pdf reader in asp.net c# : Delete text from pdf acrobat SDK control service wpf web page html dnn McConnel_USCGS_Charts_Thesis4-part809

29
CHAPTER IV 
COMPARISONS OF CHART ELEMENTS  
This chapter systematically examines and compares the chart images collected in 
the 15 layouts described in Chapter 3. It uses the list of chart elements on page 21 as a 
guide. In lieu of using page-space to show each graphic being discussed, please refer to 
the printed page layouts provided in Appendix D, or to the .pdf files provided on the 
included disc. 
Before beginning, however, it necessary to discuss the dates used to identify the 
chart editions. While seemingly straightforward, identifying a chart by a single year is 
often troublesome. A table listing many details discussed below is found in Appendix C: 
Chart Details. Charts have several different dates associated with them, and the terms 
used to refer to the dates have in some cases had more than one meaning over the course 
of C&GS history. There are dates for publication, edition, printing, issue, and ‘corrected 
to.’ In addition, nearly all charts have a date for the magnetic variation shown on the 
compass roses, and many list multiple dates for the surveys on which the chart was based. 
Navigators are most concerned with the ‘corrected to’ and survey dates, while librarians 
are most interested in date of publication, for purposes of bibliographic control. 
Most charts include a publication date, and this was used to identify the date of 
the charts used in this project, where feasible. However, seven of the 40 charts are 
identified with a dual date. For detail as to which type of date is used to identify each 
chart, Appendix C: Chart Details highlights each date used to identify the charts. 
At various times charts have also included a date of ‘issue.’ For many years charts 
were engraved on copper plates, and each chart’s plate would be corrected and added to 
for many years. For the life of any particular plate, the chart would maintain a single 
publication date, the date the plate first completed. After each correction to the plate, 
Delete text from pdf acrobat - delete, remove text from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# developers to use mature APIs to delete and remove text content from PDF document
how to erase text in pdf file; remove text watermark from pdf online
Delete text from pdf acrobat - VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File
how to delete text from a pdf document; how to delete text in pdf converter professional
30
however, the date of issue was changed. The edition SF40 1859/77 is an example of this 
practice. The plate was completed and the chart first published in 1859, but the edition 
scanned and used in this project had corrections and additions applied many times, and 
most likely several editions were issued between 1859 and the edition at hand. Is it an 
1859 chart, or an 1877 chart? The design of the chart and the base information on the 
plate is best related to the earlier date, but the important navigation-related information is 
updated to be current as of the later date. The answer is ambiguous, so the identifying 
date includes both. From the perspective of cartographic design, however, the date of 
initial chart construction is most important. 
By the turn of the twentieth century charts carried one or more ‘print’ dates (all in 
a row at the lower left corner) and sometimes an ‘Edition’ date. ‘Edition’ carries the same 
meaning as ‘Issued’ did in the 1870s, and ‘Issued’ now had a new meaning. By 1900 it 
represented the date the chart was distributed from the C&GS stock of printed charts. 
Corrections made to plates were also made by hand to all of the printed copies still in 
stock, so charts were ‘corrected to date of issue.’ After being issued, it was up to the new 
owner to correct it by hand based on information published in one of the editions of the 
Coast Pilot (U.S. Treasury Department et al. 1900a). Such charts have been identified by 
the publication date except in instances when there were many years difference between 
it and the print date.  
A few of the editions used here are missing all dates typically used to note 
publication. For some editions the dates were simply not included on the printed charts. 
In other instances, incomplete scans have made the dates unavailable. In these types of 
cases the survey and magnetic variation dates were consulted. The date for the magnetic 
variation on the compass roses is usually one or two years after the print/issue date. With 
such a small difference it seems reasonable to use it for identification when no other date 
can be found. 
Since the 1960s, charts have been given only one date related to publication. Each 
time any change is made to the chart it receives a new edition number and a new edition 
date. Today’s charts do not have separate publication, corrected to, or issue dates. Charts 
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Redact text content, images, whole pages from PDF file. Annotate & Comment. Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file. Print.
how to delete text from a pdf in acrobat; pdf editor online delete text
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Allow users to convert PDF to Text (TXT) file. can manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
how to delete text from a pdf reader; remove text from pdf
31
are no longer corrected by hand up to the point of sale—that responsibility has been 
shifted to the purchaser (Calder 2003). 
Production and Printing 
Production Methods 
For most of the time period under consideration, the C&GS produced finished 
nautical charts as copperplate engravings. However, the agency underwent a gradual 
transition from copperplate engraving to engraving on glass negatives in the years leading 
up to World War II, as illustrated in Figure 2. Finished charts were held to a higher 
standard than Preliminary charts, which were simply early editions of what would 
become Finished charts after detail work was completed. Expediency, not beauty, was the 
drive behind Preliminary charts. 
Preliminary Chart Production
Finished Chart Production
1840s 1850s 1860s 1870s 1880s 1890s 1900s
Copperplate Engraving
Copper Eng./Photo Compilation
Zylonite
Heliogravure
Copperplate Etching
Lithographic Engraving
Glass Negative Engraving
Scribing on Celluloid
Glass Negative Engraving
Copperplate Engraving
1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s
Figure 2. Chart production method timeline.  
Determining the production method of a chart from a printed copy is complicated 
by the fact that the final product of different production methods can be printed using the 
same method. For example, during the transition from copperplate engraving to glass 
negative engraving, lithographic presses, not copper plates, printed some copperplate 
engravings. Proof prints were created from the copper plates, and those prints were used 
as the basis for generating photolithographic printing plates. 
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
delete text from pdf online; erase text in pdf document
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
how to delete text from pdf with acrobat; how to delete text in pdf document
32
Between 1900 and 1940 it is unclear which charts were produced using which 
methods. Before 1900 all finished charts were engraved on copper, and after 1930 (or so) 
the practice was phased out, disappearing once the scribing on plastic was adopted.  
Engraving 
The engraving staff at the Coast Survey initially engraved entirely manually, even 
though machines for engraving lines and parallel lines were widely adopted in the early 
nineteenth century (Pearson 1983, 7). Over time mechanical aids were added to the 
toolset of the engravers at the Coast Survey, as were additional techniques for speeding 
production. 
A mechanical engraving tool was first mentioned in the annual report for 1845. 
Constructed for the engravers were a ruling machine and other tools (U.S. Treasury 
Department et al. 1846, 33). The Engraving Office began using punches
13
for engraving 
numerals, particularly for soundings on second-class charts, following experiments in 
1860 (U.S. Treasury Department et al. 1861, 222; 1864b, 124). This method was manual, 
but still much faster than engraving each numeral. It was also more consistent, if less 
elegant. Roulettes
14
for sanding work were not in use in 1854, but their use was under 
consideration (U.S. Treasury Department et al. 1855). They were in use by 1869, when a 
study of how to improve their use was undertaken (U.S. Treasury Department et al. 1872, 
59). 
In 1863, the pantograph was introduced to the office for use with scale reduction. 
The agency noted that, “Much time and expense … will be thereby saved…(U.S. 
Treasury Department et al. 1869a).” Success in using pantographs was found after 
importing two high-quality devices from Denmark in 1865 (U.S. Treasury Department et 
al. 1869b). 
13
Punches for conventional topographic symbols were standard engraver’s tools as early as 1751 (Verner 
1975). 
14
Manual engraving tools for which the cutting surface is on a wheel attached to a handle. Rolling the tool 
across the blank surface cuts the symbol. 
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
create a watermark that consists of text or image (such And with our PDF Watermark Creator, users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat.
delete text in pdf file online; delete text pdf acrobat professional
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
how to delete text from a pdf reader; how to delete text in pdf file
33
The 1869 annual report also mentions etching as a technique for engraving the 
symbol for woods (59). In the 1884 report, etching is listed as one of the steps in the 
engraving process (U.S. Treasury Department et al. 1885, 115). The annual report of 
1906 reports success with “a process of etching copper plates from transfers of drawings 
…(U.S. Department of Commerce and Labor et al. 1906, 14),” which was a substantial 
advance on the prior technique. The charts produced in this manner were all large-scale 
charts that did not require fine lines, and were of locations outside the continental U.S. 
The U.S. Naval Hydrographic Office created a Section of Mechanical Engraving 
under the supervision of Vincent Le Comte Ourdan, who invented and patented several 
different mechanical engraving machines and tools (Anonymous 1901). Among these 
are: 
•  Sounding engraving machine 
•  Tinting/border-engraving machines 
•  Border subdividing machines 
•  Border and scale-shading machine 
•  Compass engraving and lettering machine 
•  Multi-point divider 
Three of these time-saving aids were put into use in the C&GS in 1901: the 
sounding engraving machine, the border cutting and tinting machine, and the compass 
cutting machine (described as “improved”, implying there was an earlier compass cutting 
machine in use) (U.S. Treasury Department et al. 1902, 216). The sounding engraving 
machine was later modified to allow a single person to operate it (U.S. Department of 
Commerce and Labor et al. 1908, 67). 
The annual report for 1908 also described using a combination of engraving for 
base chart elements and photolithography for lettering to produce preliminary charts 
more quickly. 
In 1916, a manual on chartmaking published by the C&GS notes that most charts 
are produced as drawings on “tracing cloth” to be printed by lithography, rather than by 
copper engraving. The reason cited is that the chart will be published more quickly when 
traced (1916c, 14). This contradicts a later C&GS report, which states that mechanical 
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
Excel documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion.
how to delete text in pdf file online; how to erase pdf text
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS free hand, free hand line, rectangle, text, hotspot, hotspot more plug-ins needed like Acrobat or Adobe
how to delete text from a pdf in acrobat; delete text pdf files
34
aids available to engravers make engraving quicker than tracing by hand (Jones 1924). 
This difference meant that a “modern chart, with its simplified topography … could be 
engraved more cheaply than it could be drawn (26).” Copper also had advantages over 
other early media, specifically that it is permanent, “not subject to change in varying 
atmospheric conditions, not easily damaged, and on which old work can be erased and 
changes made…(U.S. Department of Commerce et al. 1920b, 83).” In fact, the copper 
plates were considered the “permanent record of the completed work (U.S. Department of 
Commerce et al. 1916b, 16).”  
Copperplate was also given additional life in the lithographic printing era by 
development in the early 1920s of a technique to pull transfer prints from the copper plate 
that did not have appreciable distortion (U.S. Department of Commerce et al. 1925b). A 
transfer print must always be made from the engraving, so the black ink can be 
photographed. The photograph is finally transferred to the printing plate. The main source 
of inconsistency was in the transfer print, which for many years suffered distortion from 
shrinkage when the dampened paper dried. The improved technique was to back the 
paper with glue, and stick a sheet of heavy blotting paper to it before running the joined 
pair through the press. The blotting paper stays dry and forces the thinner sheet to dry in 
place, with unappreciable shrinkage (U.S. Department of Commerce et al. 1921a, 24). 
This change made it more practical to print engravings by lithography, with the attendant 
economies that printing method provides. The accuracy of the charts also improved, 
because the chart paper did not have to be dampened for lithographic printing. 
This same advance also led to further development of engraving on glass 
negatives. Negative engraving, or scribing, on wet-pate glass negatives was developed by 
the C&GS initially as a way to touch-up charts in between chart compilation and 
lithographic printing (Shalowitz 1957). As lithography became the dominant and then the 
only printing method in the agency, more effort was put into working with negatives. 
Corrections that previously had to be applied to the copper plates could instead be made 
to the glass negatives from which the printing plates were created. Instead of making 
corrections to the ‘standard sheet’ and then to the copper plate before each reprinting, 
35
corrections would only be applied to the copper plates when very extensive, while the 
copper provided insurance against the glass negative being damaged (U.S. Department of 
Commerce et al. 1921a, 24). It was only a short leap from there to engraving directly on 
negatives from the start, which is mentioned as one of the two options for chart creation 
in the 1929 annual report (U.S. Department of Commerce et al. 1929, 8). 
In 1935, tools specifically for engraving on glass negatives were developed. Until 
then the engravers simply used tools developed for engraving on copper (Shalowitz 
1957). However, even in 1936 the C&GS was engraving “a large percentage of the new 
or completely reconstructed charts” on copper (Adams 1936, 94). The base chart was 
engraved on copper, while elements more likely to change, or easier to produce using 
photographic techniques (titles, notes, aids to navigation, compass roses, etc.), were 
applied to the glass negative. When reprinted, edits were made to the negative, not the 
copper plate (Adams 1936). These techniques were in use within the C&GS by 1928 
(U.S. Department of Commerce et al. 1928b). By 1936 it was “one of the leading 
processes of this bureau (U.S. Department of Commerce et al. 1936a, 79).” 
At the same time, work was being done on expanding the versatility of 
mechanical aids for chart creation. A new sounding engraving machine was designed and 
built by the survey’s Instrument Division in 1925 to replace a larger, older machine that 
was designed to work specifically with copper. The new machine could work on both 
copper and glass (U.S. Department of Commerce et al. 1925a, 50). By the mid-1930s, a 
projection ruling machine was in use that could work not only on copper and glass, but 
also on paper. The machine in use for creating the border and neatlines could now do 
both at the same time (U.S. Department of Commerce et al. 1936a). Also in use by the 
mid-1930s were rub-off standard chart symbols, and a Ben-Day stippling machine. 
Charts were still engraved on copper in 1935 (U.S. Department of Commerce et al. 
1936b, 136). 
Then in the late 1930s, a dimensionally stable, clear plastic film (celluloid) was 
invented that could be used as the base for cartographic production. This was first used 
by the C&GS for chart compilation in 1939, and widely adopted in the 1940s for scribing 
36
in place of glass negatives, although glass was still being used in 1949 (U.S. Department 
of Commerce et al. 1940, 110; Monmonier 1985; U.S. Department of Commerce et al. 
1950). 
Other Production Techniques 
Another technique used to produce charts was engraving on lithographic stones, 
although it was only used for preliminary charts. A Lithographic Office was established 
in 1861 to quickly produce maps and charts related to the Civil War. The finished 
products were printed by lithography and were not finished to the high-degree of detail 
expected of finished nautical charts. In 1862, this office was producing maps printed in 
color (Morrison et al. 1990, 114). The Lithographic Office was dissolved between 1866 
and 1867 with no mention in annual reports. 
In 1891, the Drawing Division made an experiment of using a clear material 
called zylonite, made of cellulose nitrate, for tracing, engraving, printing, and 
electrotyping a finished drawing. It could take the place of tracing paper and copper 
plates. Deemed an initial success that warranted further investigation, the material was 
not mentioned again (U.S. Treasury Department et al. 1892, 124).  
Heliogravure is mentioned in the 1902 report as a method of “reproducing 
negatives on copper plates,” and one chart was created used this process. The experiment 
was deemed successful, but probably most useful for preliminary charts because the 
result looks more like photolithograph (U.S. Treasury Department et al. 1903, 202). 
When the lithographic presses were switched from stones to aluminum plates, 
there was hope that drawings could be transferred to the aluminum plates via “[t]he 
‘direct process,’ by which a photoprint is made on a sensitized aluminum plate from the 
chart drawing, replacing the glass negatives and prints on transfer paper…(U.S. 
Department of Commerce et al. 1914, 120).” They relied on sunlight for illumination at 
that time, which made the process inconsistent. 
37
Printing Method 
The C&GS began its chart printing using original engraved copper plates. 
Experiments with electrotyping
15
by C&GS staff member George Mathiot lead to full 
integration of the technique into the production process, so that original plates were used 
only as data storage, and printing was done using copies. Lithography was the only 
printing method used in 1940. 
The charts used here appear to have been printed using the methods noted in 
Table 5. “CP” stands for copperplate printing, and “Lith.” stands for lithographic 
printing. The distinction is made entirely by which charts have colored area fills. 
Table 5. Print method: copperplate or lithography 
Time 
Period
NY40
SF40
MH400
GJF200
E1200
W1200
CP
CP
CP
CP
CP
CP
CP
CP
CP
3
CP
CP
CP
CP
4
CP
CP
CP
Lith.
Lith.
CP
Lith.
Lith.
6
Lith.
Lith.
Lith.
CP
Lith.
7
Lith.
Lith.
Lith.
Lith.
Lith.
Lith.
Lith.
Lith.
Lith.
Lith.
Lith.
Lith.
Lith.
Lith.
9
Lith.
Lith.
Lith.
Lith.
Lith.
Lith.
1
2
5
8
The first chart here seen to be printed by lithography, E1200 1900 has a note in 
the lower left corner that it was printed by “
JULIUS BIEN & CO. LITH. NY
”. It is a 1903 
print of the 1900 chart, as noted by a stamp in the lower right corner. 
Context 
The Coast Survey first purchased and installed a flatbed press in 1842 for intaglio 
printing from copper plates (U.S. Treasury Department et al. 1843). In 1851 a hydraulic 
15
A method of copying engraved copper plates using vats of electrolyte solution, dissolved copper, and 
electricity. 
38
flatbed press was purchased. See Figure 3 for a timeline of the printing methods used by 
the C&GS for its charts. 
Preliminary Chart Printing
Finished Chart Printing
1920s 1930s 1940s
1880s 1890s 1900s 1910s
1840s 1850s 1860s 1870s
Lithography (Stone)
Photolithography (Stone)
Photolithography (Aluminum)
Copperplate
Photolithography (Aluminum)
Zylonite
Copperplate
Figure 3. Printing method timeline 
In these early years, charts were printed from the original engravings. 
Electrotyping was seen as a possibility for reproducing charts to extend the life of the 
original engravings as early as 1851. So much effort was put into each original engraved 
plate—$3,000-$6,000 over three to four years—that spending $200 to create an 
electrotype copy was an economical choice (U.S. Treasury Department et al. 1852). Once 
experiments with electrotyping had successfully demonstrated its value, the Coast Survey 
began printing only from electrotype copies. 
In response to the outbreak of the Civil War in 1861 the survey established a 
Lithographic Division to quickly produce war-related maps and charts (U.S. Treasury 
Department et al. 1862). Two lithographic presses were in use by the Division in 1862, 
and some maps were printed in color (U.S. Treasury Department et al. 1864a). The war 
material was engraved on stone, but the Division also printed some charts by transfer 
from copper plates. This included some experiments with printing preliminary charts and 
sketches “by reproducing gradations of soundings, land, sand-banks, &c., by a system of 
light coloring (151).” In 1864 several such charts were published, while the war maps 
were being published in up to five colors (U.S. Treasury Department et al. 1866, 112). 
One of the two lithographic presses was disposed of in 1865, but the other retained for 
printing preliminary charts and sketches by transfer from copper (U.S. Treasury 
Department et al. 1867). 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested