pdf reader to byte array c# : How to add an image to a pdf file application software tool html winforms web page online OneNYC1-part1687

9
nyc.gov/onenyc
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Throughout our history, we have built a better New York City together
1821
Erie Canal  
opened
1886
First settlement 
house founded
1915
Catskill System, 
including the Ashokan 
Reservoir and Catskill 
Aqueduct, completed
1895
NY Public Library 
established
2014
One World 
Trade Center 
opened
1866
Metropolitan Board  
of Health,  
now DOHMH, created 
1625
New 
Amsterdam 
established 
1903
First IRT 
subway line 
constructed
1964
Verrazano-
Narrows Bridge 
opened
Introduction and Evolution
New York City is the place where people come to realize their dreams. It’s a city where 
people are determined to create a new and better life for themselves and their families. 
Sometimes gritty and in many ways grand, and always pulsing with a mix of symphonies, 
salsa, Broadway show tunes and street music, New York is both a global city—the 
preeminent center of commerce and culture—and one of small, vibrant neighborhoods.
Ten years from now, New York City will celebrate its 400
th
anniversary. OneNYC is 
the first step in creating a living and breathing plan for New York’s fifth century – a 
vision of our city as a place where New Yorkers of today and tomorrow have the 
opportunity to thrive and succeed. 
When PlaNYC was first released in 2007, the recession had not yet begun, nor had 
Sandy hit our shores. We are living in a different city today, and different times 
demand different approaches.
We now face multiple crises that threaten the very fabric of our city: climate change 
continues to threaten our future in a host of ways, while growing inequality gaps 
create other challenges. OneNYC lays out our approaches to dealing with income 
inequality along with our plans for managing climate change, all the while 
establishing the platform for yet another century of economic growth and vitality for 
this world capital.
How to add an image to a pdf file - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add photo to pdf file; add image to pdf acrobat reader
How to add an image to a pdf file - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
how to add image to pdf form; add image in pdf using java
10
Introduction and Evolution
nyc.gov/onenyc
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
These challenges reach beyond the five boroughs.
New York City is the engine of the region’s economy and its population center. It is 
at the center of the impact of climate change and the need for a responsible 
environmental policy. And inequality casts a shadow over the entire region, not just 
New York City itself. For all these reasons, we have the responsibility to fight for 
solutions to the challenges that we confront as a region.
OneNYC is the first step in bringing together government at every level, 
neighborhood organizations, and the private sector to tackle these crises.
OneNYC charts a course for a sustainable and resilient city for all its residents, and 
addresses the profound social, economic, and environmental issues that we face. 
Through OneNYC, we pledge to keep the promise of opportunity that has made our 
city such a remarkable place for so many generations.
OneNYC is what New Yorkers need now and for the next century. We recognize that 
we do not control all the levers and cannot alone eliminate poverty or greenhouse 
gas emissions. So we will engage the private sector, rally our people, and leverage 
our strength as a region, while committing the significant tools at our disposal, to 
meet our goals.
We cannot fix what is before us overnight. But we can lead the way. OneNYC is the 
first step.
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
how to add an image to a pdf in preview; add an image to a pdf with acrobat
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = true; // Add password to PDF file.
add jpg to pdf online; pdf insert image
11
Introduction and Evolution
nyc.gov/onenyc
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
The City of New York
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to PDF;
add a picture to a pdf document; acrobat insert image into pdf
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Scan image to PDF, tiff and various image formats. Get image information, such as its location, zonal information Able to edit, add, delete, move, and output PDF
add an image to a pdf in preview; how to add an image to a pdf in acrobat
INITIATIVES LAUNCHED IN 2014
Building on  
a Solid Foundation 
In its first year, the de Blasio administration 
presented a series of long-term goals and 
strategies, and launched comprehensive 
initiatives across City agencies. These 
initiatives have already begun to show 
results. OneNYC builds upon these 
initiatives as a launching point for the 
ambitious goals set forth in this plan.
I
Running Head Here
Vision Zero
Action Plan
City of New York 
Mayor Bill de Blasio
2014
Career Pathways
A plan to create a more compre-
hensive, integrated workforce 
development system and policy 
framework focused on skills 
building and job quality.
Vision Zero 
A plan that commits the City to 
using every tool at its disposal to 
improve the safety of our streets 
and to reduce traffic fatalities 
to zero.
1
One City, Rebuilding Tog g ethe r
ONE CITY, REBUILDING TOGETHER
Prepared by:
William Goldstein, Senior Advisor for Recovery, Resiliency and Infrastructure
Amy Peterson, Director of the Housing Recovery Office
Daniel A. Zarrilli, Director of the Mayor’s Office of Recovery and Resiliency
A Report on the City of New York’s Response to Hurricane Sandy and the Path Forward
APRIL 2014
One City, Rebuilding 
Together
A plan to overhaul the Build It Back 
program to accelerate the Sandy 
recovery process for homeowners 
and establish targets for reimburse-
ments and construction starts. Also 
established a first-ever Mayor’s 
Office of Recovery and Resiliency 
to lead the City’s climate adaptation 
and resiliency program.
1
One City
Built to Last
The City of New York
Mayor Bill de Blasio
Mayor’s Office of Long-Term Planning and Sustainability
Anthony Shorris, First Deputy Mayor
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Convert smooth lines to curves. Detect and merge image fragments. Flatten visible layers. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document. Add necessary references:
how to add image to pdf; adding image to pdf form
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively.
add photo pdf; adding images to a pdf document
INITIATIVES LAUNCHED IN 2015
The CEO Poverty Measure,  
2005 - 2013
An Annual Report from  
the Office of the Mayor
April 2015
IDNYC
A program that provides a free 
identification card to every city 
resident, including the most 
vulnerable populations who may 
have difficulty obtaining other gov-
ernment-issued ID, and provides 
access to services and programs 
offered by the City and other 
businesses.
The CEO Poverty 
Measure Report 
This year’s annual report by the 
Center for Economic Opportunity 
in the Office of the Mayor that 
measures poverty in New York 
City and is aligned with OneNYC’s 
focus on anti-poverty goals.  The 
CEO measure improves on the 
official methodology by consider-
ing the cost of living in New York 
City and the resources available 
to households after tax and social 
policy is taken into account. 
Ten-Year Capital Strategy
This strategy provides a blueprint 
for capital spending over the next 
decade. OneNYC and the Ten-Year 
Capital Strategy are aligned to 
ensure funding for OneNYC goals.
Ten-Year 
Capital 
Strategy
New York City and the  
100 Resilient Cities Initiative
100 Resilient Cities (100RC) is an innovative global 
network pioneered by the Rockefeller Foundation to help 
cities around the world become more resilient to the phys-
ical, social, and economic challenges that are a growing 
part of the 21
st
century. New York City was in the first 
wave to join the network in 2013, and through its partic-
ipation, demonstrates leadership in resiliency and takes 
advantage of the resources and opportunities it presents.
100RC supports the adoption and incorporation of a 
view of resilience that includes not just the shocks—
superstorms, blackouts, heat waves, and other acute 
events—but also the stresses that weaken the fabric of a 
city on a day-to-day or cyclical basis. Examples of these 
stresses include high unemployment; aging infrastruc-
ture; an overtaxed or inefficient public transportation 
system; endemic violence; and growing inequality. By 
addressing both the shocks and the stresses in a holistic 
manner, a city becomes more able to respond to adverse 
events, and is better able to deliver basic functions in 
both good times and bad, to all populations.
New York City has a history of innovating in the face 
of change. This plan adopts the approach of the 100RC 
initiative, recognizing the need to address acute shocks 
and chronic stresses in securing the city’s growth. 
Equity, sustainability, and resiliency are incorporated 
into OneNYC, including through the involvement of 
agencies across City government and extensive public 
engagement in creating the plan.
The City will continue to work with 100RC and its 
partners, to develop and test new systems, tools and 
methodologies for measuring and improving resiliency.
Learn more about 100RC at 100resilientcities.org.
New York City Community 
Schools Strategic Plan
Key system-building efforts that will 
be implemented over the next three 
years to achieve and surpass the 
City’s initial goal of establishing 100 
fully developed Community Schools 
to improve student achievement 
through strong partnerships among 
principals, parents, teachers and 
Community Based Organizations.
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
PDF SDK for .NET, VB.NET users are able to extract image from PDF page or file and specified DLLs for PDF Image Extraction in VB.NET. Add necessary references:
add png to pdf preview; add image to pdf acrobat
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
PDF document splitting, PDF page reordering and PDF page image and text Add necessary references: In addition, C# users can append a PDF file to the end of a
add picture to pdf document; acrobat add image to pdf
14
Introduction and Evolution
nyc.gov/onenyc
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
OneNYC: New Approaches
Previous PlaNYC reports have focused on the pressing issues of growth, 
sustainability, and resiliency. All of these goals remain at the core of OneNYC, 
but there are three significant differences in the approach taken with this plan.
A Focus on Inequality
With the poverty rate remaining high and income inequality continuing to grow, 
equity has come to the forefront as a guiding principle. In this plan, we envision 
a city that is growing, sustainable, resilient, and equitable—a place where 
everyone has a fair shot at success. The explicit addition of equity is critical, 
because a widening opportunity gap threatens the city’s future. These four 
pillars together will spur the innovation we will need for the next century. We 
know that a drive for a sustainable environment leads to innovations that create 
whole new businesses, while driving out poverty leads to healthier people, and 
safe neighborhoods spur businesses to grow. They all grow together.
A Regional Perspective
To make the changes we need, OneNYC recognizes that we need to reach out 
to our neighbors so that our whole region may thrive. The strength of the city 
is essential for the strength of the region, and strong communities around the 
city make it more competitive nationally and globally. 
Leading the Change We Need 
While New York City has a vast and complex government, even one of its 
scale cannot accomplish all that needs to be done on its own. While City 
government will take the lead in every single aspect of OneNYC, this plan also 
calls for action from other levels of the public and even private sector. That 
means calling for some actions that are not entirely within the control of the 
City government, but they are all steps that are credible and necessary. We 
will not stop pushing for the right thing for our people because some of it is 
out of our control.
OneNYC is a citywide effort. Nearly all City agencies came together in 
cross-cutting working groups that examined underlying trends and data in 
order to develop new initiatives. The working groups were tasked with 
envisioning how the physical city should be shaped to address a range of 
social, economic, and environmental challenges on the municipal and 
regional scale. This exercise required deeper consideration of the 
relationship between physical and human capital, and acknowledgment that 
the built environment has manifest implications for not just economic 
growth and development, but public health and the delivery of essential 
services. This process helped break down agency “silos” and resulted in an 
ambitious set of visions, realized through supporting goals and initiatives, 
which crossed the traditional boundaries of City agencies and their focus 
areas of activity.
Resiliency
Sustainability
Growth
Four principles informed 
OneNYC goals and initiatives:
Population growth, real estate 
development, job creation, and the 
strength of industry sectors
Improving the lives of our residents and 
future generations by cutting 
greenhouse gas emissions, reducing 
waste, protecting air and water quality 
and conditions, cleaning brownfields, 
and enhancing public open spaces
The capacity of the city to withstand 
disruptive events, whether physical, 
economic, or social
Equity
Fairness and equal access to assets, 
services, resources, and opportunities 
so that all New Yorkers can reach their 
full potential
15
Introduction and Evolution
nyc.gov/onenyc
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Vision 1  
New York City will continue to be the world’s most dynamic urban economy, 
where families, businesses, and neighborhoods thrive
Thriving 
Neighborhoods
Housing
Industry 
Expansion 
Cultivation
Broadband
Transportation
Workforce 
Development
Infrastructure  
Planning
Culture
Early  
Childhood
Integrated 
Government &  
Social Services
Healthy 
Neighborhoods, 
Active Living
Healthcare  
Access
Criminal Justice 
Reform
Vision 
Zero
Vision 2 
New York City will have an inclusive, equitable economy that offers well-paying 
jobs and opportunity for all New Yorkers to live with dignity and security
80 x 50
Zero Waste
Air Quality
Brownfields
Water 
Management
Parks & Natural 
Resources
Vision 3  
New York City will be the most sustainable big city in the world and a global 
leader in the fight against climate change
Neighborhoods
Buildings
Infrastructure
Coastal 
Defense
Vision 4 
Our neighborhoods, economy, and public services will be ready to withstand and 
emerge stronger from the impacts of climate change and other 21
st
century threats
CROTONA
PARK
EAST RIVER
5
2
S
H
E
R
I
D
A
N
E
XPY
BRUCKNER EXPY
S
O
U
T
H
E
R
N
B
L
V
D
180TH ST
CROTONA 
PARK EAST
LONGWOOD
WEST
FARMS
Neighborhood Spotlight 
Bronx River Corridor
We’re taking the neighborhoods along the Bronx 
River Corridor —including the West Farms, Crotona 
Park East, Longwood, Soundview, and Hunts Point 
neighborhoods—to illustrate how OneNYC will guide 
future growth, sustainability, and resiliency.
These Bronx neighborhoods —vibrant, diverse, and 
ever-changing like the city as a whole—represent the 
opportunities and challenges that drive this plan in a 
number of ways.
Each vision includes a “Neighborhood Spotlight” 
section that shows how this plan will impact the 
Bronx River Corridor. 
“Our community has long been 
known as the ‘Toxic Triangle’ 
between the Sheridan, Bruckner 
and Cross Bronx Expressways. 
We see a direct correlation be-
tween health issues and access 
to open space and we’re trying 
to bring recreation opportuni-
ties to the area.”
—Dave S. 
Youth Ministries for  
Peace and Justice
“I’ve lived in the Bronx since 
1979 and worked at Hunts 
Point Market since 1988. Since 
then, the community has 
changed dramatically. Every-
one feels safer. I think things 
are improving.”
—Rene C. 
Employee at Mosner Family Brands,  
Hunts Point Cooperative Market
“We need to think about how 
we’re addressing high asthma 
rates in this area. We are seeing 
lots of new residential develop-
ment in the neighborhood. When 
these new units come in, they 
often include parks and trees. 
This transition is helping to im-
prove this neighborhood.” 
—Donston E. 
Walsingham Construction
SOUNDVIEW
PARK
BRONX
PARK
BRONX RIVER
6
CROSS-BRONX EXPY
RUCKNER EXPY
B
R
O
N
X
R
I
V
E
R
P
K
W
Y
TREMONT AVE
HUNTS
POINT
SOUNDVIEW
PARKCHESTER
BRONX
RIVER
HOUSES
Asthma Emergency Department Visits 
(Youths and Adults) by Neighborhoods, 
2013
Residents experience the health effects of urban 
environmental conditions. Asthma hospitaliza-
tion and ED visit rates are higher in the Bronx 
when compared to the citywide average rate. 
Percent of Households Below 
Poverty Level, 2012
Unemployment and a high poverty 
rate of 37% of households 
demonstrate the challenges residents 
have finding well-paying jobs. 
Bronx River 
Corridor
The Bronx
New York 
City
37%
29%
19%
Public Transit Usage and  
Commute Times, 2012
While most Corridor residents (66%) use 
public transit to commute to work, 57% 
of them had a commute of 40 minutes or 
longer to work. 
Bronx River 
Corridor
The Bronx
New York 
City
66%
58%
56%
57%
54%
46%
Percentage of Residents Who  
Eat 5 or More Servings of Fruit/ 
Vegetables Daily, 2013
This area lacks access to fresh and healthy 
food, with bodegas accounting for 77% 
of all retail food stores; only 4% of food 
establishments specialize in fresh produce.
18
Introduction and Evolution
nyc.gov/onenyc
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
How New Yorkers Shaped OneNYC
To find out New Yorkers’ priorities and to tap their most creative ideas, we used a 
variety of methods—from roundtable discussions to an online survey—during the 
months leading up to the launch of OneNYC. Our residents, and the communities 
they comprise, represent tremendous diversity of knowledge, culture, interests, 
skills, and economic resources. Approximately 3 million New Yorkers—37 percent of 
the City’s total population—were born outside the U.S., and 49 percent of all 
residents speak a language other than English at home. Some residents are intensely 
involved in their local community, while others are loosely attached to their 
neighborhood but still dependent on critical services.
Resident Outreach
We met face-to-face with over 1,300 New York City residents, advocacy groups and 
elected officials in one-on-one meetings, roundtable discussions, and town hall-style 
forums. We talked about issues regarding senior citizens, schools, housing, the 
environment, parks, and transportation.
Business Roundtable
Many of the city’s largest and most innovative employers met with us to tell us what 
they needed to succeed, to retain workers, to hire new ones, and to grow. We heard 
from them about their real estate needs, transportation for their workforce, broadband 
infrastructure, childcare services, as well as the importance of our cultural community.
More than 
7,500 
New Yorkers took the online public survey
800
New Yorkers participated in the telephone survey
1,300+
residents attended more than 
40
community 
meetings in every borough
177
civic organizations and over 
50
elected officials’  
offices met about OneNYC
15
leaders from neighboring cities and counties met at City Hall 
to discuss the plan
Led by the Office of Sustainability, over 
125
representatives  
from over 
70
City agencies developed OneNYC
NYCHA residents attend a 
Town Hall meeting at Johnson 
Community Center, East Harlem.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested