pdf reader to byte array c# : Add image to pdf online application software utility html windows web page visual studio OneNYC14-part1692

139
Healthy Neighborhoods, Active Living
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 2
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Housing asthma triggers by income
Data obtained from NYC Department of Health 
and Mental Hygiene, Environment and Health 
Data Portal, March 23, 2015
http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/
environmental/tracking.shtml
*Neighborhoods are ranked according to the 
percent of people whose annual income falls 
below twice the federal poverty level. Rankings 
are then divided into 3 approximately equal 
groupings of low, medium and high poverty. 
Then the median value of the selected indicator 
is displayed for each poverty grouping. The 
median is the exact mid-point of the individual 
environment or health indicator values for each 
neighborhood within a grouping.
0
100
200
300
50
150
250
350
0
10
20
30
5
15
25
35
40
400
PERCENTAGE
RATE (PER 10,000 RESIDENTS)
NE I G H BO R HO O D  P O V E RT Y
12.1
12.4
6.8
5.8
3.0
22.2
34.7
35
.6
23.6
11.4
6.9
16.6
11.8
9.5
3.2
107.2
176.6
372.8
Low Poverty
Medium Poverty
High Poverty
Homes with cockroaches (%)
Homes with mice or rats in  
building (%)
Homes with 3 or more 
maintenance deficiencies (%)
Adults reporting mold in the 
home (%)
Adults reporting second-hand 
smoke in the home (%)
Asthma emergency department 
visits among children 5-17 years 
(rate per 10,000)
housing interventions have been shown to be effective in reducing allergens, 
resulting in fewer symptom days, missed school days, and emergency room visits. 
Secondhand smoke is also a powerful asthma trigger, with exposure occurring when 
there is a smoker in the household or smoke travels from one apartment to another. 
New York City will fund a roof replacement program in NYCHA developments 
which will address the root causes of mold. The City will also implement a joint 
HPD-DOHMH enforcement initiative focused on housing with egregious pest 
infestation. Efforts will target neighborhoods at highest risk for asthma, with 
building owners required to implement safe pest-control measures using integrated 
pest management (IPM). 
Additionally, we will explore creating strong incentives for building owners receiving 
City financing for new construction or substantial rehabilitation to use IPM, a 
comprehensive and prevention-based approach to pest control, smoke-free policies, 
safer building materials/products, and moisture/mold control. Each year, the City 
receives applications from affordable housing owners and developers for the 
financing of new construction or the financing of substantial and moderate 
rehabilitation of existing housing, impacting an estimated 16,000 housing units per 
year. These “financing moments” provide important opportunities to promote the use 
Add image to pdf online - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add jpg signature to pdf; add image to pdf preview
Add image to pdf online - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add image pdf; adding images to a pdf document
140
Healthy Neighborhoods, Active Living
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 2
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
of healthy building practices that reduce asthma triggers in the home. By integrating 
simple, often low-  cost healthy housing measures into building design and 
construction, renovation, and ongoing operations and maintenance, our buildings will 
be healthier places to live. 
B. Decrease secondhand smoke exposure in the home
There is no safe level of exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS). Non-smokers exposed 
to secondhand smoke in the home have higher risks of asthma attacks, heart disease, 
lung cancer, and chronic respiratory disease. Children and the elderly are particularly 
affected by SHS exposure in the home because they are more vulnerable to its health 
effects, and because they typically spend more time at home. Secondhand smoke 
complaints are common, with 40 percent of adult New Yorkers reporting smelling 
cigarette smoke in their home that comes from another home or apartment or from 
the outside. We are already making strides to dramatically reduce SHS. An 
overwhelming majority of non-smokers (81 percent) and most smokers (53 percent) 
in New York City do not allow smoking in their homes. And 69 percent of New York 
City adults support smoke-free housing. To address secondhand smoke, a primary 
driver of unhealthy indoor air quality, the City will work to pass legislation requiring 
multi-unit housing to have a smoking policy and to disclose it to residents and 
prospective residents. To complement this, we will explore opportunities for the 
adoption of other smoke-free housing policies in New York City.
Together, these strategies will work to reduce asthma triggers in the home, which will 
decrease the percentage of homes with housing conditions associated with asthma. 
C. Reduce housing-related fall hazards for older adults 
Falls are the leading cause of injury-related hospitalizations and deaths among 
older adults in New York City, causing an average of 17,000 hospitalizations and 
nearly 300 deaths each year. Fall-related hospitalization charges total more than 
$750 million. There are currently more than one million older adults (age 65 or 
older) in the city, and the older adult population is expected to grow by 41 percent 
to 1.41 million by 2040, which could dramatically increase the burden of falls and 
their associated costs. 
Most falls among older adults occur at home. Finding and fixing fall hazards in 
the home is effective in lowering both the risk of falls and the rate of falls among 
older adults. By 2030, all City contracts for providing home-based services for 
older adults will require an assessment for fall hazards, as per the DOHMH 
recommendation. In addition, for new construction, the City will promote the 
adoption of universal design elements such as grab bars, hand rails, slip-resistant 
floors, and lighting that reduces the risks of falls. Similarly, for existing buildings, 
the City will provide incentives for in-place retrofits for these measures aimed at 
promoting safe home environments and preventing falls among older adults. 
By reducing housing-related fall hazards for older adults, we will reduce the 
number of falls in the home, keeping our aging population healthy and safe.
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
to edit, add, delete, move, and output PDF document image. Extract image from PDF free in .NET framework application with trial SDK components and online C#
how to add an image to a pdf in reader; adding jpg to pdf
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Online source codes for quick evaluation in VB.NET class. DLLs for PDF Image Extraction in VB.NET. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
adding an image to a pdf in preview; add image to pdf java
141
Healthy Neighborhoods, Active Living
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 2
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Age Friendly NYC
Soon, older adults in New York City will outnumber school-aged children. To prepare for this 
demographic shift, the Office of the Mayor, the New York City Council, and the New York 
Academy of Medicine have partnered to create Age Friendly NYC. Age Friendly NYC is dedi-
cated to ensuring our older population is healthy, active, and engaged. Initiatives that support 
the efforts of Age Friendly NYC include:
Increased mobility through accessible transportation: As further detailed in Vision 1,  
the City aims to expand use of yellow and green taxis—including the growing number of 
wheelchair accessible yellows and greens—to provide faster and more convenient paratransit 
services to New Yorkers with disabilities. Additionally, DOT is planning to install attractive 
and durable  benches around the city, particularly in areas with high concentrations of se-
niors, to make streets more comfortable for transit riders and pedestrians.
Convenient healthy and nutritious food: 
The City will explore improved meal- and 
grocery-delivery programs that will improve access to seniors and people with dis-
abilities whose limited mobility and fixed incomes make it challenging to purchase 
nutritious food.
Age
Friendly
NYC
Enhancing Our City’s
Livability for Older
New Yorkers
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
how to add image to pdf file; how to add an image to a pdf file in acrobat
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to PDF;
how to add jpg to pdf file; add picture to pdf online
142
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 2
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Healthcare Access
Goal: All New Yorkers will have access to the 
physical and mental healthcare services that 
they need
Overview
In 2013, nearly one million New York City residents felt they did not receive the 
medical care they needed in the past year, with residents of the poorest 
neighborhoods reporting they were receiving the least care. Residents of these 
low-income neighborhoods also bear a greater burden of specific diseases, such as 
heart disease, diabetes, and infant deaths, when compared to other neighborhoods. 
For example, more than a third of residents of very high-poverty neighborhoods 
have been diagnosed with high blood pressure; by contrast, less than a quarter of 
residents of low-poverty neighborhoods were diagnosed with high blood pressure.
Mental health and substance abuse issues affect many New Yorkers. Fifteen percent 
of all New Yorkers report having been diagnosed with depression. However, the 
highest prevalence is in high-poverty neighborhoods. In the poorest New York City 
neighborhoods, seven percent of residents experience serious psychological distress 
(SPD), compared to three percent in the wealthiest neighborhoods.
To reduce disparities in health outcomes, the City will work to develop a healthcare 
delivery system that emphasizes an integrated and patient-centered approach to 
care that is delivered in convenient and accessible locations.
INDICATORS + TARGETS
Increase the percentage 
of adult New Yorkers who 
feel they have received the 
medical care they needed in 
the past 12 months
Increase the percentage of 
adult New Yorkers with  
serious psychological 
distress who have received 
counseling or taken a pre-
scription medication for a 
mental health problem
Medical care is percentage of adult 
New Yorkers that feel they received 
the medical care that they have 
needed in the past 12 months
Mental health is percentage of adult 
New Yorkers with serious 
psychological distress that have 
taken a prescription medication for 
a mental health problem
80
60
40
20
100
Lowest poverty  
(wealthiest)
Medium poverty  
High poverty
Very high poverty 
(poorest)
Mental and physical healthcare access
Percentage of NYC residents that received the care that they need  
by neighborhood poverty, 2013
62%
59%
55%
47%
87%
87%
89%
93%
Medical care
Mental health counseling or treatment
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to PDF;
how to add an image to a pdf in preview; add a picture to a pdf
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
in C#.NET framework. Support to add password to PDF document online or in C#.NET WinForms for PDF file protection. Able to create a
pdf insert image; adding images to pdf forms
143
Health Care Access
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 2
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Initiative 1
Ensure all New York City neighborhoods have access to 
high-quality essential healthcare services
Over the past decade, far too many New York City communities have lost critical 
healthcare services due to the closure of hospitals essential to their wellbeing. 
Changes in the science of healthcare delivery and healthcare reimbursement are 
realities we have to face. But New York City cannot allow neighborhoods to lack 
critical medical services. And we certainly cannot allow the closure of major 
hospital facilities that would leave communities without essential healthcare. 
For these reasons, Mayor de Blasio called for the creation of several new models in 
healthcare, including the Brooklyn Health Authority, to ensure that no community is 
left without essential care services. The Authority’s role was envisioned as ensuring 
adequate funding, leading integrated planning, and promoting the new types of 
coordinated healthcare service delivery models that protect families and workers 
given the shifting healthcare landscape. 
There have been major developments since the Mayor’s initial proposal for the 
Authority several years ago. Thanks to the support of the federal government, 
Governor Cuomo, and Mayor de Blasio, the $8 billion Medicaid waiver was 
approved by the Obama Administration in April 2014. $6.4 billion of this waiver is 
explicitly designed to help hospitals across the state restructure their care delivery 
models to reflect the most current science and reimbursement structures. New York 
City’s hospitals now have the opportunity and resources to make planned, orderly 
reforms rather than resorting to the sudden closures that marked the previous 
decade, while improving the quality and experience of care across the city.
The implementation of these changes has already significantly altered the healthcare 
landscape in New York. New hospital networks called Performing Provider Systems 
(PPSs) have developed across the city and pair some of the city’s most financially 
stressed institutions with those that are more stable. If used properly by the networks, 
Medicaid waiver funds can prevent major hospital closures and ensure that every 
community in New York City has access to essential healthcare.
The City must remain vigilant however to ensure these one-time funds are used 
appropriately and effectively. The City remains steadfast in its commitment that 
every community has access to the care it needs. We will fight for critical 
healthcare services across the City and not accept the closure of any more 
hospitals in Brooklyn or any other communities which would be left without the 
medical care we need. This commitment includes investments made by the   
New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC) (see Initiative 2) and the 
City’s own initiative to create more than 16 community-based primary care centers 
in under-served areas (see Initiative 3). These actions, as well as direct 
engagement with the major private health systems in New York City and 
De Blasio protests the  
layoffs of 500 LICH nurses  
and healthcare workers
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Best online HTML5 PDF Viewer PDF Viewer library as well An advanced PDF annotating tool, which is compatible with all Users can add sticky note to PDF document.
add image pdf document; add a picture to a pdf document
DocImage SDK for .NET: Web Document Image Viewer Online Demo
files are Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF, Tiff, Dicom is a JavaScript based document and image viewing control on the client side without additional add-ins and
add jpg to pdf online; add jpeg signature to pdf
144
Health Care Access
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 2
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
continued review and development of new structural mechanisms, such as the 
local Brooklyn Health Authority or other options, will ensure that our city has a 
strong healthcare delivery system.
Initiative 2
Transform NYC Health and Hospitals Corporation into a 
system anchored by community-based preventive care
New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC), the nation’s largest public 
healthcare system, serves 1.4 million people every year, approximately one out of six 
New Yorkers.  HHC’s role as the city’s largest safety net provider is critical to 
ensuring all New Yorkers have access to healthcare regardless of their ability or pay 
or documentation status. Close to half a million of HHC’s patients are uninsured 
and/or undocumented. 
NYC Health and Hospitals
Corporation (HHC) coverage
Acute Care Hospital
Community Health Center
Diagnostic Treatment Center
Long Term Care/Nursing Home
Mobile Medical Unit
School Based clinic
HHC
145
Health Care Access
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 2
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
In addition to its role in providing care for vulnerable New Yorkers, HHC is well 
positioned to lead transformation of the healthcare delivery system in the City because 
it offers a comprehensive array of healthcare services. Through its seven regional 
healthcare networks, HHC operates 11 acute care hospitals, four long-term care 
facilities, six diagnostic and treatment centers, a certified home health program, and 
more than 60 community-based health clinics throughout the five boroughs. In 
addition, MetroPlus, HHC’s wholly-owned health insurance company, takes care of 
more than 469,000 New Yorkers annually. HHC also provides emergency and 
inpatient services to New York City’s inmate population at City correctional facilities, 
and HHC conducts mental health evaluations. 
Given the recent shifts in the City’s healthcare landscape, HHC, like the other large 
hospital systems, is transforming from a healthcare system focused on delivering 
inpatient services to those who are already sick to a model of care that keeps people 
healthy throughout their entire lives.  This transformation requires HHC to invest in 
new models of care coupled with a new infrastructure.  
Supporting Initiatives
A. Create health access points embedded in communities rather than hospital 
campuses
In 2015, HHC is rolling out a primary care expansion aimed at providing care to 
100,000 additional patients in under-served neighborhoods across the five boroughs 
though a combination of expanded service offerings at existing and new HHC 
Gotham Health community clinic locations, including a newly constructed clinic on 
Staten Island. In addition, as one of only two PPSs that serve all five boroughs, HHC’s 
Medicaid waiver projects that increase community-based primary care and 
behavioral healthcare will have a significant impact throughout the city. Finally, when 
patients seek primary care in hospital emergency rooms, HHC is connecting patients 
without primary care providers to settings ensuring continuity of care.
B. Ensure critical hospital services are fully functioning in the face of increased 
demand, weather disasters, and aging infrastructure
The Elmhurst emergency room, where patient volume is expected to increase by 20 
percent given hospital closings in the catchment area, is in design phase for its 
planned renovation and expansion. Significant infrastructure projects underway at 
Coney Island, Bellevue, Metropolitan and Coler Goldwater hospitals are designed 
to ensure these facilities can continue operating during future weather disasters 
(see Vision 4 for more detail).  Finally, ongoing infrastructure upgrades at HHC 
facilities are essential to meet new regulatory requirements and safety initiatives.
C. Adequately provide healthcare services to New York City’s growing senior 
population
A key part of transforming HHC’s system is tailoring care to the needs of different 
146
Health Care Access
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 2
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
populations to ensure their care is the most appropriate and effective.  In 
particular, recognizing New York City’s growing senior population, HHC is 
including age-appropriate designs in its infrastructure projects.  This translates 
into exam rooms, diagnostic treatment areas and bathrooms meeting wheelchair 
and walker space requirements, and soundproofing of rooms to improve 
communication between patient and provider for patients with hearing 
impairments.  HHC also plans to transform the Seaview Campus on Staten Island, 
which currently offers services for seniors, it into a vibrant healthcare destination 
site which will meet the ongoing needs of the surrounding community.
By strengthening HHC’s infrastructure and adapting to the changes in the 
healthcare environment, HHC will continue to be a leader improving the health 
of all New Yorkers. 
Initiative 3
Expand access to primary care by establishing health 
clinics in high-need communities
Healthcare is an essential component of creating and maintaining healthy 
communities, and primary care is a key part of this equation. High-quality primary 
care provides a “medical home” for individuals and ensures they get the right care, 
in the right setting, by the most appropriate practitioner, and in a manner consistent 
with their desires and values. A close partnership between providers and patients 
helps patients navigate an increasingly complex healthcare system and strive toward 
better health outcomes.
In New York City, there are 26 neighborhoods federally designated as primary-care 
shortage areas. Even this measure undercounts the real need, as neighborhoods 
must apply for this federal designation.
To address inequalities in access to primary care the City will help create at least 16 
health clinics by the end of 2017 in neighborhoods identified by the Community 
Healthcare Association of New York State as being in need of additional primary-
care services. Some of these clinics will be based in New York City Department of 
Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) Neighborhood Health Hubs (detailed 
further in goal on Integrated Government & Social Services), collaborating with 
other local organizations to improve health in their communities. Additionally, New 
York City HHC’s Gotham health network and other federally qualified health 
centers will expand to new locations to address the need for primary care.
147
Health Care Access
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 2
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Initiative 4
Expand access points for mental health and substance 
abuse care, including integrating primary care and 
behavioral health services 
Mental health concerns are widespread in New York City. Fifteen percent of New 
Yorkers reported having been diagnosed with depression, and 12 percent of the city’s 
adult population reported receiving some form of counseling or taking prescription 
medication for a mental health problem in the past year. In 2013, five percent of the 
New York City adult population experienced serious psychological distress (SPD), 
which is characterized by a range of symptoms commonly present in individuals 
with mental illness but are not specific to any particular disorder. Mental health 
issues are not distributed evenly across the City. New Yorkers with serious mental 
illness are overwhelmingly of low- and moderate-income, with 39 percent living 
below the federal poverty line. Mental health concerns are also much more 
prevalent among those with physical health issues. 
There is significant unmet need for mental health treatment in the city. Twenty-
three percent of New York City adults experiencing SPD reported they did not get 
all the mental health treatment they needed in the past year, as did 41 percent of 
New Yorkers with serious mental illness. Barriers to receiving necessary mental 
health treatment include language difficulties, stigma, difficulty with navigating the 
mental health system, and cost. Immigrant populations may be more likely to 
experience stigma around mental, emotional, and behavioral (MEB) health and may 
be less familiar with their communities’ health resources. Additionally, the 
behavioral healthcare system is fragmented and poorly integrated with the primary 
care system. 
NYC HHC intends to improve the overall health of New Yorkers with mental health 
and substance-abuse diagnoses by scaling two best practice approaches: first, 
co-located and integrated substance-abuse and mental health specialty services, and 
second, integrated behavioral healthcare in primary care through the integrated 
Collaborative Care model—a collaborative team of a primary-care providers, care 
management staff (e.g., nurses), and psychiatric consultants. Each of the models 
requires providers to build deep relationships with community-based organizations, 
social-services agencies, and government agencies able to identify patients in need, 
engage them, and assist in supporting their treatment. 
Unmet need for 
mental health 
treatment in  
New York City
23 percent of NYC adults 
experiencing serious  
psychological distress 
reported not getting the 
medical treatment that  
they needed in the past year
41 percent of New Yorkers 
with serious mental illness 
reported not getting the med-
ical treatment they needed 
56 percent of New Yorkers 
with SPD reported not  
getting any outpatient men-
tal health treatment at all
148
Health Care Access
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 2
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Initiative 5
Work with New York State in enabling and supporting 
the transformation of the healthcare delivery system
The aforementioned initiatives are cornerstones of our vision of all New Yorkers 
living fully realized lives. But New York City can’t do it alone. As the primary 
regulatory entity, the State plays a critical role in shaping who can deliver 
healthcare, how and where those services are provided, and how services are paid 
for within New York City. The City stands ready to partner with the State to 
implement changes to the healthcare system that will ensure high-quality, 
coordinated care for all New Yorkers.
Supporting Initiatives
A. Integrate patient data across healthcare systems
Since 2009, thousands of healthcare providers have adopted and are using 
electronic health records. However, few are connected to systems that enable 
sharing of medical and behavioral health information between care settings or 
with supportive services organizations. According to the New York eHealth 
Collaborative (NYeC), only two percent of clinical practice sites are connected in 
New York City and 14 percent across New York State. Furthermore, based on 
DOHMH’s health information connectivity data, only about five percent of 7,000 
primary-care providers listed in its database are connected to a health-
information exchange.
The lack of information-sharing is associated with duplicative testing, delays in 
care, and incomplete information—all issues that have resulted in poorer health 
outcomes and higher costs to the City and State. A recent study found that up to 
32 percent of patient records reviewed had duplicative testing documented. This 
fragmentation of healthcare and supportive services affects New Yorkers across 
all five boroughs and is especially problematic for people with low health literacy, 
limited English-language proficiency, limited mobility, mental or behavioral 
health conditions, previous incarceration, or other factors that can make 
accessing care more difficult. 
A call-to-action is needed to accelerate federal and state programs to integrate 
patient information of New Yorkers across healthcare delivery and supportive 
systems, as well as across jurisdictional lines. The City stands ready to partner 
with the State to implement changes to the healthcare system so all New Yorkers 
can receive high-quality, coordinated care.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested