pdf reader in asp.net c# : Deleting text from a pdf control Library platform web page .net windows web browser McConnel_USCGS_Charts_Thesis2-part806

9
To examine the question of chart differences due to the location of the chart 
coverage, and to provide a balanced basis for comparison between the Atlantic and 
Pacific, examples of Atlantic or Gulf of Mexico 1:80,000 Coast Charts are not included 
in this thesis. Instead, one Harbor Chart, one General Chart, and one Sailing Chart from 
both the east and west coasts were selected, for a total of six different charts under 
consideration.  
The next task was to choose which six charts. While the best option would be to 
pick three charts from each coast that fully overlap, nesting the extents of the larger-scale 
charts fully inside the smaller-scale charts, another criteria was found to be more 
important—availability of enough editions to make a complete temporal comparison. To 
aid the process of selection, several resources were consulted in concert.  
The Office of the Coast Survey (OCS), part of the National Ocean Service (NOS), 
which is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce’s National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration (NOAA), has an online archive of digital images as part of its Historical 
Map and Chart Collection
3
. The OCS is the modern-day successor to the U.S. Coast 
Survey’s chart making. 
Using this collection of free images, the public can view and download scanned 
editions of maps and nautical charts published by NOAA and its precursor charting 
agencies, the U.S. Coast Survey and the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey. For the sake of 
convenience, a spreadsheet containing all of the records for the time period of interest 
was built by searching the archive’s online catalog one year at a time. A cross-tab of the 
spreadsheet was used to see which charts had the largest number of editions available for 
download. 
NOAA is the source of another tool used in the selection process. In the fall of 
2003, the University of Oregon’s MAP Library acquired a spreadsheet from NOAA 
listing all of the charts it currently publishes. The author was the MAP Library’s contact 
with NOAA, and he kept a copy of the spreadsheet for use in this project. This database 
was consulted primarily because each record includes the chart’s scale, a field that is 
3
http://historicals.ncd.noaa.gov/historicals/histmap.asp 
Deleting text from a pdf - delete, remove text from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# developers to use mature APIs to delete and remove text content from PDF document
remove text watermark from pdf; how to remove highlighted text in pdf
Deleting text from a pdf - VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File
how to delete text in pdf document; erase pdf text
10
missing from records in NOAA’s Historical Map and Chart Collection image catalog. By 
sorting the spreadsheet on scale, one can quickly see which current charts are of each 
scale, and by their titles ascertain the general location they cover.  
The information gleaned from this listing of current charts had to pass through a 
translation before it could be used to see how many chart editions from the time period of 
interest to this thesis are available for download from the archive. The primary method of 
identifying NOAA charts is by number, with title’s a secondary identifier. This is 
complicated by the fact that the chart numbering system has changed several times (and 
in some cases, so have the chart names). The numbers used today to identify charts of 
U.S. waters were assigned in 1974. To find out the prior number of a chart, which is the 
number needed for this project, there are at least two different strategies available: 
consult a conversion table, or view an edition of the chart that has the current number. A 
third option is to use a 1974 edition of NOAA’s Chart No. 1. This bound volume is 
supposed to include a full conversion list, but a copy could not be consulted to confirm it. 
To help chart users keep track of the change to the chart numbering system, for a 
short time following the conversion the following statement was included underneath 
each instance of the new number:
(formerly C&GS [####]) 
Between 1976 and 1977 this was reduced to single version of the statement, located at the 
center of the top of the chart, just above the neatline. Today the statement at top center 
reads in the form: 
Formerly C&GS [####], 1st Ed., [Mon. YYYY]    [code]
For example: 
Formerly C&GS 6152, 1st Ed., July 1913   G-1953-826 
If a current copy of chart is not at hand to look up the former C&GS chart 
number, at least two former number/current number conversion tables are available from 
libraries at the University of Oregon (UO) and Stanford University. The University of 
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
developers to add multiple text processing functions to PDF document imaging application, such as inserting text to PDF, deleting text from PDF, searching text
how to delete text in pdf using acrobat professional; how to edit and delete text in pdf file
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Provide C# Users with Mature .NET PDF Document Manipulating Library for Deleting PDF Pages in C#. C#.NET Project DLLs for Deleting PDF Document Page.
how to delete text from a pdf document; pdf text remover
11
Oregon’s MAP Library has a list of it Historic and Superseded Nautical Charts 
collections. An incomplete version lacking the older numbers is available online
4
, but the 
original file includes both current and prior chart numbers. The author of this thesis 
created the file and has a copy of it. The other source is the Branner Earth Sciences 
Library and Map Collections of Stanford University. It has online the Superseded U.S. 
Coast and Geodetic Survey Nautical Chart Conversion Table
5
, a resource developed by 
that library. Neither of the lists at these libraries are 100% complete, but between them 
and viewing a recent edition of the chart online from the NOAA’s image archive, all prior 
chart numbers needed for this project were found.  
Using the older chart number, either the spreadsheet of charts built from the 
NOAA image catalog or the catalog itself was consulted to see how many editions of the 
chart are available from NOAA. This information was used in conjunction with the UO 
MAP Library collection list to establish how many different editions were readily 
available—the more editions, the better. Based on availability, the six charts illustrated in 
Figure 1 and detailed in Table 2 were selected for use in this project.  
4
http://libweb.uoregon.edu/map/naut/nautical_ss.htm 
5
http://library.stanford.edu/depts/branner/collections/nautical_old.html 
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Free PDF edit control and component for deleting PDF pages in Visual Basic .NET framework application. DLLs for Deleting Page from PDF Document in VB.NET Class.
erase text from pdf; how to delete text in pdf file
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
NET users to add multiple text processing functions to PDF document imaging application, such as inserting text to PDF, deleting text from PDF, searching text
how to delete text in pdf converter professional; remove text from pdf preview
12
Figure 1. Chart locations 
Further research was conducted to determine all the former names and numbers of 
charts covering the six areas at the scales being used. In all cases older charts with 
different titles and identification numbers were discovered. Most of these have some 
difference in scale and/or geographic coverage, but are the best match to the later charts. 
Editions of these older charts are included in the project. Table 2 includes these older 
numbers followed by the current five-digit number for reference.  
From here forward the six charts will be referred to primarily by the alphanumeric 
codes leading each cell in the table. The older editions with slightly different scales, 
names and ID numbers are still identified by these codes because they are the in the same 
family line, so to speak. 
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
PDF to tiff, VB.NET read PDF, VB.NET convert PDF to text, VB.NET Easily manipulate multi-page PDF document file with page inserting, deleting and re
how to delete text from pdf with acrobat; delete text from pdf with acrobat
C#: How to Delete Cached Files from Your Web Viewer
C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB Introduce Visual C#.NET Developers the Ways of Deleting Cache Files.
delete text in pdf file online; how to erase pdf text
13
Table 2. Charts used in this project. 
Acquiring Chart Images 
After deciding which charts to compare, the next task was to acquire scans of the 
charts. All but six of the editions used in the project were acquired from the NOAA 
archive. Three other sources were also used: the University of Oregon’s Map and Aerial 
Photography (MAP) Library, David Rumsey’s website, and the New York Public 
Library’s website.  
NOAA’s online collection was the primary source, providing nearly all of the 
charts. Searches in the image catalog return records with a link to a file that contains a 
scan of the chart referenced in the record. Clicking the link allows one to save the file. 
All editions of the project’s six charts that NOAA has available were downloaded. 
Three charts from the UO MAP Library’s Nautical Chart Collection were scanned 
using the library’s 11-inch by 17-inch flatbed scanner. Several scans of different parts of 
each of the three charts were taken and saved as uncompressed .tiff files. Only parts that 
were to be used in the comparison phase of the project were scanned, not the entire 
Chart 
Type 
East Coast 
West Coast 
NY40: 
SF40: 
Harbor 
7 / 369
(2)
/ 369 / 12327  
New York Entrance / New York 
Harbor, 1:40,000  
621 / 621
/ 5581 / 5532 / 18649  
San Francisco Entrance, 1:40,000 
MH400: 
GJF200: 
Coast 
9 / 1109 / 12200  
Cape May to Cape Hatteras, 
1:416,944 
28 / 6300 / 18400  
Georgia Strait and Strait of Juan de 
Fuca, 1:200,000 
E1200: 
W1200: 
Sailing 
24 / A / 1000 / 13003  
Cape Sable to Cape Hatteras, 
1:1,200,000 
603 / 602 / 5052 / 18007  
San Francisco to Cape Flattery, 
1:1,200,000 
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
VB.NET read PDF, VB.NET convert PDF to text, VB.NET C# PDF - Remove Image from PDF Page. Provide C# Demo Code for Deleting and Removing Image from PDF File Page.
how to delete text from pdf document; how to delete text from a pdf
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET. Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting Word Pages. Overview.
pdf text watermark remover; how to erase in pdf text
14
charts. Each chart edition’s various scans were joined into a single image using Adobe 
Photoshop. 
Two other sources were also used to acquire scans of editions of the six charts. 
One was David Rumsey’s website
6
. He is a map enthusiast who has acquired a large 
collection of historic maps and atlases and has created digital images of many of them. 
Versions of these files are available for both viewing and download from his website. He 
lives in San Francisco and his collection is strong on the history of the western United 
States. Two files were acquired from his collection. One is a scan of all six sheets of the 
first chart engraved and published by the U.S. Coast Survey, that of the area in and 
around New York City and its harbor. The sheets were published in 1844 and 1845 at a 
scale of about 1:30,000. Also used is a scan of SF40 from 1926. 
The New York Public Library also has collections of digital images online. One 
of the collections is American Shores: Maps of the Middle Atlantic Region to 1850
7
. This 
collection includes a scan of three of the six sheets of the aforementioned chart of New 
York City and its harbor. The library also has online in its general digital collection a 
scan of the second chart engraved and published by the Coast Survey. It is a reduction to 
1:80,000 of the New York City chart, also originally published in 1845. These four 
images are included in the project. 
Table 3 shows which editions of the charts are being used in this project. Not 
every chart used in the project has the same number of editions, but each chart chosen 
offered the best balance of appropriate scale, location, and number of editions.
6
http://www.davidrumsey.com/ 
7
http://www.nypl.org/research/midatlantic/ 
15
Table 3. Year of each edition of the charts
Time 
Period
NY40
SF40
MH400
GJF200
E1200
W1200
1844
1845
1853
1859/77
1855/64
1870
1862/72
1862
1863
3
1878
1883
1881
1888
4
1902
1901
1895
1900
1914
1916
1917
1917/26
6
1926
1926
1922
1922
1927
7
1936
1938
1933
1938
1932
1944
1947a
1942
1941/48
1943
1947b/57
1951
1948
1945/54
9
1989
1989
1986
1989
1986
1986
1
5
8
2
In Table 3 the numbers on the left identify nine time periods that will be 
considered co-temporal for this project. This is a scheme based on decades but informed 
by the availability of chart editions. The intent was to have one edition of each chart for 
each time period. A few time periods have two editions of a chart. This was done to 
include charts seen to introduce significant changes. Some of the edition dates are joint 
(ex. 1945/54), which will be explained in the introduction to Chapter 4. The ninth time 
period lists the most recent edition available from the NOAA historical image collection, 
as of summer 2005. They are not used for design comparison, and are listed only for 
reference should the reader wish to make their own comparisons with current charts. The 
first time period only includes editions from a single location, but these are critical for 
understanding the early cartographic practice at the Coast Survey. The other five charts 
do not have corresponding editions from the 1840s. Their first editions were published 
later, as shown in Table 4. 
16
Table 4. Year of first edition  
Chart
Year
Available
?
Title of First Edition
1844
Y
New York Bay & Harbor, Sheet 1
1844
Y
New York Bay & Harbor, Sheet 2
1844
Y
New York Bay & Harbor, Sheet 3
1844
Y
New York Bay & Harbor, Sheet 4
1845
Y
New York Bay & Harbor, Sheet 5
1845
Y
New York Bay & Harbor, Sheet 6
SF40
1857
No
San Francisco Entrance
MH400
1862 [P]
Y
1
General Coast Chart No. IV, from Cape May to Cape Henry
GJF200
1862 [P]
Y
Reconnaissance of Washington Sound and Approaches, 
Washington Territory
E1200
1863 [P]
Y
Atlantic Coast of the United States (in four sheets) Sheet No. II, 
Nantucket to Cape Hatteras
1854 [P]
No
Alden's Reconnaissance, Western Coast, No. 2, middle sheet, 
San Francisco to Umpquah river
1855 [P]
Y
2
Reconnaissance of the Western Coast of the United States 
(Northern Sheet) from Umpquah River to the Boundary
[P] indicates Preliminary Edition
1
Corrected to 1872
2
Corrected to 1864
NY40
W1200
Working with .sids 
Except for the uncompressed .tiff files resulting from the maps that were scanned 
at the UO, all the charts acquired are in .sid format, also known as MrSID. MrSID is a 
proprietary file format featuring a compression algorithm that provides very efficient, yet 
lossless, compression of raster files. The .sid files available from NOAA are 50:1 
compressions created from scans of charts saved as .tiffs, yet offer resolution identical to 
the original file. MrSID files can be viewed with a browser plug-in called ExpressView, 
available for free from the company that owns the MrSID format, LizardTech
8
.  
Manipulating these files in their compressed state, for example saving out 
portions of an image as a separate file, requires the use of a different piece of software 
called GeoExpress. It is available for purchase from LizardTech (but is expensive). This 
project’s methodology requires working with files in a way that can only be done on 
MrSID files using GeoExpress. Performing these actions on the MrSID files would 
8
http://www.lizardtech.com/ 
17
require purchasing that software. LizardTech does provide another option: MrSID files 
can be decompressed into other formats such as .tiff using a command-line program 
called “mrsiddecode.exe,” which is available for free
9
. It decompresses the files to their 
original size with no loss in detail. The downside is that the resulting files are 
decompressed. When a .sid downloaded from NOAA is 10 MB, the uncompressed 
version of the file will be 500 MB, which is unwieldy for many computers to deal with. It 
is, however, economical, since software able to manipulate .tiff files is less expensive and 
more readily available. 
The next step, then, was to use mrsiddecode.exe to decompress each of the 
downloaded .sid files. Because there were a substantial number of them to decompress 
(over 50 were processed), a way to simplify the use of mrsiddecode.exe was desired. A 
search discovered that someone had posted some code on the Internet for a batch file to 
run mrsiddecode.exe automatically
10
. Using this code as an example, a new batch file was 
written to run mrsiddecode.exe on an entire directory of MrSID files downloaded for this 
project.  
Several conditions must be met for mrsiddecode.exe to work, and several steps 
were needed to get the files ready to be processed. 
1.  mrsiddecode.exe is easier to use when it is resident in the directory of the files 
being decompressed, so it was copied to the same directory as the files. Doing so 
allows the .bat file to be written without including the full path of both source file 
and destination file in each command. This makes the .bat file both shorter and 
simpler to write. 
2.  mrsiddecode.exe cannot process any command that includes a space in the target 
file’s name or directory path. The .sid files were downloaded before learning this, 
and spaces were used in all of the file names and the directory structure. To fix 
this problem a shareware file manager called Total Commander
11
was used to do 
batch replacement of each space in the file and directory names with an 
underscore. 
3.  To save the time it would take to type in each file name when creating the batch 
file, the command ‘dir’ was used at the Windows command line to list the 
9
http://www.lizardtech.com/download/dl_options.php?page=tools 
10
http://www.geocities.com/ctesibos/voynich/sid-to-tiff.txt 
11
http://www.ghisler.com/ 
18
contents of the directory containing the MrSID files and write the list to a file
12
An example of the syntax used to write the list: 
             
resulting in a text file looking something like: 
  ! "#$##$
%"    &'((
'#)*%(+$##$'#
'#)*'$##$'#
'#)*('%(+$'#
'  ! ",%'#%(+' 

4.  The batch file could then be created from the list of filenames. Notepad was used 
to modify each entry to read something like:  
      -.".../  ! "#$##$
$"  ! "#$##$0$"001
where [–i] gives the input file, [-o] names the output file, and the output format [-
of] of the file is specified as geo-TIFF [tifg]. This switch embeds location 
information in the image, if any is provided with the MrSID file. The switch [-
progress TIMER] was added after the last entry to show the progress of the 
conversion on-screen as the batch runs. 
With the complete file saved as 
2)3)45
, it was ready to run. Upon 
executing the batch file, the computer worked for several hours to complete the list of 
decompressions. It did not actually complete the job because the drive ran out of space 
with about 4 files left to process. As mentioned previously, the MrSID format is highly 
efficient at compressing image files. The smallest of the .sid files decompressed in the 
first batch was 889 kb and the largest a little over 12 MB. After being decompressed back 
into .tiffs at their original size and resolution, the smallest was 17.7 MB and the largest 
796 MB. It was not realized that so many of them would be so large, and there was not 
enough room for them on the destination drive. Upon discovering the problem, free space 
was made on the drive, and the .bat file was edited and re-run to finish the 
12
For instructions on the command ‘dir’, see 
http://www.windowsdevcenter.com/pub/a/windows/2005/01/04/print_directories.html or 
http://www.computerhope.com/dirhlp.htm 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested