pdf reader in asp.net c# : How to edit and delete text in pdf file online Library application class asp.net azure wpf ajax McConnel_USCGS_Charts_Thesis11-part797

99
The clip chosen for NY40 1870 has a more regular distribution of soundings in 
the deep waters than the previous editions. The distribution appears to be very much the 
same as that of the 1878 edition. 
The clips selected for NY40 1902 and 1914 demonstrate that there is still a 
difference in the density of soundings selected for the charts between shoal water and 
deeper waters. The coverage of deep water soundings appears to be complete, however, 
unlike the earliest editions in which there were obvious holes in the coverage.  
Looking at the deep water clips for the other charts, it appears that they, too, went 
through a similar history. The early charts have large gaps in soundings, with entire 
sections of chart with no soundings at all, and the tracks of individual sounding parties 
plainly represented. MH400 1916 is an excellent example of this. It appears that multiple 
runs were taken heading east until a depth of 100 fathoms was reached. On MH400 1938 
it appears that a project is shown where a party was asked to make soundings out to 1500 
fathoms, but only north of a particular line of latitude.  
E1200 shows evidence of the 1500 fathom plan but the 1948 edition is unique in 
that all deep water soundings have been removed. It is entirely dependent on bathymetric 
contours for depth information in deep water, although it does have soundings within the 
blue-tinted danger zone, the 10-fathom line. Removing the soundings makes the LORAN 
lines more distinct and, therefore, easier to use for navigating with that electronic aid. 
Sounding tracks appear on all of the W1200 editions, even the last, 1945/54.  
Context 
In 1915 a plan was approved to convert all large scale Atlantic coast charts to 
soundings in feet (U.S. Department of Commerce et al. 1915, 136). See Shalowitz 1964 
for a discussion of C&GS standards for depth units (306).  
It is clear by examining the charts that soundings have different importance for 
different mariners at different times. A high density of soundings is necessary for 
successfully traversing shallows, especially for sailing ships using the wind to tack a zig-
zag course. If fog was present and visual aids to navigation unavailable, they would 
How to edit and delete text in pdf file online - delete, remove text from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# developers to use mature APIs to delete and remove text content from PDF document
how to erase pdf text; delete text pdf document
How to edit and delete text in pdf file online - VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File
delete text pdf acrobat professional; erase text from pdf file
100
sound constantly using a lead line to determine depth. With a detailed chart, enough 
soundings, and good dead-reckoning, a navigator could make it through such dangerous 
waters. 
Making soundings in very deep water, over 100 fathoms, was difficult if not 
impossible until certain technological and scientific advances came along in the 
nineteenth century. Steam-powered sounding machines, long metal wire, and 
mechanisms to drop weights when the bottom was struck, comprised a first generation of 
advances over dropping a lead weight by hand. The next generation involved better 
instrumentation, such as pressure tubes, to make more accurate measurements. The 
twentieth century saw remote sensing technologies, particularly echo sounding for deep 
water and SHORAN, LORAN, and RADAR for navigation, which revolutionized both 
data collection and navigation. Dead-reckoning, and later an advanced version termed 
Precise Dead Reckoning, were used for determining location of soundings for work done 
out of sight of land or other pre-placed aids until electronic positioning technologies such 
as RAR were developed in the 1920s.  
While C&GS publications from the very earliest tried to reassure mariners that 
density of soundings on the finished charts did not directly relate to quality of survey, and 
that the soundings shown were only a miniscule number of representative soundings 
compared to the large number actually taken, there are instances where blank spaces 
meant ‘no soundings.’ This was acknowledged in a pamphlet published by the survey in 
1900 (U.S. Treasury Department et al. 1900a, 8). 
Channels 
Channels are interesting both for how they are represented and for what they say 
about the needs of navigation and the technological abilities of society. Layout 05—
Channels is referred to in the following section. It does not include clips from the Sailing 
Charts (there is only clip for MH400) because those charts are not designed for 
navigating through channels, and such features are poorly represented if at all. 
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. File Permissions. Password: Open Document. Edit Digital Signatures. Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing
how to delete text in a pdf acrobat; how to delete text in pdf converter
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Free PDF edit control and component for deleting PDF Easy to delete PDF page in .NET WinForms application Enable specified pages deleting from PDF in Visual
how to delete text from a pdf reader; how to delete text from pdf document
101
On NY40 1844 the line on which the words “Main Ship Channel” sit represents 
the center and deepest line of the channel, the fairway. The line intersecting it at an angle 
near the “p” in “Ship” represents the fairway of Gedney’s Channel through the outer bar 
of the harbor. These lines are keyed to sailing directions provided as notes elsewhere on 
the chart. The line through “Flynn’s Knoll” is a line of latitude. Sanding along the 
shallows to the north and south provide the boundaries of the Main Ship Channel. The 
three channels shown on the smaller clip (Fourteen Foot Channel, East Channel, and 
Swash Channel) are less-preferred routes, and do not have a fairway track shown. 
NY40 1845 has similar fairway lines, while NY40 1853 does not. The letters for 
“Main Ship Channel” are placed along a curve instead of a straight line. The font for this 
phrase has a taller x-height than the 1844 edition, and it appears less formal and elegant. 
NY40 1870 and 1878 have a dashed centerline representing the fairway of the 
channel, which has had its name shortened to “
MAIN CHANNEL
”. The font used is sans 
serif but slanted, and the words are in all caps. It is still defined only by the sanding on 
the adjacent features. 
By the 1902 edition of NY40, the channel’s label was moved a bit to the 
northwest, but the letterforms stayed the same. The channel has slightly more definition 
with the addition of a dashed bathymetric contour at the 4-fathom line to compliment the 
sanding inside 3 fathoms.  
On the 1914 edition, the fairway is better defined by adding the bearing of the 
line, “
250°18’ TRUE
”, between the line and the name of the channel. The second clip for 
1914 shows that the channel between Fourteen Foot Channel and Romer Shoal has been 
renamed from East Channel to Ambrose Channel (see NY40 1844). It has also been 
DREDGED TO 40 FEET DEC 1912
” according to the text on the chart. In addition to the 4-
fathom line, the outside edges of the dredged channel are represented by a dashed line 
with a different pitch than the fairway’s dash. Oddly, the name of the channel is placed 
outside of the actual channel. 
In the 1917 edition, the name of the channel has been moved back inside the 
channel. Also different for 1917 is the form of the dashes defining the outside of the 
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Advanced Visual Studio .NET PDF edit SDK, built on .NET framework 2.0 and compatible Able to extract and get all and partial text content from PDF file.
how to erase text in pdf; how to delete text in pdf file online
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
BestC#.NET PDF edit control for deleting PDF pages in Visual Advanced component and library able to delete PDF page in to remove a range of pages from PDF file.
how to erase in pdf text; delete text from pdf acrobat
102
dredged channel. They are thicker than the dashes representing the fairway, although the 
pitch is more nearly the same. Another change is that the label noting the channel’s depth 
has been shortened to “
40 FEET JUNE 1916
”. For the Main Channel, the name is now 
placed at a different angle than the fairway line. The bearing label has moved but is still 
present on the eastern edge of the clip. For both channels an important change is that the 
4-fathom line has been replaced with a 5-fathom line made up of sets of five dots. 
No representational changes are seen for NY40 1926, but the 1936 edition has a 
different form of the fairway line. The dashed line uses a longer, heavier dash. Also for 
1936, the sanding is replaced with a blue tint, and the 1-, 2-, and 3-fathom lines are 
shown by distinct lines inside the tinted area. 
One change to note for the NY40 1944 clip is a new name, “
SANDY HOOK 
CHANNEL
”, for what used to be the Main Channel. Also, the fairway line has been 
removed. 
The earliest example of a dredged channel is shown on SF40 1859/77. Protruding 
from the mouth of San Antonio Creek, just south of Oakland, is “
DREDGED CHANNEL 13 
FEET DEEP
”, noted in italic sans-serif letters. The label is at an angle to the channel itself, 
marked by solid lines and labeled “Training Walls” in title case, italic, with serifs. It 
appears the channel label is positioned to avoid obscuring the soundings in the channel. 
This suggests that the labels and the lines were added to the chart after the soundings. 
There is no date associated with the channel, however. (Note the high level detail in the 
braided creek north and south of the eastern end of the training wall.) 
On SF40 1883 both labels are gone, but the lines that were previously labeled as 
walls are still present. The channel is deeper in some places. Also, the label for San 
Antonio Creek has been moved so that most of it is no longer in the channel. (The detail 
in the braided creek area is absent, but a rail line and wharf are shown at the head of the 
channel.) 
For 1901, SF40 does not have text relating to the channel, but the soundings 
indicate that it is 3¼ fathoms deep through its entire length. This would require that it 
was dredged. The lines for the unlabeled training wall are still present. A new rail line 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively will also take up too much space, glyph file unreferenced can Delete unimportant contents
how to delete text in pdf acrobat; how to delete text in pdf using acrobat professional
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Evaluation library and components provide varieties of functionalities to edit and update PDF metadata in Remove and delete metadata from PDF file.
how to delete text in pdf converter professional; delete text pdf file
103
and wharf have been added to the south of the wall. The label for the creek is either 
moved or absent. 
Major changes in landform are evident on SF40 1926 in the area around the 
channel. Much of the shallows and mud flats have been filled-in, and the training walls 
now have dry land on both sides of the channel. A new rail line and wharf are shown 
along the north side of the channel. The channel itself is labeled “
26½ FEET APRIL 1927
” 
in Roman sans-serif letters in two places, and “
28 FEET APRIL 1927
” once. This text 
appears to be created with an inked stamp rather than printed. Soundings have been 
removed from the channel, but are present immediately outside of it. The sides of the 
dredged channel are represented as a dashed line, and areas shallower than 18 feet are 
sanded, even within the banks of the channel. 
SF40 1947A shows additional land area filled-in, and new wharfs built in the 
vicinity of the channel. The channel is now labeled “
28 FEET MAY 1947
” and “
29 FEET 
MAY 1947
” in italic sans-serif text that is clearly printed on the chart, not stamped. Longer 
dashes are used to show the edge of the dredged channel, and with the sanding replaced 
by blue tint, contour lines mark several depth lines. The dredged part of the channel does 
not have the blue tint, but the shallows between the dredged area and the channel banks 
are shown in blue. 
The last edition of SF40, 1947b/57, no longer states the depth to which it is 
dredged. This information has moved to a table elsewhere on the chart (shown in Figure 
9). Instead, text in part of the channel provides the label “
INNER HARBOR ENTRANCE 
CHAN
”, and a section further east is set off by a box made of dashes and labeled 
MEASURED NAUTICAL MILE. COURSE 105°32’ TRUE
”. 
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Split PDF file into two or multiple files in ASP.NET webpage online. Support to break a large PDF file into smaller files in .NET WinForms.
how to delete text from a pdf; remove text from pdf
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Append one PDF file to the end of another one in VB.NET. Free .NET framework library download and VB.NET online source code samples.
how to erase text in pdf online; delete text from pdf
104
Figure 9. Key to Oakland Outer and Inner Harbors channel information, SF40 1947b/57 
Context 
As time passed, the draft of ships increased, and better definition of channels was 
needed to safely navigate through them. There were also fewer sailing ships needing wide 
channels to tack back and forth in as ships switched to steam and diesel power. Direct 
routes were then of most importance, and the deepest direct route at that. 
In a report on standard symbology published in 1860, the survey noted that, in 
contrast to other efforts to reduce the amount of detail on charts, one item that that was to 
be added to charts was a representation “showing the channel of deepest water…(U.S. 
Treasury Department et al. 1861, 222).” 
Topographic Information 
Natural landforms have been represented on the C&GS charts in varying ways. 
This section examines the depiction of landforms above the shoreline on first the Harbor 
Charts through time, and then the General and Sailing Charts through time. The 
105
discussion refers to Layout 08—Topography (other). The General and Sailing Charts are 
represented by fewer clips than Harbor Charts, due to multiple editions with no landforms 
shown.  
Harbor Charts 
On NY40 1844, topographic relief is shown with hachures (see Table 15 for a 
summary of the types of topographic relief depiction on each chart edition).  
Table 15. Form of Topographic Relief Depiction 
Time 
Period
NY40
SF40
MH400
GJF200
E1200
W1200
Hachures
Hachures
none
Hachures
Hachures
Contours
none?
Mtn. Symbol
none
3
Hachures Contours
Mtn. Symbols Mtn. Symbols
4
Hachures Contours
Contours, Mtn. 
Symbols and 
Hachures
Mtn. Symbols
Contours 
and 
Hachures
none 
none
Mtn. Symbols
6
none
Contours
none
Contours, Mtn. 
Symbols and 
Hachures
Mtn. Symbols
7
none
none
Contours, Mtn. 
Symbols and 
Hachures
Mtn. Symbols Mtn. Symbols
none
Contours
none
Contours and 
Mtn. Symbols
Mtn. Symbols
Contours
none
Mtn. Symbols Mtn. Symbols
9
none
Contours
none
Contours and 
Mtn. Symbols
Mtn. Symbols Mtn. Symbols
1
2
5
8
Wooded areas are filled with small tree symbols, each with its own shadow, as well as 
other dots for bushes. Agricultural fields are filled with a seemingly endless mix of lines, 
dashes, and dots running across each field at its own angle. It is not known if this 
illustrates the actual direction of plowed furrows in each field when it was surveyed, or 
106
merely serves to distinguish them from their neighbors. Fields are separated from each 
other by what appears to be a symbol for hedgerow, a mix of circles and ovals of 
different sizes. Marshes are filled with many horizontal rows of small dots. Streams, 
rivers, and roads are cased by black lines of unequal weight. Smooth, regular, lines for 
roads maintain a nearly constant width between the lines, with blank interior space. Lines 
forming water bodies are wavy to a larger degree, the space between the lines varies, and 
the interior is sanded. Rural residential lots are mostly filled with a smooth gray tone that 
would have been created with very fine parallel lines, but some are unfilled. Buildings are 
shown as small black rectangles. 
NY40 1845 shows that the 1:80,000 charts began their history with the C&GS 
with hachures for topographic relief, and fields and woods are distinguished. 
In the second time period, the first edition of SF40 (1859/77) uses hachures for 
topographic relief. Roads are symbolized with parallel dashed lines, and fields are 
divided by single dashed lines. Buildings are shown as small black rectangles. Small 
streams look to be a single black line until they widen out sufficiently to represented as 
two solid lines. The scan does not show if pairs of lines for roads and larger water 
features are unequal weight. The lower clipping on the layout shows that some cultural 
and some topographic features received labels, such as “Ocean Ho.” and “Merced Lake”. 
The hachures that show the landform do not extend inland very far. By the scale on the 
chart, it averages about two miles inland before the chart goes blank.  
NY40 1870 uses contour lines for topographic relief, instead of hachuring like the 
1844 edition. Woods appear to be shown with the same symbol as before, while fields are 
divided from one another by a line or dash symbol of some kind. The scan does not have 
sufficient detail to ascertain what fill symbol is used for fields, or to tell if the lines 
between the fields are the same symbol used in 1844.  
In the third time period, topographic relief methods are swapped. NY40 1878 
returns to hachuring, while SF40 1883 uses contours. NY40 has elevations for the peaks 
of some hills: “
240
”, “
260
”, and “
120
” are distinguishable on the clip. One hill has a 
107
symbol like  at the top labeled ª
NEW DORP BEACON
º. Apart from those additions, the 
rest of the land features appear to be the same as on previous editions. 
SF40 1883, as previously mentioned, uses contours to show relief. A note 
explains that, ª[t]he curves of elevation are given for every 20 feet difference of level. 
The figures on the hills show the height in feet. The Datum line is high water mark.º The 
contours cover the entire peninsula on which San Francisco resides, unlike the hachures 
on the earlier edition. A few of the figures on the hills are seen in the lower clip. At the 
same time, engraved patterns are still used to show vegetation type. A stipple pattern is 
seen over much of the upper clip, while in the lower clip a patch of the woodland symbol 
is seen near the ªVisitation Valleyº label. Several cultural features are labeled, too. The 
upper clip has ªOcean Side Houseº and in the oval, formed from parallel dashed lines, is 
the phrase ªOcean House Race Courseº. The name of the lake noted on the previous 
edition has been changed to ªLAGUNA DE LA MERCEDº, and the lake is filled with 
waterlining.  
In time period four the waterlining has been removed from Laguna de la Merced 
on the upper clip of SF40 1901. On the lower clip, the tightly-spaced horizontal lines 
along the shore, probably representing marsh area, that appeared on the 1883 edition have 
also been removed. Apart from those two changes, the topographic representation 
appears to have been kept static. NY40 1902 uses the same representational approach as 
NY40 1878. 
In the fifth time period, however, NY40 makes a major change. The 1914 edition 
uses a representational vocabulary that is very closely related to earlier editions, but 
which is not as fine or individualized. There are fewer unique symbol forms, especially 
area and fill types. Fields are still filled with pattern, but there appears to be only two: a 
type of stipple for plowed fields, and rows of dots for orchards. Hills are shown with 
hachures, but they are very regular, more coarse, and do not provide the same quality of 
appearance, hampering the sense of shading and relief. The primary source of 
topographic information is now contour lines at 20-foot intervals, rather than the detailed 
hachures of earlier editions. Some hills still do have their elevations labeled. Barely 
108
visible in the lower clip is one small lake or pond that is filled with waterlining, as are the 
rest of the lakes on the chart, unlike earlier editions. Some buildings are shown as 
rectangles, a heavy outline filled with tightly-spaced, fine, parallel lines that appear to be 
a solid fill at low resolutions.  
For NY40 1917, even more dramatic changes are seen. Nearly all topographic 
information has been removed. The only things left are the marsh symbol and elevations 
of hills. No contour lines, no hachures, no property lines, and no field or woodland fills 
are present. Large areas of upland have been cleared of cultural information as well, 
cutting off the road and rail network within a few miles of the shore, even on Staten 
Island. All lakes and ponds have lost their waterlining except for those in Central Park 
(see Layout 00РFull Sheets). Some of the buildings shown on the chart are filled with a 
cross-hatch, rather than a solid fill or parallel lines. 
No edition of SF40 is available for the fifth time period. 
In the sixth time period, NY40 1926 has a few small changes from the 1917 
edition. Some labels for cultural features are given knockouts
21
for area fills, in addition 
to the knockouts for linear cultural features available on the previous edition. The 
shoreline has been generalized a bit more than previous, and Pralis Island has had the 
marsh fill that ringed the shoreline on the 1917 edition removed. 
SF40 1926 differs from the 1901 edition primarily in the amount of cultural 
features present, rather than changes to representational techniques. This change is more 
due to growth of population on the San Francisco Peninsula than to improvements to the 
chart. Relief is still shown through contours, although now every fifth contour (100 feet) 
is a thicker line than the others. Tops of hills are still labeled with elevations, and area fill 
is still present for several types of vegetation. Some roads are shown with parallel solid 
lines, a change from the exclusive use of dashed lines for roads. Between Laguna Puerca 
and Lake Merced on the upper clip, a road is lined with symbols for deciduous trees, 
21
Where a label or other symbol that is placed on top of another symbol has a solid fill that replaces the 
underlying symbol. This helps the map user distinguish the topmost symbol.  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested