pdf reader to byte array c# : How to add a picture to a pdf document Library software API .net windows web page sharepoint OneNYC21-part1700

209
Parks & Natural Resources
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 3
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
will identify opportunities to remove or reduce fencing and barrier vegetation in order 
to make the natural beauty of parks more visible from their neighborhoods.  
As part of Parks Without Borders, NYC Parks, in cooperation with DOT and other 
agencies, will also find new ways to bring the beauty of the park into the community by 
greening key intersections and entrances, and by identifying new opportunities to 
activate underused public spaces with temporary art and programming. We will also look 
for opportunities to extend park amenities to adjacent sidewalks and pedestrian plazas.
Parks Without Borders is a key strategy to help ensure the livability of 
neighborhoods and the strength of our communities.
Initiative 3
Reduce light pollution from large buildings at night
Light pollution exists in every borough and is worse in areas with many commercial 
office buildings and unshielded exterior lighting. It has a detrimental impact on the 
quality of life, according to complaints registered with 311. Moreover, studies suggest 
light pollution has a detrimental effect on animal migratory patterns. The Hudson 
River is one of the most important migratory flyways for birds in North America, and 
New York City’s parks and ponds are favorite rest stops. Twice a year, New York City is 
one of the great places to see rare birds and a favorite destination for birdwatchers. 
Light pollution from buildings, however, interferes with migrations. 
In addition, light pollution is also linked to inefficient use of energy, which 
contributes to greenhouse gas emissions. Offices and retail spaces that are empty at 
night yet leave the lights on both create light pollution and waste energy. 
Municipalities in Massachusetts, California, Connecticut, and Arizona have successfully 
reduced light pollution and even increased the ability to view the night’s sky, ultimately 
helping to preserve the natural environment and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. 
The City Council recently introduced the Lights Out Bill (Intro. 578/2014) to require 
vacant offices and retail spaces to shut off their lights at night. The City will work 
with the Council to pass a version of this bill that reduces energy-wasting light 
pollution from large buildings. In 2009, the City enacted Local Law 88 (LL88) 
requiring upgrades to lighting in all non-residential spaces of large buildings. This 
requires office and retail spaces to comply with current Energy Code standards by 
2025. With full compliance with the law, the city can expect to reduce greenhouse 
gas emissions by approximately an additional two percent from 2005 levels.  
Through the existing Retrofit Accelerator Program (discussed earlier in Vision 3), 
the City can assist building owners through loans and incentives to comply with 
LL88 lighting upgrades and install modern lighting and controls.
Light emanating from  
office building at night
How to add a picture to a pdf document - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
adding a jpeg to a pdf; add photo pdf
How to add a picture to a pdf document - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add picture to pdf preview; adding image to pdf in preview
210
Parks & Natural Resources
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 3
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Initiative 4
Expand the use of our streets as places to play, congregate, 
and be together
To better serve our neighborhoods, the City will continue to work with communities 
and other partners to convert underused streets into pedestrian plazas and explore 
ways to transform underused areas below elevated roads and train lines to more 
attractive and inviting public spaces. Programs like Weekend Walks, Play Streets, 
and Summer Streets will continue to provide more opportunities for New Yorkers of 
all ages to get outdoors and into the public realm.
Children taking advantage of the 
city’s Play Streets
C# TIFF: How to Insert & Burn Picture/Image into TIFF Document
Support adding image or picture to an existing new REImage(@"c:\ logo.png"); // add the image powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff files
add signature image to pdf; add a jpg to a pdf
VB.NET TIFF: How to Draw Picture & Write Text on TIFF Document in
Dim drawing As RaterEdgeDrawing = New RaterEdgeDrawing() drawing.Picture = "RasterEdge" drawing powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff files
how to add image to pdf reader; adding images to a pdf document
211
Parks & Natural Resources
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 3
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Initiative 5
Create beautiful and well-tended streets in neighborhoods 
across the city 
To further improve our streets and sidewalks, we will invest in new street trees and 
other plantings, benches, way-finding signs, and other amenities. We will focus on 
rezoned and growing neighborhoods. As part of our street safety and affordable 
housing initiatives, the City will also invest in streetscape improvements on major 
corridors, such as landscaped medians, to improve pedestrian safety and the urban 
environment. Two new City programs will bring technical assistance and other 
resources to improve plaza maintenance and the condition of planted medians in 
low-to-moderate income or otherwise under-resourced communities.
C# Word - Paragraph Processing in C#.NET
Add references: CreateParagraph(); //Create a picture for para IPicture picture = para.CreatePicture(imageSrcPath); //Save the document doc0.Save
how to add image to pdf in acrobat; adding a jpeg to a pdf
VB.NET Image: Create Code 11 Barcode on Picture & Document Using
file, apart from above mentioned .NET core imaging SDK and .NET barcode creator add-on, you also need to buy .NET PDF document editor add-on, namely, RasterEdge
adding images to pdf; how to add photo to pdf in preview
212
Parks & Natural Resources
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 3
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Initiative 6
Green the city’s streets, parks, and open spaces
To protect, maintain, and enhance the city’s green canopy, NYC Parks will continue 
to plant new trees in parks and neighborhoods citywide. Greening the public realm 
brings new beauty to our parks and neighborhoods, sustains ecological diversity, and 
adds permeable areas that enhance stormwater management. These natural systems 
provide valuable environmental benefits to all residents, including passive indoor 
and outdoor cooling; cleaning of air, water, and soil; and improved resiliency to 
natural events and climate change—true public health and quality-of-life benefits. 
The City will be guided in these efforts by a number of research initiatives designed 
to ensure a better understanding of ecosystems, natural resources, and how they 
benefit New Yorkers and improve air and water quality. Research initiatives include 
an update to the City’s state-of-the-art street tree census and an ecological and 
social assessment of the city’s natural areas, conducted in partnership with the 
Natural Areas Conservancy. 
The City will  also use LiDAR technology—land cover mapping based on aerial remote 
imaging. LiDAR technology helps inform policy decisions among different agencies 
and policy areas.  For instance, past LiDAR data has been used by the City to assess 
ecosystem decline and prioritize tree planting and forest restoration; impervious 
surface cover for green infrastructure planning; the solar energy potential of rooftops; 
and coastal flood hazards. The landscape of the city has changed since we last used 
LiDAR data in 2010 due to natural forces and human interventions, and new data will 
help to inform our understanding of and investment in the City’s resiliency and 
sustainability. The City is currently working to secure 2013 LiDAR data from the 
federal government.  
Expansion of the East River 
Esplanade 
VB.NET PowerPoint: Add Image to PowerPoint Document Slide/Page
clip art or screenshot, the picture will be AddPage", "InsertPage" and "DeletePage" to add, insert or & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff files
adding an image to a pdf file; add an image to a pdf with acrobat
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Planet Barcode Generator for Image, Picture &
on Overview. VB.NET Planet Barcode Creator Add-on within Generate Planet Barcode on Picture & Image in VB.NET. In for adding Planet barcode image to PDF, TIFF or
add image to pdf file acrobat; add a picture to a pdf file
213
Parks & Natural Resources
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 3
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Environmental Education
The City will continue to provide environmental literacy programs to support the next gen-
eration of environmental stewards and to ensure widespread awareness of the environmental 
impact of OneNYC sustainability initiatives.  
Several City agencies
including DOE, DEP, and Parks
offer environmental literacy pro-
grams. The City is supported in this work by hundreds of non-profit organizations, including 
Jamaica Bay Science and Resilience Center, GrowNYC, the Horticultural Society of New York, 
and 1,800 park stewardship groups. 
These education programs equip both students and teachers with the tools they need to be-
come engaged community and environmental stewards. The Natural Classroom, NYC Parks’ 
environmental education program for students in grades K-8, is a series of inquiry-based, 
hands-on programs led by the Urban Park Rangers and developed in partnership with Nation-
al Geographic and Columbia University. NYC Parks also offers free instruction and resources 
in neighborhood tree care. These efforts support the investments made in improving the city’s 
urban forest, and works with partner organizations to provide hundreds of hands-on stew-
ardship opportunities each year. The DEP Office of Education also provides a range of free 
programs and resources—pertaining to water and wastewater, green infrastructure, sound 
and noise, environmental stewardship, and climate change—and will soon offer complemen-
tary online teacher and student resources.
Watershed Classroom
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
SDK; VB.NET image cropping method to crop picture / photo; VB.NET image cropping control add-on needs a PC com is professional provider of document, content and
add a picture to a pdf document; add photo to pdf
VB.NET Image: Image Scaling SDK to Scale Picture / Photo
this VB.NET image scaling control add-on, we API, developer can only scale one image / picture / photo at com is professional provider of document, content and
how to add a picture to a pdf document; how to add picture to pdf
214
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 4
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Vision 4 
Our  
Resilient City
Our neighborhoods, economy, and public 
services will be ready to withstand and emerge 
stronger from the impacts of climate change 
and other 21
st
century threats
New York City will...
Eliminate disaster-related long-term displacement more 
than one year of New Yorkers from homes by 2050
Reduce the Social Vulnerability Index for 
neighborhoods across the city
Reduce average annual economic losses resulting from 
climate-related events
215
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 4
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Goals
Neighborhoods
Every city neighborhood will be safer by strengthening community, social,  
and economic resiliency
Buildings
The city’s buildings will be upgraded against changing climate impacts
Infrastructure
Infrastructure systems across the region will adapt to maintain continued services
Coastal Defense
New York City’s coastal defenses will be strengthened against flooding and sea level rise 
216
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 4
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Introduction
In late October 2012, Hurricane Sandy roared into New York Harbor with 
unprecedented force, causing record-breaking water levels. Many neighborhoods were 
devastated, with homes and businesses becoming flooded, public services interrupted, 
and infrastructure damaged. After the storm passed and the water receded, a new 
reality emerged: New Yorkers must confront the implications of living in a coastal city. 
Sandy claimed the lives of 44
New Yorkers and caused $19 billion in damages and lost 
economic activity. It also highlighted the vulnerability of New York City—as well as the 
entire region—to the risks posed by coastal storms. As the city counted the costs and 
pushed ahead with a robust recovery effort, a new conversation began: Recovery must 
also result in a city better able to face a wider range of risks—not just the “next Sandy.”
The first of these risks is climate change. Rising sea levels, increased 
temperatures and precipitation, and a growing likelihood of more intense storms 
pose unique challenges to a coastal city like ours. In 2015, the New York City Panel 
on Climate Change (NPCC) released an updated set of climate projections for the 
region. Among its findings, the report noted that sea level rise for New York City, 
which had averaged 1.2 inches per decade (a total of 1.1 feet since 1900), is nearly 
twice the observed global rate over a similar time period. 
*In June 2013, the City published A Stronger, More Resilient New York, which identified 43 Sandy-related 
fatalities in New York City. In July 2013, the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner classified one additional 
fatality as Sandy-related, bringing the total to 44.
Climate change projections through 2100
Source: New York City Panel on  
Climate Change, 2015
Middle Range
High End
Middle Range
High End
Middle Range
High End
Middle Range
High End
Average 
Temperature
54°F
+2.0 to 2.8 °F
+3.2 °F
+4.1 to 5.7 °F
+6.6 °F
+5.3 to 8.8 °F
+10.3 °F
+5.8 to 10.3 °F
+12.1 °F
Precipitation
50.1 in.
+1 to 8%
+11%
+4 to 11%
+13%
+5 to 13%
+19%
-1 to +19%
+25%
Middle Range
High End
Middle Range
High End
Middle Range
High End
Middle Range
High End
Sea Level Rise
0
+4 to 8 in.
+10 in.
+11 to 21 in.
+30 in.
+18 to 39 in.
+58 in.
+22 to 50 in.
+75 in.
Middle Range
High End
Middle Range
High End
Middle Range
High End
Middle Range
High End
Number of days per year with 
maximum temperature at or above 
90 °F
18
26 to 31
33
39 to 52
57
44 to 76
87
-
-
Number of heat waves per year
2
3 to 4
4
5 to 7
7
6 to 9
9
-
-
Average duration in days
4
5
5
5 to 6
6
5 to 7
8
-
-
Number of days per year with 
minimum temperature at or below 
32 °F
71
52 to 58
60
42 to 48
52
30 to 42
49
-
-
Intense 
Precipitation 
Days per year with rainfall 
exceeding 2 inches
3
3 to 4
5
4
5
4 to 5
5
-
-
Middle Range
High End
Middle Range
High End
Middle Range
High End
Middle Range
High End
Future annual frequency of today's 
100-year flood 
1%
1.1 to 1.4%
1.5%
1.6 to 2.4%
3.6%
2.0 to 5.4%
12.7%
-
-
Flood heights (feet) associated with 
100-year flood 
11.3
11.6 to 12.0
12.1
12.2 to 13.1
13.8
12.8 to 14.6
16.1
-
-
2080s
2100
2020s
2050s
2080s
2100
2050s
2080s
2100
Coastal Floods at 
the Battery
Baseline  
(1971-2000)
Baseline  
(2000-2004)
2020s
2050s
2080s
2100
Heat Waves & 
Cold Events
Baseline  
(1971-2000)
2020s
2050s
Extreme Events
Chronic Hazards
2020s
Baseline  
(2000-2004)
217
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 4
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
According to the middle range of these projections, sea levels are expected to rise 11 
inches to 21 inches by the 2050s, and 22 to 50 inches by 2100. Using the highest 
estimate of current projections, sea levels could rise as much as six feet by 2100. With 
this projected rise in sea level, the city’s floodplain will continue to expand, creating 
more frequent and intense flooding, and underscoring the city’s growing vulnerability 
to the many impacts of climate change. For instance, a similar Sandy-like event in 
2050 could cause $90 billion in damage and lost economic activity—compared to 
Sandy’s $19 billion—due to the rise in sea level alone.
As outlined in the City’s recent report, NYC’s Risk Landscape: A Guide to Hazard 
Mitigation, an additional set of natural hazards like winter weather, water shortages, 
earthquakes, and pandemics all pose risks to the city—as do human-induced hazards. 
Next, an evolving economy means we can no longer rely on the same sectors 
for job growth, or to comprise the city’s tax base. Climate change endangers both 
small businesses and commercial corridors in our coastal communities. A diversified 
economy, as detailed in Vision 1, is vital to maintaining the city’s economic resiliency, 
and enables those impacted by emergencies to recover more quickly. 
Finally, growing economic inequality poses challenges to the city’s social fabric. 
Inequality threatens to disrupt the connections between our neighbors, institutions, 
and communities that we rely on in times of crisis, prolonged stress, and difficult life 
events. Without these connections, recovery becomes even more difficult.
Over the years, New York City has been no stranger to shocks and stresses. For 
instance, in the years between the attacks of 9/11 and the 2014 Ebola infections, 
the city has endured, among other traumas, two hurricanes, a global economic 
downturn, and an earthquake. In each case, New Yorkers have joined together to 
face these challenges and come back stronger. In other words, New Yorkers 
have been resilient.
Since Hurricane Sandy, New York City has strengthened its commitment to 
resiliency. We are in the vanguard of a new global movement that is changing the 
way cities respond to 21
st
century threats, both acute and chronic. In partnership 
with 100 Resilient Cities (an organization pioneered by the Rockefeller 
Foundation dedicated to fostering the resiliency of cities), New York City will 
continue to lead the way toward a more resilient  future. And with half of the 
world’s population now living in cities, and two-thirds expected to live in cities by 
2050, it is more urgent than ever for New York City to demonstrate global 
leadership in  developing and utilizing the tools that will make all of us more 
resilient against future risks.
What we seek to accomplish now is to build a stronger, more resilient New York 
City—one that is ready for anything. This means we will continue to strengthen our 
communities, work to reduce the impacts of the risks we face, and improve 
recovery times when the unexpected happens. The future of New York City will 
indeed be resilient. 
DEFINITIONS
When we speak of resiliency, 
we are referring to the ability 
of people, the places where 
they live, and our infrastructure 
systems—such as transportation 
and energy—to withstand a 
stress or shock event, to recover, 
and emerge even stronger. 
Mitigation
reduces the impact 
of a stress or shock event or 
prevents the impact altogether, 
such as bolstering the defenses 
of coastal communities to 
withstand flooding. In response 
to future threats, adaptation 
takes place to change the 
physical form or function 
of a structure, a place, or a 
community, such as hardening 
power supplies to withstand 
the effects of extreme weather 
and a changing climate. 
“Sandy made it clear that 
Jamaica Bay communities 
need flood protection. 
The City should 
coordinate with state and 
federal agencies to make 
sure coastal projects for 
this area are funded and 
move forward.”
—Roger W.,  
West Hamilton Beach
218
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 4
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
To achieve this vision, New York City must adapt. A growing population, aging 
infrastructure, an evolving economy, and increasing economic inequality will 
continue to challenge our ability to adapt. But the news is not all bad. The right 
investments can be leveraged to strengthen communities while we rebuild. It is 
understood that every dollar invested in risk mitigation can repay itself four or 
more times over in future damages avoided. With the funds available after Sandy, 
the City has a unique opportunity to buy down future risk—that is, to invest now by 
working with communities, upgrading buildings, protecting infrastructure, and 
reducing flood risks—to enhance the city's resiliency. In fact, building on the City’s 
comprehensive $20 billion climate resiliency program, we will advance that 
program, expand our efforts, and prepare our city for the impacts of climate change 
and other 21
st
century threats. 
The Evolution of the City's Resiliency Program 
The City’s vision for resiliency and climate adaptation is rooted in nearly a decade of 
innovative and proactive planning that commenced with the release of A Greener, Greater 
New York in 2007. In June 2013, the City released its comprehensive climate resiliency plan A 
Stronger, More Resilient New York that outlined a 10-year, over $20 billion program with 257 
initiatives for adapting the city’s infrastructure systems and its hardest-hit neighborhoods 
after Hurricane Sandy. A Stronger, More Resilient New York provides a detailed analysis of 
what occurred to New York City’s communities, buildings, infrastructure, and coastlines 
during Sandy and sets forth a risk assessment that informs our program to prepare for a 
future with climate change. 
As part of the city's recovery from Sandy, Build it Back, run by the Mayor's Office of Housing 
Recovery Operations and supported by federal funding, was established in 2013 to oversee 
housing recovery in New York City. To provide financial or construction assistance to those 
in need, Build it Back developed several programs, integrating lessons from other disaster 
recovery programs. Houses that were substantially damaged were elevated or, in some cases, 
completely reconstructed. Houses that suffered moderate damage were offered financial and 
construction assistance for repairs, including reimbursement for those repairs completed in 
the first year after Sandy. Home acquisitions and repairs to multi-family buildings are also 
underway. Over 20,000 residents applied and nearly 12,000 applications are currently active.
In April 2014, the City committed to enhancing and expanding the resiliency and housing 
recovery programs with the release of One City, Rebuilding Together. This report created the 
Office of Recovery and Resiliency, which is dedicated to advancing the City’s resiliency vision. 
It also implemented critical improvements, including expedited reimbursement checks and 
more construction starts, to the Build it Back program and expanded economic opportunities 
for residents impacted by Sandy, such as the expansion of Sandy Recovery Workforce1, and 
developing a pipeline for pre-apprenticeship programs in the construction trades. 
To date, Build it Back has sent out over 3,200 reimbursement checks and started construction 
on over 1,100 homes, of which more than 500 were already completed. 
The appendix of this report describes our current progress on the City’s resiliency program.
The City of New York
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested