pdf reader to byte array c# : Add photo to pdf form software control project winforms azure .net UWP OneNYC3-part1709

29
New York City Today and Tomorrow
nyc.gov/onenyc
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Norwood
72% Job Gain
Belmont
169% Job Gain
Van Nest - Morris Park
Westchester Square
59% Job Gain
Crotona Park East
60% Job Gain
Queensboro Hill
59% Job Gain
Glen Oaks - Floral Park
New Hyde Park
103% Job Gain
JFK International Airport
100% Job Gain
Rugby - Remsen Village
229% Job Gain
Flatbush
52% Job Gain
Ocean Parkway South
71% Job Gain
Homecrest
54% Job Gain
Brighton Beach
102% Job Gain
Borough Park
80% Job Gain
New Brighton - Silver Lake
52% Job Gain
Brooklyn Heights
85% Job Gain
Park Slope
61% Job Gain
Brooklyn Navy Yard
119% Job Gain
Downtown Brooklyn
88% Job Gain
East Village
82% Job Gain
Chinatown
61% Job Gain
U.S. Census Bureau, LEHD Origin-Destination Employment Statistics, v. 7
Geography: Neighborhood Tabulation Area (NTA)
Employment change in total jobs 2001–2011
More than 50% Gain in Jobs
Up to 50% Gain in Jobs
Add photo to pdf form - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
adding an image to a pdf form; add picture pdf
Add photo to pdf form - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
how to add a photo to a pdf document; add a jpg to a pdf
30
New York City Today and Tomorrow
nyc.gov/onenyc
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Growing Inequality
Despite its overall prosperity, New York City continues to struggle with high rates 
of poverty and growing income inequality. The crumbling of the middle class is 
not just a local problem, it is one that requires a national solution, and is a crisis of 
our time. Over the past decade, income inequality has increased in the city, 
surpassing the national average—and in recent years, it has continued to rise. 
During the 2008 recession, workers experienced flat or declining wages, except 
for those in select high-wage sectors. The city has experienced an impressive 
recovery, gaining 422,000 private jobs between 2009 and 2014. While job growth 
has occurred across a range of sectors, it has been particularly strong in lower-
paying sectors, such as accommodation, food service and retail trade. Since 2014, 
more workers have started to see wage gains due to declining unemployment and 
increasing demand for labor. Nonetheless, these gains have not fully offset the 
wage stagnation that occurred during the recession. As a result, low-income New 
Yorkers continue to struggle with the city’s high costs of living. Without training 
to support career development, these individuals and their families are likely to 
remain in poverty. Recognizing that high-, mid-, and low-skill jobs are all part of 
a diverse, healthy economy, the City is committed to supporting job quality 
across all sectors—higher wages for low-wage jobs and expanded opportunities 
for skills training. 
These employment and wage trends are occurring against a backdrop of other 
significant economic challenges. Nearly half of the city’s population still lives in or 
near poverty, including a disproportionate number of African-American, Latino, and 
Asian New Yorkers. The city’s already-high cost of living is still increasing. The 
supply of housing has not kept pace with the increase in population, leading to a 
severe lack of affordable housing, especially for those who are least well off. 
Homelessness is at a record high. 
As it continues to grow, the City must invest strategically to create new economic 
opportunities for the most vulnerable and lowest-income New Yorkers. We must 
provide increased support to the economic sectors that drive middle-income job 
growth. The city’s rapid employment growth offers a real opportunity to improve 
the incomes of low-wage workers. To ensure that this happens, we must do all we 
can to continue to raise the minimum wage. We must also work with employers and 
labor unions to improve employee training, provide a path for advancement, and 
emphasize employee retention.
VB.NET Image: Mark Photo, Image & Document with Polygon Annotation
on PDF file without using external PDF editing software. VB.NET Methods to Add Polygon Annotation. In this Public Partial Class Form1 Inherits Form Public Sub
adding images to pdf; acrobat add image to pdf
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
VB.NET image cropping method to crop picture / photo; size of created cropped image file, add antique effect Public Partial Class Form1 Inherits Form Public Sub
add picture to pdf; add photo to pdf online
31
New York City Today and Tomorrow
nyc.gov/onenyc
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
East New York - Starrett City
Brownsville - Ocean Hill
Borough Park
Morrisania - East Tremont
University Heights - Fordham
Highbridge - South Concourse
21.7%
22.6%
25.6%
27.8%
11.3%
33.6%
24.9%
34.1%
18.4%
32.1%
22.4%
23.5%
20.7%
22.5%
32%
24%
29.5%
14.5%
13.8%
25%
9.3%
20.4%
20.7%
25.5%
20.7%
7.3%
29.2%
21.1%
32.1%
27.9%
21.4%
19.6%
27.4%
13.4%
23.2%
9.3%
16.4%
22%
20.2%
16.8%
32.5%
21.7%
25.2%
10.3%
18.8%
20.5%
10.1%
20.4%
9.7%
14.6%
19.6%
29.5%
12.5%
21.9%
14.1%
More than 30% in Poverty
25-30% in Poverty
20-25% in Poverty
15-20% in Poverty
10-15% in Poverty
Less than 10% in Poverty
Center for Economic Opportunity, Office of the Mayor
U.S. Census Bureau, ACS 2009-2013 5-Year Estimates, Public Use Microdata Sample Files as 
VB.NET Image: Image Scaling SDK to Scale Picture / Photo
about this VB.NET image scaling control add-on, we RE__Test Public Partial Class Form1 Inherits Form Public Sub can only scale one image / picture / photo at a
acrobat insert image into pdf; add image to pdf reader
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
VB.NET Image & Photo Resizing Overview. The practical this VB.NET image resizer control add-on, can powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
add an image to a pdf form; add a picture to a pdf document
While New York City is a 21
century global city, its aging infrastructure is straining 
to meet the demands of a modern and dynamic urban center. Infrastructure 
connects people, neighborhoods, and businesses, and provides essential services—
the water we drink, the gas we need to cook, the electricity that lights homes and 
businesses, and the Internet access to communicate and learn. 
Despite a mountain of evidence emphasizing the link between modern 
infrastructure and economic growth, public investment across the region has not 
kept pace with capital investment needs. New York City’s transit system is in need 
of improvement and expansion to provide the best possible service to New Yorkers. 
Our subway system, the nation’s largest, had a record 1.7 billion total riders total in 
2013 and is near or at full capacity. Every day, New Yorkers crowd onto subways and 
buses, with an average commute time of 47 minutes—the highest of any major 
American city. Investing directly in transit systems, including expanded Select Bus 
Service routes and a citywide ferry system, as well as coordination with regional 
entities, is key to supporting continued growth and will support competitiveness. 
Significant expansion of our existing rail transit system is extremely expensive and 
federal resources are dwindling. Yet without investments to maintain a state of 
good repair, aging infrastructure incurs higher costs down the road and imperils 
our long-term prosperity.
Many of the city’s gas, steam, sewer, and water lines are not only aging, but are made 
of materials not in use today, and prone to leaks and breaks. Much of the city’s 
underground infrastructure is not mapped, making it hard to pinpoint issues to 
make efficient repairs or improvements. Our highways and bridges are also old and 
at risk. The Brooklyn Bridge, for instance, opened in 1883. 
The Internet is rapidly becoming as central to our daily lives as electricity, gas, and 
water. However, currently 22 percent of New York City households lack broadband 
Internet at home. Affordability of Internet services is cited as the main barrier to 
broadband adoption in New York City. Increased affordability and public availability 
of broadband service will help to close the adoption gap and increase access to 
online tools that support individuals, families, and businesses.
Identifying adequate funding resources to maintain and upgrade critically aging 
infrastructure and ensure a consistent state of good repair across the city is a  
major challenge.
Aging infrastructure strains to 
meet both manmade and natural 
challenges.
VB.NET Image: How to Save Image & Print Image Using VB.NET
of saving and printing multi-page document files, like PDF and Word printing assembly with VB.NET web image viewer add-on, you VB.NET Code to Save Image / Photo.
add image to pdf acrobat reader; adding a jpg to a pdf
C# Image: How to Add Antique & Vintage Effect to Image, Photo
this C#.NET antique effect creating control add-on is widely used in modern photo editors, which powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
how to add a picture to a pdf document; adding a jpeg to a pdf
33
New York City Today and Tomorrow
nyc.gov/onenyc
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Urban Environmental Conditions  
and Climate Change
In recent years, New York has made substantial headway in protecting the 
environment through improved air quality and reduced greenhouse gas emissions, 
which have decreased by 19 percent since 2005. We have reduced energy use in 
buildings and switched to less carbon intensive electricity generation. New York 
City’s air quality is the cleanest it has been in over fifty years, and among U.S. cities, 
it has moved from having the 7
th
to the 4
th
cleanest air over the past several years. 
More than 100 brownfields encompassing over one million square feet have been 
cleaned up and redeveloped. The 23 sites completed this year alone will generate 
more than 420 new jobs, 550 units of affordable housing, and $162 million in new tax 
revenue. Green infrastructure initiatives such as bioswales help to mitigate 
stormwater flooding and prevent the discharge of pollutants into the city’s waterways. 
At the same time, longstanding environmental conditions continue to have chronic 
impacts on the health and livelihoods of New Yorkers, with four out of every 1,000 
children aged 5-17 years hospitalized for asthma in 2012. As the city’s population 
continues to grow, additional strain will be placed on the environment from basic 
infrastructure needs, including a projected 14 percent increase in heating fuel demand 
by 2030 and a 44 percent increase in energy consumption by 2030. The city generates 
about 25,000 tons of residential, business, and institutional garbage every day, but only 
about 15.4 percent of waste collected by City workers is diverted for recycling. 
Kayaking on the Bronx River
VB.NET Image: Tutorial for Flipping Image Using Our .NET Image SDK
version of .NET imaging SDK and add the following becomes a mirror reflection of the photo on the powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
add photo pdf; add image to pdf acrobat
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned signature and remove multiple or all images from PDF document
add jpg to pdf online; how to add a picture to a pdf file
34
New York City Today and Tomorrow
nyc.gov/onenyc
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Climate Change
The city also faces increasing risks from the impacts of global climate change.  While 
we have made significant strides in reducing our contributions to climate change, we 
still expect to face local impacts that could threaten the city.  In partnership with the 
New York City Panel on Climate Change (NPCC), the City has continued its work to 
understand these risks and make sure that the best available science continues to 
inform the City’s climate policy.
Earlier this year, the NPCC released Building the Knowledge Base for Climate Resiliency, 
which included updated projections for the region.  Among them, we can expect to 
see, by the 2050s, increased average temperatures (4.1 to 5.7° F), increased average 
precipitation (4 to 11 percent), and rising sea levels (11 to 21 inches).  The average 
number of days per year above 90° F is expected to at least double. Due to sea level rise 
alone, coastal flood events will increase in both frequency and intensity.  The number of 
the most intense hurricanes across the North Atlantic Basin is also expected to increase. 
Each of these changes will increase the exposure of the city’s neighborhoods, 
businesses, and infrastructure. Health impacts on New Yorkers will continue to 
increase. Fortunately, the City continues to reduce these risks.  We are reducing our 
greenhouse gas emissions and adapting our neighborhoods, with critical 
investments now underway on our coastline, in our buildings, and for our 
infrastructure.  Much more remains to be done, and the City is committed to leading 
the globe in this fight, to the benefit of future generations. 
75”
75
70
65
60
55
50
45
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0”
2020s
2050s
2080s
2100
0
15”
13”
58”
10”
8”
30”
4-8”
11-21”
18-39”
22-50”
2”
SEA LEVEL - MEAN ANNUAL CHANGES
Baseline (2000-2004) 
Low 10th percentile  Middle 25th to 75th percentile  Hig h 90th p p ercentile
rcentile
e
2020s  2050s  2 2 080s  2100
High
Middle
Low
volume
1336
Building the 
Knowledge Base for 
Climate Resiliency
New York City Panel on
Climate Change 2015 Report
NPCC mid-range projections on climate change
NPCC 2015 Report
Chronic Hazards
Baseline (1971-2000)
2050s
Middle Range
Average Temperature
54°F
+4.1 to 5.7 °F
Precipitation
50.1 in.
+4 to 11%
Baseline (2000-2004)
2050s
Middle Range
Sea Level Rise
0
+11 to 21 in.
Extreme Events
Baseline (1971-2000)
2050s
Middle Range
Number of days per year with maxi-
mum temperature at or above  90° F
18
39 to 52
Baseline (2000-2004)
2050s
Middle Range
Future annual frequency of today’s 
100-year flood  at the battery 
1%
1.6 to 2.4%
New York Panel on Climate Change,  
2015 Report
35
New York City Today and Tomorrow
nyc.gov/onenyc
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
New York City Voices
New York City works best when New Yorkers are involved with their city and have a 
say in their government, and when government listens to their voices to make better 
decisions. We need to create new processes for communication and dialogue. The 
result will be more informed policymaking and better-designed programs, and New 
Yorkers with the tools and resources to help shape the future of their city. Engaged 
New Yorkers are empowered residents who interact with their government, and can 
effectively help set priorities and shape policy. 
There are a number of fundamental challenges to increasing civic engagement and 
democratic participation. More than one-third of the lowest-income New Yorkers, 
for example, lack broadband Internet access, which hinders their communications 
and access to City services. Only 18 percent of New Yorkers do volunteer work, 
below the national average of 25 percent, and 49 percent are dissatisfied with the 
level of cultural services in their neighborhood. Only 66 percent of eligible New 
York City voters are registered, and the voter turnout rate was 21 percent in the 
2014 election.
Decisions about City policies and initiatives should be informed by broad public 
engagement with a wide range of stakeholders, including residents whose voices are 
not heard because of barriers such as language and time. Recognizing the 
importance of this dialogue in shaping policy, OneNYC sought and continues to seek 
input from a broad range of residents.
Mayor Bill de Blasio, NYCHA 
Chair Shola Olatoye, and Public 
Advocate Letitia James with 
residents of the Wagner Houses in 
Manhattan
36
New York City Today and Tomorrow
nyc.gov/onenyc
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Importance of the Region
New York City’s future is intertwined with its metropolitan region. The city’s economy 
drives the region’s prosperity, while benefiting from the region’s transportation, skilled 
workforce, cultural resources, and extensive infrastructure. Our suburbs and our city 
face many of the same issues, including increased income disparity, the need for 
affordable housing to keep pace with our growth, and a shared harbor. Between 1990 
and 2010, the region grew by 10.9 percent, with the greatest percentage changes in 
population in Northern New Jersey (14.3 percent). At the same time, New York City’s 
job growth constituted 80 percent of the region’s growth since 2000.
Every year, residents in the region take more than four billion trips, or 184 per person, 
on buses, subways, commuter railroads, and ferries. No other U.S. metropolitan area 
comes close. Regional travel is not only about coming into Manhattan. Between 2000 
and 2010, the number of reverse commuters increased by 12.5 percent, compared to 9.5 
percent arriving at our city’s regional transportation hubs. The ability to access a broad 
range of employment opportunities and workers within the region enhances the city’s 
competitiveness as a place to live and to locate businesses. 
However, we are not keeping pace with this growth in regional travel, and must 
coordinate with our regional partners to advocate for the critical transportation 
connections across the Hudson in New Jersey, as well as with Long Island, 
Connecticut, and beyond. The fragmenting effects of a multitude of jurisdictions 
have hindered regional planning in our broader region, including in 
Change in 
commuting trends
In Commuters grew by  
9.5%
Reverse Commuters grew by 
12.5%
U.S. Census Transportation Planning Package
MILLIONS OF DAILY PASSENGERS
Transit ridership, 1972-2012
6,000,000
1972
1988
2004
1980
1996
2012
5,000,000
4,000,000
3,000,000
400,000
300,000
300,000
100,000
Regional Planning Association— 
Fragile Success
New York City 
Subway
Penn Station  
(Long Island Rail Road, 
New Jersey Transit, 
Amtrak)
Grand Central 
(Metro-North Railroad)
growth
% growth
14.0%
12.0%
10.0%
8.0%
6.0%
4.0%
2.0%
0.0%
In 
Commuters
Reverse 
Commuters
90,000
80,000
70,000
60,000
50,000
40,000
30,000
20,000
10,000
0
37
New York City Today and Tomorrow
nyc.gov/onenyc
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
transportation, energy, telecommunications, and a number of other crucial areas. 
The siloed delivery of infrastructure and services does not produce optimal 
outcomes. New York City must be a leader in working with regional 
governments. This will ensure regional cooperation and coordination and that 
funds are wisely invested. 
A powerful illustration of this shared responsibility is that over $266 billion will be 
spent in the region over the next ten years by the City as well as regional agencies, 
such as the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) and Port Authority of 
New York and New Jersey (PANYNJ), and private utilities.  The City’s preliminary 
ten-year capital budget makes up nearly 25 percent of this anticipated spending.  
This spending has a direct impact on New York City’s capacity to thrive and meet its 
goals for equity, sustainability, and resiliency.  Looking ahead to the next ten years 
and beyond, the City is committed to taking a leadership role in directing these 
investments and incorporating them into our own strategic process, so that regional 
spending can be leveraged for the city’s maximum benefit.
*Since regional agencies and private utilities have varied capital budget years and timeframes, this analysis consists of a “rough 
justice” extrapolation where shorter-term capital budgets were extrapolated to a ten-year timeframe by assuming they would 
match projected annual spending in the future, escalated by inflation. For instance, the City assumes the MTA’s proposed 
2015-2019 budget of $32 billion will be funded and subsequently repeated from 2020-2024, escalating to $37 billion based on 
inflation adjustment. The analysis is intended to be illustrative of the magnitude and use of future capital expenditures based 
on reasonable assumptions. 
Anticipated capital spending by City of New York and 
regional agencies, ten-year estimate*
3% 
City Services
$7,624
4% 
Airports and 
Freight
$11,273
36% 
Commuter Rail/
Transit/ 
Subway
$95,860
6% 
Bridges and 
Tunnels
$15,168
11% 
Recovery and 
Resiliency
$28,558
3% 
Telecom-
munications
$7,096
13% 
Education
$35,480
3% 
Economic 
Development
$8,072
3% 
Housing
$6,957
3% 
Highways
$9,203
15% 
Energy and 
Water
$40,782
Total
$266 billion
Percentage of  
total jobs
Despite comprising only 4 percent 
of the physical area, New York City 
is a powerful economic engine for 
the entire metropolitan region.
45%
NYC
Percentage of total 
geographic area
Percentage of gross
regional product
46%
NYC
38
nyc.gov/onenyc
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
World Trade Center Redevelopment
Southeast Queens
Sewer Build-out
Pulaski Skyway Improvements
Portal Rail Bridge Reconstruction
2nd Avenue Subway
Phase II Construction
NYU Langone Hospital
Sandy Repairs and Mitigation
East Side Access: LIRR Access
to Grand Central Station
BQE Triple Cantilever
Reconstruction/Rehabilitation
Newark Liberty International
Airport - Various Projects
Bayonne Bridge Navigational Clearance
PATH Newark Airport Extension
La Guardia Airport - Various Projects
Projects located in Schoharie, Ulster 
and Westchester Counties
Many agencies and entities are responsible for the capital spending that maintains and 
improves the infrastructure that makes New York City the thriving center of the region. City 
agencies with significant capital budgets include the Department of Transportation, the 
Department of Environmental Protection, the School Construction Authority, and the City 
University of New York, among others. Regional entities such as the Port Authority of New 
York and New Jersey, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, and New Jersey Transit 
support mass transit, roads, bridges and tunnels, and airports and freight resources; private 
utilities such as Verizon, Con Edison, and National Grid provide energy and telecommuni-
cations infrastructure; and many agencies have been involved in the recovery and resiliency 
efforts across the region since Hurricane Sandy.
Major Planned City and 
Regional Capital Projects, 
2014-2025
This map illustrates the broad range of major planned City and regional capital projects, as reflected in the agencies’ projected 
capital plans in the next ten years.  These reported amounts may not reflect full project costs – some have begun construction 
before this time period, or may extend beyond ten years to complete.
Note: Includes planned city and regional 
capital projects with budgets more than 
$200 million.
Labeled projects represent more than $1 
billion in budgeted cost.
Acronyms
CSO: Combined Sewer Overow
WWTP: Wastewater Treatment Plant
Citywide Green Infrastructure
Program (not shown)
DEP - $940 million
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested