pdf reader in asp.net c# : Delete text pdf control Library platform web page asp.net html web browser gmic_reference0-part93

TheHandbook
Version1.7.2(pre-release#051616)
DavidTschumperl´e
May16,2016
Delete text pdf - delete, remove text from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# developers to use mature APIs to delete and remove text content from PDF document
how to delete text in pdf using acrobat professional; how to delete text from a pdf
Delete text pdf - VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File
remove text from pdf online; erase text in pdf document
2
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
›› VB.NET PDF: Delete PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - How to Delete PDF Document Page in VB.NET. Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in VB.NET Class.
how to delete text from a pdf document; delete text pdf
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Delete PDF Page. C#.NET PDF Library - Delete PDF Document Page in C#.NET.
how to delete text in pdf file; erase pdf text online
Contents
1 Usage
7
1.1 Overallcontext t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7
1.2 Imagedefinitionandterminology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8
1.3 Itemsofaprocessingpipeline e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8
1.4 Inputdataitems s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9
1.5 Commanditemsandselections s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
1.6 Input/outputproperties s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
1.7 Substitutionrules s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
1.8 Mathematicalexpressions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
1.9 Imageanddataviewers s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
1.10 Addingcustomcommands s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1.11 Listofcommands s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
2 Listofcommands
23
2.1 Globaloptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
2.2 Input/output t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
2.3 Listmanipulation n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
2.4 Mathematicaloperators s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
2.5 Valuesmanipulation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
2.6 Colorsmanipulation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
2.7 Geometrymanipulation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
2.8 Filtering g . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
2.9 Featuresextraction n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
2.10 Imagedrawing g . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238
2.11 Matrixcomputation n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262
2.12 3drendering. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265
2.13 Programcontrol. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 312
2.14 Arrays,tilesandframes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 322
2.15 Artistic c . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 338
2.16 Warpings s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 359
2.17 Degradations s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 370
2.18 Blendingandfading. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 377
2.19 Imagesequencesandvideos s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 386
2.20 PINK-libraryoperators s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 391
2.21 Conveniencefunctions s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 398
2.22 Otherinteractivecommands s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 409
2.23 Commandsshortcuts s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 413
2.24 Examplesofuse. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 415
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Text. VB.NET PDF - Extract Text from PDF Using VB. How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application.
delete text pdf document; remove text from pdf acrobat
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Text. C# PDF - Extract Text from PDF in C#.NET. Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File.
delete text from pdf preview; delete text pdf file
4
CONTENTS
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Text to PDF. C#.NET PDF SDK - Insert Text to PDF Document in C#.NET. Providing C# Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page with .NET PDF Library.
how to delete text in pdf acrobat; deleting text from a pdf
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to Text in C#.NET. Integrate following RasterEdge C#.NET text to PDF converter SDK dlls into your C#.NET project assemblies;
how to erase text in pdf file; pdf text watermark remover
Preamble
License
ThisdocumentisdistributedundertheGNUFreeDocumentationLicense,version1.3.
Readthefulllicensetermsathttp://www.gnu.org/licenses/fdl-1.3.txt.
Anonlineversionofthisdocumentationisavailableat:
http://gmic.eu/reference.shtml.
Motivations
G’MICisafull-featuredopen-sourceframeworkforimageprocessing,providingseveraldifferentuserinter-
faces toconvert/manipulate/filter/visualize generic image datasets, from 1d scalar signales to 3d+t sequences
of multi-spectral volumetric images. Technically speaking, what it does is:
• Define a lightweight but powerful script language (theG’MIC language) dedicated to the design of
image processing pipelines.
• Provide several user interfaces embedding the corresponding interpreter:
– A command-line executable ’gmic’, to use theG’MICframework from a shell. In this setting,
G’MICmaybeseenasadirect(andfriendly)competitoroftheImageMagickorGraphicsMagick
software suites.
– A plug-in ’gmic
gimp’, to bringG’MICcapabilities to the GIMP image retouching software.
– A web-service ’G’MIC Online’,to allow users applying image processing algorithms directly
in a web brower.
– A Qt-based interface ’ZArt’,for real-time manipulation of webcam images.
– A C++ library ’libgmic’, to be linked with third-party applications.
G’MICisfocusedonthedesignofpossiblycomplexpipelinesforconverting, manipulating,filteringand
visualizing generic 1d/2d/3d multi-spectral image datasets. This includes of course color images, but also
more complex data as image sequences or3d(+t) volumetric float-valued datasets.
G’MICisanopenframework:thedefaultlanguagecanbeextendedwithcustom G’MIC-writtencommands,
defining thus new available image filters or effects. By the way,G’MIC already contains a substantial set of
pre-defined image processing algorithms and pipelines (more than1000).
G’MIChasbeendesignedwithportabilityinmindandrunsondifferentplatforms(Windows,Unix,Ma-
cOSX). It is distributed under the CeCILL license (GPL-compatible). Since 2008, it is developed in the
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to Text Using VB. Integrate following RasterEdge text to PDF converter SDK dlls into your VB.NET project assemblies;
how to delete text from pdf with acrobat; how to delete text in a pdf file
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
Text: Search Text in PDF. C# Guide about How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information with .NET PDF Control.
how to delete text from pdf reader; pdf editor delete text
6
CONTENTS
Image Team of the GREYC laboratory, in Caen/France, by permanent researchers working in the field of
image processing on a daily basis.
Version
gmic: GREYC’s Magic for Image Computing.
Version1.7.2 (pre-release #051616), Copyright (c) 2008-2016,David Tschumperl´e
(http://gmic.eu)
Chapter 1
Usage
gmic[−command1 [arg1
1,arg1
2,..]] .. [−commandN[argN
1,argN
2,..]]
gmic’ is the open−source interpreter of theG’MIClanguage, ascript−based programming
languagededicated to thedesign of possibly complex imageprocessing pipelines.
Itcan beused to convert, manipulate, filter and visualizeimagedatasets madeof one
or several1d/2d or 3d multi−spectral images.
Thisreferencedocumentation describestherulesand technical aspects of theG’MIClanguage.
You may bealsointerested by our detailed tutorialpages, at:http://gmic.eu/tutorial/
1.1 Overall context
−Atany time,G’MICmanagesonelistof numbered (and optionallynamed) pixel−based
images, entirely stored in computermemory.
−Thefirstimageof thelisthasindice ’0’and is denoted by’[0]’. Thesecond imageof
thelist is denotedby ’[1]’, thethirdby ’[2]’ and so on.
−Negativeindicesare treated in aperiodicway:’[−1]’ refers to the lastimageof the
list, ’[−2]’ to thepenultimateone, etc. Thus, if thelisthas4 images, ’[1]’ and ’[−3]
both designatethesecond imageof thelist.
−A named image may beindicated by ’[name]’, if ’name’ uses thecharacter set[a−zA−Z0−9
]
and does notstartwith anumber. Imagenames can be setor reassigned atany moment
during theprocessing pipeline(seecommands ’−name’ and ’−input’ for this purpose).
G’MICdefines aset of variouscommands and substitution mechanismsto allow thedesign
of complex pipelines managing this list of images, in avery flexible way:
You can insertor removeimagesin thelist, rearrange imageindices, process images
(individually or grouped), merge imagedatatogether, displayand outputimagefiles, etc.
−Such apipeline can bewritten itself asacustomG’MICcommand storablein a user
command file, and can bere−used afterwards in another pipeline if necessary.
8
CHAPTER 1. USAGE
1.2 Image definition and terminology
−InG’MIC, each imageis modeled asa1d, 2d, 3d or 4d array of scalar values, uniformly
discretized on a rectangular/parallelepipedicdomain.
−Thefour dimensions of this array arerespectively denoted by:
.’width’, thenumber of image columns (size along the’x’−axis).
.’height’, the number of imagerows (size along the’y’−axis).
.’depth’, thenumber of imageslices(sizealong the’z’−axis).
Thedepth is equal to 1 for usualcolor or grayscale 2d images.
.’spectrum ’, thenumber of imagechannels (sizealong the’c’−axis).
Thespectrumis respectively equalto 3 and 4 for usual RGB and RGBAcolor images.
−There areno limitationson thesize of each image dimension. For instance, the number of
image slicesor channels can beof arbitrary size within the limits of availablememory.
−Thewidth,heightanddepth of an image areconsidered as spatialdimensions, whilethe
spectrumhasamulti−spectralmeaning.Thus,a4dimagein G’MICshouldbemostoften
regarded as a3d datasetof multi−spectralvoxels. Most of theG’MICcommandswill stick
with this idea(e.g. command ’−blur’ blurs images only along thespatial’xyz’−axes).
G’MICstores allthe image data as buffers of ’float’ values(32 bits,
valuerange[−3.4E38,+3.4E38]). It performs all its imageprocessing operations with
floating point numbers. Each imagepixel takes then 32bits/channel(exceptif double−
precision buffers have been enabledduring thecompilation of thesoftware, in which case
64bits/channelisthe default).
−Considering ’float’−valued pixels ensureto keep the numericalprecision when executing
image processing pipelines. For image input/outputoperations, you may wantto prescribe
theimagedatatype to bedifferentthan ’float’ (like ’bool’, ’char’,’int’, etc...).
This is possibleby specifying itasafile option when using I/O commands.
(see section ’Input/outputproperties’ to learn moreabout fileoptions).
1.3 Items of a processing pipeline
−InG’MIC, an imageprocessing pipelineis described as asequenceof items separated by
thespace character ’ ’. Such itemsare interpreted and executed fromthe left to the
right. For instance, theexpression:
filename.jpg −blur3,0 −sharpen 10 −resize 200%,200% −outputoutput.jpg
definesa valid pipeline composed of nineG’MICitems.
−EachG’MICitemisastring that is either acommand, a listof command arguments,
afilename, or aspecialinputstring.
−Escape characters’\ and doublequotes’’ can beused to define items containing
1.4. INPUT DATA ITEMS
9
spaces or other specialcharacters. For instance, thetwo strings
single\item ’ and ’”singleitem”’ definethesamesingleitem, with a spacein it.
1.4 Input data items
−If aspecifiedG’MICitemappears to bean existing filename, thecorresponding image
dataareloaded and inserted at theend of theimagelist (which is equivalentto the
useof ’−inputfilename’).
−Specialfilenames ’’ and ’−.ext’ stand for thestandard input/outputstreams, optionally
forced to be in aspecific ’ext fileformat(e.g. ’−.jpg’ or ’−.png’).
−Thefollowing specialinputstringsmay beused asG’MICitems to createand insert new
imageswith prescribed values, attheend of the imagelist:
.’[selection]’ or ’[selection]xN ’: Insert1 or N copies of already existing images.
selection’ may representoneor several images
(seesection ’Commanditemsandselections’ to learn moreabout selections).
.’width[%],
height[%],
depth[%],
spectrum[%],
values’:Insertanewimagewith
specified sizeand values (adding ’%’ to adimension means’percentageof thesize
along thesameaxis, taken fromthe lastimage ’[−1]’’). Any specified dimension
can bealso written as’[image]’, and isthen setto thesize(along thesameaxis)
of the existing specified image[image]. ’values’ can beeither asequence of numbers
separated by commas’,’, or amathematical expression, as e.g. in input item
256,256,1,3,if(c==0,x,if(c==1,y,0))’ which createsa 256x256 RGB color image with a
spatialshading on thered and green channels.
(seesection ’Mathematicalexpressions’ to learn moreaboutmathematicalexpressions).
.’(v1,v2,..)’:Inserta newimage from specified prescribed values.
Valueseparator insideparentheses can be’,’ (column separator), ’;’ (row separator),
/’ (sliceseparator) or ’ˆ’ (channelseparator). For instance, expression
(1,2,3;4,5,6;7,8,9)’ creates a3x3 matrix (scalar image), with values running from1 to 9.
.’0’:Insert anew’empty image,containing no pixel data. Empty imagesareused only
in rareoccasions.
−Inputitem’name=value’ declares anew localor global variable’name’, or assign anew
valueto an existing variable.Variablenames mustusethe character set[a−zA−Z0−9
]and
cannotstartwith anumber.
−A variable definition is alwayslocal to the currentcommand except when itstartsby the
underscorecharacter ’
’. In thatcase, itbecomes also accessible byany command invoked
outsidethe currentcommand scope(global variable).
−If avariablenamestartswith twounderscores ’
’, the global variableis also shared
among differentthreadsand can beread/set by commandsrunning in parallel (seecommand
−parallel’ for this purpose). Otherwise, it remainslocal to the thread thatdefined it.
−Numericalvariablescan beupdated with the use of thesespecialoperators:
+=’ (addition), ’−=’ (subtraction), ’∗=’ (multiplication), ’/= ’ (division), ’%=’ (modulo),
10
CHAPTER 1. USAGE
&=’ (bitwise and), ’|= ’ (bitwiseor), ’ˆ= ’ (power), ’<<=’ and ’>>=’ (bitwiseleft
and rightshifts). As in: ’foo=1foo+=3’.
1.5 Command items and selections
−AG’MICitemstarting by ahyphen ’’ designatesacommand, mostof the time. Generally,
commandsperform imageprocessing operations on oneor severalavailableimages of thelist.
−Reccurentcommandshavetwo equivalentnames (regular andshort). For instance, command
names ’−resize’ and ’−r’ refer to the sameimageresizing action.
−AG’MICcommand may have mandatory or optionalarguments. Command arguments mustbe
specified in thenextitem on thecommand line. Commas ’,’ areused to separatemultiple
arguments of asinglecommand, when required.
−Theexecution of aG’MICcommand may berestrictedonly to asubsetof the imagelist, by
appending ’[selection]’ to the command name. Examples of valid syntaxesfor ’selection’ are:
.’−command[−2]’: Apply command only on thepenultimateimage[−2]of thelist.
.’−command[0,1,3]’:Apply command only on images[0],[1] and[3].
.’−command[3−6]’: Apply command only on images[3] to[6] (i.e,[3],[4],[5] and[6]).
.’−command[50%−100%]’:Apply command only on thesecond half of the image list.
.’−command[0,−4−−1]’: Applycommand only on thefirstimageandthelast four images.
.’−command[0−9:3]’:Apply command only on images[0] to[9], with a step of 3
(i.e. on images[0],[3],[6] and[9]).
.’−command[0−−1:2]’:Apply command only on imagesof thelist with even indices.
.’−command[0,2−4,50%−−1]’: Apply command on images[0],[2],[3],[4] and on thesecond half
of theimagelist.
.’−command[ˆ0,1]’:Apply command on allimages except thetwo first.
.’−command[name1,name2]’: Apply command on named images’name1’ and ’name2’.
−Indicesin selections arealwayssorted in increasing order, and duplicateindices are
discarded. For instance, selections ’[3−1,1−3]’ and ’[1,1,1,3,2]’ are both equivalentto
[1−3]’. If you wantto repeata singlecommand multipletimes on an image, usea
−repeat..−done’ loop instead. Inverting theorder of images for acommand isachieved by
explicitly inverting the order of theimagesinthelist, with command ’−reverse[selection]’.
−Command selections ’[−1]’,’[−2]’ and ’[−3]’ areso often used thatthey have their own shortcuts,
respectively ’.’, ’..’ and’...’. For instance, command ’−blur..’ is equivalentto ’−blur[−2]’.
These shortcuts work onlyfor command selections, notfor command arguments.
G’MICcommands invoked without’[selection]’areapplied on allimages of the list, i.e. the
default selection is ’[0−−1]’ (exceptfor command ’−input’ whose default selection is’[−1]’).
−AG’MICcommand starting with adouble hyphen ’−−’ (instead of asingle hyphen ’’) does notact
’in−place’ but inserts its result as one or severalnew images atthe end of the image list.
−There aretwo differenttypesof commands thatcanbe run by theG’MICinterpreter:
.Nativecommands, arethehard−coded functionalitiesin theinterpreter core.
They arethus compiled as binary code and run fast, mostof the time.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested