pdf reader in asp.net c# : How to erase text in pdf online SDK control API wpf azure web page sharepoint McConnel_USCGS_Charts_Thesis15-part801

139
Civilian Versus Military 
One of the biggest influences on the C&GS in the nineteenth century was the 
repeated battle over whether the activities of the survey should be under civilian or 
military control (Manning 1988). Apart from the argument that the survey was producing 
charts too slowly, proponents of military control argued that the charts being produced 
were too detailed, particularly the topographic information. As long as there was question 
about the final home of the survey, the agency would have resisted removing topographic 
detail for fear of proving their opponents correct. The question was finally settled in 1903 
by transferring the survey from the Treasury Department to the Department of Commerce 
and Labor. Soon after, the C&GS began to revisit the content of the charts, including 
simplifying topography (Tittmann 1903, 1912). While they were being externally 
challenged they could not afford to give in to their critics, who wished not simply for 
different results, but a different structural authority. The different results may have been 
warranted, but the survey could not risk conceding those points while their existence was 
imperiled.  
Funding and Economy 
Another source of pressure on the survey came from Congress' power of the 
purse and fiscal oversight. Throughout the agency's annual reports to Congress is a 
recurring theme of economization of funds and how making certain investments in new 
equipment will lower costs.  
There is defensiveness in the reports and a sense that every decision is predicated 
on making the most of every dollar. Superintendent Hassler noted in his report for 1834 
that ª¼ every thing is arranged in the most strictly economical manner ¼  so as to 
produce ¼  perfectly accurate results in the shortest space of time; for in this principle 
lies the true economy of the work¼ (Hassler 1836b, 69).º Even this early in the work of 
the survey, the Superintendent felt the need to defend the work on the basis of its 
efficiency and economy. 
Funding pressures in 1851 ªforced the closest scrutiny of the organization, 
progress, results, economy ± in short, of every particular relating to the coast survey¼  
How to erase text in pdf online - delete, remove text from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# developers to use mature APIs to delete and remove text content from PDF document
how to delete text in pdf file; erase text in pdf document
How to erase text in pdf online - VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File
how to edit and delete text in pdf file online; pdf editor online delete text
140
(U.S. Treasury Department et al. 1852).º One economizing decision the survey made was 
to engrave some charts on thin paper, particularly those that had to be mailed long 
distances or bound into books (U.S. Treasury Department et al. 1855). Continued 
pressures were evident in the 1878 annual report, with Superintendent Patterson 
emphasizing economizing measures on page 1: ªAs heretofore the aim has been steadily 
maintained of limiting the outlay for each party to the least sum consistent with its 
efficiency. All items in estimates for outfit and for monthly expenditures in field work 
and hydrography have been closely scanned, and it is gratifying to add that the assistants 
have cheerfully sustained all arrangement for promoting economy (U.S. Treasury 
Department et al. 1881a, 1).º 
Another ostensibly economizing decision was that of purchasing a calendar press 
in 1883 for finishing and hardening paper. Part of the reasoning for this purchase was that 
it might allow the use of paper made in America, ªwhich would be a step favorable to 
economy,º as well as quieting any critics who would deplore the government buying 
foreign goods (U.S. Treasury Department et al. 1884, 93). However, the survey saw 
several years of struggle finding a consistent supply of chart paper, particularly 1885 and 
1886. 
Even the adoption of computing machines in the Washington Office was worth 
noting in the annual reports. These new machines allowed the Computing Division to 
ªincrease[e] the output ¼  with consequent reduction in cost (U.S. Department of 
Commerce and Labor et al. 1907, 57).º 
Some of the external pressure that eventually led to changes in the amount of 
detail present on the charts came from complaints by economy-minded members of 
Congress that detailed topography was not necessary on nautical charts. The Allison 
Commission, set up in 1885 to examine the role and finances of the C&GS, solicited 
testimony from private chart publishers and others as to the necessity of providing such 
detailed topography (Manning 1988). The commission was part of an economy 
movement in Washington, led by Democrats in Congress and President Grover 
Cleveland, who wished to shrink the size of the federal government and reduce the tax 
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Redact tab on viewer empower users to redact and erase PDF text, erase PDF images and erase PDF pages online. Miscellaneous. • RasterEdge XDoc.
how to delete text from a pdf in acrobat; erase text from pdf file
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Draw PDF markups. PDF Protection. • Sign PDF document with signature. • Erase PDF text. • Erase PDF images. • Erase PDF pages. Miscellaneous.
delete text from pdf online; how to remove text watermark from pdf
141
burden. The first Cleveland administration sacked superintendent Hilgard in 1885, 
ostensibly to fight waste, fraud, and shady accounting, but the survey's practices were 
vindicated by the Allison Commission's report. Such inquiries had to be on the mind of 
the survey when it later redesigned charts to simplify topography, however.  
One change that happened immediately after the Allison Commission was hiring 
women in the Washington Office. Three were hired in 1886 to work in the Miscellaneous 
Division. They initially worked on hand-coloring printed charts (U.S. Treasury 
Department et al. 1887, 133). It seems likely this could have been an economizing 
measure, because it is likely the women were paid less than men for the same work. 
Several economic crises had impacts on the agency's finances, as well. Panics 
caused recessions in 1857-60, 1873-77, 1884, and 1893, several of which lead to 
rollbacks in appropriations.  
Another external push for economy came during the Taft administration. The 
President's Commission on Economy and Efficiency was active from 1910-1913, and the 
Commission's information requests took ªa large amount of the time of officers and 
employees¼ º of the C&GS during those years (U.S. Department of Commerce and 
Labor et al. 1913a, 19; 1913b, 19). 
The spirit of economy had become entrenched in the survey by the mid-1920s, 
when the Director felt it worth noting that, ª¼ to make one dollar do the work of two, has 
become traditional and is accepted as a matter too commonplace to justify comment (U.S. 
Department of Commerce et al. 1926, 2).º 
The work projects of Roosevelt's early Depression budgets gave the survey 
several new tools. Among their temporary hires were instrument designers who designed 
a 9-lens aerial camera that would take 35º by 35º photographs (one planar image, eight 
oblique images, all on the same negative) and an echo sounder that could work in shallow 
water (U.S. Department of Commerce et al. 1934, 8-9). Both these tools increased the 
survey's efficiency.  
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Draw markups to PDF document. PDF Protection. • Add signatures to PDF document. • Erase PDF text. • Erase PDF images. • Erase PDF pages. Miscellaneous.
remove text from pdf acrobat; delete text pdf
C# PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from PDF
application. Free online C# source code to erase text from adobe PDF file in Visual Studio. NET class without adobe reader installed.
how to delete text from a pdf reader; delete text pdf document
142
1942
Thousands
Appropriaton
Estimate
Figure 13. Appropriation and budget estimate (request), 1807-1942. (Annual Reports and other 
C&GS publications) 
As with many, if not most, federal agencies, the C&GS had trouble receiving the 
funding it felt necessary to fulfill its mandate. Figure 13 illustrates that there were times 
when funds requested (the `Estimate', which was included in the annual report for many 
years) were not fully appropriated, while at other times it received more than it requested. 
At various times, particularly between the late 1850s and 1900, funds were reduced from 
previous appropriations. The Civil War years saw several years of reductions, and 
economic and political troubles in the last 25 years of the century brought other periods 
of budget cuts. After the Spanish-American War brought another small decrease, annual 
appropriations grew substantially up to and through WWII, apart from several years 
during the Great Depression in the 1930s. 
Figure 14 and Figure 15 offer slightly different views of the agency's 
appropriation history from 1807 to 1945. Using two different methods, appropriations 
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
setting PDF file permissions. Help C# users to erase PDF text content, images and pages online in ASP.NET. RasterEdge C#.NET HTML5
how to delete text in pdf document; deleting text from a pdf
C# PDF Image Redact Library: redact selected PDF images in C#.net
call our image redaction API to redact PDF images. as text redaction, you can specify custom text to appear How to Erase PDF Images in .NET Using C# Class Code.
how to erase in pdf text; how to delete text from pdf reader
143
reported in annual reports
23
(and other agency publications) are adjusted to constant 2005 
dollars. Figure 14 uses the Consumer Price Index (CPI), while Figure 15 uses a 
calculation of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) to determine each appropriation's 
relative share of GDP. 
$-
$1
$2
$3
$4
$5
$6
$7
$8
$9
$10
1807
1812
1817
1822
1827
1832
1837
1842
1847
1852
1857
1862
1867
1872
1877
1882
1887
1892
1897
1902
1907
1912
1917
1922
1927
1932
1937
1942
Millions
$0
$20
$40
$60
$80
$100
$120
Millions
Nominal
Adjusted (CPI)
Figure 14. Appropriation, nominal and adjusted (Consumer Price Index), 1807-1945. (Williamson 
2006) 
The CPI measure largely tracks the nominal value of the appropriation. There are 
only a few areas of appreciable difference. One example is between 1870 and 1877, 
where the adjusted value grew at a faster rate than the nominal value. Another is seen in 
the period between 1900 and WWI, where the adjusted value remained flat while the 
nominal value grew consistently. 
23
Appropriation values are not available in annual reports for all years. 
How to C#: Special Effects
Erase. Set the image to current background color, the background color can be set by:ImageProcess.BackgroundColor = Color.Red. Encipher.
remove text from pdf; how to erase text in pdf
Customize, Process Image in .NET Winforms| Online Tutorials
Include crop, merge, paste images; Support for image & documents rotation; Edit images & documents using Erase Rectangle & Merge Block function;
how to delete text in pdf converter professional; online pdf editor to delete text
144
$-
$1
$2
$3
$4
$5
$6
$7
$8
$9
$10
1807
1812
1817
1822
1827
1832
1837
1842
1847
1852
1857
1862
1867
1872
1877
1882
1887
1892
1897
1902
1907
1912
1917
1922
1927
1932
1937
1942
Millions
$0
$500
$1,000
$1,500
$2,000
$2,500
Millions
Nominal
Adjusted (Relative Share of GDP)
Figure 15. Appropriation, nominal and adjusted (relative share of GDP), 1807-1945. (Williamson 
2006) 
The comparison in Figure 15 is less consistent, and the author of the conversion 
series warns that values before 1930 are only valid to two significant digits and should 
not be used for time-series comparison (Williamson 2006). Still, this measure shows an 
interesting pattern after 1930. The Roosevelt budget for 1934 provided a large increase in 
both nominal dollars and share of GDP, after which both dropped for a few years before 
WWII. The war years, on the other hand, saw an even larger nominal increase in funds 
for the C&GS, but no concomitant increase in share of GDP. In fact, during the war, its 
share was entirely within the historical range seen since 1880 (with the exception of the 
Depression years).  
The two ways of calculating constant dollars provide very different pictures of the 
funds available to the agency. This is not the place to provide a comparison of such 
methodology, but it provides an interesting look at the agency's financial fortunes all the 
same.  
.NET Imaging Processing SDK | Process, Manipulate Images
Basic image edit function support, such as Erase Rectangle, Merge Block, etc Go to our Online Tutorials to find detailed user guide and check out how much they
how to erase text in pdf file; how to delete text from a pdf document
145
Corrections 
Once the first survey of entire U.S. coast and those of the U.S. territories and 
possessions was complete, the agency faced a new challenge: keeping the charts current. 
Natural changes to shorelines, harbors, and magnetic variation continued. With increased 
population and increased economic activity came increased human impacts on the 
shoreline. Larger and deeper ships led to additional dredging by the Army Corps of 
Engineers, as evidenced on both the SF40 and NY40 Harbor charts over time. The 
Lighthouse Board and the Coast Guard continued to move and change navigational aids 
to meet current needs.  
All such changes had to be incorporated onto the charts when new editions were 
printed. The frequency with which new editions were printed ranged from less than once 
every five years for lightly-used and lightly-populated areas with rocky shorelines and no 
nearby rivers dumping sediment (such as parts of Alaska); up to six times per year for 
busy ports with a high demand for charts and sandy harbors that constantly shifted (such 
as New York Harbor). At various times, including 1889 and the second decade of the 
twentieth century, every draftsman and engraver in the C&GS was working on revisions. 
This worked was deemed the highest priority of the agency, taking precedence over 
creating new charts (U.S. Treasury Department et al. 1890, 134; U.S. Department of 
Commerce et al. 1922, 30).  
This realization was in stark contrast to initial promises that the Coast Survey 
would only need to exist until all of the shoreline was surveyed and charts published. It 
turned out that the office work to maintain the existing charts took more labor than the 
initial creation, so that each new chart published became an additional drain on resources. 
There were, in fact, two meanings for `correction', referring to two different 
activities in the Washington office. The first definition refers to updating the stock of 
printed copies of charts before they leave the agency for sale. Charts were printed in 
batches of several hundred per print run. Updates were made by hand to printed copies in 
stock prior to their being sold to sales agents. The second meaning of `correction' refers 
to bringing the original copper plate (and in later years, glass negative) up-to-date prior to 
146
a new print run. The discussion here refers to the second meaning unless otherwise 
specified.   
The work of correcting charts was first noted in the annual report for 1877 (U.S. 
Treasury Department et al. 1880, 65). In 1882, correction work was increased due to 
better communication between the C&GS, the Lighthouse Board, and the Hydrographic 
Inspector. It was hoped that this information sharing arrangement this would, in a few 
years, decrease the number of needed corrections (U.S. Treasury Department et al. 1883, 
102). This would not be the case.  
The pressure of keeping the catalog of charts up-to-date was starting to show by 
the mid-1880s. In 1885 came the first articulation that maintaining the existing charts is 
more important than making new ones: ªthe work of engraving new charts has ¼  given 
way to the more pressing necessity of making corrections to charts already published 
¼(U.S. Treasury Department et al. 1886, 95).º A system of tracking chart corrections 
was adopted in 1899. Corrections were first to be made on a print, termed the `standard 
proof' of a plate, and only transferred to copper when all of the corrections have been 
made, just before reprinting (U.S. Treasury Department et al. 1900b, 110). 
By the middle of the first decade of the twentieth century, corrections were again 
starting to dominate the work of the engraving office. It was noted in 1906 that ªthe work 
of engraving was principally confined to making necessary changes in existing plates to 
bring them up to date (U.S. Department of Commerce and Labor et al. 1906, 14).º By 
1912, the survey had begun to simplify the charts' content in order to minimize the 
amount of revision work that would later be required to maintain each chart (Tittmann 
1912). The number of charts published was also studied, which resulted in a 
reorganization of the chart scheme and a small reduction in the total number of charts 
(Tittmann 1912).  
Chart correction was still a factor in the mid-1920s, however. To minimize the 
issue of hand corrections to printed sheets, ªwe print small editions ¼  frequently (U.S. 
Department of Commerce et al. 1926, 2).º As for correcting the originals, ªthe time of 
our chart force is devoted primarily to the correction of existing charts, and only such 
147
time as remains from this task can be devoted to the production of new charts or the 
extensive reconstruction of existing ones (3).º  
The volume of information coming into the survey from other organizations 
(primarily other federal agencies) had become so large by the early 1930s that in 1932, 
further simplification of topography was instigated. Applying all available corrections to 
the land areas of the charts was not possible with the staff available, so the practice 
stopped (U.S. Department of Commerce et al. 1932, 3).  
Contracting 
At various times in its history, the survey used outside labor to complete some of 
its chart creation and printing tasks. This was almost always due to pressures to either 
economize or increase production. Early contracts for copperplate engraving were 
essentially forced on the survey by complaints about how long it was taking the charts to 
get published. The agency faced such a shortage of skilled engravers that the engraving 
office was a bottleneck in production. The remedy was to contract with private persons, 
and later, companies, to do some of the engraving work.  
The 1846 annual report notes that the output capacity of the engraving room was 
five or six charts, including three to four harbor maps engraved , in part, by contractors 
(U.S. Treasury Department et al. 1847). The contractors were used largely to help clear 
out the large backlog of work. There were complaints, however, about contractors not 
finishing work on time, and a lack of consistent quality (36-7). 
The practice did continue, from time to time, as noted in annual reports. ªPortions 
of several charts have been engraved on contract¼ º in 1854 (U.S. Treasury Department 
et al. 1855). Some views of entrances to harbors were engraved on contract in 1872 (U.S. 
Treasury Department et al. 1875, 51). In other years, it was hard to find contractors 
willing to do the work. For example, the survey was only able to expend 25 per cent of its 
budget for contract engraving in 1891 (U.S. Treasury Department et al. 1892, 124).  
Printing was also contracted, particularly lithographic printing in the years before 
the survey had its own powered offset presses. There were frequently times when the in-
148
house presses were not able to keep up with demand, so contracts were let. This appears 
to have begun during the Civil War when, in 1864, 10,200 sheets were printed by ªother 
printing offices (U.S. Treasury Department et al. 1866, 112).º  
Dissatisfaction with the work of contract lithographic printers, as well as likely 
concerns about the safety and security of copper plates, led the Engraving Division to 
begin pulling its own transfer proofs from copper plates for printing on lithographic 
presses (U.S. Treasury Department et al. 1884, 103). The same year it was noted that 
publication of the 1881 annual report was delayed by the failure of contract lithographers 
to deliver their work (U.S. Treasury Department et al. 1884, 107).  
During the crisis in 1885 when the Cleveland administration forced new 
management on the survey, contracts for photolithography printing were examined by the 
new management. It was discovered that the price of the existing contracts were 
appropriate after trying several low bidders and receiving unacceptable results (U.S. 
Treasury Department et al. 1887, 116). 
A report on ªProcesses Employed In Chart Productionº in the 1898 annual report 
notes that, ª[l]ithograph charts are usually printed by contract in editions of 300 
copies¼ (U.S. Treasury Department et al. 1899, 97).º After the survey bought its own 
lithographic press in 1904, the amount of contract lithography quickly declined. In 1905, 
only one-third of the lithographic printing was contracted out, and none in 1906 (U.S. 
Department of Commerce and Labor et al. 1905, 14; 1906, 99). E1200 1900, printed in 
1903 by the Julius Bien Co., was apparently among the last charts lithographed on 
contract, then. 
Standards 
Another influence on the chart's changing content was a continuing process of 
standardization. This refers both to the content of the charts and the influences. There 
were initially internal standards and later there were external standards for chart 
symbology. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested