and the need to protect privileged content.  Documents withheld as 
privileged would necessarily be identified in a privilege log by Bates number, so, their 
location within the collection could be readily established.  Defendant prevails. 
3.  The  Court  could  have  found  (and  did  find)  that  the  Parties  agreement  respecting 
production was a stipulation that altogether removed the issue from the purview of Rule 
34(b)(2)(E), and the Court could have fashioned any outcome it  deemed proper and 
proportionate without further need to address the (inapplicable) Rule 34(b)(20(E) in dicta. 
Instead, the Court pursued a broad-ranging assessment of Rule 34(b)(2)(E) that stirs an eddy of 
uncertainty. 
1. 
For example, the Court termed “unavailing” the argument that the source documents 
weren’t  ESI  because  they  existed  in  hard  copy  form  and  were  only  imaged  for 
production.  The Court reasoned that the agreement to image the documents was, in fact, 
the parties stipulating out of the rule’s default provisions.
VB.NET PDF- HTML5 PDF Viewer for VB.NET Project
C#: ASP.NET PDF Editor; C#: WPF PDF Viewer; C#: Create PDF from Word; C# Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract
how to delete text in pdf converter professional; pdf text remover
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
framework class. An advanced PDF editor enable C# users to edit PDF text, image and pages in Visual Studio .NET project. Support to
remove text from pdf; how to delete text in a pdf acrobat
52 
This makes little sense.  Certainly, parties can agree to stipulate around Rule 34(b)(2)(E); but 
such a stipulation should be clear and express.  
It needn’t follow that because one party accedes 
to another party’s desire to make paper records more convenient, organization of the information 
is optional.  Why should a mutually beneficial endeavor come at the risk that an opponent is free 
to destroy the usual and customary organization of the evidence or at the cost of a requesting 
party’s right to know what’s responsive to what?
The  parties  merely  settled  upon forms of  production.   They  made  no  bargain  respecting 
the organization of production, nor did they agree to restrict the scope of production.  These are 
three distinct dimensions of discoverable information. 
It was  the producing  party’s avowed intention to convert the  hard
-copy documents to TIFF 
images.   Had  they  done  so  without  the  agreement  of  the  requesting  party,  they  would 
nonetheless have been obliged to produce the hard-copy documents as kept in the usual course 
or organized and labeled to correspond to the request.  Judge Browning made quite clear that, 
“’if at the beginning of the litigation the documents existed in document hard copy form,’ then the 
Defendant could not unilaterally convert the documents into ESI.”
However, if the requesting 
party cooperates and allows a producing party to convert hard-copy documents to TIFF or PDF, 
the requesting party is now agreeing, sub silentio, to forego organization of the documents.  The 
producing party is thus free to make an unholy mess of the production from an organizational 
standpoint, and there’s not 
a thing the requesting party can do about it.  
That doesn’t add up.
2.  At the start of the litigation, the 20,000 pages produced were paper records kept in the 
usual course of the Defendants’ business.
From the standpoint of the usual course of the 
Defendant
s’ business, they never changed form.
That is, they did not become ESI in 
conjunction  with  the  customary  operation  or  recordkeeping  of  the  Defendants’ 
business.   So,  they  remained  subject  to  the  provisions  of  Rule  34(b)(2)(E)(i).  
It’s  a 
mistake to equate conversion for the convenience of the lawyers to conversion in the 
usual course of the litigants’ business.
If a lawyer elects to convert ESI to another form like scanned images, the destination form may 
be the form used in the course of the lawyer’s business, but it’s not the form used by the 
producing party 
The Court fails to distinguish between the form and organization of information as used by the 
parties to an action and the (de)form and (dis)organization occasioned by counsel’s wish to 
convert  information  to  something  else.   We  frequently  encounter  this  assumption  in  e-
discovery.  
That is, producing parties assume that requesting parties can’t demand any form 
more complete or utile than the dumbed-
down versions used by producing party’s counsel.
That’s not the rule.
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Delete PDF Page. C#.NET PDF Library - Delete PDF Document Page in C#.NET.
delete text pdf acrobat; how to delete text from pdf with acrobat
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
|. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Insert Text to PDF. Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text.
how to erase text in pdf file; deleting text from a pdf
53 
Requesting parties should be entitled to obtain forms of production that mirror the forms the 
producing parties use, not compelled to accept the degraded forms preferred by the producing 
party’s lawyer.
3.  The form  of  production  does  not  implicate  the organization of  production.  They  are 
different,  and  each  presents  different  opportunities  for  abuse.   A  party  can  produce 
information items in utile, complete and searchable forms but still disrupt organization or 
logical  unitization  (i.e.,  folder  structure)  so  as  to  render  the  production  all  but 
useless.  The notion that electronic search adequately offsets the risk of shuffling and 
other organizational mischief is untenable
—ask anyone who’s ever gotten a malformed 
load file. 
Organizational information, like foldering data and file locations (paths), are as essential to utile 
production today as they were in the paper era, if not more so. 
4. 
I don’t share the Court’s view that potentially responsive documents/ESI collected as 
maintained  in  the  usual  course  of  business  lose  that  character  when  privileged 
documents are culled.  Granted, the collection is not as complete as kept in the usual 
course, but the remaining documents are still organized and in the same form as kept in 
the  usual  course.   In  the paper  era, it  was customary  for the boxes  from  the  legal 
department to be spirited out of the warehouse; and when privileged contents turned up, 
they,  too,  were  pulled.  
Production  by  inspection  didn’t  oblige  a  producing  party  to 
abandon privilege.  Parties need not do so with respect to ESI. 
5. 
Most  problematic  of  all  is  the  Court’s  conclusion  that  provisions  34(b)(2)(E)(i)  and 
34(b)(2)(E)(ii)  “apply  to  distinct,  mutually  exclusive  categories  of  discoverable 
information,” being “Documents,” which the Court calls “a term that does not include ESI,” 
governed  exclusively  by  34(b)(2)(E)(i),  and  ESI,  which  the  Court  says  is  governed 
exclusively by 34(c)(E)(ii).  The Court relies on the views of a distinguished commentator, 
John K. Rabiej.  With respect to Professor Rabiej
who was closely involved with the 
amendments process
his disjunctive interpretation of 34(b)(2)(E) is one thoughtful view; 
but one that seems oddly out of step with the Committee Notes. 
The Court’s  embrace  of such  a  distinction is  regrettable  b
ecause  the  2006  Federal  Rules 
amendments and the Committee Notes that accompany them go to some pains to underscore 
that the term  “documents” includes  ESI.
In  fact,  defining “Documents”  to encompass  data 
compilations has a long and uncontentious history in the Rules. 
The  Court  saw  the  perils,  stating,  “There  is  something  to  be  gained  from  imposing  basic 
organization requirements onto massive productions of ESI; artifacts of ESI can be jumbled 
beyond usefulness 
by dumping them out of their file directories and onto the requesting party 
just as easily as hard copy documents can.”
Indeed, and it happens all the time , though more 
often as a consequence of carelessness than of bad faith. 
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
PDF to Text. |. C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to Text in C#.NET. Empower C# Users to Convert PDF to Text (TXT) in Visual C# with .NET XDoc.PDF Converter Library.
how to erase text in pdf online; how to delete text in pdf converter
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
|. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Search PDF Text. C#.NET PDF SDK - Search and Find PDF Text in C#.NET. C#.NET PDF DLLs for Finding Text in PDF Document.
remove text from pdf preview; how to delete text in pdf using acrobat professional
54 
The organization of ESI in production can fairly and efficiently be made to mirror its organization 
in the usual course of business.  It typically requires little more than competent handling of 
system  metadata.  
It  doesn’t require  granting  an opponent  access  to  a  responding  party’s 
computer systems. 
Here  again,  it’s  useful 
to  distinguish  the  three  dimensions  of  discoverable  ESI: form, 
organization and scope If a party culls privileged content before producing the data for 
inspection, form and organization remain the same; only scope changes
—and it’s appropriate 
that privileged content be  outside  the general scope of discovery.   Any  minimal  impact on 
organization is offset by the obligation to log content withheld as privileged. 
6. 
Finally, it’s an ill wind which blows no man to good.
Judge Browning clarified that his 
ruling  did  not  apply  unless  the  requesting  party  sought  conversion  to  an  imaged 
format.  
“’[I]f at the beginning of the litigation the documents existed in document hard 
copy form,’ then the Defendant could not unilaterally convert the documents into ESI.”
By  that  reasoning,  if  at  the  beginning  of  the  litigation  the  documents  existed  as  ESI,  the 
producing party cannot unilaterally convert the documents into paper or paper-like forms (e.g., 
images) unless the requesting party stipulates to same
Quoting Professor Ra
biej,  the Court  notes that “while (E)(i) document  production  gives the 
producing party the right to choose whether to produce ‘in the usual course of business” or 
“label[ed] … to correspond to the categories in the request,’ (E)(ii) puts the ball in the re
questing 
party’s court by first giving them the option to ‘specify a form for producing’ ESI. Fed. R. Civ. P. 
34(b)(2)(E)(i)-(ii). It is only if the requesting party declines to specify a form that the producing 
party is offered a choice between producing 
in the form ‘in which it is ordinary maintained’ —
native format 
or ‘in a reasonably useful form or forms.’ Fed. R. Civ. P. 34(b)(2)(E)(i)
-
(ii).”
That’s powerful stuff, and dead right.
Producing parties have long assumed that they were free 
to ignore a 
requesting party’s specification of form so long as they produced in a form claimed to 
be “reasonably usable.”
Not so.  
As the Court notes, the “reasonably usable” option applies only 
when a requesting party fails to specify a form. 
The lesson for requesting parties is always, always, ALWAYS specify forms for production in 
your requests.  If you want Word documents produced natively, SAY SO!  If you want e-mail in 
functional forms, specify the forms!  The Rules afford requesting  parties the crucial right to 
specify form or forms of production, and lawyers who fail to avail themselves of that right are 
inviting production of less utile and -complete forms.  
If you wear a “KICK ME” sign on your 
bootie, don’t be surprised by the boot.
So, with apologies to Judge Browning, the result seems right, but the rationale not so much.  
It’s 
dicta likely to be cited in support of mischief, and I know that’s not what the Court wished.
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project. Remove and delete metadata from PDF file.
delete text pdf preview; delete text pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
›› VB.NET PDF: Delete PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - How to Delete PDF Document Page in VB.NET. Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in VB.NET Class.
erase text from pdf file; acrobat remove text from pdf
55 
1.  "Information items" as used here encompass individual documents and records 
(including  associated metadata)  whether  on  paper  or film,  as discrete  "files" 
stored electronically, optically or magnetically or as a record within a database, 
archive or container file. The term should  be  read broadly to include e-mail, 
messaging, word processed documents, digital presentations and spreadsheets.  
2.  Responsive electronically stored information (ESI) shall be produced in its native 
form; that is, in the form in which the information was customarily created, used 
and stored by the native application employed by the producing party in the 
ordinary course of business.   
3.  If it is infeasible to produce an item of responsive ESI in its native form, it may be 
produced in an agreed-upon near-native form; that is, in a form in which the item 
can be imported into the native application without a material loss of content, 
structure or functionality as compared to the native form.  Static image production 
formats  serve  as  near-native  alternatives  only  for  information  items  that  are 
natively static images (i.e ., photographs and scans of hard-copy documents). 
4.  The table below supplies examples of agreed-upon native or near-native forms in 
which specific types of ESI should be produced: 
Source ESI 
Native or Near-Native Form or Forms Sought 
Microsoft Word documents 
.DOC, .DOCX 
Microsoft Excel Spreadsheets 
.XLS, .XLSX 
Microsoft PowerPoint 
Presentations 
.PPT, .PPTX 
Microsoft Access Databases 
.MDB, .ACCDB 
WordPerfect documents 
.WPD 
Adobe Acrobat Documents 
.PDF 
Photographs 
.JPG, .PDF 
E-mail 
Messages should be produced in  a form or 
forms that readily support import into standard 
e-mail  client  programs;  that  is,  the  form  of 
production should adhere to the conventions 
set  out  in  RFC  5322  (the  internet  e-mail 
standard).      For  Microsoft  Exchange  or 
Outlook messaging, .PST format will suffice.  
Single message production formats like .MSG 
or .EML may be furnished, if source foldering 
data is preserved and produced.  For Lotus 
Notes  mail,  furnish  .NSF  files  or  convert to 
.PST.    If  your  workflow  requires  that 
attachments  be  extracted  and  produced 
separately  from  transmitting  messages, 
attachments  should  be  produced  in  their 
Appendix 2: Exemplar Production Protocol 
56 
native forms with parent/child relationships to 
the message and container(s) preserved and 
produced in a delimited text file. 
5.  Absent a showing of need, a party shall produce responsive information reports 
contained in databases through the use of standard reports; that is, reports that 
can be generated in the ordinary course of business and without specialized 
programming efforts beyond those necessary to generate standard reports.  All 
such reports shall be produced in a delimited electronic format preserving field 
and record structures and names.  The parties will meet and confer regarding 
programmatic database productions as necessary. 
6.  Information items that are paper documents or that require redaction shall be 
produced in static image formats scanned at 300 dpi e.g., single-page Group 
IV.TIFF  or  multipage PDF  images. If an information item  contains  color, the 
producing party shall not produce the item in a form that does not display color. 
The full content of each  document will  be  extracted directly from  the  native 
source  where  feasible  or,  where  infeasible,  by  optical  character  recognition 
(OCR)  or  other suitable method  to  a  searchable  text file  produced with the 
corresponding page image(s) or embedded within the image file.  Redactions 
shall be logged along with other information items withheld on claims of privilege. 
7.  Parties  shall  take  reasonable  steps  to  ensure  that  text  extraction  methods 
produce usable, accurate and complete searchable text.  
8.  Individual information items requiring redaction shall (as feasible) be redacted 
natively,  produced  in  .PDF  format  and  redacted  using  the  Adobe  Acrobat 
redaction feature or redacted and produced in a format that does not serve to 
downgrade the ability to electronically search the unredacted portions of the item.  
Bates identifiers should be endorsed on the lower right corner of all images, but 
not so as to obscure content. 
9.  Upon a showing of need, a producing party shall make a reasonable effort to 
locate and produce the native counterpart(s) of any unredacted .PDF or .TIF 
document produced.  The parties agree to meet and confer regarding production 
of any such documents.  This provision shall not serve to require a producing 
party to reveal redacted content. 
10. Except as set out in this Protocol, a party need not produce identical information 
items in more than one form and shall globally de-duplicate identical items across 
custodians  u
sing  each  document’s  unique  MD5  hash  value.    The  content, 
metadata and utility of an information item shall all be considered in determining 
whether information items are identical, and items reflecting different information 
shall not be deemed identical.  
57 
11. Production should be made on CD, DVD or hard drive(s) using the medium 
requiring the least number of deliverables.  Label all media with the case number, 
production date, Bates range and disk number (1 of X, if applicable).  Organize 
productions by custodian, unless otherwise instructed. All documents from an 
individual custodian should be confined to a single load file.  All productions 
should be encrypted for transmission to the receiving party.  The producing party 
shall,  contemporaneously  with  production,  supply  decryption  credentials  and 
passwords  to  the  receiving  party  for  all  items  produced  in  an  encrypted  or 
password-protected form. 
12. Each  information  item  produced  shall  be  identified  by  naming  the  item  to 
correspond to a Bates identifier according to the following protocol:  
i. The first four (4) characters of the filename will reflect a unique alphanumeric 
designation identifying the party making production;  
ii.  The  next  six  (6)  characters  will  be  a  designation  reserved  to  the 
discretionary  use  of the party  making  production for  the  purpose  of,  e.g., 
denoting the case or matter.  This value shall be padded with leading zeroes 
as needed to preserve its length; 
iii. The next nine (9) characters will be a unique, consecutive numeric value 
assigned to the item by the producing party. This value shall be padded with 
leading zeroes as needed to preserve its length;  
iv.  The  final  six  (6)  characters  are  reserved  to  a  sequence  consistently 
beginning with a dash (-) or underscore (_) followed by a five digit number 
reflecting pagination of the item when printed to paper or converted to an 
image format for use in proceedings or when attached as exhibits to pleadings.  
v. By way of example, a Microsoft Word document produced by Acme in its 
native  format  might  be  named:  ACMESAMPLE000000123.docx.  Were  the 
document printed out for use in deposition, page six of the printed item must 
be  embossed  with  the  unique  identifier  ACMESAMPLE000000123_00006. 
Bates identifiers should be endorsed on the lower right corner of all printed 
pages, but not so as to obscure content. 
vi.  This  format  of  the  Bates  identifier  must  remain  consistent  across  all 
productions. The number of digits in the numeric portion and characters in the 
alphanumeric  portion  of  the  identifier  should  not  change  in  subsequent 
productions, nor should spaces, hyphens, or other separators be added or 
deleted except as set out above. 
13. 
Information items designated Confidential may, at the Producing Party’s option:
58 
a. Be separately produced on electronic production media prominently labeled to 
comply with the requirements of the [DATE] Protective Order entered in this 
matter; or, alternatively, 
b. Each such designated information item shall have appended to the file’s name 
(immediately following its Bates identifier) the following protective legend: 
~CONFIDENTIAL-SUBJ_TO_PROTECTIVE_ORDER 
When any item so designated is converted to a printed or imaged format for use 
in  any submission or  proceeding,  the printout  or  page  image shall  bear the 
protective legend on each page in a clear and conspicuous manner, but not so 
as to obscure content. 
14. Producing party shall furnish a delimited load file supplying the metadata field 
values listed below for each information item produced (to the extent the values 
exist and as applicable): 
Field Name 
Sample Data 
Description 
BegBates 
ACMESAMPLE000000001 
First Bates identifier of item  
EndBates 
ACMESAMPLE000000123 
Last Bates identifier of item 
AttRange  
ACMESAMPLE000000124 - 
ACMESAMPLE000000130 
Bates identifier of the first page of the parent 
document to the Bates identifier of the last page 
of the last attachment “child” document 
BegAttach 
ACMESAMPLE000000124 
First Bates identifier of attachment range 
EndAttach 
ACMESAMPLE000000130 
Last Bates identifier of attachment range 
Parent_Bates  
ACMESAMPLE000000001 
First Bates identifier of parent document/e-mail 
message.   
**This Parent_Bates field should be populated in 
each record representing an attachment ³child´ 
document. ** 
Child_Bates  
ACMESAMPLE000000004; 
ACMESAMPLE000000012; 
ACMESAMPLE000000027 
First Bates identifier of “child” attachment(s); may 
be more than one Bates number listed 
depending on number of attachments. 
**The Child_Bates field should be populated in 
each record represent
ing a ³parent´ document. **
Custodian 
Houston, Sam 
E-mail: mailbox where the email resided.  
Native: Individual from whom the document  
originated   
Path 
E-mail: \Deleted Items\Battles\ 
SanJac.msg 
Native: Z:\TravisWB\Alamo.docx 
E-mail: Original location of e-mail including 
original file name. 
Native: Path where native file document was 
stored including original file name. 
From 
GuerreroJ@hotmail.com; David 
Crockett [mailto: 
Davy@Crockett.net] 
E-mail:  Sender  
Native: Author(s) of document  
**semi-colons separate multiple entries ** 
To 
Genl. A.L. de Santa Anna 
Recipient(s)  
**semi-colons separate multiple entries ** 
CC 
Jim.Bowie@bigknife.com 
Carbon copy recipient(s) 
**semi-colons separate multiple entries ** 
BCC 
AustinSF@state.tx.gov 
Blind carbon copy recipient(s) 
**semi-colons separate multiple entries ** 
Date Sent 
03/18/2014 
E-mail:  Date the email was sent  
59 
Time Sent  
11:45 AM 
E-mail: Time the message was sent  
Subject/Title 
Remember the Alamo! 
E-mail: Subject line of the message  
IntMsgID  
<A1315BC17ABD4774BF779CB3
E3E62B9B@gmail.com> 
E-mail: For e-mail in Microsoft 
Outlook/Exchange, the “Unique Message ID” 
field; For e-mail in Lotus Notes, the UNID field. 
Native: empty. 
Date_Mod 
02/23/1836 
E-mail: empty.  
Native: Last Modified Date 
Time_Mod 
01:42 PM 
E-mail: empty  
Native: Last Modified Time 
File_Type 
XLSX 
E-mail: empty 
Native: file type 
Redacted 
Denotes that item has been redacted as 
containing privileged content (yes/no). 
File_Size 
1,836 
Size of native file document/email in KB. 
HiddenCnt  
Denotes presence of hidden Content/Embedded 
Objects in item(s) (yes/no) 
Confidential  
Denotes that item has been designated as 
confidential pursuant to protective order (yes/no). 
MD5_Hash 
eb71a966dcdddb929c1055ff2f1cc
d5b 
MD5 Hash value of the item. 
DeDuped 
E-mail: \Inbox\SanJac.msg 
Native: Z:\CrockettD\Alamo.docx 
Full path of other instances de-deduplicated by 
MD5 hash 
**semi-colons separate multiple entries ** 
15. Each production should include a cross-reference load file that correlates the 
various files, images, metadata field values and searchable text produced. 
16. Parties  shall  respond  to  each  request  for  production  by  listing  the  Bates 
identifiers/ranges of responsive documents produced, and where an information 
item responsive to these discovery requests has been withheld or redacted on a 
claim that it is privileged, the producing party shall furnish a privilege log. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested