pdf reader in asp.net c# : How to delete text from pdf document software SDK project winforms windows wpf UWP McConnel_USCGS_Charts_Thesis12-part798

109
demonstrating that a wealth of detail was still provided for cultural information and 
topography above the waterline. 
For time period seven, NY40 1936 appears to have no changes from the previous 
edition. No edition is available for SF40. 
The eighth time period does have changes on NY40 1944. The symbol for 
marsh has changed to an overprint of blue on yellow to create green. It is outlined by a 
dashed line where not otherwise bounded by other cultural or topographic features (roads, 
railroads, stream banks, shorelines, etc.) within the two-mile swath of upland detail. It is 
also repeatedly labeled by the word ª
marsh
º in a lowercase sans serif font face. Labels for 
natural and cultural features that are placed within the color fill do not knock out the 
color like they did for the marsh symbol on the previous edition. Buildings are filled with 
heavier parallel lines. The absence of some sections of the road and rail network appear 
to be updates to reflect what is built, versus merely platted, as it seems unreasonable for 
such large sections to be demolished and replaced by marsh in such a short period of 
time. More natural features, particularly creeks, are labeledРnote ªMorse Cr.º and 
ªPiles Cr.º  
For SF40 1947a and 1947b/1957, no changes to representation are seen. It is 
interesting to see the bay between Candlestick Point and Visitation Point progressively 
filled-in, however. Also, between these two editions, the name ªVisitationº was changed 
to ªVisitacion.º 
General and Sailing Charts 
The General Charts and Sailing Charts always had less topographic detail than the 
Harbor Charts. Starting with W1200 1855/64 in the second time period it is clear that 
the smaller scale charts have very little information on inland landforms. This 
Reconnaissance Chart does have a thin strip of very generalized topography along the 
U.S. Pacific coast (but not on Vancouver Island) that is represented as hachuring and 
vague dotting that has not reproduced well. The clip shown on the layout has less detail 
How to delete text from pdf document - delete, remove text from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# developers to use mature APIs to delete and remove text content from PDF document
acrobat delete text in pdf; how to remove text watermark from pdf
How to delete text from pdf document - VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File
how to erase text in pdf file; how to delete text from a pdf document
110
than parts of the coast further south. No topographic or cultural information is shown 
further inland than the thin coastal strip. 
GJF200 1862 is the first example here that represents important mountain peaks 
within sight of water through the use of a generalized symbol for mountains, labeled with 
the name of the feature and its height in feet. On this chart it is not a standard symbol, as 
each is drawn individually with some indication of relative size shown by the size of the 
symbol. It is a modified hachure-like symbol, created by drawing rays out around a 
central circular void. The clip on the layout shows ªMt. Constitution 2411 ft.º and 
ªEntrance Mt 1120 ft.º on Orcas Island. Apart from such peaks, there are no other 
landforms shown. As with E1200 1863, land is distinguished from water by many 
parallel horizontal rows of dots that serve to give a gray tint to the land. It only continues 
a few miles inland from the shore, however. Past the ribbon of dots the land is left blank.  
MH400 1862 has areas of detailed landforms, as shown in the clip, but most of 
the land is left blank. This is the only edition of MH400 with any topographic 
information at all, and clips are not provided for the other time periods. The clip for the 
1862 edition shows Cape Charles at the southern end of the DelMarVA Peninsula just 
north of the entrance to Chesapeake Bay. It is very marshy, and may have been included 
with such detail because some of the channels are navigable, or for expediency through 
unrevised photographic reduction from larger-scale charts. Marsh areas are indicated with 
a marsh fill symbol, while solid land appears to be filled with a combination of gray dots, 
and larger circles representing vegetation. It is not clear from the scan if the darker 
meandering shaded areas are representing actual landforms, or are a generalized symbol. 
On other parts of the chart (see Layout 00РFull Sheets) land area is represented for a 
much shorter distance inland.  
E1200 1863 has no topographic information at all. All of the land area is shaded 
with rows of small dots to appear gray and provide contrast to the paper-colored water 
areas. The only cultural information shown is the dark, heavy patterned area representing 
the city limits of New York City and Brooklyn. 
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
VB.NET PDF - How to Delete PDF Document Page in VB.NET. Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in VB.NET Class. Free
how to copy text out of a pdf; how to delete text in pdf document
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
C#.NET PDF Library - Delete PDF Document Page in C#.NET. Provide C# Users in C#.NET. How to delete a single page from a PDF document.
how to delete text from pdf with acrobat; erase pdf text
111
In the third time period, both of the sailing charts use the mountain symbol to 
indicate navigationally-important peaks. On E1200 1881 ªAgamenticus Mt. 728 ft.º in 
Maine is shown, while the nearby ªYork R.º is only labeled, not shown continuing past 
the tidal zone. Inland areas are not filled with rows of dots as the previous edition was, 
but are left empty. 
W1200 1888 does have its land area filled with a gray tone, although a legend 
area with a white background sits over much of the land. It also shows all of the 
important peaks of the Coast Range and Cascade Range. Many but not all include height 
in feet, and each is symbolized with unique version of the mountain symbol. Several 
mountains are shown within the legend box (ªMt. Jefferson 
10567
º, Dodson Butte 
3045
º, 
ªMt. Pittº, ª
9000
Mt. Scottº, and ªThompsonº). Heights are in a different lettering face 
than the names of the mountains. 
For the fourth time period, GJF200 1895 has a mix of several types of 
topographic representation. On some areas, particularly within Puget Sound and the San 
Juan Islands, topography is shown with 100-foot contours (heavier lines every fifth 
contour) and spot heights, and vegetation types are shown with area fill symbols much 
like what was being used for SF40 at this time. Elevations are in a different font than 
names. This level of detail is inconsistently applied, however. Orcas Island, for example, 
is only partially detailed, with much left blank. Elsewhere on the chart (see Layout 00Ð
Full Sheets) topography is shown with hachures. This is particularly prevalent in areas of 
the charts showing Canada. Islands along Georgia Straight have the most detail, with less 
detail present on Vancouver Island. The symbol for mountain is also on the chart, most 
noticeably on the south side of the Straight of Juan de Fuca on the Olympic Peninsula. 
Several hills and peaks are shown with the not-quite-full hachuring of the mountain 
symbol. None are identified with labels. 
E1200 1900 is the first chart used here that was lithographed, and as such is the 
first seen to use yellow ink as a fill for land. No engraved texture is provided, as it has 
been replaced by the color. As with the previous edition, navigationally-important hills 
are shown with the symbol for mountain. Heights are now provided in a sans-serif font, 
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Free online source code for extracting text from adobe PDF document in C#.NET class. Ability to extract highlighted text out of PDF document.
delete text from pdf with acrobat; remove text watermark from pdf online
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
SharePoint. Extract text from adobe PDF document in VB.NET Programming. Extract file. Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Image
erase text from pdf; delete text pdf acrobat
112
while names are still in a serif font. Inland waters are now shown to continue further 
away from the coast than in the previous editions. 
For time period five, W1200 1917/26 still has many mountain symbols, but the 
style has changed. The radiating lines are now heavier, which is a change similar to the 
hachuring seen on NY40 1914. The clip shows that some peaks have been joined into 
groups by other hachures. Some peaks now have heights without labels giving their 
name, while others still have neither. The only other inland topographic information 
shown are single lines for some rivers, extending only a short way from the coast. 
The sixth time period has GJF200 1922 showing detailed topography on Orcas 
Island. As with the previous edition, landforms are shown with contours and spot heights 
for peaks, and vegetation is shown with area fill symbols. Contours are now used for the 
Canadian islands along the Straight of Georgia, although peaks on Vancouver Island are 
still shown with mountain symbols. Canadian islands along Haro Straight are still shown 
with hachures. On the Olympic Peninsula, the peaks shown with mountain symbols are 
now partially set within 200-foot contours drawn with dashed lines. The contours are 
incomplete and apparently provisional, although no note mentions this. The river systems 
are now more complete and extend further inland. Small sections of solid-line 100-foot 
contours with vegetation-symbol fill are also present in a ribbon along the U.S. side of 
the Straight of Juan de Fuca. Other parts of this shore have hachures instead of contours.  
The clip for E1200 1927 shows that it had changed to the new, heavier form of 
mountain symbol since the previous edition. There is also a bit more detail for inland 
waters near the coast. The height for Agamenticus Mt. has been changed to ª
673 ft.
º 
Time period seven  
W1200 1932 has no changes from the 1917/26 edition, and E1200 1938 has no 
changes from the 1927 edition. Of note is the poor registration of the color plates relative 
to the black plate on E1200 1938. 
GJF200 1933 has dramatically different topographic representation than the 1922 
edition. The chart was converted from copper plate to lithographic printing, and with the 
change came a reduction in topographic detail. Vegetation area fill has been removed. 
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Insert Text to PDF Document in C#.NET. This C# coding example describes how to add a single text character to PDF document. // Open a document.
acrobat remove text from pdf; how to delete text from pdf
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
C#.NET PDF SDK - Edit PDF Document Metadata in C#.NET. Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project.
delete text from pdf file; pdf text watermark remover
113
Contour lines, where present, are every 200 feet instead of every 100 feet, in both Canada 
and the U.S. Meanwhile Vancouver Island and the islands in Haro Straight still have 
peaks shown with mountain symbols and hills with snaky, rudimentary hachures. On the 
Olympic Peninsula additional areas are shown with contours, but parts do still have the 
dashed contours first seen on the previous edition. All hachures along the coast have been 
replaced by contours. 
In the eighth time period, GJF200 1941 continues its progression from hachures 
to contours for Canadian land area, while no changes are made to US topography. The 
clip of Orcas Island shows no changes to representation, but elsewhere, particularly on 
Vancouver Island, fewer hills are represented with hachures than the 1933 edition, and 
those are all inland past where additional contours line the coast. 
E1200 1943 has a different representation of the mountain symbol than the 1938 
edition. Compared to the previous edition it is much more distinctly two concentric 
circles made of short lines radiating from the center point. The 1938 edition looks at a 
glance to be a single circle of radiating lines, while very close inspection reveals two 
rows that touch.  
For W1200 1945/54, the only change in upland information appears to be a switch 
from upright to italic numbers for spot heights on mountains. The mountains themselves 
are still shown as mountain symbols. 
Engraved Views 
One other method of showing landform information that was used on some charts 
was the engraved view. Some of the earliest charts were not only works of art 
themselves, but had separate, inset landscape engravings included. They were drawn 
from the point of view of a ship's captain looking toward land, and typically showed 
entrances to bays, headlands, and other prominent landmarks that would be useful to 
piloting a ship. They were engraved in the Washington DC office, based on drawings and 
descriptions provided by the survey crews. Table 16 notes which of the charts used here 
include engraved views. Layout 00РFull Sheets should be consulted for greater detail. 
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
C#.NET. C# Guide about How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information with .NET PDF Control.
online pdf editor to delete text; deleting text from a pdf
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
All text content of target PDF document can be copied and pasted to .txt files by keeping original layout. C#.NET class source code
how to delete text from a pdf in acrobat; erase pdf text online
114
Table 16. Charts with engraved views 
Time 
Period
NY40
SF40
MH400
GJF200
E1200
W1200
Yes
Yes
no
Yes
Yes
no
no
no
no
3
Yes
no
no
no
4
Yes
no
no
no
Yes
no
no
no
6
no
no
no
no
no
7
no
no
no
no
no
no
no
no
no
no
no
no
no
no
9
no
no
no
no
no
no
1
2
5
8
Discussion and Context 
NY40 1844 probably has the most landform detail of any charts examined in this 
project. Part of this can be attributed to it being the largest scale, 1:30,000. But much of 
the responsibility lies with the decisions of the first Coast Survey Superintendent, 
Ferdinand R. Hassler. The first baseline surveyed was in the vicinity of New York, and 
this was the first example of the Coast Survey's work, so undoubtedly extra effort went 
into it. The survey was not occupied with simultaneously working on nearly as many 
charts as in later years, and the issue of updating charts as information changes had not 
been discussed in the agency's annual reports. Later, as more charts were published, 
updating content took a larger and larger percentage of the survey's effort. Eventually it 
was decided that topographic detail would be reduced, in part to focus the charts on 
nautical information, but partly to save effort on updates to the quickly-changing cultural 
information. 
It was recognized within the survey as early as 1854 that hachures may give way 
to contours. In a report on engraving included as an appendix to the annual report, it is 
noted that, ªThe method of hachures has some radical faults, which make its perpetuity 
only desirable in case nothing better can be substituted. The extent to which it sacrifices 
the distinctness of the contour lines will, as contours become more universal in surveys, 
115
be felt as a growing objection,º and ª[i]t seems by no means impossible that ere long 
some cheap, clear, expressive and tasteful system of hill delineation may supercede 
hachures with great advantage (U.S. Treasury Department et al. 1855, 211).º It is time-
consuming, and therefore expensive, to engrave hachures, and the office was behind in its 
engraving work for many years due to shortage of skilled engravers (U.S. Treasury 
Department et al. 1856a, 21, 252).  
Contours were used on experimental map created in 1866. They were combined 
with ªshading in crayonº to produce relief, and it was printed in color (U.S. Treasury 
Department et al. 1869a, 7). 
In 1935, the symbol for `Marsh' was made more distinctive on large-scale charts 
(U.S. Department of Commerce et al. 1936b, 141).  
Cultural Information 
The C&GS charts published in 1844 have very different representation of man-
made structures and impacts on the landscape than the charts published by World War II. 
This section refers to clips on Layout 07РUrban Topography. It first looks at the Harbor 
Charts through time, and then the General and Sailing Charts together. 
Harbor Charts 
The clips from the NY40 chart focus on a town in New Jersey called Perth 
Amboy, with supplemental clips for the more urban area of New York City. The smaller 
town provides a better balance of showing both urban and rural cultural landforms. 
NY40 1844 shows how the survey included highly detailed information about 
cultural features on its charts. Roads are represented as the voids between city blocks 
within town, and as the void between two parallel lines outside town. It appears that one 
of the lines casing the roads is usually heavier that the other, giving a look of shaded 
relief. Within the city blocks individual platted properties are shown, along with alleys. 
Within properties, structures are depicted as black rectangles that appear to show the 
building footprint. The town square is depicted with a single structure in the center, 
116
flanked by two rows of four smaller dots that could be trees or small structures. Lots are 
shaded with different patterns (rough, smooth) and degrees (light, dark) of shading, 
presumably to indicate type of vegetation and groundcover, as well as if the land has been 
cleared. Many individual trees are shown, particularly along roads and hedgerows, and in 
fields. Farmland outside the town is represented with several different types and 
combinations of dashes and lines, presumably to represent particular types of crops. The 
town name is provided in proud capital letters placed along on the horizontal, with large 
serifs and a slight lean to the right.  
Somewhat less information is shown for the urbanized areas around New York 
City. Platted blocks create the outline for the street system but individual buildings are 
not included. Some roads are shown as wider than other roads, presumably to indicate 
local importance. The blocks are filled with either of two degrees of shading, with more 
central blocks shaded darker than peripheral blocks. It may indicate which blocks are 
inside and outside the city limits. The unequal line weight for the outside of the blocks is 
most evident on the lightly shaded blocks south of Brooklyn. It gives them an extruded 
look, creating the appearance that they have height and are sitting on top of a flat ground 
plane, illuminated from the northwest.  
On NY40 1845, this smaller-scale version of the earlier map shows Perth Amboy 
as a cluster of dark rectangles that end up defining a partial street network through 
figure/ground contrast. It does not appear that city blocks are shown. Outside town the 
roads are shown as what appear to be single lines, and the shading of the farm fields is 
much less pronounced and detailed. The city label is in the same location, but uses 
thicker lines that are not as elegant, although it is still oriented horizontally with a slight 
italic lean to the right. 
For the second time period, NY40 1853 does not show any urban cultural 
features, and a clip is not provided. 
NY40 1870 is a poor scan that obscures the ability to identify if fine detail present 
on the 1844 edition is still in use. Shaded city blocks still create the road network through 
figure/ground contrast, but the line weight appears consistent on all sides of the blocks. 
117
Individual structures are shown as before. The town square has a circle inscribed in it, but 
no structure. There appears to be differing degrees of shading in some places, but the 
patterns are obscured. Fields are divided into properties by lines of perhaps two weights. 
The name of the city has moved to an arc oriented mostly north/south. A railroad has 
been added that runs from the northeast to the southwest as a straight, black line with 
what may be crossties. The font is more like the thicker font of the 1845 edition than 
1844, but does not have an italic slant. 
SF40 1877 forms San Francisco using the same technique: outlined city blocks 
with interior shading create the road network through contrast. Roads vary in width, 
blocks reflect their actual dimensions, and structures are shown in black in some of the 
city blocks. Several of the streets jut out into the bay, presumably indicating wharves. 
The name ªCity of San Franciscoº is placed in an arc from northwest to southeast cutting 
across the street grid in a font similar to that used for Perth Amboy on NY40 1870. 
In time period three, NY40 1878 has reduced the amount of detail for the city of 
Perth Amboy. Roads are depicted as before, but there appears to be less detail for 
property lines within the blocks, and fewer buildings are included. Again the scan makes 
distinguishing the finest detail challenging, but there do not appear to be individual trees 
depicted, either along the roads or in the fields. The railroad is somewhat more 
distinguishable, particularly the regularity of the crosstie marks. The town square no 
longer has the circle inside of it. 
SF40 1883 has similar scan clarity issues, but changes from the second time 
period look similar to those of NY40 1878. The relationship of roads and blocks is the 
same, but fewer buildings are distinguishable, even though the city has grown 
substantially. The label for the city has moved and is not visible on the clip. Some of the 
blocks appear to be entirely filled in, as with most urban blocks in Brooklyn on NY40 
1844. Some of the streets appear to be black lines, which may show railroad or trolley 
tracks.  
118
For the fourth time period, NY40 1902 has no changes to representation of 
cultural features, and only a few alterations to the features themselves. A few structures 
and a few roads have been added. SF40 1901 has the same situation. 
Time period five does not have a sample of SF40, but the two examples of NY40 
(1914 and 1917) both have changes, the latter more dramatic than the former. On the clip 
of Perth Amboy on the 1914 edition the base information is largely the same as the 1901 
edition, and it is represented in the same way. Two changes stand out, however. First, a 
standard symbol for a tall structure is shown, which looks like , and is labeled as a 
spire. Second, the railroad symbol expands into a larger symbol, perhaps for a trestle, as 
it nears the water. It appears there is a special symbol for the railroad bridge crossing the 
water, as well. These are the first examples of emphasis on navigationally significant land 
features at this location. 
On the other clip from NY40 1914 several changes from 1844 should be noted. 
As with Perth Amboy, the blocks that frame the road system have equal weight lines on 
all sides, so the effect of relief shading is no longer present. More of the blocks are filled 
with a dark tone, although some do have a lighter toneРparks or greens, as suggested by 
the fine path systems shown in two of the blocks. These lightly shaded blocks are also 
framed with a lighter line. Near the west edge are some blocks that are outlined with the 
same line, but have no interior shading. The fort on Governor's Island is drawn with a 
single line instead of a double line, but additional structures are shown as black 
rectangles. Navy Yard has many structures shown, as well as bare ground. 
It is NY40 1917 where the really dramatic changes are seen. The urban features 
are symbolized very differently, and do not extend as far away from the water's edge. 
The figure/ground relationship of roads to blocks has been reversed. It is now the few 
roads that stand out, rather than the blocks. The blocks are no longer shaded and no 
vegetation or property lines are shown, nor are fields distinguished. There are very few 
buildings shown, and they are all apparently either large or otherwise visible from the 
water since they are clustered along the shore. The decrease in cultural information 
makes the symbol and label for the spire stand out more than on the previous edition, 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested