17
STORING YOUR DATA
KEEP YOUR DIGITAL DATA SAFE,
SECURE AND RECOVERABLE
How to delete text in pdf preview - delete, remove text from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# developers to use mature APIs to delete and remove text content from PDF document
erase text from pdf file; delete text from pdf file
How to delete text in pdf preview - VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File
how to delete text in pdf file; how to delete text in a pdf acrobat
MAKING BACK-UPS 
Making back-ups of files is an essential element of data
management. Regular back-ups protect against accidental
or malicious data loss due to: 
• hardware failure 
• software or media faults 
• virus infection or malicious hacking 
• power failure 
• human errors 
Backing-up involves making copies of files which can be
used to restore originals if there is loss of data. Choosing a
precise back-up procedure depends on local
circumstances, the perceived value of the data and the
levels of risk considered appropriate. Where data contain
personal information, care should be taken to only create
the minimal number of copies needed, e.g. a master file
and one back-up copy. Back-up files can be kept on a
networked hard drive or stored offline on media such as
recordable CD/DVD, removable hard drive or magnetic
tape. Physical media can be removed to another location
for safe-keeping.
For best back-up procedures, consider: 
• whether to back-up particular files or the entire
computer system (complete system image)
• the frequency of back-up needed, after each change to
a data file or at regular intervals 
• strategies for all systems where data are held, including
portable computers and devices, non-network
computers and home-based computers
• organising and clearly labelling all back-up files and
media
CRITICAL FILES AND MASTER COPIES
Critical data files or frequently used ones may be backed-
up daily using an automated back-up process and are best
stored offline. Master copies of critical files should be in
open, as opposed to proprietary, formats for long-term
validity. Back-up files should be verified and validated
regularly, either by fully restoring them to another location
and comparing them with the originals or by checking
back-up copies for completeness and integrity, for
example by checking the MD5 checksum value, file size
and date.
INSTITUTIONAL BACK-UP POLICY
Most institutions have a back-up policy for data held on a
network space. Check with your institution to find out
which strategy or policy is in place. If you are not happy
with the robustness of the solution, you should keep
independent back-up copies of critical files.
INCREMENTAL OR DIFFERENTIAL BACK-UPS
Incremental back-ups consist of first making a copy of all
relevant files, often the complete contents of a PC, then
making incremental back-ups of the files which have
altered since the last back-up. Removable media
(CD/DVD) are recommended for this procedure. 
For differential back-ups, a complete back-up is made
first, and then back-ups are made of files changed or
created since the first full back-up and not just since the
last partial back-up. Fixed media, such as hard drives, are
recommended for this method. 
Whichever method is used, it is best not to overwrite old
back-ups with new.
DATA STORAGE 
A data storage strategy is important because digital
storage media are inherently unreliable, unless they are
stored appropriately, and all file formats and physical
storage media will ultimately become obsolete. The
accessibility of any data depends on the quality of the
storage medium and the availability of the relevant 
data-reading equipment for that particular medium. 
Media currently available for storing data files are optical
media (CDs and DVDs) and magnetic media (hard drives
and tapes). 
The National Preservation Office has published guidelines
on caring for CDs and DVDs, which are vulnerable to poor
handling, changes in temperature, relative humidity, air
quality and lighting conditions.24
18
LOOKING AFTER RESEARCH DATA FOR THE LONGER-TERM AND PROTECTING THEM FROM
UNWANTED LOSS REQUIRES HAVING GOOD STRATEGIES IN PLACE FOR SECURELY STORING,
BACKING-UP, TRANSMITTING, AND DISPOSING OF DATA. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH BRINGS
CHALLENGES FOR THE SHARED STORAGE OF, AND ACCESS TO, DATA.
Best practice is to: 
• store data in non-proprietary or open standard
formats for long-term software readability (see file
formats table) 
• copy or migrate data files to new media between two
and five years after they were first created, since both
optical and magnetic media are subject to physical
degradation 
• check the data integrity of stored data files at regular
intervals 
• use a storage strategy, even for a short-term project,
with two different forms of storage, e.g. on hard drive
and on CD 
• create digital versions of paper documentation in
PDF/A format for long-term preservation and storage 
• organise and clearly label stored data so they are
easy to locate and physically accessible 
• ensure that areas and rooms for storage of digital or
non-digital data are fit for the purpose, structurally
sound, and free from the risk of flood and fire 
STORING YOUR DATA
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Word file in C#.net.
how to delete text from a pdf reader; delete text pdf files
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing PowerPoint file in C#.net.
how to delete text from a pdf document; pdf editor online delete text
19
STORING YOUR DATA
DATA SECURITY 
Physical security, network security and security of
computer systems and files all need to be considered to
ensure security of data and prevent unauthorised access,
changes to data, disclosure or destruction of data. Data
security arrangements need to be proportionate to the
nature of the data and the risks involved. Attention to
security is also needed when data are to be destroyed.
Data security may be needed to protect intellectual
property rights, commercial interests, or to keep personal
or sensitive information safe.
Physical data securityrequires:
• controlling access to rooms and buildings where data,
computers or media are held
• logging the removal of, and access to, media or
hardcopy material in store rooms
• transporting sensitive data only under exceptional
circumstances, even for repair purposes, e.g. giving a
failed hard drive containing sensitive data to a computer
manufacturer may cause a breach of security
Network securitymeans:
• not storing confidential data such as those containing
personal information on servers or computers
connected to an external network, particularly servers
that host internet services
• firewall protection and security-related upgrades and
patches to operating systems to avoid viruses and
malicious code
Security of computer systems and filesmay include:
• locking computer systems with a password and
installing a firewall system
• protecting servers by power surge protection systems
through line-interactive uninterruptible power supply
(UPS ) systems
• implementing password protection of, and controlled
access to, data files, e.g. no access, read only, read and
write or administrator-only permission
• controlling access to restricted materials with
encryption
• imposing non-disclosure agreements for managers or
users of confidential data
• not sending personal or confidential data via email or
through File Transfer Protocol (FTP), but rather transmit
as encrypted data
• destroying data in a consistent manner when needed
DATA BACK-UP AND STORAGE 
A research team carrying out coral
reef research collects field data
using handheld Personal Digital
Assistants (PDAs). Digital data are
transmitted daily to the institution’s
network drive, where they are held in
password-protected files. All data files are identified by
an individual version number and creation date. Version
information (version numbers and notes detailing
differences between versions) is stored in a
spreadsheet, also on the network drive. The institution’s
network drive is fully backed-up onto Ultrium LTO2 data
tapes. Incremental back-ups are made daily Monday to
Thursday; full server back-ups are made from Friday to
Sunday. Tapes are securely stored in a separate
building. Upon completion of the research the data are
deposited in the institution’s digital repository. 
DATA BACK-UP AND STORAGE
In February 2008 the British Library (BL) received the
recorded output of the Survey of Anglo-Welsh Dialects
(SAWD), carried out by University College, Swansea,
between 1969 and 1995. This survey recorded the
English spoken in Wales by interviewing and tape-
recording elderly speakers on topics including the farm
and farming, the house and housekeeping, nature,
animals, social activities and the weather. The collection
was deposited in the form of 503 digital audio files,
which were accessioned as .wav files in the BL’s Digital
Library. Digital clones of all files are held at the Archive
of Welsh English, alongside the original master
recordings on 151 audio cassettes, from which the digital
copies were created. 
The BL’s Digital Library is mirrored on four sites – at
Boston Spa, St Pancras, Aberystwyth and a ‘dark’
archive which is provided by a third party. Each of these
servers has inbuilt integrity checks. The BL makes
available access copies for users, in the form of .mp3
audio files, in the British Library Reading Rooms via the
Soundserver system. A small set of audio extracts from
the SAWD recordings are also available online on the
BL’s Accents and Dialects web site, Sounds Familiar. 
CASE 
STUDY
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
a preview component enables compressing and decompressing in preview in ASP images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size Delete unimportant contents:
how to erase text in pdf online; pdf text remover
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Add text to PDF document in preview. • Add text box to PDF file in preview. • Draw PDF markups. Search PDF text in preview. • View PDF outlines.
how to delete text in pdf using acrobat professional; erase pdf text
DATA TRANSMISSION AND ENCRYPTION
Transmitting data between locations or within research
teams can be challenging for data management
infrastructure. To ensure sensitive or personal data is
secure for transmitting it must be encrypted to an
appropriate standard. Only data confirmed as anonymised
or non-sensitive should be transmitted in unencrypted
form. Encryption maintains the security of data during
transmission. 
Relying on email to transmit data, even internally, is a
vulnerable point in protecting sensitive data. Be aware that
anything sent by email persists in numerous exchange
servers – the sender’s, the receiver’s and others in-between.
TRANSFERRING LARGE FILES
In an era of large-scale data collection, transferring large
files can be problematic. Third party commercial file
sharing services exist to facilitate the movement of files.
However, services such as Google Docs or YouSendIt are
not necessarily permanent or secure, and are often
located overseas and therefore not covered by UK law.
They may even be in potential violation of UK law,
particularly in relation to the UK Data Protection Act
(1998) which states data should not be transferred to
other countries without adequate protection. Encrypting
data before transfer offers protection.
A dropbox service can be a safe solution for transferring
large data files, if it is managed and controlled by the
responsible institution. For example, the UK Data Archive
recommends data deposits from researchers are made via
the University of Essex dropbox service, with data files
containing sensitive or personal information encrypted
before submission.
ENCRYPTING DATA
After testing a number of software applications for
encrypting data to enable secure data transmission from
government departments to the Archive, the UK Data
Archive recommends the use of Pretty Good Privacy (PGP),
an industry-standard encryption technology. Using this
method, encrypted data can be transferred via portable
media or electronically via file upload or email. Reliable
open source encryption software exists, e.g. GnuPG.
Encryption requires the creation of a public and private
key pair and a passphrase. The private PGP key and
passphrase are used to digitally sign each encrypted file,
and thus allow the recipient to validate the sender’s
identity. The recipient’s public PGP key is installed by the
sender in order to encrypt files so that only the authorised
recipient can decrypt them. 
20
STORING YOUR DATA
SECURITY OF PERSONAL DATA
Where the safeguarding of personal datais involved,
data security is based on national legislation, the Data
Protection Act 1998, which dictates that personal data
should only be accessible to authorised persons.
Personal data may also exist in non-digital format, for
example as patient records, signed consent forms, or
interview cover sheets. These should be protected in
the same secure way as digital files.
Data that contain personal information should be
treated with higher levels of security than data which
do not. Security can be made easier by:
• anonymising or aggregating data
• separating data content according to security needs 
• removing personal information, such as names and
addresses, from data files and storing them
separately
• encrypting data containing personal information
before they are stored - encryption is certainly
needed before transmission of such data. 
How confidential data or data containing personal
information are stored may need to be addressed
during informed consent procedures. This ensures that
the persons to whom the personal data belong are
informed and give their consent as to how the data are
stored or transmitted.
DATA DESTRUCTION
The German Institute for
Standardisation (DIN) has
standardised levels of destruction for
paper and discs that have been
adopted by the shredding industry. 
For shredding confidential material, adopting DIN 3
means objects are cut into two millimetre strips or
confetti like cross-cut particles of 4x40mm. The UK
government requires a minimum standard of DIN 4 for its
material, which ensures cross cut particles of at least
2x15mm. 
The highest security level is known as DIN 6, this is used
by the United States federal government for ultra secure
shredding of top secret or classified material, cross
cutting into 1x5mm particles.
CASE 
STUDY
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit
PowerPoint Conversion. • Convert Microsoft Office PowerPoint to PDF (.pdf). Delete annotations from PowerPoint. Select PowerPoint text contents for edit.
delete text pdf file; erase text from pdf file
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Supports adding text to PDF in preview without adobe reader installed in ASP.NET. Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text.
erase text from pdf; remove text watermark from pdf
21
STORING YOUR DATA
DATA DISPOSAL 
Deleting files and reformatting a hard drivewill not
prevent the possible recovery of datathat have previously
been on that hard drive. Having a strategy for reliably
erasing data files is a critical component of managing data
securely and is relevant at various stages in the data cycle.
During research, copies of data files no longer needed can
be destroyed. At the conclusion of research, data files
which are not to be preserved need to be disposed of
securely.
For hard drives, which are magnetic storage devices,
simply deleting does not erase a file on most systems, but
only removes a reference to the file. It takes little effort to
restore files deleted in this way. Files need to be
overwritten to ensure they are effectively scrambled.
Software is available for the secure erasing of files from
hard discs, meeting recognised standards of overwriting
to adequately scramble sensitive files. Example software is
BC Wipe, Wipe File, DeleteOnClick and Eraser for
Windows platforms. Mac users can use the standard
‘secure empty trash’ option; an alternative is Permanent
Eraser software.
Flash-based solid state discs, such as memory sticks, are
constructed differently to hard drives and techniques for
securely erasing files on hard drives can not be relied on
to work for solid state discs as well. Physical destruction is
advised as the only certain way to erase files.
The most reliable way to dispose of data is physical
destruction. Risk-adverse approaches for all drives are to:
encrypt devices when installing the operating software
and before first use; and physically destroy the drive using
a secure destruction facility approved by your institution
when data need to be destroyed.
Shredders certified to an appropriate security level should
be used for destroying paper and CD/DVD discs.
Computer or external hard drives at the end of their life
can be removed from their casings and disposed of
securely through physical destruction.
FILE SHARING AND COLLABORATIVE
ENVIRONMENTS
Collaborative research can be challenging when it comes
to facilitating data sharing, transfer and storage, and
providing access to data across various partners or
institutions. Whilst various virtual research environments
exist, at the time of writing these are all relatively
undeveloped, require significant set up and maintenance
costs, and are usually mono-institutional. Consequently,
many researchers are not comfortable with their features
and may still resort to data transfer via email and online
file sharing services. 
Cloud-based file sharing services and wikis may be
suitable for sharing certain types of data, but they are not
recommended for data that may be confidential, and users
need to be aware that they do not control where data are
ultimately stored.
The ideal solution would be a system that facilitates 
co-operation yet is able to be adopted by users with
minimal training and delivers benefits that help with data
management practices. Such solutions using open source
repository software like Fedora and DSpace are currently
being developed at the time of writing, but are not yet
user-friendly or scalable. Institutional IT services should be
involved in finding the best solution for a research project.
Virtual research environments often provide an encrypted
shared workspace for data files and documents in group
collaboration. Users can create workspaces, add and invite
members to a workspace, and each member has a
privately editable copy of the workspace. Users interact
and collaborate in the common workspace which is a
private virtual location. Changes are tracked and sent to
all members and all copies of the workspace are
synchronised via the network in a peer-to-peer manner. If
a platform is adopted it should be encrypted to an
appropriate standard and be version controlled.
VIRTUAL RESEARCH ENVIRONMENTS
A range of systems are commonly
used across higher education
institutions, which have advantages
and disadvantages for file transfer
and sharing. Examples are SharePoint
and Sakai.
SharePoint is used across UK universities, with varying
degrees of satisfaction. Researchers finding it
cumbersome to install and configure. Advantages are:
enabling external access and collaboration, the use of
document libraries, team sites, workflow management
processes, and version control ability.
Open source system Sakai has been used by projects of
the JISC virtual research environment programme and
can be obtained under an educational community
licence.25 It has an established support network and
features announcement facilities, a drop box for private
file sharing, email archive, resources library,
communications functions, scheduling tools and control
of permissions and access. 
CASE 
STUDY
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Excel. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Excel file in C#.net.
how to delete text in pdf file; how to delete text from pdf with acrobat
C# PDF replace text Library: replace text in PDF content in C#.net
Description: Delete specified string text that match the search option from specified PDF page. Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value.
acrobat remove text from pdf; how to erase in pdf text
ETHICS AND CONSENT 
SHARE SENSITIVE AND CONFIDENTIAL RESEARCH DATA ETHICALLY
22
23
When research involves obtaining data from people,
researchers are expected to maintain high ethical
standards such as those recommended by professional
bodies, institutions and funding organisations, both during
research and when sharing data. 
Research data — even sensitive and confidential data — can
be shared ethically and legally if researchers pay attention,
from the beginning of research, to three important aspects: 
• when gaining informed consent, include provision for
data sharing 
• where needed, protect people’s identities by
anonymising data 
• consider controlling access to data 
These measures should be considered jointly. The same
measures form part of good research practice and data
management, even if data sharing is not envisioned.
Data collected from and about people may hold personal,
sensitive or confidential information. This does not mean
that all data obtained by research with participants are
personal or confidential.
LEGAL AND ETHICAL ISSUES
Strategies for dealing with confidentiality depend upon
the nature of the research, but are essentially informed by
a researcher’s ethical and legal obligations. A duty of
confidentiality towards informants may be explicit, but
need not be.
Legislation that may impact on the sharing of confidential
data:26
• Data Protection Act 1998 
• Freedom of Information Act 2000 
• Human Rights Act 1998 
• Statistics and Registration Services Act 2007 
• Environmental Information Regulations 2004
INFORMED CONSENT AND DATA SHARING 
Researchers are usually expected to obtain informed
consent for people to participate in research and for use
of the information collected. Where possible, consent
should also take into account any future uses of data, such
as the sharing, preservation and long-term use of research
data. At a minimum, consent forms should not preclude
data sharing, such as by promising to destroy data
unnecessarily.
Researchers should: 
• inform participants how research data will be stored,
preserved and used in the long-term 
• inform participants how confidentiality will be
maintained, e.g. by anonymising data 
• obtain informed consent, either written or verbal, for
data sharing 
To ensure that consent is informed, consent must be freely
given with sufficient information provided on all aspects
of participation and data use. There must be active
communication between the parties. Consent must never
be inferred from a non-response to a communication such
as a letter. Without consent for data sharing, opportunities
for sharing research data with other researchers can be
jeopardised. 
A COMBINATION OF GAINING CONSENT FOR DATA SHARING, ANONYMISING AND
REGULATING ACCESS TO DATA WILL INCREASE THE POTENTIAL FOR MAKING PEOPLE-
RELATED RESEARCH DATA MORE READILY AND WIDELY AVAILABLE. 
DEFINITIONS 
Personal data
Personal data are data which relate to a living individual
who can be identified from those data or from those
data and other information which is in the possession
of, or is likely to come into the possession of, the data
controller and includes any expression of opinion about
the individual and any indication of the intentions of the
data controller. This includes any other person in
respect of the individual (Data Protection Act 1998).
Confidential data
Confidential data are data given in confidence or data
agreed to be kept confidential, i.e. secret, between two
parties, that are not in the public domain such as
information on business, income, health, medical
details, and political opinion.
Ssensitive personal data
Sensitive personal data are defined in the Data
Protection Act 1998 as data on a person’s race, ethnic
origin, political opinion, religious or similar beliefs, trade
union membership, physical or mental health or
condition, sexual life, commission or alleged commission
of an offence, proceedings for an offence (alleged to
have been) committed, disposal of such proceedings or
the sentence of any court in such proceedings.
SAMPLE CONSENT STATEMENT FOR QUANTITATIVE
SURVEYS 
Thank you very much for agreeing to participate in this
survey.
The information provided by you in this questionnaire
will be used for research purposes. It will not be used in
any manner which would allow identification of your
individual responses.
Anonymised research data will be archived at ………. in
order to make them available to other researchers in
line with current data sharing practices. 
ETHICS AND CONSENT
24
ETHICS AND CONSENT
SAMPLE CONSENT FORM FOR INTERVIEWS 
CONSENT FORM FOR [NAME OF PROJECT]
Please tick the appropriate boxes
Yes
No
Taking Part
I have read and understood the project information sheet dated DD/MM/YYYY.
I have been given the opportunity to ask questions about the project. 
I agree to take part in the project. Taking part in the project will include being interviewed 
and recorded (audio or video).a
I understand that my taking part is voluntary; I can withdraw from the study at any time and 
I do not have to give any reasons for why I no longer want to take part.
Use of the information I provide for this project only
I understand my personal details such as phone number and address will not be revealed to 
people outside the project.
I understand that my words may be quoted in publications, reports, web pages, and other 
research outputs.
Please choose oneof the following two options:
I would like my real name used in the above 
I would notlike my real name to be used in the above.
Use of the information I provide beyond this project 
I agree for the data I provide to be archived at the UK Data Archive.b
I understand that other genuine researchers will have access to this data only if they agree 
to preserve the confidentiality of the information as requested in this form.
I understand that other genuineresearchers may use my words in publications, reports, 
web pages, and other research outputs, only if they agree to preserve the confidentiality 
of the information as requested in this form.
So we can use the information you provide legally 
I agree to assign the copyright I hold in any materials related to this project to [name of researcher].
Name of participant [printed] Signature
Date
Researcher [printed] Signature
Date
Project contact details for further information: Names, phone, email addresses, etc.
Notes:
Other forms of participation can be listed.
More detail can be provided here so that decisions can be made separately about audio, video, transcripts, etc.
25
ETHICS AND CONSENT
WRITTEN OR VERBAL CONSENT?
Whether informed consent is obtained in writing through
a detailed consent form, by means of an informative
statement, or verbally, depends on the nature of the
research, the kind of data gathered, the data format and
how the data will be used.
For detailed interviews or research where personal,
sensitive or confidential data are gathered:
• the use of written consent forms is recommended to
assure compliance with the Data Protection Act and
with ethical guidelines of professional bodies and
funders
• written consent typically includes an information sheet
and consent form signed by the participant
• verbal consent agreements can be recorded together
with audio or video recorded data
For surveys or informal interviews, where no personal data
are gathered or personal identifiers are removed from the
data:
• obtaining written consent may not be required • an
information sheet should be provided to participants
detailing the nature and scope of the study, the identity
of the researcher(s) and what will happen to data
collected (including any data sharing)
Sample consent forms are available from the UK Data
Archive.27
ONE-OFF OR PROCESS CONSENT?
Discussing and obtaining all forms of consent can be a
oneoff occurrence or an ongoing process. 
• One-off consent is simple, practical, avoids repeated
requests to participants, and meets the formal
requirements of most Research Ethics Committees.
However, it may place too much emphasis on ‘ticking
boxes’.
• Process consent is considered throughout the research
project and assures active informed consent from
participants. Consent for participation in research, for
primary data use and for data sharing, can be
considered at different stages of the research. This gives
participants a clearer view of what their participation
means and how their data are to be shared. It may,
however, be repetitive and burdenesome.
RESEARCH ETHICS COMMITTEES AND DATA SHARING
The role of Research Ethics Committees (RECs) is to
help protect thesafety, rights and well-being of research
participants and to promote ethically sound research.
This involves ensuring that research complies with the
Data Protection Act 1998 regarding the use of personal
information collected in research.
In research with people, there can be a perceived
tension between data sharing and data protection where
research data contain personal, sensitive or confidential
information. However, in many cases, data obtained from
people can be shared while upholding both the letter
and the spirit of data protection and research ethics
principles. 
RECs can play a role in this by advising researchers that:
• most research data obtained from participants can be
successfully shared without breaching confidentiality
• it is important to distinguish between personal data
collected and research data in general
• data protection laws do not apply to anonymised data
• personal data should not be disclosed, unless consent
has been given for disclosure
• identifiable information may be excluded from data
sharing
• many funders recommend or require data sharing or
data management planning
• even personal sensitive data can be shared if suitable
procedures, precautions and safeguards are followed,
as is done at major data centres
For example, survey and qualitative data held at the UK
Data Archive are typically anonymised, unless specific
consent has been given for personal information to be
included. They are not in the public domain and their
use is regulated for specific purposes after user
registration. Users sign a licence in which they agree to
conditions such as not attempting to identify any
individuals from the data and not sharing data with
unregistered users. For confidential or sensitive data
stricter access regulations may be imposed.
RECs can play a critical role by providing such
information to researchers, at the consent planning
stages, on how to share data ethically.
SHARING CONFIDENTIAL DATA 
The Biological Records Centre (BRC)
is the national custodian of data on
the distribution of wildlife in the
British Isles.28 Data are provided by
volunteers, researchers and
organisations. BRC disseminates data for
environmental decision-making, education and research.
Data whose publication could present a significant threat
to a species or habitat (e.g. nesting location of birds of
prey) will be treated as confidential. The BRC provides
access to the data it holds via the National Biodiversity
Network Gateway. Standard access controls are as follows:
• public access to view and download all records at a
minimum 10 km2level of resolution, and at higher
resolution if the data provider agrees
• registered users have access to view and download all
except confidential records at the 1 km2level of
resolution 
• conservation organisations have access to view and
download all except confidential records at full
resolution with attributes
• conservation officers in statutory conservation agencies
have access to view and download all records, including
confidential records at full resolution with attributes
• records that have been signified as confidential by a data
provider will not be made available to the conservation
agencies without the consent of the data provider.
CASE 
S
TUDY
ANONYMISING DATA 
Before data obtained from research with people can be
published or shared with other researchers, they may need
to be anonymised so that individuals, organisations and
businesses cannot be identified from the data.29
Anonymisation may be needed for ethical reasons to
protect people’s identities, for legal reasons to not
disclose personal data, or for commercial reasons.
Personal data should not be disclosed from research
information, unless a respondent has given specific
consent to do so. 
Anonymisation may not be required for example, in oral
histories where it is customary to publish and share the
names of people interviewed, for which they have given
their consent. 
It can be time consuming, and therefore costly, to
anonymise research data, in particular qualitative textual
data. This is especially the case if not planned early in the
research or left until the end of a project.
Special attention may be needed for: 
• relational data, where relations between variables in
related datasets can disclose identities 
• geo-referenced data, where identifying spatial
references such as point co-ordinates also have a 
geo-spatial value 
Removing spatial references prevents disclosure, but it
means that all geographical information is lost. A better
option may be to keep spatial references intact and to
impose access regulations on the data instead. As an
alternative, point co-ordinates may be replaced by larger,
non-disclosing geographical areas or by meaningful
alternative variables that typify the geographical position. 
Consideration should be given to the level of anonymity
required to meet the needs agreed during the informed
consent process. Researchers should not presume the only
way to maintain confidentiality is by keeping data hidden.
Obtaining informed consent for data sharing or regulating
access to data should also be considered alongside any
anonymisation.
Managing anonymisation: 
• plan anonymisation early in the research at the time of
data collection 
• retain original unedited versions of data for use within
the research team and for preservation 
• create an anonymisation log of all replacements,
aggregations or removals made
• store the log separately from the anonymised data files 
• identify replacements in text in a meaningful way, e.g. in
transcribed interviews indicate replaced text with
[brackets] or use XML markup tags <anon>…..</anon>
AUDIO-VISUAL DATA
Digital manipulation of audio and image files can be used
to remove personal identifiers. However, techniques such
as voice alteration and image blurring are labour-intensive
and expensive and are likely to damage the research
potential of the data. If confidentiality of audio-visual data
is an issue, it is better to obtain the participant’s consent
to use and share the data unaltered, with additional access
controls if necessary.
26
ETHICS AND CONSENT
Data may be anonymised by:
• removing direct identifiers, e.g. name or address
• aggregating or reducing the precision of information
or a variable, e.g. replacing date of birth by age
groups 
• generalising the meaning of detailed text, e.g.
replacing a doctor’s detailed area of medical
expertise with an area of medical speciality 
• using pseudonyms
• restricting the upper or lower ranges of a variable to
hide outliers, e.g. top-coding salaries 
A person’s identity can be disclosed from: 
• direct identifiers, e.g. name, address, postcode
information or telephone number 
• indirect identifiers that, when linked with other
publicly available information sources, could identify
someone, e.g. information on workplace, occupation
or exceptional values of characteristics like salary or
age 
DATA SECURITY AND
ANONYMISATION
UK Biobank aims to collect medical
and genetic data from 500,000
middle-aged people across the UK in
order to create a research resource to
study the prevention and treatment of
serious diseases. Stringent security, confidentiality and
anonymisation measures are in place.30 UK Biobank
holds personal data on recruited patients, their medical
records and blood, urine and genetic samples, with data
made available to approved researchers. Data or
samples provided to researchers never include personal
identifying details. 
All data and samples are stored anonymously by
removing any identifying information. This identifying
information is encrypted and stored separately in a
restricted access database that is controlled by senior
UK Biobank staff. Identifying data and samples are only
linked using a code that has no external meaning. Only
a few people within UK Biobank have access to the key
to the code for re-linking participants’ identifying
information with data and samples. All staff sign
confidentiality agreements as part of their employment
contracts. 
CASE 
STUDY
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested