pdf reader to byte array c# : Add picture to pdf preview SDK control project winforms web page wpf UWP OneNYC17-part1695

169
80 x 50
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 3
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Transmission
C. Increase the share of wind power in the City’s power mix 
Wind power is a well-established renewable power technology 
but it only represents a small fraction of the City’s mix. The 
City will work to increase the amount of wind power supplied 
from the region. It will also work closely with key stakeholders 
to enhance the viability of large-scale wind projects by 
increasing demand, lowering costs to meet market electricity 
prices, and advocating for financial assistance. Key efforts 
include developing a regional commitment to a pipeline of 
projects to develop economies of scale and attract more 
interest from developers; ensuring wind power will be sold 
under long-term contracts, and working with regulators to 
change market entry rules to reduce risks and financing costs; 
identifying port facilities and other locations for assembly and 
construction staging sites; assessing the availability of 
interconnection points; and adopting local zoning or other 
means to streamline and support these projects.
NEW YORK STATE PUBLIC SERVICE  
COMMISSION REFORMING THE ENERGY  
VISION PROCESS
Over the past two decades, the technology used to produce 
and provide electricity to customers has changed signifigant-
ly.  We are at the beginning of a new era with more power 
options for customers than ever before. The New York State 
Public Service Commission is at the forefront of develop-
ing the regulatory paradigm for the future of the electric 
power industry through the Reforming the Energy Vision 
(REV) initiative. REV aims to reorient both the electric 
power industry and the utility ratemaking paradigm toward 
a consumer-centered approach that harnesses technology 
and markets. The process promotes efficient use of energy; 
deeper market penetration of renewable energy resources; 
wider deployment of distributed energy resources such as 
micro-grids, on-site power supplies, and storage; and the use 
of advanced energy management products. We are actively 
participating in REV through filings and committees. 
Electricity Delivery System
Utility Scale 
Renewables
Hospital
School
Transmission
Conventional Power 
Generation
Natural Gas
Nuclear
Fuel Oil
Underground and
Overhead
Wind Power
Apartment House
Commercial
Residential and Light 
Commercial Customers
Consumers
Area
Substation
Distribution 
Network
CHP
CHP
CHP
Solar  
Panel
Solar  
Panel
Solar  
Panel
Financial
The bulk of New York City’s power comes from 
large conventional power plants running on 
natural gas, nuclear power, or fuel oil. However 
to achieve 80 x 50 the City will need to increase 
its reliance on utility scale renewable power 
sources.
Power produced in large, centralized plants is 
transmitted through high voltage transmission 
lines. To ensure smooth integration of a grow-
ing share of renewable energy, the transmis-
sion system must be maintained and enhanced. 
Substations convert electricity to lower voltage 
before distribution to consumers. 
Distributed generation, such as from com-
bined heat and power (CHP) or solar installa-
tions, also plays an important role in reducing 
GHG emissions. These are located closer to 
customers thereby reducing transmission and 
distribution losses.
Finally, by increasing the use of smart grid 
technologies, such as automated demand 
response and smart meters, consumers can 
reduce both peak and total demand.
Add picture to pdf preview - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add image to pdf preview; how to add an image to a pdf file in acrobat
Add picture to pdf preview - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
adding image to pdf in preview; acrobat add image to pdf
170
80 x 50
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 3
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
D. Adopt smart grid technologies and reduce transmission bottlenecks
Bottlenecks in the transmission system from energy generated in western and northern 
New York to the east and south to the lower Hudson Valley and New York City restrict 
the ability of the city to rely on renewable energy generated in other parts of the state. 
The City will work with its neighbors and State agencies to develop solutions to 
transmission bottlenecks through transmission modernization, new facilities, and smart 
transmission technology. 
Smart grid technologies can also enable greater integration of distributed generation 
technologies and allows consumers to better manage consumption, helping to reduce 
both peak and total energy loads. The City supports the development of a comprehensive 
strategy to deploy smart grid technologies. This is consistent with the New York State 
Public Service Commission’s efforts to develop a new vision for the region’s power grid. 
E. Expand decentralized power production 
Decentralized and district-scale clean energy also have a role to play in meeting our 80 x 
50 goal. On-site power generation across a network of decentralized systems, such as CHP 
systems and community-shared solar photovoltaic (PV) systems can reduce losses 
associated with transmission and distribution, increase efficiency, and enable a more 
resilient power system. Through One City: Built to Last, the City committed to supporting 
community-shared solar PV projects. These installations would use net-metering to bring 
solar power to new neighborhoods and allow homes and businesses to feed unused 
energy back into the grid.
Additionally, the City will leverage direct capital investment, power purchase agreements, 
and emergent solar deployment models to attain the most cost-effective and comprehensive 
clean energy strategy. As the market develops and available incentives for solar and clean 
energy shift, the City will adjust its approach to assess and pursue the most desirable 
pathways to increasing cost-effective low carbon energy throughout its operations.
F. Achieve net-zero energy at in-city wastewater treatment plants by 2050
Emissions from the water and wastewater system are responsible for nearly 20 percent of 
City government emissions and wastewater treatment accounts for 90 percent of that. 
The City will work to dramatically reduce these emissions with an aim of net-zero energy 
consumption at in-city wastewater treatment plants by 2050. Improving the efficiency of 
wastewater treatment, increasing the production of biogas, and capturing and beneficially 
using all biogas as a renewable energy source will significantly reduce carbon emissions 
associated with flaring, as well as offset emissions from energy generated from traditional 
fossil-fuel sources. Over the next decade, the City will achieve further reductions in energy 
consumption across all of the wastewater treatment plants by decreasing demand, 
increasing on-site power generation, recovering and reusing biogas, and undertaking 
co-digestion of organic wastes.
DECENTRALIZED  
ENERGY IN LONDON 
Decentralized Energy (DE) 
is a core component of the 
London’s Climate Change Mit-
igation and Energy Strategy to 
reduce carbon emissions. Like 
New York City, London is com-
mitted to reducing emissions 
by 80 percent by 2050. London 
defines decentralized energy as 
the local generation of electric-
ity and the recovery of surplus 
heat for such purposes as build-
ing space heating and domestic 
hot water production. 
London’s goal is to use DE to 
develop a more sustainable, 
secure, and cost-effective 
energy supply, with a target of 
delivering a quarter of London’s 
energy through DE by 2025. 
This commitment emerged 
from a decentralized energy 
master-planning exercise across 
London. The target will be 
met through a combination of 
energy-efficiency measures, 
micro-generation renewable 
energy systems, and the use of 
CHP linked to heat networks. 
Heat generated as a by-product 
of electricity generation will be 
pumped into buildings, either 
as hot water or steam. Biomass 
is also a potential energy source. 
North River Wastewater  
Treatment Plant Combined  
Heat and Power Facility
C# Word - Paragraph Processing in C#.NET
Add references: C# users can set paragraph properties and create content such as run, footnote, endnote and picture in a paragraph.
adding a jpg to a pdf; add photo to pdf in preview
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned signature, logo, etc. Remove Image from PDF Page Using C#. Add necessary references:
add signature image to pdf acrobat; add a picture to a pdf
171
80 x 50
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 3
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
North River
Design is underway to install a 12 megawatt cogene-
ration system at the North River Wastewater Treat-
ment Plant. This CHP system will use digester gas, 
produced on site, as well as supplemental natural gas 
to generate electricity that will meet the plant’s base 
electrical demand, while recovering enough heat 
for the plant’s heating needs. This project will offset 
the use of 90 percent of utility electricity and over 
1.7 million gallons of fuel oil and double the amount 
of digester gas used. This will improve air quality, 
reduce carbon emissions by approximately 10,000 
metric tons of CO
2
e per year, and reduce energy bills.
CHP is a good fit for a facility such as the North River 
Wastewater Treatment Plant because it operates 24 
hours a day and continuously needs electricity and 
heat. Wastewater treatment plants produce digester 
gas as part of the treatment process, which is made 
up of 60 percent methane, and can be used as a 
renewable energy source for the CHP system. Fur-
thermore, CHP systems offer electric reliability and 
resiliency benefits by being able to produce energy 
on-site and “self-power” in the event of an electrical 
grid disruption.
Wards Island
Wards Island Wastewater Treatment Plant was built in 
1937. It is the second largest of the 14 WWTPs located 
across the city. The plant serves a population of over 
one million people and a drainage area of over 12,000 
acres, which includes the western portion of the Bronx 
and the Upper East Side of Manhattan. The WWTP has 
an average load of just under 12 MW and consumes ap-
proximately 100 million kilowatt hours (kWh) a year—
the equivalent of approximately 12,450 homes. In addi-
tion, in order to meet the WWTP’s thermal demand, it 
consumes about 30,000 million British Thermal Units 
(MMBTU) of fuel oil each year and 168,000 MMBTU 
of digester gas—combined, the equivalent of heating 
approximately 1,650 homes.
Because of the relatively constant power and thermal 
requirements necessary to operate the WWTP, and 
the need for a new heating system and backup power, 
cogeneration offers a tremendous opportunity to 
meet all of these needs with a single solution. It 
is estimated that a cogeneration system fueled by 
digester and natural gas will reduce GHG emissions 
by almost 37,000 metric tons per year. This reduc-
tion represents a 68 percent reduction in the plant’s 
carbon footprint—the equivalent of removing near-
ly 7,600 passenger vehicles from the road. Using 
digester gas produced at the WWTP as the primary 
fuel source and recapturing the waste heat as part 
of the cogeneration system is estimated to save $3.4 
million per year. 
Hunts Point
Built in 1952, the Hunts Point Wastewater Treatment 
Plant is located in a section of the Bronx adjacent to 
the Hunts Point Terminal Produce Market Center—
the largest food distribution system in the world. The 
plant services a population of over 680,000 people 
across 16,660 acres in the eastern section of the Bronx. 
It has an average load of eight MW and consumes 
approximately 70 million kWh per year—the equiv-
alent of powering approximately 8,700 homes. For 
its heating needs, Hunts Point uses approximately 
169,300 MMBTUs of fuel oil, natural gas, and digester 
gas—the equivalent of heating approximately 1,400 
homes a year.
The replacement of the plant’s digesters along with 
possible future cogeneration would produce over 
70,000 MWh per year (enough to power 8,700 
homes), yield cost savings of $3 million per year, and 
reduce carbon emissions by 11,400 metric tons, per 
year – the equivalent of removing 2,300 passenger 
cars from the road. By providing digester capacity 
to accept high strength feedstocks (e.g., food waste), 
additional higher quality digester gas would be 
produced.  This could allow the WWTP to meet all 
of its energy needs and potentially become net en-
ergy-positive, allowing excess energy to be supplied 
back to the Food Distribution Center.  
This would offset the need to purchase fossil  
fuel-generated energy, divert waste from landfills,  
and reduce long-haul trucking, thereby multiplying 
the environmental benefits associated with reducing 
GHG and criteria pollutant emissions.
Cogeneration at In-City Wastewater 
Treatment Plants
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned signature, logo, etc. VB.NET: Remove Image from PDF Page. Add necessary references:
add jpg to pdf preview; add an image to a pdf acrobat
VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
Help to copy, paste and cut vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned VB.NET DLLs: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in PDF Page. Add necessary references:
add picture to pdf online; add image pdf document
172
80 x 50
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 3
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Initiative 2
Develop a mode shift action plan to reduce greenhouse 
gas emissions from the transportation sector
New Yorkers produce fewer greenhouse gas emissions to get around than citizens of 
most other cities in the country, thanks to our 24/7 subway system, citywide bus 
network, and dense, walkable communities. But we can do more.
Despite widespread mass transit use, New York City’s transportation sector, which 
includes private vehicles, freight, and mass transit (subway, commuter rail, and bus), 
makes up 23 percent of the city’s total greenhouse gas emissions. Fossil fuels burned 
in passenger cars contribute 16 percent of the citywide total, while those in trucks 
are responsible for an additional four percent. On-road vehicles also emit 
particulates and other air pollutants such as nitrogen and sulfur oxides (NO
X
and 
SO
X
), which contribute to asthma rates and premature mortality.
The transportation investments detailed under Vision 1 of this plan are the first key 
steps to diversified low-carbon transportation options for New Yorkers. Select Bus 
Service, the expansion of bike networks and bike share, safer streets for walking and 
biking, expanded ferry service, and upgrades to the subway system all reduce the 
need for getting around by car and will have regional impacts on greenhouse gas as 
well as air pollutant emissions. These benefits will help create cleaner communities 
and reduce commute times, thereby enhancing livable neighborhoods and providing 
a better quality of life for all New Yorkers.
Beyond the currently planned investments in better buses, an expanded bike 
network, safer streets, and improved transit, the Department of Transportation 
(DOT), in partnership with the Mayor’s Office of Sustainability (MOS), will develop 
a long-term plan for further reductions in emissions from the cars and trucks in New 
York City to achieve the necessary GHG reductions on a trajectory to 80 x 50. This 
will include consideration of additional policies and investments that emphasize 
low-carbon and multi-modal options such as walking and biking; reduced 
dependency on private fossil fuel vehicles; greater use of low- or zero-emission 
vehicles; improved mass transit; and the continued development of zoning and 
parking policies to further these goals. The City is already working to encourage the 
use of alternative vehicles. For example, since the end of 2014, the electrical systems 
of all new parking garages and open parking lots, as well as those undergoing 
increases in electric service, must be capable of supporting electric vehicle charging 
stations. Other alternative vehicle programs are discussed under the air quality goal 
of this plan.
C# Word - Document Processing in C#.NET
GetDocument(); //Document clone IDocument doc0 = doc.Clone(); //Get all picture in document List<Bitmap> bitmaps = doc0.GetAllPicture(); Create, Add, Delete or
how to add an image to a pdf in preview; adding an image to a pdf file
173
80 x 50
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 3
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Supporting Initiatives 
A. Reduce carbon emissions from the City government’s vehicle fleet
As technologies such as electric vehicles, biodiesel, compressed natural gas, 
gas-electric hybrid, and hydrogen-powered vehicles come to market, they will 
contribute to the solution. As discussed in more detail in the air quality section of 
this plan, the City will continue to pursue clean vehicle technology adoption 
pilots and strategies.
Proper fuel management is paramount to reducing consumption and efficient 
operations, and the City will introduce new fuel use reporting protocols and 
anti-idling technologies and enforcement to control consumption. 
For vehicles used for City government functions, the City’s current vehicle 
fleet-share program with Zipcar will be expanded to at least 1,000 vehicles by 
2017, up from its current 600 vehicles across five City agencies.
Initiative 3
Build upon Zero Waste to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 
from the solid waste sector
Every day, New Yorkers generate 18,500 tons of waste. Only a portion of this waste is 
recycled, composted, or converted to energy. Most of it is sent by truck to landfills, 
where it releases methane as it decomposes. Together, this adds up to over two 
million tons of CO
2
e a year, or four percent of the city’s total. 
Emissions have decreased 22 percent in the solid waste sector since 2005, as New 
Yorkers generate less waste and some of the waste transport has shifted to rail and 
barge. However, to reach our 80 x 50 goal, additional GHG emissions reductions 
must be attained. In the near term, the City will focus on waste reduction, scaling up 
the processing of organic waste, improving recycling, addressing commercial waste, 
and identifying the waste destinations that result in the smallest emissions footprint. 
Achieving 80 x 50 will require changing behaviors through education and 
incentives, strengthening regulations, investing in new infrastructure, and working 
closely with the communities and industries that generate waste.
As detailed in the following section, the City is adopting a Zero Waste goal. The 
various initiatives required to meet this ambitious goal and divert all waste from 
landfills will be a key component of our 2025 GHG emissions reduction action plan. 
As with the other sectors, the 2025 action plan will aim to put the city on a trajectory 
toward 80 x 50 and will identify further initiatives to close the remaining gap.
Methane capture at Fresh  
Kills Landfill
174
80 x 50
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 3
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Initiative 4
Continue implementation of 
One City: Built to Last
to 
reduce greenhouse gas emissions from buildings by 30 
percent by 2025, and chart a long-term path away from 
fossil fuels 
Our effort to achieve 80 x 50 began through One City: Built to Last. This comprehensive 
ten-year action plan aims to retrofit public and private buildings to reduce GHG 
emissions, generate jobs and business growth in construction and energy services, and 
provide operational savings to owners and tenants. One City: Built to Last has established 
an interim target to reduce emissions from energy used in buildings by 30 percent by 
2025 from a 2005 baseline and reduce emissions by 35 percent in City-owned buildings 
to maintain a trajectory toward the 80 x 50 goal. In 2015, the City convened the Buildings 
Technical Working Group, with leaders in real estate, architecture, engineering,  
labor, affordable housing, and environmental advocacy to help develop the indicators, 
interim metrics, high performance construction standards, and potential mandates for 
existing buildings. The goals of the Buildings Technical Working Group are closely 
linked to the City’s affordable housing plan, Housing New York, as utility costs continue 
to rise and disproportionately impact low-income residents.
The initiatives mentioned above for the power, transportation, and solid waste sectors 
follow the One City: Built to Last model in determining interim targets and developing 
long-term GHG reduction policies to ensure 80 x 50. For the buildings sector, the City 
will retrofit every City-owned property with significant energy use and will install 100 
MW of renewable power by 2025. For privately-owned buildings, the City will create a 
thriving market for energy efficiency and renewable energy investments and services, 
establish world class green building and energy codes, and make New York City a global 
hub for clean energy technology and innovation. In 2015, the City will launch the Energy 
and Water Retrofit Accelerator, which will offer technical assistance and education 
programs to help building owners make energy- and water-saving retrofits. Coupled 
with access to innovative financing and incentives, these programs will generate demand 
for private sector energy efficiency and renewable energy services. The City will also 
launch a specific initiative for small and midsize buildings, with an initial focus on 
neighborhoods within Con Edison’s Brooklyn/Queens Demand Management Zone, 
which includes Brownsville, East New York, Cypress Hills, and Ozone Park. The City 
will work to accelerate customer-side solutions, including demand reduction at scale, 
energy storage, and distributed generation, to help ensure the reliability of the electricity 
network and realize energy use reductions in neighborhoods facing disproportionate 
affordability pressures. The City will also bring access to energy use information to 
mid-size buildings by requiring energy benchmarking and audits to identify the greatest 
opportunities for conservation and savings. 
To serve the specific needs of the affordable housing sector, the Department of 
Housing Preservation and Development, in conjunction with the Housing 
One City: Built to Last  
report cover
175
80 x 50
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 3
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Development Corporation, will implement the Green Housing Preservation 
Program to integrate energy audits and conservation measures into its moderate 
rehabilitation projects. NYCHA will implement a series of Energy Performance 
Contracts projected to total over $100 million, representing the largest energy 
savings program for any public housing authority in the country. The first in the 
series, expected to total $40 to $60 million, will target inefficient lighting and boilers 
within the Housing Authority portfolio.
A number of One City: Built to Last initiatives are already underway, including the NYC 
Carbon Challenge—a voluntary carbon reduction program among universities, hospitals, 
commercial offices, and multi-family buildings to reduce emissions by 30 percent or 
more in 10 years. The City is also expanding educational opportunities to improve 
building operations and maintenance. The City continues to implement data-driven 
GreeNYC public education campaigns to foster energy-consumption reduction for 
residents. Through these initiatives, the City will continue to work with commercial 
building owners and tenants to raise awareness of tenants’ energy use and encourage 
investments in energy-efficient retrofits. Low-cost measures such as using sensors and 
smart controls to turn off lights in commercial and retail spaces at night will reduce 
energy waste, commensurate GHG emissions, and light pollution. 
The City has taken steps to expand renewable power on buildings. City government is 
leading by example with a target to install 100 megawatts of renewable energy on 
City-owned buildings by 2025. Through the Department of Citywide Administrative 
Services Energy Management, twenty-four schools across the five boroughs are already 
slated for solar photovoltaic (PV) installations. The City is actively surveying over 80 
City properties for rooftop solar PV potential, with another 50 assessments already 
identified for the coming years. Feasibility studies will also target innovative, non-roof-
mounted solutions such as parking canopies; ground mounted and other building 
deployments; development of resilient solar PV resources through incorporation of 
energy storage technologies; and piloting wind, geothermal, and other clean-energy 
resources across City properties. In the private sector, the City has expanded the NYC 
Solar Partnership to facilitate solar PV adoption on private sector buildings and reach 
previously underserved areas through innovations in community-shared solar. The goal 
is to reach 250 megawatts of production capacity by 2025. 
176
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 3
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
INDICATORS + TARGETS
Reduce volume of 
DSNY-collected refuse (ex-
cluding material collected 
for reuse/recycling) by 90 
percent relative to 2005 
baseline of ~3.6M tons
Increase curbside and con-
tainerized diversion from a 
rate of 15.4 percent in 2014
Increase citywide diversion 
rate (including all streams 
of waste: residential, com-
mercial, construction and 
demolition, and fill) from 
current state of ~52 percent
Zero Waste
Goal: New York City will send zero waste to landfills 
by 2030
Overview
Every week, the average New Yorker throws out nearly 15 pounds of waste at home 
and another nine pounds of waste at work and in commercial establishments. 
Altogether, in New York City this adds up to more than three million tons of 
residential waste and three million tons of commercial waste generated per year.  
To manage all of this waste, the City has developed a complex system to collect, 
transport, and dispose of waste. It is a system with an enormous impact on our 
neighborhoods, our environment, and our economy.
The things New Yorkers throw away contain potentially valuable resources. For 25 
years, the City has offered curbside recycling programs to divert certain materials, 
including paper, metal, plastic, and glass, from the refuse stream. However, these 
programs divert only 15.4 percent of the waste collected by City workers. 
But we are moving in the right direction. In 2013, the City began a pilot curbside 
collection program for organic waste, such as food scraps, yard waste, and soiled 
paper. This program will continue to expand to serve a total of 133,000 households in 
all five boroughs. In addition, many New Yorkers already choose to donate or sell used 
clothing, furniture, and other household goods. These efforts reflect a changing 
focus—how we export and dispose of waste has become an opportunity for us to build 
industries and develop a local economy around materials that can be recovered.
Building on these achievements, the City will become a worldwide leader in 
solid waste management by achieving a goal of Zero Waste by 2030. We will 
eliminate the need to send our waste to out-of-state landfills, thus minimizing the 
overall environmental impact of our trash. To measure our progress toward this 
goal, we will track the extent of our waste reduction and how much we divert waste 
away from landfills. We have set an ambitious target of reducing the amount of waste 
disposed of by 90 percent by 2030 from a 2005 baseline—and we are already taking 
steps to get there. For example, the decision to ban expanded polystyrene foam was 
a positive step in this direction.
This report charts the full path to Zero Waste by enumerating several bold 
initiatives, including the expansion of the NYC Organics curbside collection and 
local drop-off site programs to serve all New Yorkers by the end of 2018. It also aims 
to implement single-stream recycling collection for metal, glass, plastic, and paper 
products by 2020.
177
Zero Waste
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 3
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
In the 1970s and ’80s, New York City came to symbolize the modern “garbage crisis.”  
In 1973, the National League of Cities and the U.S. Conference of Mayors issued a report docu-
menting the skyrocketing volume of solid waste and the sharp decline in available urban land  
for disposal sites. The notorious Fresh Kills Landfill in Staten Island became the largest in the 
country, and the City’s incinerators burned garbage without the environmental controls of  
today’s energy-from-waste facilities. With the gradual closure of Fresh Kills beginning in the 
1990s, low-income and minority neighborhoods in the South Bronx, northern Brooklyn, and 
southeast Queens increasingly bore the burden of the City’s waste processing facilities. 
Over time, the City improved waste management operations, closing its incinerators and landfills 
and, in 1989, creating the nation’s largest mandatory recycling program. The 2006 adoption of the 
City’s comprehensive Solid Waste Management Plan (SWMP) was a landmark achievement for 
long-term waste planning and environmental justice. The plan was championed by grassroots envi-
ronmental justice organizations, who long advocated for the City to switch from a truck-based waste 
export system that overburdened low-income communities to an equitable network of marine and 
rail transfer stations located in all five boroughs. 
In 2015, the City opened the North Shore Marine Transfer Station in College Point, the first of four 
converted marine transfer stations that will open under the SWMP. At the North Shore facility, De-
partment of Sanitation (DSNY) employees transfer waste from collection trucks into sealed shipping 
containers to be shipped out by barge. Once it operates at full capacity, that facility will shift nearly 
1,000 tons of waste out of the overburdened neighborhood of Jamaica, Queens.
Solid Waste Management Plan  
Implementation
Covanta-Essex RRF
Hamilton Ave MTS
WM-Varick TS
WM-Review TS
North 
Shore MTS
East 91st St MTS
WM-Harlem River 
Yard TS
Southwest 
Brooklyn MTS
Staten Island TS
2014 or Earlier
2015
2016
2017
2018
DSNY Facility
Contract Facility
Wasteshed Border
178
Zero Waste
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 3
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Initiative 1
Expand the New York City Organics program to serve all 
New Yorkers by the end of 2018
Food scraps, yard waste, and soiled paper not suitable for recycling make up 31 
percent of the city’s residential waste stream. In landfills, this organic material 
decomposes, releasing methane gas, a greenhouse gas six times more potent than 
carbon dioxide. However, this material can be composted and converted into a 
nutrient-rich natural fertilizer that can replenish our city’s soil, strengthen our parks 
and street trees, and enrich community gardens. Energy-rich food waste can also be 
processed through anaerobic digestion, wherein microbes break down complex fats 
and carbohydrates, releasing methane gas that can be captured and used as an 
alternative to natural gas.
In 1993, the City created the NYC Compost Project to educate New Yorkers about 
the benefits of composting their food and yard waste, as well as foster community-
scale composting initiatives in all five boroughs. In 2013, DSNY began a pilot 
program to offer curbside organic-waste collection service to residents of 
Westerleigh, Staten Island, to test the feasibility of collecting the material directly 
from residents’ homes. Today, the program serves more than 100,000 households in 
all five boroughs, covering 240,000 New Yorkers. In 2015, the program will expand 
once again to an additional 33,000 households with nearly 100,000 residents.
To meet our goal of Zero Waste, we will expand the NYC Organics program by 
increasing curbside organics collection and convenient local drop-off sites. To do 
this, DSNY will complete the evaluation of the curbside organics collection pilot 
required by Local Law 77 of 2013. In 2015, DSNY will submit a report to the Mayor and 
City Council, detailing the results of the pilot and the Department’s plans to expand 
curbside collection service. 
Supporting Initiatives 
A. Develop additional organics sorting and processing capacity in New York 
City and the region
Currently, material collected on Staten Island through the City’s curbside organics 
collection pilot is delivered to the City-owned composting facility on the site of the Fresh 
Kills Landfill. There, workers sort out non-compostable contaminants such as plastic bags, 
and pile the material into long piles called windrows where organisms break down the 
organic waste into a nutrient-rich soil-like product. Material collected in the other 
boroughs is transported to compost facilities in upstate New York and Connecticut. 
However, these facilities don’t have the capacity to take all the waste we generate. 
Staten Island compost facility
New York Paydirt Potting  
Soil from the Lower East Side 
Ecology Center
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested