MANAGING AND 
SHARING DATA
BEST PRACTICE FOR RESEARCHERS
MAY 2011
How to delete text from pdf document - delete, remove text from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# developers to use mature APIs to delete and remove text content from PDF document
how to delete text from a pdf document; how to erase text in pdf online
How to delete text from pdf document - VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File
delete text pdf preview; how to delete text in pdf document
First published 2009 
Third edition, fully revised, 2011
Authors: Veerle Van den Eynden, Louise Corti, Matthew
Woollard, Libby Bishop and Laurence Horton. 
In memory of Dr. Alasdair Crockett who co-authored our
first published Guide on Data Management in 2006.
All online literature references available 16 March 2011. 
Published by: 
UK Data Archive 
University of Essex 
Wivenhoe Park 
Colchester 
Essex 
CO4 3SQ 
ISBN: 1-904059-78-3
This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-
NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported Licence. To view a copy of 
this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
Designed and printed by 
Print Essex at the University of Essex
© 2011 University of Essex 
50% recycled
material
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
VB.NET PDF - How to Delete PDF Document Page in VB.NET. Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in VB.NET Class. Free
deleting text from a pdf; erase pdf text online
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
C#.NET PDF Library - Delete PDF Document Page in C#.NET. Provide C# Users in C#.NET. How to delete a single page from a PDF document.
pdf editor online delete text; erase pdf text
CONTENTS
ENDORSEMENTS
iii
FOREWORD 
1
SHARING YOUR DATA - WHY AND HOW
2
Why share research data 
3
How to share your data 
4
DATA MANAGEMENT PLANNING
5
Roles and responsibilities
7
Costing data management 
7
DOCUMENTING YOUR DATA
8
Data documentation 
9
Metadata 
10
FORMATTING YOUR DATA
11
File formats
12
Data conversions 
13
Organising files and folders
13
Quality assurance 
14
Version control and authenticity 
14
Transcription 
15
STORING YOUR DATA
17
Making back-ups 
18
Data storage 
18
Data security 
19
Data transmission and encryption
20
Data disposal
21
File sharing and collaborative environments 
21
ETHICS AND CONSENT
22
Legal and ethical issues
23
Informed consent and data sharing 
23
Anonymising data 
26
Access control 
27
COPYRIGHT 
28
STRATEGIES FOR CENTRES
31
Data management resources library
32
Data inventory
33
REFERENCES
34
DATA MANAGEMENT CHECKLIST
35
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Free online source code for extracting text from adobe PDF document in C#.NET class. Ability to extract highlighted text out of PDF document.
how to delete text in pdf converter professional; remove text watermark from pdf online
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
SharePoint. Extract text from adobe PDF document in VB.NET Programming. Extract file. Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Image
how to delete text in pdf file online; remove text from pdf preview
The scientific process is enhanced
by managing and sharing research
data. Good data management
practice allows reliable verification
of results and permits new and
innovative research built on existing information. This is
important if the full value of public investment in
research is to be realised.
Since the first edition of this excellent guide, these
principles have become even more widely endorsed
and are increasingly supported by the mandates of
research funders who are concerned to see the
greatest possible return on investment both in terms of
the quality of research outputs and the re-use of
research data. In the USA, the National Science
Foundation now requires grant applications to include
a data management plan. In the UK: a joint Research
Councils UK (RCUK) statement on research data is in
preparation; the Engineering and Physical Sciences
Research Council (EPSRC) is preparing a policy
framework for management and access to research
data; the Medical Research Council (MRC) is
developing new, more comprehensive, guidelines to
govern management and sharing of research data; and
the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) has
revised its longer standing research data policy and
guidelines. 
Given this rapidly changing environment, the Joint
Information Systems Committee (JISC) considers it a
priority to support researchers in responding to these
requirements and to promote good data management
and sharing for the benefit of UK Higher Education and
Research. JISC funds the Digital Curation Centre, which
provides internationally recognised expertise in this
area, as well as support and guidance for UK Higher
Education. Furthermore, through the Managing
Research Data (MRD) programme, launched in October
2009, JISC has helped higher education institutions
plan their data management practice, pilot the
development of essential data management
infrastructure, improve methods for citing data and
linking to publications; and funded projects which are
developing training materials in research data
management for postgraduate students. 
The UK Data Archive has been an important and active
partner and stakeholder in these initiatives. Indeed,
many of the revisions and additions that have
occasioned the new edition of this guide were
developed through the UK Data Archive’s work in the
JISC MRD Project ‘Data Management Planning for
ESRC Research Data-Rich Investments’. As a result,
‘Managing and Sharing Data: best practice for
researchers’ has been made even more targeted and
practical. I am convinced that researchers will find it an
invaluable publication.
Simon Hodson, Joint Information Systems Committee
(JISC)
Data are the main asset of economic and
social research – the basis for research
and also the ultimate product of
research. As such, the importance of
research data quality and provenance is
paramount, particularly when data
sharing and re-use is becoming increasingly important
within and across disciplines. As a leading UK agency in
funding economic and social research, the ESRC has
been strongly promoting the culture of sharing the
results and data of its funded research. ESRC considers
that effective data management is an essential
precondition for generating high quality data, making
them suitable for secondary scientific research. It is
therefore expected that research data generated by
ESRC-funded research must be well-managed to enable
data to be exploited to the maximum potential for
further research. This guide can help researchers do so.
Jeremy Neathey, Director of Training and Resources,
Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)
The Rural Economy and Land Use
(Relu) Programme, which undertakes
interdisciplinary research between
social and natural sciences, has
brought together research
communities with different cultures
and practices of data management and sharing. It has
been at the forefront of cross-disciplinary data
management and sharing by developing a proactive
data management policy and the first cross-council Data
Support Service. It adopted a systematic approach from
the start to data management, drawing on best practice
from its constituent Research Councils. The Data
Support Service helped to inculcate researchers from
across different research communities into good data
management practices and planning and its close
engagement with researchers laid an important basis for
this best practice guide. It also orchestrates the linked
archiving of interdisciplinary datasets across data
archives, accessed through a knowledge portal that for
the first time for the Research Councils brings together
data and other research outputs and publications. Relu
shows that a combination of a programme level strategy,
well-established data sharing infrastructures and active
data support for researchers, result in increased
availability of data to the research community.
Philip Lowe, Director, Rural Economy and Land Use
(Relu) Programme 
Also endorsed by: 
Archaeology Data Service (ADS)
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research
Council (BBSRC)
British Library (BL)
Digital Curation Centre (DCC)
History Data Service (HDS)
LSE Research Laboratory (RLAB)
National Environment Research Council (NERC)
Research Information Network (RIN)
University of Essex
ENDORSEMENTS
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Insert Text to PDF Document in C#.NET. This C# coding example describes how to add a single text character to PDF document. // Open a document.
remove text from pdf; erase text in pdf document
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
C#.NET PDF SDK - Edit PDF Document Metadata in C#.NET. Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project.
how to delete text from pdf document; online pdf editor to delete text
Initiatives by higher education institutions and supporting
agencies follow suit and focus on developing data sharing
infrastructures; supporting researchers to manage and
share data through tools, practical guidance and training;
and enabling data citation and linking data with
publications to increase visibility and accessibility of data
and the research itself.
Whilst good data management is fundamental for high
quality research data and therefore research excellence, 
it is crucial for facilitating data sharing and ensuring the
sustainability and accessibility of data in the long-term
and therefore their re-use for future science.
If research data are well organised, documented,
preserved and accessible, and their accuracy and validity
is controlled at all times, the result is high quality data,
efficient research, findings based on solid evidence and
the saving of time and resources. Researchers themselves
benefit greatly from good data management. It should be
planned before research starts and may not necessarily
incur much additional time or costs if it is engrained in
standard research practice, 
The responsibility for data management lies primarily with
researchers, but institutions and organisations can provide
a supporting framework of guidance, tools and
infrastructure and support staff can help with many facets
of data management. Establishing the roles and
responsibilities of all parties involved is key to successful
data management and sharing.
The information provided in this guide is designed to help
researchers and data managers, across a wide range of
research disciplines and research environments, produce
highest quality research data with the greatest potential for
long-term use. Expertise for producing this guidance comes
from the Data Support Service of the interdisciplinary Rural
Economy and Land Use (Relu) Programme, the Economic
and Social Data Service (ESDS) and the Data Management
Planning for ESRC Research Data-rich Investments project
(DMP-ESRC) project. All these initiatives involve close
liaising with numerous researchers spanning the natural and
social sciences and humanities.
The UK Data Archive thanks data management experts
from the National Environmental Research Council (NERC),
the NERC Environmental Bioinformatics Centre (NEBC), the
Environmental Information Data Centre (EIDC) of the
Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH), the British
Library (BL), the Research Information Network (RIN), the
Archaeology Data Service (ADS), the History Data Service
(HDS), the London School of Economics Research
Laboratory, the Wellcome Trust, the Digital Curation Centre,
Naomi Korn Copyright Consultancy and the Commission
for Rural Communities for reviewing the guidance and
providing valuable comments and case studies.
This third edition has been funded by the Joint
Information Systems Committee (JISC), the Rural
Economy and Land Use Programme and the UK Data
Archive. 
This printed guide is complemented by detailed and
practical online information, available from the UK Data
Archive web site. 
The UK Data Archive also provides training and workshops
on data management and sharing, including advice via
datasharing@data-archive.ac.uk.
www.data-archive.ac.uk/create-manage
1
FOREWORD
FOREWORD
THE DATA MANAGEMENT AND SHARING ENVIRONMENT HAS EVOLVED SINCE THE PREVIOUS
EDITION OF THIS GUIDE. RESEARCH FUNDERS PLACE THE SHARING OF RESEARCH DATA
EVER HIGHER AMONGST THEIR PRIORITIES, REFLECTED IN THEIR DATA SHARING POLICIES
AND THE DEMAND FOR DATA MANAGEMENT PLANS IN RESEARCH APPLICATIONS.
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
C#.NET. C# Guide about How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information with .NET PDF Control.
how to erase pdf text; pull text out of pdf
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
All text content of target PDF document can be copied and pasted to .txt files by keeping original layout. C#.NET class source code
delete text pdf file; remove text from pdf online
SHARING YOUR DATA –
WHY AND HOW 
2
DATA SHARING DRIVES SCIENCE FORWARD
WHY SHARE RESEARCH DATA
Research data are a valuable resource, usually requiring
much time and money to be produced. Many data have a
significant value beyond usage for the original research. 
Sharing research data: 
• encourages scientific enquiry and debate 
• promotes innovation and potential new data uses
• leads to new collaborations between data users and
data creators 
• maximises transparency and accountability
• enables scrutiny of research findings 
• encourages the improvement and validation of research
methods 
• reduces the cost of duplicating data collection 
• increases the impact and visibility of research 
• promotes the research that created the data and its
outcomes 
• can provide a direct credit to the researcher as a
research output in its own right 
• provides important resources for education and training 
The ease with which digital data can be stored,
disseminated and made easily accessible online to users
means that many institutions are keen to share research
data to increase the impact and visibility of their research. 
RESEARCH FUNDERS
Public funders of research increasingly follow guidance
from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and
Development (OECD) that publicly funded research data
should as far as possible be openly available to the
scientific community.Many funders have adopted
research data sharing policies and mandate or encourage
researchers to share data and outputs. Data sharing
policies tend to allow researchers exclusive data use for a
reasonable time period to publish the results of the data. 
In the UK, funding bodies such as the Economic and Social
Research Council (ESRC), the Natural Environment
Research Council (NERC) and the British Academy
mandate researchers to offer all research data generated
during research grants to designated data centres – the
UK Data Archive and NERC data centres. The
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council
(BBSRC), the Medical Research Council (MRC) and the
Wellcome Trust have similar data policies in place which
encourage researchers to share their research data in a
timely manner, with as few restrictions as possible.
Research programmes funded by multiple agencies, such
as the cross-disciplinary Rural Economy and Land Use
Programme, may also mandate data sharing.2
Research councils equally fund data infrastructures and
data support services to facilitate data sharing within their
subject domain, e.g. NERC data centres, UK Data Archive,
Economic and Social Data Service and MRC Data Support
Service.
In addition, BBSRC, ESRC, MRC, NERC and the Wellcome
Trust require data managing and sharing plans as part of
grant applications for projects generating new research
data. This ensures that researchers plan how to look after
data during and after research to optimise data sharing.
JOURNALS
Journals increasingly require data that form the basis for
publications to be shared or deposited within an
accessible database or repository. Similarly, initiatives such
as DataCite, a registry assigning unique digital object
identifiers (DOIs) to research data, help scientists to make
their data citable, traceable and findable, so that research
data, as well as publications based on those data, form
part of a researcher’s scientific output.
3
SHARING YOUR DATA – WHY AND HOW
JOURNALS AND DATA SHARING
The Publishing Network for
Geoscientific and Environmental Data
(PANGAEA) is an open access
repository for various journals.3By
giving each deposited dataset a DOI, 
a deposited dataset acquires a unique and
persistent identifier, and the underlying data can be
directly connected to the corresponding article. For
example, PANGAEA and the publisher Elsevier have
reciprocal linking between research data deposited with
PANGAEA and corresponding articles in Elsevier journals.
‘Naturejournals’ have a policy that requires authors to
make data and materials available to readers, as a
condition of publication, preferably via public
repositories.Appropriate discipline-specific repositories
are suggested. Specifications regarding data standards,
compliance or formats may also be provided. 
For example, for research on small molecule crystal
structures, authors should submit the data and materials
to the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) as a
Crystallographic Information File, a standard file
structure for the archiving and distribution of
crystallographic information. After publication of a
manuscript, deposited structures are included in the
CSD, from where bona fide researchers can retrieve them
for free. CSD has similar deposition agreements with
many other journals.
CASE 
STUDY
DATA CREATED FROM RESEARCH ARE VALUABLE RESOURCES THAT CAN BE USED AND RE-
USED FOR FUTURE SCIENTIFIC AND EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES. SHARING DATA FACILITATES
NEW SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY, AVOIDS DUPLICATE DATA COLLECTION AND PROVIDES RICH REAL-
LIFE RESOURCES FOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING.
4
HOW TO SHARE YOUR DATA 
There are various ways to share research data, including:
• depositing them with a specialist data centre, data
archive or data bank 
• submitting them to a journal to support a publication
• depositing them in an institutional repository 
• making them available online via a project or
institutional website 
• making them available informally between researchers
on a peer-to-peer basis 
Each of these ways of sharing data has advantages and
disadvantages: data centres may not be able to accept all
data submitted to them; institutional repositories may not
be able to afford long-term maintenance of data or
support for more complex research data; and websites are
often ephemeral with little sustainability. 
Approaches to data sharing may vary according to
research environments and disciplines, due to the varying
nature of data types and their characteristics. 
The advantages of depositing data with a specialist data
centre include: 
• assurance that data meet set quality standards
• long-term preservation of data in standardised
accessible data formats, converting formats when
needed due to software upgrades or changes 
• safe-keeping of data in a secure environment with the
ability to control access where required
• regular data back-ups
• online resource discovery of data through data
catalogues
• access to data in popular formats
• licensing arrangements to acknowledge data rights 
• standardised citation mechanism to acknowledge data
ownership 
• promotion of data to many users 
• monitoring of the secondary usage of data 
• management of access to data and user queries on
behalf of the data owner 
Data centres, like any traditional archive, usually apply
certain criteria to evaluate and select data for
preservation. 
SHARING YOUR DATA – WHY AND HOW
EXAMPLES OF RESEARCH DATA CENTRES 
Antarctic Environmental Data Centre 
Archaeology Data Service 
Biomedical Informatics Research Network Data
Repository 
British Atmospheric Data Centre 
British Library Sound Archive
British Oceanographic Data Centre 
Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre 
Economic and Social Data Service 
Environmental Information Data Centre 
European Bioinformatics Institute 
Geospatial Repository for Academic Deposit and
Extraction 
History Data Service 
Infrared Space Observatory 
National Biodiversity Network 
National Geoscience Data Centre 
NERC Earth Observation Data Centre 
NERC Environmental Bioinformatics Centre 
Petrological Database of the Ocean Floor 
Publishing Network for Geoscientific and
Environmental Data (PANGAEA) 
Scran 
The Oxford Text Archive 
UK Data Archive 
UK Solar System Data Centre 
Visual Arts Data Service 
5
DATA MANAGEMENT
PLANNING
PLAN AHEAD TO CREATE HIGH-QUALITY AND SUSTAINABLE DATA THAT CAN BE SHARED
In the last few years many UK and international research
funders have introduced a requirement within their data
policies for data management and sharing plans to be part
of research grant applications; in the UK this is the case
for BBSRC5, ESRC6, MRC7, NERCand the Wellcome Trust9.
Whilst each funder specifies particular requirements for
the content of a plan, common areas are:
• which data will be generated during research 
• metadata, standards and quality assurance measures 
• plans for sharing data
• ethical and legal issues or restrictions on data sharing
• copyright and intellectual property rights of data
• data storage and back-up measures
• data management roles and responsibilities
• costing or resources needed
Best practice advice can be found on all these topics in
this Guide.
It is crucial when developing a data management plan for
researchers to critically assess what they can do to share
their research data, what might limit or prohibit data
sharing and whether any steps can be taken to remove
such limitations.
A data management plan should not be thought of as a
simple administrative task for which standardised text can
be pasted in from model templates, with little intention to
implement the planned data management measures early
on, or without considering what is really needed to enable
data sharing.
A big limitation for data sharing is time constraints on
researchers, especially towards the end of research, when
publications and continued research funding place high
pressure on a researcher’s time.
At that moment in the research cycle, the cost of
implementing late data management and sharing
measures can be prohibitively high. Implementing data
management measures during the planning and
development stages of research will avoid later panic and
frustration. Many aspects of data management can be
embedded in everyday aspects of research co-ordination
and management and in research procedures.
Good data management does not end with planning. It is
critical that measures are put into practice in such a way
that issues are addressed when needed before mere
inconveniences become insurmountable obstacles.
Researchers who have developed data management and
sharing plans found it beneficial to have thought about
and discussed data issues within the research team.10
6
DATA MANAGEMENT PLANNING
Key issues for data management planning in research:
• know your legal, ethical and other obligations
regarding research data, towards research
participants, colleagues, research funders and
institutions
• implement good practices in a consistent manner
• assign roles and responsibilities to relevant parties in
the research
• design data management according to the needs and
purpose of research 
• incorporate data management measures as an
integral part of your research cycle
• implement and review data management throughout
research as part of research progression and review
DATA MANAGEMENT PLANS
The Rural Economy and Land Use
(Relu) Programme has been at the
forefront of implementing data
management planning for research
projects since 2004. 
Drawing on best practice in data management
and sharing across three research councils (ESRC,
NERC and BBSRC), Relu requires that all funded
projects develop and implement a Data Management
Plan to ensure that data are well managed throughout
the duration of a research project.11 In a data
management plan researchers describe:
• the need for access to existing data sources 
• data to be produced by the research project
• quality assurance and back-up procedures 
• plans for management and archiving of collected data
• expected difficulties in making data available for
secondary research and measures to overcome such
difficulties
• who holds copyright and Intellectual Property Rights
of the data
• who has data management responsibility roles within
the research team
Example plans of past projects are available.12
CASE 
STUDY
A DATA MANAGEMENT AND SHARING PLAN HELPS RESEARCHERS CONSIDER, WHEN
RESEARCH IS BEING DESIGNED AND PLANNED, HOW DATA WILL BE MANAGED DURING THE
RESEARCH PROCESS AND SHARED AFTERWARDS WITH THE WIDER RESEARCH COMMUNITY. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested