pdf reader to byte array c# : Add image to pdf SDK application service wpf html winforms dnn OneNYC23-part1702

229
Neighborhoods
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 4
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Heat Vulnerability Index (HVI) for 
New York City Community Districts
The HVI is adapted from a study by researchers at the 
Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) 
and Columbia University who analyzed mortality data 
from 2000 through 2011. The analysis identified factors 
that were associated with an increased risk of deaths 
during a heat wave. The map shows New York City 
Community Districts ranked from least to most vulner-
able and divided into five equal groups. Each Commu-
nity District HVI is the average of all census tracts in 
the Community District.
Low Vulnerability 
Moderate Vulnerability 
High Vulnerability 
Notes: Data on heat-related deaths, hospital visits, and emergency department visits are restricted to events in the months of May through September for the 
years indicated. Neighborhood poverty rates are based on zip code and are defined as the percentage of residents with incomes below 100% of the Federal 
Poverty Level per the American Community Survey 2007-2011. Population estimates for incidence are based on 2010 census data.
Source: NYC DOHMH
Source: NYC DOHMH
Neighborhood  
Poverty
Average annual ED  
visit rate per million, 
excluding admissions 
and deaths  
(2005–2010)
Average annual  
hospital admission  
rate per million,  
excluding deaths 
(2000–2010)
Average annual death 
rate per million 
(2000–2011)
Percentage  
Aged 65+ Without  
Air Conditioning  
(2013)
Low (<10%)
36.7
12
.7
1.2
8.1
Medium (10 to <20%)
52
.
4
18.5
1.4
9.3
High (20 to <30%)
55.2
19.0
1.5
18.9
Very High (30%+)
76.5
21.1
1.9
18.8
Heat-related illness and death rates, by neighborhood poverty in New York City
Add image to pdf - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
attach image to pdf form; add image pdf document
Add image to pdf - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
how to add a jpg to a pdf; add an image to a pdf
230
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 4
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Buildings
Goal: The city’s buildings will be upgraded against 
changing climate impacts
Overview
Newly constructed buildings in New York City are designed to meet current codes 
that promote safety and energy efficiency. But the vast majority of city buildings—
our homes, schools, workplaces, businesses, and places of worship—were 
constructed before most modern standards were in place. There is a significant need 
to adapt buildings across the five boroughs to withstand and recover from extreme 
weather events and other hazards, while continuing to serve residents and 
businesses during normal conditions. 
The Mayor's Office of Housing Recovery Operations is making significant 
investment in homes across the city through the Build it Back program, supporting 
the recovery of single-family homeowners and multi-family building residents. 
Eligible homeowners may repair, elevate, rebuild, or sell their homes. This program 
was dramatically improved in 2014 and is continuing to serve Sandy-impacted 
residents.
Other buildings across the city are also subject to ongoing climate risks, particularly 
the flooding associated with storm surge and sea level rise, as well as wind and heat. 
When the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) released its first Flood 
Insurance Rate Maps for New York City in 1983, it defined the 100-year floodplain—
the area that has a one percent or greater chance of flooding in any given year—as an 
expanse that today includes approximately 35,500 buildings. However, Sandy’s 
extensive flooding encompassed over 88,700 buildings, and according to current 
FEMA updates to these maps, the new 
100-year floodplain is expected to include 
approximately 71,500 buildings. These 
expanding floodplains will bring flood 
construction and insurance requirements 
into neighborhoods that were not built to 
such standards. 
Looking ahead, with new flood maps and 
rising flood insurance premiums, it will be 
critical to align new zoning and land use 
changes with existing building codes to 
mitigate the risk of flooding, upgrade 
against other threats, and ensure mitigation 
and insurance options remain available and 
affordable in the city’s coastal communities.
INDICATORS + TARGETS
Increase the percentage of 
households in the 100-
year floodplain with flood 
insurance policies 
Increase the square footage 
of buildings upgraded 
against flood risk
Increase the number of 
homes elevated through the 
Build it Back program
Using white roofs to adapt
buildings at the Brooklyn 
Navy Yard
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Get image information, such as its location, zonal information, metadata, and so on. Able to edit, add, delete, move, and output PDF document image.
how to add a jpeg to a pdf file; add picture to pdf reader
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
adding image to pdf file; how to add an image to a pdf in preview
231
Buildings
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 4
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Initiative 1
Upgrade public and private city 
buildings 
Many of New York City’s nearly one million buildings 
are not as prepared as they need to be against evolving 
risks. To address this, we will adapt vulnerable 
building stock to withstand the risks of climate 
change and extreme weather events. 
The City will implement the Build it Back program to 
demonstrate how best to prepare homes and 
neighborhoods for the future. In addition to elevating 
houses, the program is exploring other protective 
strategies to improve single-family homes and 
upgrade multi-family buildings, including the 
relocation or hardening of building systems, and 
flood-proofing of lower levels. The City’s multi-family 
housing component of Build it Back provides 
comprehensive resiliency retrofit measures necessary 
to protect vulnerable residents from the loss of 
critical building services in the event of a storm, such 
as raising electrical equipment and other building 
systems, flood-proofing lower levels of buildings, and 
ensuring the redundancy of building systems. 
The City will also invest in increasing the resiliency 
of public housing. NYCHA has secured over $3 
billion from FEMA to execute a comprehensive 
resiliency program across 33 public housing 
developments, which will include the elevation and 
hardening of building systems, flood-proofing, and 
upgrading infrastructure. 
The City will also continue to repair and upgrade 
City-owned buildings to mitigate the impacts of 
future climate changes. In all cases, the City is 
committed to maximizing the allocation of federal 
funding for building resiliency and will identify all 
required local match funding to secure those funds. 
A Build it Back home elevation in 
Broad Channel, Queens
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
C# Sample Code: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied in C#.NET. This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
adding an image to a pdf; how to add a picture to a pdf file
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
DLLs for PDF Image Extraction in VB.NET. In order to run the sample code, the following steps would be necessary. Add necessary references:
adding image to pdf form; add multiple jpg to pdf
232
Buildings
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 4
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Initiative 2
Adopt policies to support building upgrades 
The City’s efforts to upgrade buildings for climate resiliency must be supported by 
policies that enable the right investments in building resiliency. Overall, new zoning 
requirements, updated building codes, and reforms to flood insurance programs are 
already having an effect on the built environment, with the City coordinating these 
efforts across government stakeholders and with the community. 
The City will continue to align zoning and building code updates with reforms to the 
National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) and expected changes to the Flood 
Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMs). A working group focused on resiliency is already 
active within City government, with representatives across capital and planning 
agencies, and will lead this program.
By 2018, the City will work to develop and adopt consistent resilient design guidelines 
for buildings in areas vulnerable to flooding, extreme wind, and heat. With our 
changing climate, these standards will need to be developed based on an evaluation of 
the inherent uncertainty of future climate projections, the lifespan of assets, and their 
criticality in order to develop cost-effective design guidelines. These guidelines will 
ensure what is built adheres to the highest performance standards. 
Retrofit strategy for an attached 
home from Retrofitting Buildings 
for Flood Risk
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
List<Bitmap> images = new List<Bitmap>(); images.Add(new Bitmap(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.gif")); / Build a PDF document with GIF image.
how to add jpg to pdf file; adding a png to a pdf
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Sticky Note to PDF Page in C#.NET. Able to add notes to PDF using C# source code in Visual Studio .NET framework.
add an image to a pdf in preview; add image to pdf file
233
Buildings
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 4
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
As part of this effort, the City will explore funding for loans and grants to finance 
and encourage resiliency retrofits such as home elevations and other building 
upgrades for building owners who were unable to participate in current programs. 
Another important aspect in this effort is land use. The City continues to evaluate 
land use as a tool to promote resiliency across the city. The Department of City 
Planning’s ongoing Resilient Neighborhoods studies are engaging communities in 
ten areas across the five boroughs that face flooding and other resiliency challenges. 
In this process, the City will evaluate and establish a framework for adaptive land 
use planning based on a range of coastal hazards and with consideration of climate 
change projections. This will include updates to local land use regulations and 
citywide zoning to promote resiliency investments in buildings and infrastructure, 
including commercial and industrial buildings, and will explore incentives to 
balance the costs of improvements.
Finally, the City will increase the capacity of owners and operators of buildings located 
in the floodplain to align investments around both sustainability and resiliency 
investments when capital improvements are made. This will coincide with 
investments being made in the City’s municipal and private building stock to promote 
energy efficiency and reduced greenhouse gas emissions, as detailed in Vision 3. 
Initiative 3
Work to reform FEMA’s National Flood Insurance 
Program (NFIP)
As the city’s coastal communities continue to be threatened by escalating flood risk 
and rising FEMA NFIP premiums, the City will pursue a comprehensive set of 
activities to promote investments in physical risk reduction and better policies, 
including those that promote NFIP affordability. This includes conducting several 
studies to evaluate recent NFIP changes and their impacts on urban environments, 
reviewing federal studies while they are being drafted, and working with FEMA to 
institute reforms based on the results of these studies. 
The City wants to be sure the public understands its flood risk and flood insurance 
purchase requirements, and is already conducting frequent outreach meetings and 
developing further public education campaign materials for city residents living in 
and near the floodplain. This flood insurance consumer education campaign seeks to 
inform as many people as possible about their flood risk through advertisements on 
public transportation and radio, as well as at community events and through elected 
officials, with two key messages for consumers: understand your risk and flood 
insurance purchase requirements and purchase flood insurance. 
“I live in Red Hook, 
Brooklyn, where flood 
insurance affordability is 
a concern. FEMA should 
reduce insurance 
premiums if homeowners 
take action to mitigate 
flood risk, like elevating 
mechanical equipment. 
We're really excited about 
the Integrated Flood 
Protection System for 
Red Hook and all such 
resiliency projects across 
the city.”
—Andrea S.,  
Red Hook
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to PDF; Remove Image from PDF Page Using C#. Add necessary references:
adding images to pdf forms; how to add image to pdf
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to PDF; VB.NET: Remove Image from PDF Page. Add necessary references:
how to add an image to a pdf file in acrobat; acrobat insert image into pdf
234
Buildings
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 4
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Based on this program, the City will also work to build a regional and nationwide 
coalition in advance of the 2017 reauthorization of the NFIP to achieve reforms that 
will ensure residents are better educated about their risk, more incentivized to 
mitigate risk, and better able to afford flood insurance premiums.
At the same time, the City will continue to explore participation in FEMA’s 
Community Rating System (CRS), which could reduce premiums for the city’s flood 
insurance policyholders.
Today's population  
in the current  
and projected 
floodplain
Today's buildings  
in the current  
and projected 
floodplain
2013  
(Preliminary 
FIRMs)
2050s 
(Projected)
2080s 
(Projected)
2100 
(Projected)
Manhattan
89,100
214,500
275,600
317,700
Bronx
16,300
51,200
113,900
143,800
Brooklyn
164,800
331,100
466,200
515,400
Queens
99,100
167,200
201,500
219,100
Staten Island
30,700
44,900
56,300
63,100
Citywide Total
400,000
808,900
1,113,500
1,259,100
2013  
(Preliminary 
FIRMs)
2050s 
(Projected)
2080s 
(Projected)
2100 
(Projected)
Manhattan
3,100
5,900
7,600
8,800
Bronx
4,500
8,200
13,700
16,500
Brooklyn
26,900
51,600
70,700
80,100
Queens
25,200
35,600
41,100
44,800
Staten Island
11,800
16,700
19,800
21,500
Citywide Total
71,500
118,000
152,900
171,700
Floodplain Source: FEMA (Current Floodplain) New York City 
Panel on Climate Change (NPCC) 2015 (2050s Floodplain) 
235
Buildings
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 4
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Expanding 
floodplains due to 
rising sea levels
There are currently an 
estimated 400,000 residents 
and 71,500 buildings in the 
city’s 100-year floodplain. 
By the 2050s, the 100-year 
floodplain will expand to 
include an area that today has 
808,900 residents and 118,000 
buildings.  This expansion 
of the floodplain, caused by 
sea level rise, is expected to 
continue through the end of 
the century.
Source: New York City Panel on Climate 
Change, 2015
FEMA’s National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) 
Recent changes to the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), including the Bigger-Waters Flood Insurance Re-
form Act of 2012 and the Homeowner Flood Insurance Affordability Act of 2014, will have drastic consequences for 
the city’s coastal communities, including rising insurance premiums, increasing risks for home foreclosures, and loss 
of value for affected homes. To address this challenge, the City will continue to invest in risk reduction and work 
with FEMA to improve four critical aspects of its National Flood Insurance Program: 
1. Improve FEMA’s Flood Mapping Process: The City’s new Preliminary Flood Insurance Rate Maps, issued in 
December 2013, had not been updated since they were first created in 1983, and as a result, when Hurricane Sandy 
hit, the flood maps severely understated the City’s flood risk. To better communicate and prepare for flood risk, the 
City seeks to require FEMA to update the maps at least every ten years. Further, the City will call on FEMA to imple-
ment a series of technical and process improvements—including exploration of the next generation of coastal flood 
models—to better represent and communicate flood risk. 
2. Improve Risk-Based Pricing: Currently, FEMA does not have the data required to adequately price a majority of 
New York City policies, such as those deemed to be “negatively-elevated structures.” In addition, FEMA does not, 
for the most part, offer premium reductions for mitigation approaches other than building elevation. The City is 
advocating for a broader list of partial mitigation measures that result in reduced risk and premiums. 
3. Improve Management of Write Your Own (WYO) Companies: FEMA sells its NFIP products through WYO 
insurance companies. Recent allegations concerning Sandy claims payments have demonstrated the need for better 
management and controls within insurance companies and by FEMA. The City will advocate for better oversight 
of these companies and better training of WYO companies to improve communication to existing and prospective 
clients. 
4. Ensure NFIP Affordability: The City is undertaking two affordability studies to help ensure the NIFP takes into 
account the specific characteristics of a dense, urban environment in the floodplain for both multi-family and one-
to-four family housing.
FEMA 2015 Preliminary FIRMS 100-Year Floodplain
2050s Projected 100-Year Floodplain
2080s Projected 100-Year Floodplain
2100 Projected 100-Year Floodplain
236
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 4
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Infrastructure
Goal: Infrastructure systems across the region 
will adapt to maintain continued services
Overview
The risks from climate change and other 21
st
century threats will further challenge 
the resiliency of the city’s aging infrastructure for years to come. The City aims to 
adapt infrastructure systems in the city and across the region to withstand the 
impacts of climate change, to ensure the continuity of critical services in an 
emergency, and to recover more quickly from service outages. 
The City is already implementing a robust portfolio of infrastructure-based recovery 
and resiliency initiatives as part of a more than $20 billion climate resiliency 
program—which will reach nearly $30 billion with additional spending by other 
regional partners. 
The City also coordinates closely with its partners in the energy, telecommunica-
tions, and transportation sectors across the region to facilitate planning for and 
investment in the resiliency of their assets. These partners include the Metropolitan 
Transportation Authority (MTA), the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey 
(PANYNJ), Con Edison, the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA), National Grid, 
AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile, Cablevision, Verizon, and Time Warner Cable, among 
others. 
These publicly and privately owned systems are vulnerable to natural disasters and 
the impacts of climate change. Without proper investment, our transportation 
network, water, sewer, and waste infrastructure, energy system, telecommunications 
assets, and social infrastructure are all at risk. 
Transportation: The city’s transportation network is vital to helping New Yorkers 
recover after a disruptive event. There is a need for focused attention to prepare these 
facilities and assets for future shocks by making the right investments for adaptation. 
Our subway system is particularly vulnerable to flooding and power disruption. New 
York City’s freight infrastructure is not only critical for day-to-day operations, but also 
serves as a necessary network in emergency response during natural and man-made 
disasters. The freight network connects New Yorkers to commodities such as food and 
fuel from areas across the region by air, rail, ship, and road. 
Water, Sewer, and Waste: The city’s sewer system can be overwhelmed by heavy 
downpours that exceed the system’s design capacity, creating flooding and sewer 
backups, as well as by storm surges, which pose a risk to the city’s wastewater 
treatment plants and pumping stations. During heavy downpours, partially treated 
or untreated sewage can spill into waterways around New York City as a relief 
INDICATORS + TARGETS
Reduce customer-hours of 
weather-related utility and 
transit service outages
Increase the percentage of 
patient beds at hospitals 
and long-term care facilities 
in the 100-year floodplain 
benefiting from retrofits for 
resiliency
237
Infrastructure
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 4
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
mechanism to avoid damage to treatment facilities. These events are anticipated to 
increase as New York City experiences more intense precipitation with more 
frequent flooding. The capacity of the City to manage its solid waste during and after 
a shock event is critical to maintaining healthy and safe conditions for communities. 
However, potential damage of sanitation facilities and assets, the ability to fully staff 
shifts, and the conditions of roadways, street lights, and other infrastructure in place 
determine the resiliency of the City’s solid waste management system. 
Energy: The city’s underground and overhead energy distribution systems are 
vulnerable to floodwaters and high winds, as are electricity- and steam-generating 
facilities and liquid fuel refinery and distribution terminals. Today, 88 percent of the 
City’s steam-generating capacity lies within the 100-year floodplain. In the electric 
power system, 53 percent of in-city electricity-generation capacity, 37 percent of 
transmission substation capacity, and 12 percent of large-distribution substation 
capacity lie within the floodplain. Heat waves also pose significant challenges to 
operability of the electrical grid. Of the 39 fuel terminals in the New York 
metropolitan area, nearly all lie within FEMA’s 100-year floodplain. Extreme 
weather events would cause direct damage to key liquid fuel assets in the region and 
disrupt the power infrastructure critical to the functioning of terminals, refineries, 
and pipelines.
Telecommunications: The ability to communicate reliably is critical, especially in 
an emergency. More than ever, the resiliency of telecommunications services across 
the city, including wired and wireless telephone, video, and internet, will affect the 
city’s capacity to both respond to a major disruptive event and implement a 
coordinated recovery. These systems rely on a vast infrastructure of over 50 
thousand miles of cabling, thousands of cell sites, and nearly 100 critical facilities. By 
the 2020s, 18 percent of telecommunications infrastructure will lie within the 
100-year floodplain. Recent upgrades to the fiber optic network have helped, but 
more improvements are needed.
Social Infrastructure: Infrastructure that strengthens communities, such as 
hospitals, community centers, libraries, and schools, can enhance social resiliency and 
assist in immediate response after a disruptive event. Parks, in particular, can play a 
role in protecting adjacent neighborhoods from severe weather, and serve as gathering 
places after an event. But these facilities are as vulnerable to damage or to the 
interruption of essential services as any other critical facilities. In an emergency, the 
continuity of operations for buildings, critical vehicles, and telecommunications 
networks for first responders is a matter of life and death. And hospitals and long-term 
care facilities, including nursing homes and adult care facilities, are equally crucial to 
the immediate response and long-term recovery of neighborhoods after a crisis. 
Each of these systems requires a specific set of activities to ensure the resiliency of 
the city.
238
Infrastructure
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 4
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Bellevue Hospital
NYU Langone
Medical Center
$1,100 million
Riis Houses I and II
$127 and $58 million
Lavanburg Homes
$23 million
Wald Houses
$162 million
Campos Plaza II
$25 million
Campos Plaza I
$25 million
Baruch Houses
$192 million
Smith Houses
$115 million
Battery Park Underpass
$50 million
Two Bridges
$17 million
LaGuardia Houses
$84 million
Gowanus Houses
$115 million
Staten Island
University Hospital
$28 million
Red Hook East
$209 million
Red Hook West
$241 million
Transportation: $565 million
Regional Water and Wastewater: $5.5 billion 
Hospitals: $2.9 billion
Libraries: $10 million
Schools: $755 million 
NYCHA: $3.2 billion 
Other Housing Resiliency: $60 million 
MTA Fix and Fortify: $10.5 billion 
PANYNJ Sandy Program: $1.1 billion 
Con Edison: $1.0 billion 
Other: $50 million 
2013 100-Year Floodplain
2050s 100-Year Floodplain 
Floodplain Source: FEMA (Current Floodplain) New York City Panel on 
Climate Change (NPCC) 2015 (2050s Floodplain) 
Note: NPCC Floodplain is a high-end projection (90th percentile).  
All costs are rounded estimates. Not all projects shown. 
A Resilient City
Current Investments in Infrastructure  
and Buildings
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested