pdf reader to byte array c# : Add image to pdf in preview Library application class asp.net html windows ajax OneNYC5-part1716

SOUNDVIEW
PARK
CROTONA
PARK
BRONX
PARK
EAST RIVER
BRONX RIVER
6
5
2
S
H
E
R
I
D
A
N
E
X
P
Y
CROSS-BRONX E
X
PY
BRUCKNER EXPY
B
R
O
N
X
R
I
V
E
R
P
K
W
Y
CROTONA
PARK EAST
HUNTS POINT
LONGWOOD
PARKCHESTER
BRONX
RIVER
HOUSES
WEST
FARMS
Neighborhood Spotlight
In the Bronx River Corridor, new transit, affordable housing, and local 
jobs will support thriving families, businesses, and neighborhoods. 
Metro-North Penn Station 
Access 
Four new stations along the 
Metro-North New Haven Line will 
create direct connections to Penn 
Station from this area.
Hunts Point Food  
Distribution Center 
Investments in facilities modern-
ization and resiliency will ensure 
this major hub of economic activ-
ity and jobs remains competitive 
now and into the future.
New Affordable Housing 
Building on a prior phase of 
affordable housing development 
in the West Farms neighborhood, 
future plans will provide up to 
1,031 additional new units of 
affordable housing.
Sheridan Expressway  
Redevelopment 
Planning for a new boulevard, 
crossings, and off ramps would im-
prove pedestrian safety, waterfront 
access, and provide a direct high-
way connection to Hunts Point. 
B
B
D
A
C
A
C
B
D
Add image to pdf in preview - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
acrobat insert image into pdf; adding image to pdf
Add image to pdf in preview - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add a jpg to a pdf; how to add image to pdf in acrobat
50
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 1 
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Industry Expansion & Cultivation
Goal: New York City will have the space and 
assets to be a global economic leader and grow 
quality jobs across a diverse range of sectors
Overview
New York City has seen very strong economic growth over the past five years. We have  
gained 422,000 jobs and demonstrated an employment growth rate of 11.5 percent—
compared to 6.1 percent across the U.S., with 113,000 private sector jobs added in 2014 
alone. Yet, there is an opportunity to catalyze future growth through a more diversified 
economy with increased employment across a broader set of industries. 
New York City has benefited from, and will continue to grow, sectors in which it is a 
global leader, such as finance, insurance, and real estate (FIRE). Diversification will 
add to this growth and reduce economic risk for the city as a whole. For example, 
finance and insurance account for 30 percent of the city’s total payroll and 27 
percent of the base, but only 9 percent of employment. There are increasing signs 
that this diversification is already occurring. While lower-skill jobs in food services, 
retail, and accommodation have increased, so too have high-wage, high-growth 
sectors driven by the tech ecosystem, which now accounts for over 291,000 jobs and 
$30 billion in wages annually. Furthermore, advances in technology will continue to 
drive job growth in the high-skilled innovation industries.
Private jobs in innovation industries grew 15.8 percent from 2009 to 2013. Many of 
these jobs provide quality wages and have spurred growth outside the core 
Manhattan office markets. Moreover, some innovation industry firms have helped 
increase opportunities in traditional industries, such as manufacturing, which are 
leveraging new technologies to transform their businesses and create quality jobs. 
Although New York City is already a major hub for innovation industries, such as 
advertising, media, and technology, we have the opportunity to catalyze growth in 
others, such as the life sciences and advanced manufacturing sectors. To achieve this 
we must deliver a talented workforce, maintain a strong infrastructure, and ensure 
space and access for the specialized facilities these companies require. 
To grow a diversified economy that offers quality jobs to all New Yorkers, the City 
must unlock the potential for businesses—in traditional industries, the innovation 
economy, and small businesses—to grow and innovate.
INDICATORS + TARGETS
Spur more than 4.9  
million jobs by 2040
Increase the share of  
private sector jobs in  
innovation industries  
from 15 percent today to  
20 percent in 2040
Increase median  
household income
Continue to outperform the 
national economy, mea-
sured by growth in NYC 
GCP versus US GDP
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Convert PDF to Tiff image (.tif, .tiff). • Convert PDF to HTML (.htm, .html). PDF Annotation. • Add sticky notes to PDF document in preview.
add png to pdf acrobat; how to add image to pdf
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
PDF to Tiff image (.tif, .tiff). • Convert PDF to HTML (.htm, .html). PDF Annotation. • Add sticky notes to PDF document. • Highlight PDF text in preview.
adding an image to a pdf in acrobat; add an image to a pdf in preview
51
Industry Expansion & Cultivation
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 1   
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Initiative 1
Maintain New York as the global capital for innovation 
by supporting high-growth and high-value industries
A growing population, coupled with changes in the way we live and work, requires 
both the expansion of commercial space as well as the development of new models for 
the commercial business districts (CBDs) of the future. Today’s high-growth 
industries are knowledge economy industries that invest heavily in research and 
development (R&D) and intellectual capital, thereby benefiting from opportunities to 
cluster and share information. To prepare for future economic growth, the City can 
support the activation of space within existing clusters (such as media and finance) as 
well as future innovation clusters, which will be dynamic, mixed-use urban business 
districts that benefit from sharing knowledge and resources, across the five boroughs. 
This report defines innovation industries as those that:
•  Derive their primary value from intellectual capital and creativity, and thereby place a strong premium on talent
•  Invest heavily in R&D of new business models, harness new technologies, or leverage old technologies in new ways
•  Disrupt the status quo to create new markets, often by collaborating across disciplines or with public or 
academic partners
Advanced Manufacturing 
(including Clean Tech)
Design
Advertising, Media,  
and Arts
E-Commerce
Biotech/Life Sciences
Tech and Information
These industries include: 
NYC Innovation 
Economy 
Employment Growth
14%
15%
20%
25%
20%
15%
10%
5%
0%
2009
2013
2040
Source: Moody’s
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
C# DLLs for Word File Preview. Add references: Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Word file in C#.net.
adding a jpg to a pdf; add photo to pdf
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
Add necessary XDoc.PowerPoint DLL libraries into your created C# application as You may get document preview image from an existing PowerPoint file in C#.net.
add jpg to pdf online; acrobat add image to pdf
52
Industry Expansion & Cultivation
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 1 
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Supporting Initiatives
A. Maintain and grow New York City’s traditional economic sectors
New York City’s traditional sectors are key engines of economic growth, job creation, 
tax revenue, and foreign investment. These sectors, which include finance, 
entertainment, fashion, and higher education, face a number of challenges as they 
seek to expand or maintain their footprints within their existing geographic areas. To 
ease these challenges, the City will examine strategies to support office development 
in Central Business Districts (CBDs) throughout New York City, including both 
traditional and growing CBDs. Strategies for preserving and growing these 
commercial districts include zoning mechanisms for supporting new development 
and activating existing commercial corridors. 
For example, the entertainment industry in New York is critical to maintaining 
our economic competitiveness and ability to attract residents, tourists, and 
businesses. It is also a key source of direct economic activity and jobs, and is one 
of the city’s strongest and most unique traditional sectors. Broadway ticket sales 
alone were $1.4 billion in 2014. During the 2012-2013 season, the Broadway 
industry contributed $11.9 billion to the city’s economy and supported 87,000 jobs. 
Film and television production in the city are also at an all-time high, currently 
generating a direct annual spend of $7.1 billion, $400 million in tax revenue, and 
130,000 jobs. With this activity, the need for commercial spaces for these 
industries is also at an all-time high. The City will leverage its assets and strategic 
partnerships to activate the types of spaces required to maintain and grow the 
entertainment industry. 
New York City’s fashion industry employs more than 183,000 people, accounting 
for 5.5 percent of the city’s workforce and generating $11 billion in total wages, 
with tax revenues of $1.35 billion. An estimated 900 fashion companies are 
headquartered in the city, and in 2013, there were approximately 13,800 fashion 
firms with a presence. New York City is home to more than 75 major-fashion trade 
shows, plus thousands of showrooms. We can help maintain the city’s status as a 
fashion-industry leader by supporting the sector and fostering new businesses 
across the spectrum from design to manufacturing. 
B. Ensure that businesses in emerging sectors are able to find and fit out the 
space they need to start, grow, and scale their companies
In addition to support for traditional sectors, the City is studying ways to respond 
to changing patterns in the way we live and work. For instance, a hallmark of the 
innovation economy is the number of self-employed and freelance workers, with 
nearly 834,000 freelancers in 2012. These jobs require workspace, which can be 
found through high-cost co-working facilities or by working at home. 
Approximately 52,000 individuals or 21 percent of self-employed workers in New 
York City worked from home in 2013. With a focus on alleviating barriers to 
entrepreneurship and business-to-business or business-to-customer interaction, 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
enables compressing and decompressing in preview in ASP.NET to reduce or minimize original PDF document size Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or
add photo to pdf in preview; add png to pdf preview
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Excel file in C#.net.
adding an image to a pdf form; add jpg to pdf acrobat
53
Industry Expansion & Cultivation
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 1   
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
we are completing a study to identify new real estate development concepts that 
allow for live-work arrangements such as live-work apartments, live-work 
buildings, or live-work districts.
The mechanisms for increasing availability of affordable, flexible commercial 
space might include providing a loan guarantee for upgrades to underutilized or 
underinvested commercial and/or industrial loft space; strategically activating 
City-owned property for targeted commercial uses; designing new zoning 
approaches; creating financing vehicles for development; and considering ways to 
complement existing incentives. 
Initiative 2
Make triple bottom line investments in infrastructure 
and City-owned assets to capture economic, 
environmental, and social returns
The City will identify opportunities to maximize economic, environmental, and 
social returns (the triple bottom line) in capital planning and investments in City-
owned assets. The initiatives below detail the City’s intent to invest in City-owned 
assets, while initiatives related to infrastructure planning are detailed in the 
Infrastructure Planning and Management goal.
Downtown Flushing
LGA Airport
Hutchinson Metro Center
Long Island City
Queens Center
St George
125th Street
Sunset Park
Downtown Brooklyn
JFK Airport
Jamaica
DUMBO/
Brooklyn Navy Yard
Employment Centers 
Outside of Manhattan Core
Potential Rail Corridors/
Stops
Existing SBS Corridors
Planned SBS Corridors
Existing Ferry Network 
Proposed Ferry Network/
Stops
NYCT Subway
Potential Subway 
Expansion
Priority Subway Signal 
Enhancements
Source: 2011 US Census Bureau LEHD 2011
The continued growth of employ-
ment centers across the city is one 
way in which the city’s economy, 
strong and robust in its core and 
in its traditional sectors, contin-
ues to diversify across the city 
and into new innovative sectors. 
The areas outside Manhattan 
now make up a larger share of the 
city’s employment than they did 
before the recession.
Some of the city’s more dense em-
ployment centers that are the focus 
of targeted investment and planning 
are pictured in the map above.
Note: Based on analysis of 2011 LEHD data 
for census tracts outside of Manhattan core 
with job density greater than 50,000 workers 
per square mile. Highest employment density 
census tract in Staten Island included.
How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word following steps below, you can create an image viewer WinForm Open or create a new WinForms application, add necessary dll
add photo to pdf online; add image pdf
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Generally speaking, using well-designed APIs, C# developers can do following things. Remove Image from PDF Page Using C#. Add necessary references:
add photo to pdf for; add picture to pdf form
54
Industry Expansion & Cultivation
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 1 
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
East Midtown 
East Midtown has long been the global capital of commerce, but the quality and capacity 
of its office space does not meet the demands of modern tenants. Modern tenants seek new 
buildings with open floor plans and high floor-to-ceiling heights, but the average age of 
buildings in the East Midtown area is over 75 years. 
In May 2014, the City announced a two-track approach to protecting and strengthening East 
Midtown’s role as the world’s premiere business district. The first step was a focused proposal 
for the Vanderbilt Corridor between 42
nd
and 47
th
Streets. In exchange for permitting 
additional square feet for development, the City will provide an option for developers to make 
specific improvements in the area’s transit-oriented pedestrian circulation and public realm. 
This proposal has since been approved by the City Planning Commission and is currently 
before the City Council. The first building seeking approval pursuant to this approach is 
One Vanderbilt. The developer will provide more than $200 million in public space and 
transit improvements for the Grand Central Terminal subway station in return for increased 
development rights. The second stage for a broader proposal for the entire East Midtown 
district is being examined through a longer-term, stakeholder-driven process. A task force 
led by Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer and Council Member Dan Garodnick will 
provide recommendations to the Department of City Planning later this year.
Applied Sciences
Applied Sciences New York City is the ambitious initiative to build and expand world-class 
applied sciences and engineering campuses in New York City. The campuses will more than 
double the number of full-time applied science graduate students and faculty members and 
create a projected 48,000 jobs over the next 30 years. In addition, the campuses will not only 
create jobs and enrich the City’s existing research capabilities, but also lead to innovative 
ideas that can be commercialized, catalyzing the establishment of an anticipated 1,000+ spin-
off companies over the next thirty years. This increases the probability that the next high 
growth company—a Google, Amazon, or Facebook—will emerge right here in Silicon Alley. 
Laboratory Space for Early State Life Sciences and 
Research and Development Companies
With $1.4 billion in annual National Institutes of Health funding across nine academic 
medical centers, New York City is positioned to play a transformative role in early-stage life 
sciences R&D. In fact, there has been a 15 percent total increase in life sciences jobs since 
2009, bringing the total to more than 13,000 jobs and one million square feet of life sciences 
R&D laboratory space. However, this is significantly less than the 50,000 jobs and 10 million 
square feet in life science hubs such as Boston and Cambridge, Massachusetts. To achieve 
a critical mass of life sciences activity and to support roughly 10,000 new commercial life 
science jobs, we need an additional four to five million square feet of laboratory space. We will 
maximize the potential of City-owned assets to catalyze the development of critically needed 
wet lab space in proximity to key anchor institutions and hubs for the sector. Additionally, the 
City will consider zoning and other non-capital intensive measures to spur the development 
of this type of space.
55
Industry Expansion & Cultivation
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 1   
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Supporting an Advanced Manufacturing 
Network
New York City is well-positioned to become a center for innovation in 
advanced manufacturing. Our traditional industrial businesses are adopting 
new technologies and practices to increase production efficiency and overall 
competitiveness, while the startups driving these advancements are benefiting 
from New York City’s entrepreneurial talent pool, academic research, 
and access to markets. The City will support the creation of an Advanced 
Manufacturing Network, which will link traditional and emerging firms to 
resources across the tech ecosystem. The City will also invest in  
state-of-the-art facilities that will house high-tech equipment, affordable  
workspaces, business support services, and workforce training programs.  
The centers will help businesses reduce their upfront costs by sharing high-
cost technologies needed for innovation in today’s manufacturing sector,  
such as 3D printers and robotics equipment. Such investments will ensure 
New York City’s manufacturing firms and workforce remain competitive in  
the 21
st
century economy.  
Invest in Fashion Manufacturing and 
Innovation Hub
The City will help the fashion manufacturing industry, especially the 
garment production business, transition to a more sustainable cluster model, 
which will offer access to more affordable real estate and workforce training 
opportunities to enhance skills. For example, the City invested $3.5 million 
to support Manufacture New York to fit-out and modernize a 160,000 square 
foot space in Sunset Park, Brooklyn. This hub will include:  
• A workforce development center to help train workers to develop fashion 
production skills and receive placements in on-site, high quality jobs 
• A research and development center to help create new materials and 
wearable technologies
• A small-batch factory specializing in print-making and sample productions
• A design accelerator to create an educated pipeline of fashion and 
manufacturing talent
• Incubator space containing 12 private studios, classroom space, conference 
rooms, a computer lab, an industrial sewing room, storage, and work areas 
for 50 designers
The creation of this hub represents the City’s commitment to encourage 
innovation and partnership between the public and private sectors. Such 
investments ensure that companies at the cutting edge of the fashion 
industry can grow and innovate right here in New York City. 
56
Industry Expansion & Cultivation
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 1 
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Supporting Initiatives
A. Support a state-of-the-art food production and distribution industry
Hunts Point Food Distribution Center (HPFDC) is one of the largest food-distribution 
centers in the world, occupying 329 acres and housing more than 115 firms. We will 
support the modernization and upgrade of Hunts Point to create space for food 
retailers and wholesalers serving the city. Currently, 60 percent of the city’s produce 
and 50 percent of meat and fish pass through the HPFDC, which directly employs 
8,000 people and is responsible for many other indirect jobs and positive economic 
spillover effects in the Hunts Point Peninsula and throughout the South Bronx. By 
investing in modernizing and improving resiliency for the public markets and other 
HPFDC properties, Hunts Point will be better prepared for power outages, coastal 
flooding, job losses, and other disruptions that could come from extreme storm events 
to the citywide food distribution system. Moreover, at the adjacent Hunts Point 
Wastewater Treatment Plant, the New York City Department of Environmental 
Protection (DEP) is working to replace sludge digesters with a new design that could 
potentially take the food waste from HPFDC and use it as a source of energy for a 
local microgrid. Additionally, the City will work with the New York State Department 
of Transportation (NYSDOT) to make efforts to reconfigure the Bruckner-Sheridan 
Interchange and Sheridan Expressway to improve truck access to the HPFDC. 
HPFDC will anchor a world-class food cluster in Hunts Point Peninsula—with 
economic benefits for the South Bronx as well—thus strengthening the entire 
citywide food-distribution system. 
B. Activate the City’s industrial assets to support the creation of quality jobs 
The City will renovate and redevelop City-owned industrial assets to maximize their 
economic development potential as well as their positive outcomes. The City will 
prioritize the creation of high-quality jobs as well as the activation of job-intensive 
uses within its industrial properties. 
Initiative 3
Foster an environment in which small businesses can succeed 
Small businesses are critical to the city’s growth, providing entrepreneurial and 
employment opportunities to New Yorkers; delivering important local services; and 
attracting residents and visitors by adding to the urban fabric that makes New York 
City so compelling. Recognizing the importance of small businesses to the City’s 
economy and character, New York City will seek to address the challenges they 
experience in starting and expanding. In recent years, small businesses (with fewer 
than 100 employees) and very small businesses (with fewer than 20 employees) have 
grown more rapidly than large businesses, in terms of percentage change in number 
of establishments. Small businesses, especially neighborhood retailers, support 
economic mobility for a diverse range of New Yorkers, from immigrant families to 
low-income entrepreneurs looking for a pathway to the middle class. 
57
Industry Expansion & Cultivation
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 1   
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Supporting Initiative
A. Reduce the regulatory burden on small 
businesses through the Small Business First plan
Small Business First is a comprehensive plan to 
reduce the regulatory burden on small businesses 
in New York City. It will leverage a $27 million 
investment over the next five years to simplify the 
regulatory hurdles many small businesses face in 
opening and operating. It will improve communica-
tion between business owners and City govern-
ment; streamline licensing, permitting and tribunal 
processes; provide support and resources to help 
businesses understand and comply with City 
regulations; and ensure assistance is accessible to 
all communities across the five boroughs. 
Small Business First includes thirty initiatives 
developed as a direct result of conversations with 
stakeholders, advocates, small business owners, 
community leaders, and elected officials represent-
ing a diverse slate of city neighborhoods. In total, 
more than 600 unique comments and ideas were 
solicited, detailing the specific needs of small 
businesses in communities across the five bor-
oughs. As a result, Small Business First initiatives 
will include:
•  Consolidating locations for businesses to find and 
process applications, permits, and information 
across agencies—both in person and online
•  Creating one place—both in-person and online—
for business owners to settle the majority of 
fines and violations
•  Helping businesses navigate regulatory pro-
cesses such as providing pre-inspection walk-
throughs to help them comply before receiving 
fines or violations
•  Translating resources and information materials 
into multiple languages 
Brooklyn Navy Yard 
The City has made a $76.8 million capital investment to upgrade 
Building 77, a one million square-foot building in the Brooklyn Navy 
Yard (BNY). The investment, along with an additional $63.2 million 
from other sources, for a total of $140 million, will transform this un-
derutilized warehouse into a modern facility to accommodate both 
active manufacturing and technology-based businesses. This renno-
vation will increase an additional 3,000 jobs will be created through 
this renovation, accounting for more than a 40 percent increase in 
employment at BNY. Not only will this increase capacity at BNY, 
which has had a 100 percent occupancy rate for over a decade, the 
City will also expand the on-site job training center in partnership 
with the local philanthropic community. The companies at the Yard 
will have the space they need, as well as a talented workforce with 
the skills for a 21st century economy. 
Building 77 is a big part of the BNY’S  current expansion, the largest 
since World War II. Other significant projects include: 
1. Green Manufacturing Center: A $67 million, 250,000 square-
foot adaptive reuse of a former machine-shop building
2. Steiner Studios: New York City’s anchor for the film and televi-
sion industry will create a next-generation media campus com-
plete with pre-and post-production studios 
3. Admiral’s Row: A site that will house a 74,000 square-foot grocery 
store, topped by 127,000 square feet of light-industrial space, 
89,000 square feet of additional retail space, and a 7,000 square-
foot office/community facility
All initiatives underway underscore BNY’s mission to support the 
growth of well-paying, modern industrial jobs and ensure positive 
community impact. Through the work of its Employment Center, 
BNY will ensure these opportunities are available to local residents.
58
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 1 
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Workforce Development
Goal: New York City will have a workforce 
equipped with the skills needed to participate in 
the 21
st
century economy 
Overview
All able New Yorkers should have the opportunity to participate in the 
workforce, with access to stable, high-quality employment. 
During the recession, New York City workers experienced flat or declining wages, 
except for those in select high-wage sectors. However, since 2014, more workers 
have started to see wage gains, due to increased employment and demand for labor 
across a range of sectors. Nonetheless, these gains have not fully offset the wage 
stagnation that occurred during the recession. For example, in 2014, inflation-
adjusted average annual wages were 2.1 percent lower than in 2007 for private, 
non-financial workers. Consequently, low-income New Yorkers continue to struggle 
with the city’s high living costs. Without the qualifications to advance to mid-wage 
jobs, these individuals and their families are likely to remain in poverty. Recognizing 
that high-, mid-, and low-skill jobs are all part of a diverse, healthy economy, the 
City is committed to supporting job quality across all sectors, as well as increasing 
wages and access to Paid Sick Leave and Family Leave for low-wage jobs.
The City’s new 
Career Pathways
strategy aims to create a more inclusive 
workforce, comprised of individuals from a range of backgrounds in all five 
boroughs. Through Career Pathways, the City is committed to providing New 
Yorkers with opportunities to enter the workforce and achieve economic stability, 
regardless of their starting skill level or educational attainment. To realize this 
vision of a more inclusive workforce, the City will support training programs that 
give people who historically struggle to enter the labor market the skills needed for 
entry-level work, as well as support the career advancement of low- and middle-skill 
New Yorkers. The Career Pathways strategy rests on the creation of a more 
comprehensive, integrated workforce development system and policy framework 
that supports agencies in effectively coordinating to help workers gain skills and 
progress in their careers. 
The City can leverage its purchasing power and investments to train and 
employ New Yorkers, including those investments envisioned by OneNYC. 
Each year, the City spends billions of dollars on infrastructure, goods, and services. 
We can promote targeted hiring to employ and train New Yorkers of all skill levels 
and qualifications, including those who experience the greatest challenges to stable 
employment. We will provide these individuals with enhanced training and support 
to increase their participation in the labor market and build relevant skills. 
INDICATORS + TARGETS
Increase workforce 
participation rate from 
current rate of  
61 percent
Increase the number of 
individuals receiving City-
sponsored, industry-focused 
training each year to 30,000 
by 2020
Increase the number of 
New York City public 
school graduates attaining 
associate’s or bachelor’s 
degrees 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested