pdf reader to byte array c# : Add image pdf SDK control service wpf azure html dnn OneNYC6-part1717

59
Workforce Development
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 1   
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
The City additionally recognizes that postsecondary attainment is critical to 
improving workforce participation and alleviating poverty. Workers with 
higher educational attainment demonstrate lower unemployment rates and higher 
median weekly earnings. For example, workers with a bachelor’s degree had an 
unemployment rate of 4.0 percent, compared to 7.5 percent for workers with a high 
school diploma and 11.0 percent for workers with less than a high school diploma. 
Likewise, based on median weekly earnings, workers with a bachelor’s degree made 
more than twice as much as workers with less than a high school diploma. By 
investing in increasing postsecondary attainment, we can empower our residents to 
join the workforce and thrive.
Initiative 1
Train New Yorkers in high-growth industries, creating 
an inclusive workforce across the city 
The Career Pathways report identifies six target sectors for the City’s workforce 
development efforts, including Healthcare, Technology, Industrial/Manufacturing, 
Construction, Retail, and Food Service, which account for about half of all jobs in 
New York City. These sectors offer economic mobility and/or significant potential 
for both employer and worker benefits through improvements in job quality. They  
were chosen based on analysis of tax revenue, recent job growth, forecasted job 
growth, total employment, jobs multipliers, wages, and wage distributions. 
Healthcare and Technology are high-growth sectors that offer higher-wage, middle-
skill jobs. The Industrial/Manufacturing and Construction sectors represent 
lower-growth sectors that offer relatively well-paying jobs that do not necessarily 
require high educational attainment. Finally, the Retail and Food Service sectors 
represent high-growth sectors that employ a large part of the workforce, thus 
providing the opportunity to aid significant numbers of New Yorkers through 
improvements in job quality. 
Labor
Supply
Employment
Employer 
Demand
Industry 
Partnerships
Jobs
Talent Needs and Qualifications
Job-Relevant Training and Education
Skills
Career  
Pathways
Career Pathways’ workforce 
development feedback loop
Add image pdf - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add jpg to pdf; add an image to a pdf
Add image pdf - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add signature image to pdf acrobat; add image field to pdf form
60
Workforce Development
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 1 
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Supporting Initiatives
A. Establish and expand Industry Partnerships 
Reflecting our commitment to enhanced industry-focused training, we will create 
four new Industry Partnerships focused on the Industrial/Manufacturing, 
Construction, Retail, and Food-Service sectors. The program will be modeled 
after the City’s two existing Industry Partnerships in Technology and Healthcare, 
specifically the Tech Talent Pipeline and New York Alliance for Careers in 
Healthcare programs. Partnerships are teams of trusted industry experts focused 
on addressing the mismatches of labor supply and demand in each sector. They 
formalize feedback loops between education, training, and employers, and 
mobilize outside resources to address the needs of supply and demand. The 
Partnerships will convene public and private stakeholders to develop curricula 
and training programs that match industry needs. They will be located within 
City government or be competitively contracted. 
B. Use Common Metrics for workforce programs
The City will pursue a system-wide effort to align definitions and data among 
workforce development agencies and build a shared system to collect data across 
all workforce programs. This will allow for evaluation of programs and 
longitudinal study of the impact of training and investments.
C. Create bridge programs to prepare low-skill job seekers 
Bridge programs serve individuals not yet ready for college, training, or career-
track jobs, typically scoring below tenth-grade literacy levels. The Career 
Pathways program will develop bridge programs to help New Yorkers obtain the 
academic credentials, experience, and technical skills required to secure entry-
level work and advance into skilled training.
D. Ease the path to employment for formerly incarcerated people
People with a criminal history are often excluded from employment opportunities 
because they are required to disclose their background on job applications, thus 
may miss the chance to gain an interview and be considered for hire. A policy 
adopted by City government, and other cities around the nation, removes this 
upfront disclosure requirement so that an individual’s full range of skills and 
attributes can be considered before making a hiring decision. The City supports 
pending local legislation to extend this policy to private sector employers.
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Get image information, such as its location, zonal information, metadata, and so on. Able to edit, add, delete, move, and output PDF document image.
add an image to a pdf with acrobat; how to add a picture to a pdf document
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
DLLs for PDF Image Extraction in VB.NET. In order to run the sample code, the following steps would be necessary. Add necessary references:
add photo to pdf preview; how to add image to pdf acrobat
61
Workforce Development
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 1   
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Initiative 2
Leverage OneNYC investments to train and employ New 
Yorkers of all skill levels 
OneNYC envisions major investments in housing and infrastructure. These 
investments present a valuable opportunity to support training and employment for 
New Yorkers, which advance their careers and build a more inclusive workforce that 
creates pathways for those who have historically experienced high rates of 
unemployment. 
Supporting Initiatives
A. Leverage City investments to create jobs and training opportunities for 
New Yorkers, and encourage targeted hiring 
The City will expand targeted hiring programs that encourage targeted hiring  
and establish a “First Look” process that requires employers receiving City 
contracts to review and consider local qualified workers. In pursuing targeted 
hiring, the City will build on the model of the Sandy Recovery Hiring Plan, which 
ensures housing recovery projects create construction jobs and training 
opportunities for New Yorkers who were economically impacted by Hurricane 
Sandy. An online portal will support this and other targeted hiring programs to 
facilitate interaction and data exchange, and provide feedback regarding hiring 
and recruiting. The portal will create a real time loop that allows the City to use 
employer input to better prepare and assist candidates.
In addition, the City will support the use of Project Labor Agreements to increase the 
number of New York City residents that have access to middle-class jobs in the 
unionized construction industry. For example, the City recently launched a new New 
York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) $3.5 billion Project Labor Agreement, through 
which it is expanding its commitment to linking NYCHA residents, minorities, 
women, veterans, and high school students to the unionized construction industry. 
B. Capitalize on the 
Career Pathways
Construction Industry Partnership to 
create and expand construction training and employment opportunities for 
traditionally underrepresented New Yorkers 
The City will establish a new Construction Industry Partnership to help qualified 
residents from targeted neighborhoods connect to construction jobs. The City 
will work with labor unions, construction firms, contractors, and developers to 
improve referral and recruiting systems that link New Yorkers to construction 
jobs. The model will be built on current successful pre-apprenticeship training 
programs such as the Edward J. Malloy Initiative for Construction Skills, a 
partnership among construction unions, the City, and union construction 
contractors to connect New York City’s youth to pre-apprenticeship programs. As 
part of this effort, the City will support construction training programs to help 
“…There need to be more 
internship opportunities 
for those just starting 
out… and training 
programs that are 
extremely focused on 
entering the workforce… 
for people who… can’t 
find work that focus[es] 
on specialized, specific 
skills required to land 
jobs in certain areas.”
—Jesse W., Manhattan
Workforce Skills Training 
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
add image to pdf; adding images to pdf forms
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
C# Sample Code: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied in C#.NET. This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
add multiple jpg to pdf; add photo pdf
62
Workforce Development
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 1 
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
traditionally under represented populations enter and thrive in this industry. 
These training programs will benefit inexperienced young adults, veterans, 
women, NYCHA residents, and low-income individuals, as well as 
underemployed construction workers. It will include pre-apprenticeship training 
for workers entering the field, including both adults and out-of-school/out-of-
work youth, as well as skills-upgrade training for existing workers. The 
Partnership will also explore opportunities to expand access to design, 
construction management, and other construction-related careers.
C. Support the creation of, and training for, green jobs 
The City will create jobs to maintain growing investment in green infrastructure. 
The Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) plans to hire 260 
maintenance and horticultural workers by June 2018 to monitor and maintain the 
agency’s growing number of bioswales and other stormwater-management tools 
in public areas, including the right-of-way, parks, schools, and NYCHA properties. 
DEP’s goal to have 9,000 bioswales in place by June 2018 is the first milestone in 
its plan to decrease impermeable surfaces and improve stormwater management 
in New York City. These entry-level jobs will provide workers with opportunities 
for further professional advancement within DEP, and be coupled with a separate 
City program to train 10,000 building operators in the latest energy-efficiency 
principles and practices by 2025. The program will help operators develop their 
skills and gain access to new work opportunities and, at the same time, help 
reduce the city’s emissions and better manage its energy demands. While this 
program will focus on providing green operations and maintenance training 
opportunities to non-union workers, the City will collaborate with Union 32BJ 
and Local 94 to develop and share best-in-class curricula specific to New York 
City’s built environment. The program will also support the development of 
energy benchmarking and monitoring tools to ensure that we can track progress 
of greenhouse gas emissions reduction goals and key performance indicators.
Initiative 3
Ensure all New York City students have access to an 
education that enables them to build 21
st
century skills 
through real-world, work-based learning experiences
We are committed to preparing our students for the 21
st
century global economy 
through greater access to educational opportunities in computer science and related 
disciplines; Career and Technical Education (CTE) Programs; bilingual learning 
environments; support for college- and degree-attainment; and connections 
between schools and relevant businesses and industries to provide students with an 
on-ramp to a career.
“Our schools must be able 
to provide not only 
books, but Internet 
access, and information-
literacy instruction if we 
hope to have successful 
students who are ready 
for college and careers 
upon graduation.”
—Stephanie R, Queens
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
List<Bitmap> images = new List<Bitmap>(); images.Add(new Bitmap(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.gif")); / Build a PDF document with GIF image.
adding image to pdf in preview; attach image to pdf form
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Sticky Note to PDF Page in C#.NET. Able to add notes to PDF using C# source code in Visual Studio .NET framework.
how to add picture to pdf; adding images to pdf
63
Workforce Development
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 1   
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Supporting Initiatives
A. Significantly expand access to computer science/technology education 
across New York City public schools by 2020
Recognizing the high demand for talent and education in the technology sector, 
we have made great strides in expanding access to educational opportunities in 
computer science and related disciplines. The Department of Education (DOE) is 
launching a comprehensive, standards-aligned computer-science and software-
engineering education program, the Software Engineering Pilot, for grades 6 
through 12. The goals of the program, launched in 2013 are to increase the number 
of high school graduates ready to enter new and emerging high-tech fields, and 
develop students’ computational thinking and problem-solving skills in real-
world contexts. The Department of Small Business Services (SBS) launched the 
Tech Talent Pipeline to support the growth of the city’s businesses and prepare 
New Yorkers for 21
st
century jobs. We are committed to expanding these efforts 
even further. We have convened an advisory committee to define an ambitious 
vision for technology education in our schools, along with specific programs and 
goals to ensure our students have the skills they need to succeed in a 21
st
century 
economy. This group is working to develop a detailed strategy and will be 
releasing plans later this school year. 
B. Strengthen and expand Career and Technical Education programs 
CTE programs are valuable, high impact programs on par with college 
preparatory programs and a critical part of the current New York City workforce 
development plan, codified in the Career Pathways report. These programs, 
which are formalized academic and technical education opportunities, prepare 
enrolled students for a seamless transition into postsecondary opportunities in 
two- or four-year degree programs, further training, apprenticeships, and entry-
level work. Approximately 120,000 New York City public high school students 
take part in CTE programs each year. To address challenges related to space and 
access to necessary technology, DOE will invest in building sustainable systems 
that strengthen current offerings and add capacity within existing and new CTE 
programs to ensure high-quality instruction aligned with industry expectations. 
We will also develop and launch new, leading-edge CTE programs within existing 
schools in order to benefit more students. 
C. Expand Transition Coordination Centers to every borough by 2020 to 
improve postsecondary outcomes for students with disabilities 
Given the focus on developing opportunities for all students to access work-based 
learning opportunities, it is critical to identify and enable students who may not 
be able to access these traditional opportunities. To empower these students to 
pursue postsecondary opportunities, we will consider expanding our Transition 
Coordination Centers, which provide disabled students with work-based learning 
opportunities, assessments, and professional learning experiences. Currently, 
Career and technical education in schools
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to PDF; Remove Image from PDF Page Using C#. Add necessary references:
add image to pdf java; add jpg to pdf document
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to PDF; VB.NET: Remove Image from PDF Page. Add necessary references:
add a picture to a pdf document; adding image to pdf file
64
Workforce Development
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 1 
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
these centers serve only a small fraction of the population—between 500 and 800 
of the 235,000 students receiving special-education services annually—and are 
available at one location in the city.
D. Explore the opportunity to create bilingual learning environments to 
promote multilingualism among New York City students
The 21
st
century global economy demands a bilingual learning environment for all 
New York City students. At the same time, the population of English-Language 
Learners (ELLs) is growing and would be better supported in a bilingual learning 
environment. The State and City have undertaken multiple initiatives to address 
these challenges and better prepare our students based on their language- and 
literacy-learning needs. We are constantly re-evaluating an ELL initiatives to 
include more innovative models and expand on others that have been proven to 
promote academic success. As part of DOE’s commitment to student achievement 
and increasing access to multilingual programs across the city, we will open 40 
dual-language programs during the 2015-2016 school year.
The City has recognized that expanding tech education across our school system cannot 
be done without the help of industry partners who demand specific skills in our 21
st
cen-
tury economy. As such, the Department of Education has already instituted the following 
programs and intends to expand its strategy with private sector partners:
A. Preparing 100 high school teachers to teach a new AP Computer Science Principles 
course in partnership with the University of California at Berkeley and the Educational 
Development Corporation, and funded by the National Science Foundation
B. Preparing 50 middle and 130 high school teachers through the Blended Learning 
Institute on Exploring Computer Science and Project GUTS (Growing Up Thinking 
Scientifically) curricula in partnership with code.org
C. Expanding access to successful computer-science/coding curricula and programs run 
with partners such as CSNYC and Microsoft (e.g., Technology Education and Literacy in 
Schools, Bootstrap, ScriptEd)
D.  Ensure that every New York City high school has at least one university and/or industry 
partnership so that all students have robust college and career experiences throughout 
their high school experience
65
Workforce Development
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 1   
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Initiative 4
Increase postsecondary attainment
Supporting efforts to increase postsecondary attainment is key to the City’s goal to 
lift New Yorkers out of poverty and strengthen an inclusive workforce. To achieve 
this goal, we are committed to increasing the number of New York City public 
school graduates attaining associate’s or bachelor’s degrees. This initiative 
complements other strategies to lift New Yorkers out of poverty, as part of a 
complete set of actions that the City will pursue to reach this goal. 
Strategies to increase postsecondary attainment begin in high school, where the City 
will work to increase access to college-specific advising. Efforts to improve advising 
are intended to promote high school graduation and college matriculation. Based on a 
study by the Research Alliance for New York City Schools, 59 percent of public school 
graduates enrolled in postsecondary education programs in 2006: 16 percent in the 
City University of New York (CUNY) 4-year, 13 percent in CUNY 2-year, and 30 
percent non-CUNY. The City will take a comprehensive approach to advising, 
ensuring that it continues beyond high school, to college. In college, the City will 
expand programs designed to assist students in completing their degrees. 
Increased advising enables students to better access the myriad resources available to 
them in both high school and college, as counselors are often the primary source of 
information about the resources and services available to students. While progress has 
been made to improve the ratio of guidance counselors to students in New York City’s 
public schools, there is still a significant need for counselors who have been trained to 
advise students on postsecondary options. In many schools, guidance counselors have 
caseloads of up to 500 students, and not all schools have designated college counselors. 
For New York City public high school students, the DOE is partnering with the 
Goddard Riverside Community Center to train new counselors and educators on the 
college advisement process. This and other efforts are intended to support a target 
of one trained counselor for every 35 high school seniors. 
Once in college, students may require additional help completing their degrees. Of 
New York City public high school graduates who started at CUNY in 2006 and 2007, 
53 percent completed the CUNY 4-year program and 13 percent completed the 
CUNY 2-year program. At CUNY, Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP) 
assists students in earning associate degrees within three years. ASAP participants 
are more than two times as likely to graduate as their peers. ASAP also increases 
credits earned, lowers the cost per degree, and raises the number of students 
transferring to four-year colleges. Building on the success of this program, we are 
committed to expanding ASAP to serve 13,000 students over the next three years.
The success of these programs will help to build a well-prepared workforce, and 
enable more New Yorkers to participate in the City’s economic prosperity through 
quality jobs and careers.
66
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 1 
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Housing
Goal: New Yorkers will have access to affordable, 
high-quality housing coupled with robust 
infrastructure and neighborhood services
Overview
Housing is in high demand and short supply, as the population continues to grow 
and housing production lags behind demand. Despite a total supply of 3.4 million 
housing units, the largest New York City’s housing stock has ever been, the vacancy 
rate was only 3.45 percent in 2014, well below the legal definition of a housing 
emergency (a vacancy rate below 5 percent).
In 2014, almost 56 percent of New York City renter households were rent 
burdened, defined as paying more than a third of their income toward housing 
costs. More than 30 percent of renter households were severely burdened, defined 
as paying more than half of their income toward rent. This trend is a result of 
stagnating wages and increasing costs over the past 20 years. As described above, 
the creation of new housing supply at all income levels will help to alleviate this 
pressure and contribute to housing affordability in the city. The initiatives below 
support housing preservation and production, emphasizing Housing New York’s 
focus on affordability and the City’s commitments to support overall housing 
production. Additionally, we are committed to pursuing strategies for mitigating 
homelessness, beginning with the provision of support services for the city’s most 
vulnerable populations. Initiatives discussed in Vision 4 address our commitment 
to strengthening the capacity of homeowners, landlords, renters, and tenants 
affected by Hurricane Sandy. 
Housing production across the metropolitan area has also 
lagged behind demand, adversely affecting the region’s 
competitiveness as employers across diverse sectors seek to 
locate in areas that provide varied housing options for their 
workforce. As the region continues to grow, reaching 22 
million residents in total by 2040, the City will seek to 
coordinate with regional partners to stimulate the production 
of housing to meet demand and relieve the burden on 
families of all income levels. 
INDICATORS + TARGETS
Accommodate 8.4 million 
households within the 
region by 2040, an increase 
of 1.1 million households 
Finance the new construc-
tion of 80,000 affordable 
housing units and preserva-
tion of 120,000 affordable 
housing units by 2024
Support the creation of 
240,00 total new housing 
units (both affordable and 
market rate) by 2024 and 
an additional 250,000 to 
300,000 by 2040
Rent Burden
56 percent of renters are rent burdened and three in 10 
households are severely rent-burdened, paying half or more 
of their income to rent and utilities 
= severely rent-burdened household
= rent-burdened household
= unburdened household
Source: New York City Housing and Vacancy Survey, 2014
67
Housing
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 1   
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Flushing West
Queens
Jerome Avenue Corridor
The Bronx
Sherman Creek/Inwood
Manhattan
Long Island City Core
Queens
Bay Street Corridor
Staten Island
East Harlem
Manhattan
East New York
Brooklyn
Neighborhood planning studies in 
support of Housing New York
Neighborhood Study Areas
Potential Rail Corridors/Stops
Existing SBS Corridors
Planned SBS Corridors
Existing Ferry Network
Proposed Ferry Network/Stops
Potential Subway Expansion
Priority Subway Signal Enhancements
NYCT Subway
Source: DCP
68
Housing
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 1 
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Housing 9 Million New Yorkers by 2040
To accommodate a population of over nine million New Yorkers by 2040, the city 
will need at least 3.7 million housing units throughout the five boroughs. The city’s 
population growth is driven by its desirability as a place to live and work. With-
out the production of new housing, this population growth drives housing prices 
upward, as new New Yorkers compete with current residents for a limited supply 
of existing housing units. To ensure all New Yorkers have access to housing they 
can afford, we must not only produce and preserve affordable units but increase the 
overall supply of all types of new housing. 
Housing New York, the City’s ambitious ten-year housing plan, forms a foundation 
for creating and preserving 200,000 affordable housing units over the next ten years. 
The City will also support creation of 160,000 additional new units over the same 
period. This level of production will accomplish three key objectives to alleviate New 
York City’s housing crisis: accommodate a growing population, ease supply con-
straints, and offset loss in the housing market as units are taken offline, demolished, 
or converted to non-residential units. To meet demand and continue to alleviate 
the housing crisis, the City estimates it will need to support creation of 250,000 to 
300,000 new units from 2025 to 2040. 
Like New York City, other mature major U.S. and global cities are continuing to 
accommodate population growth and manage affordability challenges through in-
creased density, new housing typologies, expansion into surrounding land area, and 
smart infrastructure and technology investments. Many of these strategies point the 
way for our future growth.
•  London plans to accommodate population growth from 8.2 million residents in 
2011 to 10.1 million residents in 2036 by developing significant areas of vacant or 
underutilized land in coordination with transportation improvements, intensify-
ing uses in town centers, and pursuing regional coordination. 
•  San Francisco anticipates growth in the Bay Area to 9.3 million residents by 2040, 
from 7.1 million people in 2010. Regional housing production efforts will focus on 
housing for low-and middle-income households, concentrating development in ex-
isting neighborhoods that can accommodate growth with access to public transit, 
housing, jobs, and services, while preserving surrounding natural resources. 
•  Projecting a population of 6.5 to 6.9 million by 2030, from 5.5 million in 2014, Sin-
gapore plans to meet this demand by intensifying land use in new developments, 
recycling land currently occupied by low-intensity uses, and creating additional 
developable area through infill. 
New York City can accommodate the number of units planned and future units 
required to meet the need. The locations most likely to be suitable for substantial 
numbers of new units are key areas close to public transit. Increased density can 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested