pdf reader in asp.net c# : How to copy text out of a pdf Library software component asp.net winforms wpf mvc McConnel_USCGS_Charts_Thesis6-part811

49
In the annual reports, charts continue to be referred to by the pre-1866 numbers until the 
1880 report begins noting their catalogue numbers. It mentions that, during the past fiscal 
year (July 1879 through June 1880), “Special attention was given … to the publication of 
an edition of the catalogue of the charts embodying a number of improvements, and to a 
study of the forms best adopted to secure clear and concise expression in the titles of 
publications (U.S. Treasury Department et al. 1882, 51).” The 1867 scheme was as 
follows: 
•  Atlantic & Gulf Coasts  
o  Sailing Charts (1:1,200,000): 1-5 
o  General Coast Charts and Preliminary Coast Charts (1:400,000 & 
1:200,000): 6-31 
o  Coast Charts (1:80,000): 101-213 (100 was added to the chart 
series number)  
o  Harbor Charts: 300-528  
•  West Coast, CA–WA 
o  All classes of chart: 601-657 
•  West Coast, north of WA (beginning 1868) 
o  All classes of chart: 700- 
A change was made to this scheme in 1892. Four-digit numbers were assigned to 
west coast charts, leaving enough room in the numbering scheme for all coasts so that a 
unique identifier could be assigned to each chart, and never be reused if the chart was 
retired (U.S. Treasury Department et al. 1893, 138-39). This included changing the 
projection of a chart. For example, Chart A became Chart 1000 when it was converted 
from polyconic projection to Mercator projection in 1900 (U.S. Treasury Department et 
al. 1901, 93). 
A plan for modernizing charts was approved in 1909. It included retiring out-
dated charts with new editions featuring a single unit for soundings, placing charts on the 
Mercator projection, making all charts have a north/south orientation, and including less 
detail, particularly topographic detail (U.S. Department of Commerce and Labor et al. 
1911, 11-12).  
How to copy text out of a pdf - delete, remove text from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# developers to use mature APIs to delete and remove text content from PDF document
online pdf editor to delete text; how to delete text in pdf document
How to copy text out of a pdf - VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File
how to delete text from pdf reader; how to delete text in a pdf file
50
During the years when charts were engraved the most likely place for a 
typographical to survive to be printed was the upper left. The number was often the last 
thing engraved because it changed based on the destination of the print, and in some 
cases were stamped onto the charts by hand (U.S. Treasury Department et al. 1889b, 129; 
Shalowitz 1964, 90). 
Neatline 
Coast and Geodetic Survey charts have been created with a wide variety of 
formats for their neatline. There have always been two main parts of their neatline—an 
outer section consisting of at least one thick and one thin black line, and an inner section 
of one or more thin lines. The two sections are separated by a broad white space 
containing, among other things, latitude and longitude number labels. The design of the 
inner section has varied more than the outer. 
Four of the layouts consistently show portions of the neatline: 01–Upper Left 
Corner, 12–Bottom Center, 13–Lower Left Corner, and 14–Lower Right Corner. In this 
section these layouts will be referred to as UL, BC, LL, and LR. See also Table 7 and 
Table 8 for summaries of neatline formatting. 
Table 7. Neatline format: number of outer and inner lines 
Time 
Period
NY40 SF40 MH400 GJF200 E1200 W1200
4, 2 
2, 3 
3, 1
3, 2
3, 3 
3, 1
2, 3 
3, 2
3, 3 
3
3, 1
3, 1
3, 3 
2, 3 
4
3, 1
3, 1
2, 2 
2, 3 
3, 1
2, 3 
2, 1
2, 3 
6
2, 1
2, 1
2, 3 
2, 2 
2, 3 
7
2, 1
2, 3 
2, 3 
2, 3 
2, 3 
2, 1
2, 1
2, 3 
2, 3 
2, 3 
2, 1
2, 3 
2, 3 
2, 3 
9
2, 1
1
5
8
2
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF Support to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
how to delete text from pdf document; how to erase text in pdf file
VB.NET PDF replace text library: replace text in PDF content in vb
PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text out of selected PDF page or all PDF document in VB.NET. Support .NET WinForms, ASP
how to delete text in pdf acrobat; pull text out of pdf
51
The two charts in time period one have subtle differences in the design of their 
neatlines. The outer section of six-sheet NY40 1844/45 consists of (from the outside to 
the inside) four lines and three white spaces:  
1.  a black hairline 
2.  a medium-width white space  
3.  a black line two to three times thicker than the white space 
4.  another medium-width white space 
5.  a second black hairline 
6.  a double-width white space  
7.  a third hairline  
Inside this is a white space slightly wider than the entirety of the outside section. It is 
populated by latitude and longitude numbers. Just below or to the left of each of these 
numbers are lines of latitude or longitude extending to the outer edge of this white space. 
Bounding it to the inside is the inner section of the neatline. It has two hairlines a medium 
width apart, and the interior space is divided into sections measuring 1/6 of a minute (10 
seconds) of longitude (on the top and bottom) or 1/6 of a minute of latitude (on the left 
and right sides). These divisions are created by ruling every other 10-seconds of width 
with a large number of fine lines connecting the inner and outer bounding line. On some 
scans this shows as a patch of grey, but on higher resolution scans individual lines are 
discernable. It appears the rules are spaced so as to divide the 10 seconds into 60 sections 
of equal width, alternating black and white, each thereby covering 1/6 seconds of latitude 
or longitude. 
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Support to zoom in and zoom out PDF page. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document.
remove text from pdf; delete text pdf acrobat
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Select. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V. Rotation (Ⅲ) & Zoom (Ⅳ) Tabs. Click to zoom out current PDF document page. 5.
how to remove highlighted text in pdf; pdf editor online delete text
52
Table 8. Neatline format: from the left edge in 
Time 
Period
NY40
SF40
MH400
GJF200
E1200
W1200
HvTvHwH W Hw(f)H
TvH W Hw(f)HwH
HvTvH W H HvTvH W HwH
HwTwH W Hw(B)HwH
HvTvH W H
TvH W Hw(f)HwH
HvTwH W HwH
HvTvH W Hw(B)HwH
3
HvTvH W H
HvTvH W H
HwTvH W HwHwH
TwH W Hw(B)HwH
4
HvTvH W H
HvTvH W H
TvH W Hw(f)H
TvH W Hw(B)HwH
HvTvH W H
TwH W Hw(B)Hw(b)H
TwH W H
TwH W Hw(B)HwH
6
TwH W H
TwH W H
TwH W Hw(B)HwH
TwH W Hw(f)H
TvH W Hw(B)HwH
7
TwH W H
TwH W Hw(B)Hw(b)H TwH W Hw(B)HwH
TvH W Hw(B)HwH
TwH W Hw(B)HwH
TwH W H
TwH W H TwH W Hw(B)Hw(b)H TwH W Hw(B)HwH
TwH W Hw(B)HwH
TwH W H TwH W Hw(B)Hw(b)H
TwH W Hw(B)HwH
TwH W Hw(B)HwH
9
TwH W H
1
2
5
8
T =  Thick line 
 =  Wide white space 
(f)  =  Fine-line shading for dividers 
H =  Hairline 
 =  Medium white space 
(B) =  Medium-weight cross-bar for dividers 
 =  Thin white space 
(b) =  Light-weight cross-bar for dividers 
NY40 1845 was drawn and engraved at the same time as the larger-scale version 
of the same location but has small differences from its sibling chart, the format of the 
neatline being no exception. Its outer section has only two black lines, a thick one on the 
outside and a hairline just inside. The white space separating the outer from the inner 
section contains latitude and longitude numbers and lines the same as the other chart, but 
it also has another series of lines extending perpendicular from the outside hairline 
halfway across the white space. These are only on the top and bottom of the chart, not the 
two sides. The inner section of the neatline has three equidistant hairlines, and the white 
space created by the outer two is apportioned by areas of tightly ruled lines. These 
alternating areas of white and shading are each one minute wide, and every fifth minute is 
labeled.  
A statement at the top center of the chart, just inside the neatline, identifies the 
second set of lines as representing “Longitude West of Greenwich.” The Greenwich 
Meridian had not yet been officially established as the standard zero meridian. That did 
not take place until 1871 (Monmonier 1985, 31). The primary grid on this chart uses 
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
Select. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V. Rotation (Ⅲ) & Zoom (Ⅳ) Tabs. Click to zoom out current PDF document page. 5.
delete text from pdf acrobat; remove text from pdf reader
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Ability to extract highlighted text out of PDF document. it is feasible for users to extract text content from source PDF document file with a copy-and-paste
delete text pdf file; how to delete text from a pdf
53
“Longitude from the Meridian of New York City Hall” to measure distance east/west, as 
identified at the bottom of the chart to the left of center, inside the neatline. The larger 
scale map of New York also sets its prime meridian at City Hall, and states that it is 
74°.00’.41” West of Greenwich observatory, or “in time 4
H
.56
m
.02
s
.7.” The addition of 
this second set of longitude indicators probably stems from comments made by mariners 
who used British Admiralty charts, which at that time were the most accurate charts for 
most of the world. These charts used Greenwich as the prime meridian and navigators 
were familiar with it.  
Moving into the second time period, the eight chart editions shown on the UL 
layout can be grouped into four neatline formats. The three editions of NY40 share one; 
SF40 1859/77 and GJF200 1862 share one; the two sailing charts share one; and MH400 
1862/72 has its own format.  
NY40 1853 is an anomaly to this project. It is a chart showing only a small 
portion of New York Harbor: Romer Shoal and Flynn’s Shoal. The 1853 edition is 
preliminary, meaning it was not engraved to the same high standard as the other charts of 
New York Harbor. The neatline is much less elaborate than the first two New York 
Harbor charts, but this plainer style is more like later charts. Also there is no indication of 
latitude or longitude; the chart seems to have no geodetic control apart from a statement 
on the location of the Sandy Hook Lighthouse in the Notes area. 
The NY40 editions now have an outer section made up of three lines: a thick 
central line flanked by equidistant hairlines enclosing a medium-width white area. 
Compared to NY40 1844 it is missing the innermost of that chart’s three hairlines, and 
the two remaining are the same distance from the central line rather than having a slight 
difference. The inner section has been simplified down to a single hairline. The broad 
expanse of white between the two section still houses latitude and longitude numbers and 
lines for the 1870 editions, but the 1853 preliminary edition has no grid or identifying 
numbers. The 1870 editions (and all subsequent editions of all the charts examined here) 
use Greenwich for their prime meridian, and there is a line and label for every two 
minutes of both latitude and longitude. The lines again start at the inner hairline of the 
C# PDF Image Redact Library: redact selected PDF images in C#.net
file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF NET control allows users to black out image in
remove text watermark from pdf; how to delete text from pdf
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Image text extraction control provides text extraction from PDF images and image files.
how to copy text out of a pdf; acrobat delete text in pdf
54
outer section, but only extend past the inner section’s hairline for a length approximately 
half the width of the space between the inner and outer neatline parts. Instead of having a 
grid run over the entire chart, the intersection of every other minute of distance is marked 
with a small ‘+’. 
SF40 1859/77 and GJF200 1862 share with the NY40 editions the three-line outer 
section of neatline. They differ in that the inner section uses two hairlines set apart by a 
white space approximately the same width as the thick black line in the outer section. 
Latitude and longitude are labeled in the space between the two parts of the neatline but 
their lines do not extend past the innermost hairline. These charts have a full grid of lines 
across the face of the chart, interrupted only by notes and views. Also unlike the NY40 
charts, longitude is only labeled on the bottom of the chart, not the top. Latitude is 
labeled on both sides. 
E1200 1863 and W1200 1855/64 also share the triple-line design for the outer 
portion, but their inner portion is a design not seen before. It is made from three 
equidistant hairlines, as with the inner section of the first two New York charts, and are 
also divided, but using a different method. The two white spaces created by the three 
lines are divided into twelve parts (five minutes) per degree of latitude or longitude, by a 
thin line connecting the inner and outer of the three hairlines. Every sixth such line, 
marking 30 minutes, extends into the chart by a length equal to the width of the inner 
portion of the neatline. Each degree line extends from the inner line of the outer portion 
of the neatline all the way across the chart. The numbers labeling the longitude lines are 
centered on the line, subdivided by it. Latitude line labels sit just above their respective 
lines. The outer half of the inner section of the neatline emphasizes the five-minute 
divisions by extending a medium-width line from divider to divider in every other 
section. The inner portion is subdivided by lines marking every minute of distance. It is 
worth noting that the projection of the chart is polyconic
18
, which creates a grid where 
18
For polyconic projections, each map has its own unique projection. The central meridian is straight and 
true to scale; all other meridians are curved. Each parallel of latitude is a curved line (actually a non-
concentric circular arc) with true scale that emanates from the map’s central meridian. 
55
every line of longitude, except the central meridian, is curved. The lines marking off 
minutes of longitude are each angled to match the curve of the arc. 
The fourth design seen among the chart editions in the second time period is used 
only on MH400 1862/72. It appears to use the same design as NY40 1845 except that the 
shaded divisions in the outer half of the inner section of the neatline are each five minutes 
wide. Scan resolution does not allow counting the number of lines per shaded area. 
Time period three shows the beginnings of some design stability. NY40 1878 
has no changes from 1870. SF40 1883 changes only to conform to the same design as 
NY40. W1200 1888 has three small changes: the outer section has lost its outermost 
hairline; the projection grid lines extend through to the inner hairline of the outer portion; 
and the longer divider line marking 30 minutes now out of instead of into the chart, into 
the middle white space. E1200 1881 has its outside hairline still, but is missing the one- 
and five-minute- divisions of the inner section. This absence makes it look almost 
unfinished. 
It regains its finished look by 1900, however. It uses nearly the same format as 
W1200 1888, which returns the minute divisions first seen in E1200 1863. The main 
difference is that the grid lines for the projection no longer extend through the neatline’s 
center expanse. These lines now stop with the inner portion of the neatline. The only lines 
in the inner white space are the 30-minute lines, which are now a little shorter. One other 
change is seen on the right third of the bottom. A ‘border break’ is included where the 
chart content has been drawn to extend into the neatline (U.S. Department of Commerce 
et al. 1997, 2-19, 2-21). It can be seen on layout 00–Full Sheets. This is the earliest chart 
used in this thesis that features this design decision. 
Other chart editions from the fourth time period include NY40 1902 and SF40 
1901, neither showing any change from the third period. GJF400 1895 has lost the 
outside hairline from the outer portion of the neatline, but has added internal divisions to 
the two hairlines of its inner portion. The divisions are one minute wide, and while they 
look solid black in reproduction, a close look at the scan shows they are once again an 
indeterminable number of finely ruled lines. Every 10 minutes of distance there is a 
56
numeric label and a line spanning the white space between the two portions of the 
neatline. Halfway between each of these is a line extending out from the inner portion, 
half the width of the white space. While the 1862 edition of GJF200 had a full grid over 
the chart, this 1895 edition has only the lines and labels in the neatline area. It has 
adopted the ‘+’ convention of the harbor charts. One final change is that, like GJF200 
1895, E1200 1900 has a border break near the lower left corner where the chart content 
has been extended into the neatline area.  
During the fifth time period NY40 loses the outside hairline from the outer 
portion of the frame. NY40 1914 still has the three outer lines inaugurated with NY40 
1844/45, but with the 1917 edition there remain only two. Projection lines change from 
existing primarily between the two sections of neatline to being a full grid over the chart 
that does not project into the neatline area at all. Latitude/longitude labels did not change, 
nor did the single hairline making up the inner portion of the neatline.  
There is an addition to the lower left of NY40 1914 that does not seem to reappear 
on any other NY40 editions, but does appear on other charts. A set of numbers reading 
‘972.
6
-1212.
6
is just below the horizontal and left justified with the vertical lines of 
the inner portion of the neatline. Their meaning is not immediately obvious, but present-
day charts list the inner dimensions of the neatline in metric units. SF40 1989 includes 
the statement 
‘(inner neatline 108.22cm. N.S. x 82.93cm. E.W.)
’. If represented in 
millimeters they would be fairly close to the numbers on NY40 1914.  
MH400 1916 adds the same type of numbers to the lower left, 
‘768.
6
-1093.
6
’,
but places them in a slightly different location, probably due to interference from a 
longitude label. This edition also introduces a new format for its inner neatline. The outer 
portion only changes to add a bit of space between the heavy and hairline rules so as to be 
consistent with NY40, GJF200, E1200 and W1200. The inner portion, however, is 
completely new. As with the Sailing Charts there are three equidistant hairlines. Of the 
two white spaces thus formed, the outer one is divided into sections five minutes wide 
using the same strategy as the Sailing Charts: a medium-width line joins divider to 
57
divider in every other section. Due to the scale difference the sections are significantly 
longer on the smaller-scale General Chart. The extra width allows a different design for 
the division of the inner white space. The hairlines defining this space are connected 
every half-minute (30 seconds) by a thin line, rather than one every minute. Minutes are 
indicated by a bar spanning every other minute, joining three half-minute lines and then 
skipping one before reappearing. This edition also begins the use of a larger font for 
numerals representing degrees than for numerals representing minutes. The other Harbor 
and General charts pick up this change sooner or later, but MH400 appears to have a 
larger difference between the two fonts than the other charts. 
W1200 1917/26 is the representative of Sailing Charts for the fifth period. There 
are very few differences between it and both W1200 1888 from the third and E1200 1900 
from the fourth time periods. The main difference from the east coast Sailing Chart is a 
smaller width for the space between the inner and outer portions of the neatline. The main 
difference from the 1888 version of the west coast Sailing Chart is having the grid lines 
stop at the inner section instead of continuing through the interior space. One small 
change is the absence of a decorative line in each corner that connected the three hairlines 
of the inner portion at a 45-degree angle.  
The sixth time period offers evidence that standards were phased in rather than 
being applied to all charts at once. NY40 1926 has no differences from 1917, but SF40 
1926 only shows about half of the changes implemented to NY40 by 1917. SF40 is 
significantly changed from its last example in 1901, but is still not fully coordinated with 
the Harbor Chart from other coast. The changes it did make toward standardization 
include dropping the outermost hairline, removing grid lines from the neatline interior 
white space, and adding grid tics that extend into the chart area marking every other 
minute. A feature that did not change to coordinate with NY40 is continuing to show only 
the intersections of grid lines instead of the full lines. It also has one example of 
formatting that appears only on this chart—the numerals used for the latitude/longitude 
labels are sans serif and have equal thickness throughout the glyphs. Other sans-serif 
fonts are used for these numbers on other charts and editions, but all use glyphs with 
58
unequal thickness. An italic sans-serif equal-weight font is used on SF40 1859/77 (and all 
but one subsequent occurrence on all charts) for the phrase ‘
:2<
=2
’ at the 
lower right corner, and beginning with MH400 1916 such a font is used for soundings on 
most editions of the charts, but nowhere else is it used for the latitude/longitude labels. It 
is possible this was an experiment in using the same engraving machine used to engrave 
soundings. 
MH400 1922 dropped a feature that had been added to its neatline for the 1916 
edition. The lines that set off one-minute increments among the half-minute dividers in 
the innermost section of neatline are missing. In a major contrast to the east coast General 
Chart, GJF200 1922 had not yet been modernized—the same base plate was used as that 
of the 1895 edition, complete with the many fine lines creating shaded areas to divide the 
inner portion of the neatline into minutes. Added to it are the cryptic numbers shared by 
NY40 and MH400 (
‘968.
7
-687.
5
), and the body of the chart has other additions, but 
it is still the same base chart. The final chart edition of time period six is E1200 1927. 
There appear to have been no design changes to the neatline from the 1900 editions. The 
only visible change is an increase in the amount of detail in the border break in the lower 
left corner. Additional chart details are present, and the innermost neatline looks to have 
been extended partially across the break instead of being fully blocked as it was in 1900. 
Moving on to the seventh time period, NY40 1936 shows a single change from 
1926. The grid tics marking minutes that had extended into the chart from the innermost 
neatline since the 1844 edition have been reflected over the innermost hairline for the 
1936 edition. Starting with this edition they extend into the center of the neatline area 
from the innermost hairline. Tics formatted this way were first seen on W1200 1888, 
GJF200 1895, and E1200 1900, and they became standard for all charts in the eighth time 
period. 
MH400 1938 similarly only shows a single change from the previous edition, 
1922. The lines marking one-minute increments among the half-minute dividers in the 
innermost section of neatline are back, returning to the design of the 1916 edition. E1200 
1938 shows two changes from its previous edition, 1927. First, grid tics extending out 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested