pdf reader in asp.net c# : How to delete text in pdf preview application Library tool html asp.net .net online McConnel_USCGS_Charts_Thesis1-part795

xi
LIST OF TABLES 
Table   
Page 
1. U.S. Coast Survey Original Charting Scheme ..............................................
2. Charts Used in This Project ..........................................................................
13 
3. Year of Each Edition of the Charts ...............................................................
15 
4. Year of First Edition .....................................................................................
16 
5. Print Method: Copperplate or Lithography ...................................................
37 
6. Chart Numbers ..............................................................................................
45 
7. Neatline Format: Number of Outer and Inner Lines .....................................
50 
8. Neatline Format: From the Left Edge In .......................................................
52 
9. Titles  .............................................................................................................
63 
10. Location of Seal Relative to Title .................................................................
66 
11. Short Title .....................................................................................................
71 
12. Shoal Water Represented by Sanding or Color, in Fathoms  ........................
86 
13. Bathymetric Contours: Fathoms Marked with Depth Contours ...................
88 
14. Units of Measurement for Soundings ...........................................................
97 
15. Form of Topographic Relief Depiction ......................................................... 105 
16. Charts with Engraved Views  ........................................................................ 114 
How to delete text in pdf preview - delete, remove text from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# developers to use mature APIs to delete and remove text content from PDF document
how to erase text in pdf file; how to delete text in pdf preview
How to delete text in pdf preview - VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File
how to delete text in pdf document; remove text from pdf reader
xii
LIST OF FILES ON COMPACT DISC IN POCKET 
File   
Size 
1. 00_FullSheets.pdf ..........................................................................................7 MB 
2. 01_UpperLeft.pdf ...........................................................................................9 MB 
3. 02_Title.pdf ................................................................................................86.2 MB 
4. 03_CR.pdf ................................................................................................ 72.3 MB 
5. 04_Shoal.pdf ................................................................................................9.2 MB 
6. 05_Channels.pdf ............................................................................................1 MB 
7. 06_Deep.pdf ................................................................................................8.6 MB 
8. 07_Urban.pdf .................................................................................................8 MB 
9. 08_Topo.pdf ................................................................................................7.7 MB 
10. 09_Color.pdf ................................................................................................2.2 MB 
11. 10_Notes.pdf ................................................................................................6.3 MB 
12. 11_Aids.pdf ................................................................................................34.9 MB 
13. 12_BottomCenter.pdf .....................................................................................5 MB 
14. 13_LowerLeft.pdf ..........................................................................................3 MB 
15. 14_LowerRight.pdf ........................................................................................5 MB 
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Word file in C#.net.
delete text from pdf acrobat; pdf text watermark remover
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing PowerPoint file in C#.net.
pdf editor delete text; delete text pdf
1
CHAPTER I  
INTRODUCTION 
In 1844, the United States Coast Survey published its first official nautical chart. 
It was the result of an immense amount of manual topographic and hydrographic 
surveying, manual drafting, manual engraving on copper printing plates, and manual 
intaglio printing (using black ink from copper plates). 
In 1939, the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey (C&GS) published its first 
nautical chart that included isobaths as the primary representation of the seafloor rather 
than individual depth soundings. Data for the isobaths were collected by a recording echo 
sounder, while topographic revision was performed from aerial photographs. The 
production process included manual and mechanical scribing on wet-plate glass 
negatives; additional chart compilation using photography to merge in standard elements; 
photographic transfer to aluminum lithographic printing plates; and printing in multiple 
colors on a powered rotary offset press. 
This thesis looks at the history of changes to the design of C&GS nautical charts 
from their first publication in 1844 through the World War II era. This period of time 
spans several transitions: from copperplate engraving and printing, to scribing on glass 
and plastic and photolithographic printing; from lead-line depth soundings at points to 
echo sounding and air photo interpretation for determining depth contours; from printing 
with black ink to printing with multiple color inks; from designing charts for use by 
sailing ships to designing them for steam and then diesel powered ships; and others. 
The thesis focuses on the design of chart elements, what information was 
included/excluded from the charts, and chart marginalia such as chart identification 
numbering systems and edition statements. The objective is to understand how 
incremental changes so transformed C&GS nautical charts during the first century of the 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
a preview component enables compressing and decompressing in preview in ASP images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size Delete unimportant contents:
delete text from pdf online; acrobat remove text from pdf
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Add text to PDF document in preview. • Add text box to PDF file in preview. • Draw PDF markups. Search PDF text in preview. • View PDF outlines.
how to delete text in pdf file; delete text from pdf
2
agency’s publishing history. The reason for choosing this objective is to better understand 
this period in the history of cartography, in particular how technological and societal 
changes influenced changes in cartography. A subsidiary goal is to help map librarians 
and historians understand the continuity of charts as they went through changes in design 
and numbering systems. The beginning of the full transition away from the last of the 
original techniques began in 1939 when the first chart was published that fully 
incorporated the possibilities for different symbology offered by the vast quantities of 
data created by recording echo sounders. Charts continued to evolve after 1939, entering 
a new phase around 1980 based on internationally approved symbology, but the greatest 
changes are evident by 1939.  
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit
PowerPoint Conversion. • Convert Microsoft Office PowerPoint to PDF (.pdf). Delete annotations from PowerPoint. Select PowerPoint text contents for edit.
how to erase pdf text; how to delete text from pdf document
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Supports adding text to PDF in preview without adobe reader installed in ASP.NET. Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text.
erase pdf text; delete text pdf document
3
CHAPTER II 
LITERATURE REVIEW 
Dramatic changes occurred in the nautical charts published by the U.S. Coast 
Survey/U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey between 1844 and 1940. These changes have not 
been systematically described or discussed.  
The literature that is relevant to this project can be broken into two primary 
components: writing about nautical charts, and writing about printing techniques & 
technologies. 
Nautical Charts 
Woodward suggests in a commentary that there has been little analysis of the 
graphic design of “workaday maps—the huge topographic map series or detailed 
reference atlases” that are in everyday use (1985). Nautical charts are included in this 
category. 
Typical histories of nautical charts dwell on early charts, from antiquity up to 
around the year 1800. Portolan charts have received the most attention and authors either 
conclude their studies at the creation of the major national surveys—the French Dépôt 
des Cartes et Plans des Marines in 1720, the British Hydrographic Office in 1795, the 
U.S. Coast Survey in 1807, and U.S. Naval Hydrographic Office in 1830—or merely deal 
with them in a cursory manner (Blake 2004; Taylor 1951; Robinson 1952). Robinson’s 
short paper from 1952 on English nautical charts is an example of the former, but it does 
at least provide an example of a format on which to expand. One author has written on 
early U.S. Coast Survey topographic mapping (Allen 1998), but the article does not 
discuss charts published after 1861. The authors of two secondary works that touch on 
C&GS charts mention the lack of other research on their topic (Cook 2002; Allen 1998).  
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Excel. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Excel file in C#.net.
delete text pdf file; how to erase text in pdf
C# PDF replace text Library: replace text in PDF content in C#.net
Description: Delete specified string text that match the search option from specified PDF page. Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value.
delete text from pdf file; acrobat delete text in pdf
4
Morris’ 1986 article, “Paper Chart to Digital Chart - Possibilities and Problems,” 
offers a paragraph-each discussion of the design of five British nautical charts. The charts 
cover the same area through time, published in 1800, 1859, 1916, 1964, and ‘current’ (the 
1980s). The bulk of the article discusses the coming transition to electronic charts, and 
provides only a limited example of chart comparison. 
To date, the majority of writing about C&GS charts has been by agency staff 
(U.S. Treasury Department et al. 1900a; Tittmann 1912; U.S. Department of Commerce 
et al. 1916c, 1921b; Jones 1924; U.S. Department of Commerce et al. 1936a; Shalowitz 
1957; Wraight et al. 1957; Shalowitz 1964; Theberge 1989). Of that literature, only 
Shalowitz has made any contribution to delineating changes to published charts, and his 
work was explicitly focused on using historic charts for legal purposes (1964). However, 
he did not place changes in any kind of larger context.  
There have also been a few articles published in the popular press regarding 
C&GS charts. They seem to have been part of efforts for agency survival in the 
nineteenth century, but each was a static portrait, more laudatory than analytical 
(Hoffman 1847; Davis 1849; Davidson 1880; Powell 1892a, 1892b; Harris 1898; Claudy 
1908). 
The British Admiralty’s transition in chart design that took place from about 1968 
to 1970 was the occasion for a couple articles describing either the before, the after, or 
comparing the two designs (Magee 1971; Kitching 1974). It seems that the British 
charting agency was even more conservative than the C&GS when it came to changing 
chart designs and production techniques. While their first use of printed color came at 
about the same time as the C&GS, in the first decade of the twentieth century, the use of 
a blue tint for shoal water was not fully put into practice until about 1945 (Magee 1971, 
7-8).  
Kerr and Anderson of the Canadian Hydrographic Service published a paper 
entitled “Communication and the Nautical Chart” in 1982. Originally a lecture at a 
conference, it focuses on changes in navigation and shipping up to their time, and broadly 
discusses changes to chart design in reaction. Their work provides few specifics about 
5
chart designs, references no specific charts, and concludes as a manifesto to start from 
scratch.  
Printing Techniques and Technology 
In his 1975 essay “Mapmaking and Map Printing: The Evolution of a Working 
Relationship,” Robinson differentiates four time periods in the history of the relationship 
between cartographers and printers. He identifies the period 1790-1940 as one of 
mechanization and innovation, marked by “great change and variety in printing methods 
(Robinson 1975, 4).” Throughout this time cartographers and printers slowly begin 
working more closely together, and around 1940 enter a new period, one of symbiosis. 
This idea of change around 1940 fits well the choice of World War II as a break in past 
practice for examining the C&GS charts’ design.  
Karen Severud Cook (neé Pearson) has written a series of articles on cartography 
and printing in the nineteenth century (Pearson 1980, 1983; Cook 1995, 2002). In her 
1983 article examining area symbols on maps published in nineteenth century geographic 
journals, she intertwines advances in printing technology with changes in production 
processes, methods and technologies. 
One of the advances she notes is the shift from printing maps in black to printing 
in multiple colors. Color applied by hand to intaglio-printed sheets was largely decorative 
and confined to highlighting point and line symbols. A major cartographic advance she 
notes is the shift to using printed color for area symbols, and color becoming integral to 
carrying information rather than supplementary. This was made possible by advances in 
lithographic printing (Pearson 1980, 9-11). She notes that the major shift is that maps 
“were being conceived in colour (16),” and they would be incomplete without the color 
plate(s). This quickly led to development of conventions for what information to place on 
which color plate, “i.e. black for base information and lettering, blue for hydrography and 
brown for terrain (16).”  
These changes she observes were seen in a survey of maps printed in scientific 
journals, and she notes that most of these maps would have been “executed ‘from 
6
scratch’(9)” specifically for an article. Creating new maps offers less “technological 
inertia (Pearson 1983, 1)” to resist change in production methods than existing map 
series. This implies freedom on the part of the map creator to incorporate technological 
advances. National surveys, with their large investment in methods and plate stock, 
would have faced much larger hurdles in adopting novel production and printing 
methods. It is not surprising to find that the Coast Survey was late to adopt many of the 
advances she mentions. 
7
CHAPTER III 
METHODOLOGY 
In order to survey a sample of charts representative of the style and content of the 
U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey’s published charts over time, multiple charts must be 
compared, preferably from different chart series
1
. For this thesis, images of common 
components of multiple editions of six charts were extracted from digital versions of the 
original charts. These images were compiled into several large layouts, grouped by 
theme, to facilitate comparison of the charts’ features. This chapter details the steps 
leading to the creation of these layouts.  
Choosing Charts 
The choice of charts determines what comparisons can be made as well as 
impacting the breadth of conclusions that can be drawn. Among the factors that could be 
compared if appropriate charts are selected:  
•  Differences due to scale (how were features represented at different scales?) 
•  Differences due to intended purpose (how were charts different when they 
were intended for mariners to use them for off-shore navigation as opposed 
to in-shore navigation?) 
•  Differences due to geographic area (were different parts of the coast 
represented differently?)  
•  Differences due to time (what changes were made to the design and content of 
charts over time?) 
Regarding scale, the Coast Survey and other authors typically recognize four main 
divisions based on the intended type of navigation (see Appendix B: Scale Divisions for a 
detailed breakdown of scales used for nautical charts and the common names given to 
1
A chart, or navigational chart, is a single printed sheet consisting of at least one main map having 
navigation as its intended purpose. A chart series uses multiple charts to cover an area that cannot fit on a 
single printed sheet, and all of the main maps typically share a single scale and design.  Multiple editions of 
a chart can be published over time. 
8
these scales). The names typically used to refer to the four most common ranges of scale 
are Sailing Chart, General Chart of the Coast, Coast Chart, and Harbor Chart. Sailing 
Charts are for plotting long courses across hundreds of miles of open water. Coast Charts 
are for navigating offshore but within sight of land. General Charts have a scale in-
between Sailing Charts and Coast Charts. Harbor Charts are used for inland waters, 
especially when carefully maneuvering into bays and up to docks.  
The survey’s scheme of scale divisions was explained in the agency’s annual 
reports for 1856 and 1857 (see Table 1). Coast Charts would be at 1:80,000; Preliminary
2
Coast Charts would be 1:200,000; and General Coast Charts would be 1:400,000 (U.S. 
Treasury Department et al. 1856b, 1858). In the 1863 annual report, mention was made 
that Sailing Charts were planned to be 1:1,200,000 (U.S. Treasury Department et al. 
1864b). Larger scale charts were to be provided at varying scales, as required by the 
situation.  
Table 1. U.S. Coast Survey original charting scheme 
Sailing Charts
1: 1,200,000
1: 1,200,000
General Coast Charts
1:
400,000
1:
200,000
Preliminary Seacoast Charts
1:
200,000
1:
Coast Charts
1:
80,000
1:
Harbor Charts
1:
>80,000
1:
>80,000
East & Gulf 
Coasts
West Coast
There is a hitch in this scheme, however. These were all for the Atlantic and Gulf 
coasts of the country. For the Pacific coast, plans were different. There is no mention of 
plans for series at 1:80,000 or 1:400,000 for the Pacific coast. A compromise scale of 
1:200,000 was instead provided. Even though the 1:80,000 Coast Charts were one of the 
most important chart series covering the Atlantic and Gulf coasts, the series was not 
continued on the Pacific. It seems likely this was due to a combination of finances and 
the relative lack of in-shore navigating done along this rocky coast.  
2
Preliminary charts were engraved on copper plates, but were not finished to the same degree of detail as 
Finished charts. The 1:200,000 Preliminary charts were considered a temporary product to provide stop-gap 
information until the 1:80,000 Finished chart of an area became available. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested