pdf reader in asp.net c# : How to copy text out of a pdf application Library tool html asp.net .net online McConnel_USCGS_Charts_Thesis7-part812

59
from the chart area into the central portion of the neatline are added for each degree, 
joining tics for each half-degree that first appeared with the 1900 edition. W1200 1932 
does not yet have the one-degree tics, but rather the half-degree tics. Its only change is 
the addition of the first instance seen here where the interior of the neatline contains a 
statement referring the user to another chart. The text appears near bottom center and 
reads, ‘
(
JOINS CHART 5002
)
’. E1200 1938 adds a similar statement. 
GJF200 is the last chart of the six to migrate from the look of copperplate 
engraving to lithography. GJF200 1933 is the first edition with the new look, including 
the design of the neatline. It finally joins the other General and Sailing Charts in having 
an interior neatline made of three equidistant hairlines. The inner two are subdivided by 
half-degrees, as is MH400 1922. The outer pair are divided by single degrees, and every 
other degree is crossed by a medium-weight bar—unlike MH400, which divides its 
corresponding space in five-degree increments. 
The eighth time period shows much consolidation toward standards. NY40 1944 
has several changes from the 1936 edition, including: a new font style for 
latitude/longitude labels; a change to the relative size of the numerals used in those labels 
for degrees versus minutes; and the addition of a section near bottom center where a 
minute is subdivided into five-second sections by tics extending into the interior of the 
neatline. Every third tic is both labeled and slightly longer and heavier than the others. 
The font used for latitude/longitude labels on both of the SF40 editions, 1947a and 
1947b/57, is the same used on NY40 1936. They also have the same style for grid tics 
that NY40 began to show with 1936, plus the additional five-second tics and labels seen 
with NY40 1944. Aside from SF40 editions using the older font, the SF40 neatline is 
formatted the same as NY40. The former has also regained a full grid on the chart face, 
replacing the grid intersection marks (‘+’) that NY40 moved away from by 1917. 
MH400 also becomes more standard during the eighth period. The 1942 edition 
neatline has one discernable difference from 1938—the loss of the cryptic numbers at 
lower left. The 1951 edition appears to use a subtly different font within its neatline, one 
a bit taller, with less weight contrast within each glyph, but this could also be an artifact 
How to copy text out of a pdf - delete, remove text from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# developers to use mature APIs to delete and remove text content from PDF document
how to erase text in pdf; pdf text watermark remover
How to copy text out of a pdf - VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File
erase text in pdf document; delete text pdf preview
60
of the scan. There is no doubt about it implementing grid tics pointing into the neatline 
interior, however. GJF200 1941/48 includes the same change to its grid tics, but 
continues to differ from MH400 by not marking five-minute sections. This should be due 
to the scale difference and not seen as a lack of standardization. GHF200 1941/48 also 
adds at least two statements inside the neatline referring the user to other charts. They 
read ‘
(
CONTINUED ON CHART 6401
)
’ at lower right and ‘
(
CONTINUED ON CHART 
6102
)
’at lower left, which is the first instance seen where such a reference says 
‘Continued’.  
Despite the enormous change involved with adding LORAN lines to E1200, the 
neatline of the chart has almost no change during this period. Between 1938 and 1943 the 
chart face drops every other grid line, and increases both the size of the numbers used to 
label the lines and the length of the grid tics inside the neatline. Only with the change in 
the size of the numbers is a change in the font style. The new font is swoopier, with 
bracketed serifs instead of thin slabs, and many more curves. E1200 1943 and 1948 are 
the only charts seen to use this font. The only difference noted between 1943 and 1948 is 
a slight reduction in the length of the grid tics, which returns some white space between 
the tics and labels. The format must have been considered quite robust at this point to 
require no other changes when the LORAN lines were added to the chart.  
W1200 1945/54 has switched from having tics into the neatline interior only at 
half degrees to having them only at degrees. E1200 has interior tics at each degree and 
half-degree. W1200’s font for grid labels is larger on 1945/54 than 1932, but does not 
change faces. 
Context 
Early in the history of the survey neatlines were engraved by hand. Very soon, 
however, machines were developed to partially automate the engraving of this chart 
feature. See the discussion of chart production methods earlier in this chapter for a 
history of the adoption of mechanical engraving tools. 
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF Support to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
pdf text remover; delete text from pdf file
VB.NET PDF replace text library: replace text in PDF content in vb
PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text out of selected PDF page or all PDF document in VB.NET. Support .NET WinForms, ASP
delete text from pdf preview; delete text pdf
61
Dropping the decorative line from the corners of W1200 1917/26 is evidence of 
the survey’s move from emphasizing the rightness of a traditional design for its aesthetics 
to emphasizing utility and ease-of-use. Removing superfluous decorative touches was 
also part of the move toward standardized designs, under the belief that it made charts 
easier to use. 
Removing the grid lines from the interior white space of the neatline 
accomplished two things. First, it removed a possible obscurant to the latitude/longitude 
labels. Second, it allowed the latitude labels to be centered with the grid line instead of 
offset slightly above. Placing the identifier directly in line with the item it labels should 
improve the accuracy of plotting courses when eyeballing the chart. Both changes should 
make the chart easier to read at a glance, for example at the helm of a pitching ship. 
Title, Short Title, and Statement of Responsibility 
As with most other aspects of the C&GS charts, names used to identify the charts 
changed substantially during the early years, then later become stable, formalized, and 
consistent. See Table 9 (and Appendix C: Chart Details) for a truncated version of the 
title of each edition as it appears on the chart in the title area. See Table 11 for the short 
title, found outside the neatline on the lower right. 
Title 
Early charts had long, descriptive titles that included the statement of 
responsibility for their creation, including the two charts in the first time period (refer to 
Layout 02—Title Area). The full title on the map/chart of the New York area published 
in six sheets in 1844 and 1845 is:  
MAP of NEW-YORK BAY AND HARBOR AND THE ENVIRONS. Founded upon a Trigonometrical Survey 
under the direction of F.R. HASSLER  Superintendent of the SURVEY OF THE COAST OF THE UNITED 
STATES Triangulation by JAMES FERGUSON and EDMUND BLUNT Assistants, The Hydrography under the 
direction of  THOMAS R. GEDNEY Lieutenant U.S.Navy The Topography by C. RENARD and T.A.JENKINS 
Assist
s
. Published in 1844, Verified by [signature of ?.M. Eakin, assistant], Variation of the Magnetic Needle at 
Sandy Hook in January 1844, 5
°
51’ West. [seal of U.S. Coast Survey Depot], Longitude of New York City Hall 
West of Greenwich observatory, 74
°
00’41”; in time 4
H
56
m
02
s
7.  
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Support to zoom in and zoom out PDF page. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document.
how to delete text from a pdf document; how to edit and delete text in pdf file
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Select. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V. Rotation (Ⅲ) & Zoom (Ⅳ) Tabs. Click to zoom out current PDF document page. 5.
delete text from pdf; remove text from pdf preview
62
The single-sheet version of the same area published the following year has a similar title: 
MAP of NEW-YORK BAY AND HARBOR AND THE ENVIRONS. Founded upon a Trigonometrical Survey 
under the direction of F.R. HASSLER  Superintendent of the SURVEY OF THE COAST OF THE UNITED 
STATES Triangulation by JAMES FERGUSON and EDMUND BLUNT Assistants, The Hydrography under the 
direction of  THOMAS R. GEDNEY Lieutenant U.S.Navy The Topography by C. RENARD, T.A.JENKINS & 
B.F.SANDS Assist
s
. Published in 1845. A.D.Bache Superintendent. Scale 1/80,000, Verified by Lieut. 
A.A.Humphries, Assistant U.S.Coast Survey, [seal of U.S. Coast Survey Depot], Price 75 cents. 
The titles were typographically complex. The statement on the six-sheet map is 
broken into 13 lines, and the single-sheet is arranged in 15 lines. The former uses nine 
font and style combinations, and the latter uses 10. It should be noted that both of these 
first works published were titled Maps, not charts. They have more information about the 
topography and cultural features of the land than the topography of the waters, which 
may have led the survey to name them as they did. 
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
Select. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V. Rotation (Ⅲ) & Zoom (Ⅳ) Tabs. Click to zoom out current PDF document page. 5.
erase pdf text; erase pdf text online
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Ability to extract highlighted text out of PDF document. it is feasible for users to extract text content from source PDF document file with a copy-and-paste
remove text from pdf online; how to erase text in pdf file
63
Table 9. Titles 
Time  
Period 
NY40 
SF40 
MH400 
GJF200 
E1200 
W1200 
Map of New-York 
Bay and Harbor 
and the Environs. 
Map of New-York 
Bay and Harbor 
and the Environs. 
Romer’s and 
Flynn’s Shoals: 
New York Bay 
Entrance to San 
Francisco Bay, 
California  
Reconnaissance of the 
Western Coast of the 
United States 
(Northern Sheet) from 
Umpquah River to the 
Boundary 
New York Entrance 
General Chart of 
the Coast No. IV, 
From Cape May to 
Cape Henry 
Reconnaissance of 
Washington Sound 
and Approaches, 
Washington Territory 
[Preliminary] 
Atlantic Coast of 
the United States 
(in four sheets) 
Sheet No. II, 
Nantucket to Cape 
Hatteras 
New York Entrance 
San Francisco 
Entrance, 
California  
Atlantic Coast: 
Cape Sable to 
Cape Hatteras 
(Northern Sheet) 
Pacific Coast from San 
Francisco Bay to the 
Strait of Juan de Fuca  
Missing from scan 
San Francisco 
Entrance, 
California  
Gulf of Georgia and 
Strait of Juan de Fuca, 
Washington 
Atlantic Coast: 
Cape Sable to 
Cape Hatteras 
New York Bay and 
Harbor 
United States - East 
Coast: Cape May to 
Cape Hatteras 
United States - 
East Coast: New 
York Harbor 
Pacific Coast: San 
Francisco to Cape 
Flattery 
United States - 
East Coast: New 
York Harbor 
United States - 
West Coast: San 
Francisco 
Entrance, 
California  
United States - East 
Coast: Cape May to 
Cape Hatteras 
United States - West 
Coast: Georgia Strait 
and Strait of Juan de 
Fuca, Washington 
Atlantic Coast: 
Cape Sable to 
Cape Hatteras 
United States - 
East Coast: New 
York Harbor 
United States - East 
Coast: Cape May to 
Cape Hatteras 
United States - West 
Coast, Washington: 
Georgia Strait and 
Strait of Juan de Fuca 
Atlantic Coast: 
Cape Sable to 
Cape Hatteras 
Pacific Coast: San 
Francisco to Cape 
Flattery 
United States - 
East Coast: New 
York Harbor 
United States - 
West Coast, 
California: San 
Francisco 
Entrance  
United States - East 
Coast: Cape May to 
Cape Hatteras 
United States - West 
Coast, Washington: 
Georgia Strait and 
Strait of Juan de Fuca 
Atlantic Coast: 
Cape Sable to 
Cape Hatteras 
United States - 
West Coast, 
California: San 
Francisco 
Entrance  
United States - East 
Coast: Cape May to 
Cape Hatteras 
Loran Chart - 
Atlantic Coast: 
Cape Sable to 
Cape Hatteras 
United States - West 
Coast: San Francisco 
to Cape Flattery 
United States - 
East Coast, New 
York - New Jersey: 
New York Harbor 
United States - 
West Coast, 
California: San 
Francisco 
Entrance  
United States - East 
Coast: Cape May to 
Cape Hatteras 
(Loran -C 
Overprinted) 
United States - West 
Coast, Washington: 
Strait of Georgia and 
Strait of Juan de Fuca 
Atlantic Coast: 
Cape Sable to 
Cape Hatteras 
United States - West 
Coast: San Francisco 
to Cape Flattery 
C# PDF Image Redact Library: redact selected PDF images in C#.net
file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF NET control allows users to black out image in
how to remove highlighted text in pdf; remove text from pdf
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Image text extraction control provides text extraction from PDF images and image files.
how to edit and delete text in pdf file online; how to delete text in pdf document
64
The second time period sees similar title and statement of responsibility wording 
and formatting. The small 1853 chart of a critical entrance to New York Bay was named: 
U. S. COAST SURVEY, A.D.BACHE Superintendt., ROMER AND FLYNN’S SHOALS, NEW YORK BAY, By 
the Hydrographic Party under the command of Lieut. M.WOODHULL, H.R.N. Asst., Scale 1/40,000, 1853.
This chart had the publisher and author above the geographic area covered by the chart, 
although typography again leads the reader quickly to the name of the area of interest. 
The second edition of NY40 in this time period is also the latest published, in 
1870. It shows evidence of a deliberate shortening of the content in the title area: 
U.S.COAST SURVEY, BENJAMIN PIERCE SUPERINTENDENT, NEW YORK ENTRANCE, Scale 1/40.000, 
1870, [seal of U.S. Coast Survey Office], 
The first edition of SF40, from 1859/77, follows a similar format as the first New 
York area maps and charts. All of the chart responsibility information is in the title area 
along with the geographic area of interest: 
ENTRANCE TO SAN FRANCISCO BAY CALIFORNIA, From a Trigonometrical Survey under the direction of 
A.D.BACHE Superintendent of the SURVEY OF THE COAST OF THE UNITED STATES. Triangulation by 
R.D.CUTTS Asst. & A.F.RODGERS Sub-Asst. Topography by R.D.CUTTS Asst. A.M.HARRISON &  
A.F.RODGERS Sub-Assts. Hydrography by the Party under the command of Lieut.Comdg. JAMES ALDEN 
U.S.N.Assist. Scale 1/50,000, 1859, Aids to Navigation corrected to 1867, [seal of United States Coast Survey], 
Issued October 1877  C.P.PATTERSON  Superintendent, Verified, J.E.Hilgard Assistant in charge of Office
PRICE 75 CENTS
The earliest MH400: 
GENERAL CHART OF THE COAST No. IV, FRM CAPE MAY TO CAPE HENRY,
From a Trigonometrical 
Survey under the direction of F.R.HASSLER and A.D.BACHE Superintendents of the SURVEY OF THE 
COAST OF THE UNITED STATES, Published 1862, A.D.BACHE Superintendent, Scale 1/400.000, [seal of 
U.S. Coast Survey Office], Verified, J.E.Hilgard, Assist. Coast Survey, In charge of Office.  
The earliest GJF200: 
U.S.COAST SURVEY, A.D.BACHE Supdt., RECONNAISSANCE OF WASHINGTON SOUND AND 
APPROACHES, WASHINGTON TERRITORY, Triangulation and Topographry by G.DAVIDSON Asst. and 
J.S.LAWSON Sub-Assistant, Hydrography by the Parties under the command of Comdr. J.ALDEN and 
Lieut.R.M.CUYLER U.S.N.Assists., Scale 1/200,000, 1862, [seal of U.S. Coast Survey Office], Verified, 
[signature of J.E.Hilgard], Assist. Coast Survey, In charge of Office. 
The earliest E1200: 
[seal of U.S. Coast Survey Office], U.S.COAST SURVEY, A.D.BACHE Supt., ATLANTIC COAST OF THE 
UNITED STATES ( in four sheets ) Sheet No.II, NANTUCKET TO CAPE HATTERAS, Scale 1/1200 000, 1863 
The earliest W1200:
[seal of U.S. Coast Survey Office], PRICE $1.30, Verified, H.W.Benham, Dept. of Eng
ng
, Asst. C.S. In Charge of 
Office, U.S.COAST SURVEY, A.D.BACHE Superintendent, RECONNAISSANCE OF THE WESTERN COAST 
65
OF THE UNITED STATE ( NORTHERN SHEET ) FROM UMPQUAH RIVER TO THE BOUNDARY, By the 
Hydrographic Party under the command of Lieut. JAMES ALDEN U.S.N. Assistant, Geographical Positions by 
G.DAVIDSON, Scale 1/1,200,000, 1855, Corrected to 1864
One can see evidence of lack of standardization between titles at this time. Even 
where certain features were attempted to be made standard, details were still 
implemented differently between charts. One standard that appears as early as 1853 is to 
lead the responsibility statement with the name of the agency, and the name of the 
Superintendent. This format was not followed for MH400 1862, however, and the title 
associated with the superintendent is presented in four different forms on six charts:  
•  Superintendt. (NY40 1853) 
•  Superintendent (W1200 1855/64, MH400 1862, NY40 1870) 
•  Supdt. (GJF200 1862) 
•  Supt. (E1200 1863) 
Other inconsistencies include: abbreviating/not abbreviating first names; order of 
elements (topography before hydrography and vice-versa); commas/no commas in the 
scale representative fraction; font size for words such as “of the”; phrasing 
(“Hydrography by…” versus “By the Hydrographic Party…”); including the signature of 
the Assistant in Charge of Office or just the name; and placement of the seal (see Table 
10).  
The third time period has further movement toward standardization. NY40 1878 
is the last example with extensive responsibility information in the title area. This 
information had been made visually distinct by aligning it to the left instead of center, 
and putting it in italics. As can be seen, it was becoming too detailed to remain in the title 
area: 
[seal of United States Coast and Geodetic Survey], NEW YORK ENTRANCE, Scale 1/40.000, 1875, Aids to 
Navigation corrected to 1883, Triangulation by Edmund Blunt Assistant in 1855. Topography by H.L.Whiting 
S.A.Gilbert A.M.Harrison C.M.Bache Assistants and F.W.Dorr Sub-Assist. Between 1855 and 1864. 
Hydrography by Lieuts.Comdg.T.A.Craven R.Wainwright and T.R.Gedney U.S.N.Assists. in 1842,1855 and 
1856. The Main and Swash Channels from re-surveys by H.Mitchell and F.F.Nes Assists.in 1863 and 1874. 
Issued February 1878. C.P.Patterson Superintendent. Verification by J.S.Hilgard Assistant in charge of Office. 
PRICE 50 CENTS 
66
Table 10. Location of seal relative to title 
Time 
Period
NY40
SF40
MH400
GJF200
E1200
W1200
bottom 
center
bottom right
no seal
bottom right
top left
bottom right
bottom left bottom right top center
3
top center
top center
top center
top center
4
Missing from 
scan
top center
top center
top center
top center
top center
top center
top center
6
top center
top center
top center
top center
top center
7
top center
top center
top center
top center
top center
top center
top center
top center
top center
top center
top center
top center
top center
top center
9
top center
top center
top center
top center
top center
top center
1
2
5
8
SF40 1883 moves most of the responsibility information out of the title area into a 
new section called “Authorities.” This section details the persons who performed the 
Triangulation, Topography, Hydrography, Astronomical observations, Magnetic 
observations, and Verification of Hydrography, and their related dates. The only 
responsibility remaining in the title area are the seal of the United State Coast and 
Geodetic Survey; the name and title of the Superintendent; date of issue; and “Verified: 
R.D.Cutts, Assistant in charge of Office”. This leaves the title more distinct and easier to 
identify completely—less confusion is possible about what to consider part of the chart’s 
title. 
The Sailing charts also slimmed down the title area during the third time period. 
E1200 1881 became: 
[seal of United States Coast and Geodetic Survey], ATLANTIC COAST, CAPE SABLE TO CAPE HATTERAS, 
Scale 1/1200 000, Issued February 1881 C.P.PATTERSON Superintendent, Verification by J.E.Hilgard 
Assistant in charge of Office, PRICE ONE DOLLAR, SOUNDINGS IN FATHOMS  
while W1200 1888 became: 
[seal of United States Coast and Geodetic Survey], PACIFIC COAST FROM SAN FRANCISCO BAY TO THE 
STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA, Scale 1/1200000, Issued December 1888 F.M.Thorn Superintendent. Verified: 
B.A.Colonna Assistant in charge of Office. PRICE 50 CENTS, ALL SOUNDINGS IN FATHOMS 
67
The primary difference between these two is the word “From” in the Pacific Coast 
title, which is missing from the Atlantic Coast title. Meanwhile the Scale statement for 
E1200 has a space in the denominator between the thousands digit and the hundreds digit, 
while W1200 does not. 
Time period four offers several changes to note. GJF200 1895 has a new title 
that is not seen again:  
[seal of United States Coast and Geodetic Survey], GULF OF GEORGIA AND STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA, 
WASHINGTON, Scale 1/200000, Published           189[?] W.W.DUFFIELD, Superintendent. Verified: 
O.H.Tittmann, Assistant in charge of the Office. J.F.Moser Lieut. Comdr. U.S.N.Hydrographic Inspector.
E1200 1900 adds several clarifications regarding bureaucratic provenance: 
[seal of United States Coast and Geodetic Survey], TREASURY DEPARTMENT, ATLANTIC COAST, CAPE 
SABLE TO CAPE HATTERAS, ( Mercator Projection ), ALL SOUNDINGS IN FATHOMS, Published at 
Washington, D.C., April, 1900, BY THE U.S. COAST AND GEODETIC SURVEY, O.H.Tittmann Superintendent. 
The bureaucratic identifier “Treasury Department” is placed just underneath the seal of 
the U.S. C.&G.S. at top center. The projection is named in the title area for the first time 
[
(  Mercator Projection )
], and the word “
ALL
” is placed before “
SOUNDINGS IN FATHOMS
”. Also new 
to the title area is “
Published at Washington, D.C.
” 
SF40 1901 shares the new features, with “Treasury Department” at the top, 
Published at Washington, D.C.
” toward the bottom, and the projection named “(Polyconic 
Projection)”. One additional new item is at the very bottom of the title area, “
(Date of first 
publication 1895)
”. 
The fifth time period sees further refinement of standards and consistency across 
charts. Two of the charts in the group, NY40 1914 and W1200 1916/26, are more like the 
charts in the fourth time period than the other two fifth period charts, NY40 1917 and 
MH400 1916. The latter two are more like charts of later periods. 
NY40 1914: 
[seal of the Department of Commerce], NEW YORK, BAY AND HARBOR, Scale 1/40000, Published at 
Washington, D.C., May 1914, BY THE COAST AND GEODETIC SURVEY, O. H. Tittmann, Superintendent 
MH400 1916: 
[seal of the Department of Commerce], UNITED STATES – EAST COAST, CAPE MAY TO CAPE HATTERAS, 
SOUNDINGS IN FATHOMS, AT MEAN LOW WATER, (For offshore navigation only)
68
The publication and responsibility information for MH400 1916 and all later 
charts is located at bottom center, outside the neatline. This edition is also the first among 
the examples used here to have the title formation that would become standard for Harbor 
and General charts for many decades: seal of the Commerce Department at top center, 
above a geographic identifier that narrows down from country (UNITED STATES) to 
coast (EAST, WEST, or GULF) before stating the proper title of the chart. For charts that 
covered only a single State, the State name was included after the proper title during time 
period six, but there are no examples of single-State charts in time period five. It is 
possible that this format was present during this time period, but it cannot be confirmed. 
Also included in the standard title area is identification of the unit of measurement for 
depths, and what tidal datum the soundings are measured against. Scale was included for 
Harbor charts and some General charts.  
A standard for titles is appreciable during this time period. The title is now 
constructed according to this standard as one or more specific places, either connected by 
“AND” or “TO” depending on if the named places are area features (GEORGIA 
STRAIGHT AND STRAIGHT OF JUAN DE FUCA) or point features (CAPE SABLE 
TO CAPE HATTERAS).  
One last novel feature of MH400 1916 is the addition of a disclaimer to the title 
area: “
(For offshore navigation only)
.
NY40 1917 follows the new formulation of the title area: 
[seal of the Department of Commerce], UNITED STATES – EAST COAST, NEW YORK HARBOR, Scale 
1/40000, SOUNDINGS IN FEET, AT MEAN LOW WATER
However, it took many years to convert all charts to the new format, as evidenced by 
W1200 1917/26, which does not include the Country/Coast/State statement: 
[seal of the Department of Commerce], PACIFIC COAST, SAN FRANCISCO TO CAPE FLATTERY, 
SOUNDINGS IN FATHOMS, (Not intended for inside navigation) 
In fact, the Sailing Chart examples used here did not see the Country/Coast/State 
statement until W1200 1945/54, instead simply using the Coast/place-to-place 
construction. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested