pdf reader to byte array c# : Adding image to pdf in preview SDK control API wpf azure asp.net sharepoint OneNYC9-part1720

89
Transportation
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 1   
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
W
o
o
d
h
a
v
e
n
B
lv
d
C
o
r
r
i
d
o
r
Utica Ave Corridor
Southern Brooklyn 
East-West Corridor
Northern Blvd Corridor
E,F,M,R-lines
7-line
14th St Crosstown
Corridor
34th St 
1st Ave/2nd Ave
86th St Crosstown 
Corridor
South Bronx East-West 
Connector
B
ro
n
x-L
GA 
Connector
Flatbush A
ve 
C
o
rridor
Bushw
ick t
o Downtown B
rookly
n Corridor
Flu
shin
g-Ja
m
a
i
c
a C
orrido
rs
Southeast Queens C
orridor Option
S
o
u
t
h
eas
t Queens
 C
o
rr
id
o
r
 O
p
tio
n
Southeast Q
ueens Cor
r
idor Option
N
o
s
t
r
a
n
d
A
v
e
Atlantic Avenue Conversion
U
t
i
c
a
A
v
e
S
u
b
w
a
y
E
x
t
e
n
s
i
o
n
Hunts Point 
MNR Station
Parkchester 
MNR Station
Morris Park 
MNR Station
Co-Op City 
MNR Station
Ford
ham 
Road
W
eb
ster A
v
e
125th St - LGA
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
15
14
16
17
18
19
19
21
20
22
23
25
24
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
32
33
34
1
2
3
4
5
DRAFT 04/20/2015 06:19 PM 
Adding image to pdf in preview - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
adding a jpg to a pdf; how to add jpg to pdf file
Adding image to pdf in preview - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add picture to pdf document; how to add image to pdf document
Transit 
Network 
Expansion 
Projects
This map shows two types 
of projects: 
1. Major transit projects  
already under construc-
tion by the MTA and 
PANYNJ.
2. Major capital projects 
that are essential to the 
future growth of the 
city and are called for in 
OneNYC. 
1. 2nd Avenue Subway (Phase 2)
Who: MTA-CC
What: Extension of the Second 
Avenue Subway from 96th Street to 
125th Street, with new stations at 
106th, 116th, and 125th Streets.
2. Metro-North Railroad Penn 
Station Access
Who: MTA-CC
What: Creation of a new connec-
tion from the Metro-North New 
Haven Line to Penn Station, with 
four new stations in the Bronx.
3. Port Authority Bus Terminal 
Who: PANYNJ
What: Design of a new terminal 
and supporting facilities to accom-
modate future bus demand and 
improve the customer experience.
4. Gateway Program
Who: Amtrak
What: Construction of two new 
Hudson River rail tunnels and oth-
er improvements to double train 
capacity into Penn Station.
5. Penn Station Terminal 
Redevelopment
Who: NJT/MTA
What: Design of a new modern 
train station to replace the existing 
outmoded facility, alleviating 
overcrowding and improving the 
passenger experience.
6. PATH Newark Airport Extension
Who: PANYNJ
What: Extension of PATH service 
to Newark Liberty Airport to 
provide a one-seat ride from Lower 
Manhattan.
7. Atlantic Avenue Conversion
Who: MTA-LIRR
What: Study of the conversion of 
the commuter rail line between 
Atlantic Terminal and Jamaica 
Station into subway-like passenger 
service.
8. Utica Avenue Subway 
Extension
Who: MTA-CC
What: Study of the extension 
of the Eastern Parkway Line to 
provide service on the 3 and 4 lines 
along Utica Avenue in Brooklyn.
9. Advanced Subway Signals
Who: MTA-NYCT
What: Installation of CBTC, new 
communications and signal equip-
ment to increase reliability and 
capacity on the E,F,M and R lines.
10. 2nd Avenue Subway (Phase 3)
Who: MTA-CC
What: Design of the extension 
of the Second Avenue subway 
south to Houston Street, with new 
stations at 55th, 42nd, 34th, 23rd, 
14th, and Houston Streets.
Other Subway Enhancements
Who: MTA-CC
What: Study of new transfer be-
tween the L and 3 lines at Livonia 
Avenue, improvements at Broad-
way Junction, and acceleration of 
advanced subway signals on other 
key congested subway lines (not 
shown).
Major Transit 
Projects Under 
Construction
1. 2nd Avenue Subway (Phase 1)
Who: MTA-CC
What: Tunneling and station work to 
extend Q line service to 96th Street.
2. East Side Access
Who: MTA-CC
What: Provide LIRR access to Grand 
Central Terminal via the 63rd Street 
Tunnel, increasing frequency and pro-
viding direct access to East Midtown.
3. Advanced Subway Signals
Who: MTA-NYCT
What: Installation of new commu-
nications and signal equipment to 
increase reliability and frequency on 
the 7 line.
4. Moynihan Station Expansion
Who: Amtrak
What: Initial design and construction 
to convert the Farley Post Office into 
a new passenger rail station while 
improving Penn Station as a major 
component of the Gateway Project.
5. WTC Transportation Hub
Who: PANYNJ
What: Replacing World Trade Center 
PATH station with a new transporta-
tion hub that provides connections to 
subway and ferry services. 
New York City’s 
Priority Transit 
Projects
C# Word - Insert Image to Word Page in C#.NET
Preview Document. Conversion. Convert Word to PDF. Convert Word to HTML5. VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word It's a demo code for adding image to word page using
add jpeg to pdf; adding jpg to pdf
C# PowerPoint - Insert Image to PowerPoint File Page in C#.NET
Preview Document. Conversion. Convert PowerPoint to PDF. Convert PowerPoint to Pages. Annotate PowerPoint. Text Search. Insert Image. Thumbnail Create.
acrobat add image to pdf; add an image to a pdf with acrobat
New York City subway ridership has reached record highs. 
In 2014, the system recorded over 6.1 million trips in a single 
day, the highest daily figure since recording began in 1985. 
Commuter rail tunnels under the Hudson River, which are 
over 100 years old, are also carrying a record number of pas-
sengers. High transit ridership is putting tremendous strain 
on the subway and commuter rail systems. 
The first map shows that subway and commuter rail lines 
are at 88 percent of passenger capacity overall entering the 
Manhattan Central Business Districts during rush hour, with 
many lines (shown in dark red) at over 90 percent capacity. In 
some cases lines are operating at over 100 percent, with trains 
tightly packed and passengers often waiting for several trains 
to pass before being able to board. 
The second map shows estimated capacity with the set of 
major expansion projects described in Initiative 3, including 
Amtrak’s Gateway Project, current and future phases of Sec-
ond Avenue Subway, acceleration of advanced subway signal 
system improvements to expand the capacity of existing lines, 
as well as the East Side Access project currently underway. 
With completion of these projects, lines would be at 65 per-
cent passenger capacity overall entering Manhattan during 
rush hour, allowing over half a million more passengers to 
reach places of work in the Central Business Districts during 
the average work day. Many lines would achieve significant 
improvements to their capacity as shown by the number of 
dark green lines on the map.
Existing Transit Capacity
Increased Capacity with 
Expansion Projects
42nd St
14th St
Canal St
Central Park West
Rutgers Tunnel
WTC Path Tunnel
Clark Tunnel
Cranberry Tunnel
Steinway Tunnel
Montague Tunnel
33rd St - Path Tunnel
63rd St. Tunnel
53rd St. Tunnel
Joralemon Tunnel
14th St Tunnel
Williamsburg Bridge
Manhattan Bridge
60th St. Tunnel
MetroNorth Tunnel
NJT- Amtrak Tunnel
Amtrak-LIRR Tunnel
Existing Amtrak service
not shown
2nd Ave Subway
Amtrak Empire Service
Lexington Ave
7th Ave
Overall Available Capacity Used 
At Rush Hour
Overall Available Capacity Used  
At Rush Hour
90% or more utilized
75-90%
50-75%
0-50%
90% or more utilized
75-90%
50-75%
0-50%
42nd St
14th St
Canal St
7th Ave
Central Park West
Rutgers Tunnel
WTC Path Tunnel
Clark Tunnel
Cranberry Tunnel
Steinway Tunnel
Montague Tunnel
33rd St - Path Tunnel
63rd St. Tunnel
53rd St. Tunnel
Joralemon Tunnel
14th St Tunnel
Williamsburg Bridge
Manhattan Bridge
60th St. Tunnel
MetroNorth Tunnel
NJT- Amtrak Tunnel
Amtrak-LIRR Tunnel
Lexington Ave
*Existing guideline capacity adjusted 
for typical performance based on 
average headways or trips completed.
35%
65%
Existing 
Passengers
Existing 
Passengers
Available 
Capacity
Available 
Capacity
12%
88%
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
applications. Support adding and inserting one or multiple pages to existing PDF document. Forms. Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer
adding images to pdf forms; add image to pdf in preview
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Supports adding text to PDF in preview without adobe reader installed in ASP.NET. Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text.
add jpg to pdf acrobat; adding an image to a pdf in acrobat
92
Transportation
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 1 
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
•  The Gateway Project, an initiative to build two new 
commuter rail tunnels under the Hudson River and 
dramatically expand rail capacity into Penn Station 
•  Long- and short-term interventions to improve access, 
connectivity, amenities, and circulation in Penn Station
•  Modernization of the Port Authority Bus Terminal 
and other bus facilities. The City will also work 
with the PANYNJ to develop a cost-efficient strate-
gy to modernize the PABT
B. Study new subway routes in underserved 
communities and other improvements to the 
subway network 
The City will work with the MTA to study a Utica 
Avenue extension from the Eastern Parkway Line 
(3/4 train). The Utica Avenue corridor is a prime 
candidate for the next generation of subway 
expansion—it is one of the densest areas in the city 
not directly served by the subway and is served by 
the second busiest bus route in the City, the B46. 
The City will also work with the MTA to explore 
creating new system transfers, such as a transfer 
between the L and 3 trains at Livonia Avenue. 
These new connections will reduce travel times 
and expand travel options for thousands of subway 
riders. Finally, the City will work with the MTA to 
identify strategies to improve and expand station 
entrances at subway stops experiencing growing 
ridership. As subway ridership continues to climb, 
we must take action to reduce over-crowding 
within subway stations, especially at choke points 
like stairways and fare-gate areas.
C.  Expand the ferry network
The City will launch an expanded citywide ferry 
network to improve transit connections between 
the city’s waterfront communities; this service will 
be fully accessible to New Yorkers with disabilities. 
Three new routes—Rockaway, South Brooklyn, and 
Astoria—are scheduled to launch in 2017, with two 
others in 2018 (Lower East Side and Soundview). 
The City has also committed capital funding for the 
construction of landings.
Citywide Ferry System
Existing 
East River Ferry  
Staten Island Ferry  
Planned 2017 
Rockaway 
South Brooklyn 
Astoria 
Planned 2018 
Soundview 
Lower East Side 
Legend 
SOUNDVIEW 
ASTORIA 
LOWER 
EAST SIDE 
E 90th 
E 62nd 
E 34th 
Stuyvesant Cove 
Grand 
Wall St/Pier 11 
Soundview 
Astoria 
Long Island  
City North 
Hunters Pt South 
Greenpoint 
North Williamsburg 
South Williamsburg 
BBP Pier 1-DUMBO 
Roosevelt  
Island South 
St George 
Whitehall 
QUEENS 
BROOKLYN 
MANHATTAN 
BRONX 
ROCKAWAY 
SOUTH BROOKLYN 
BBP Pier 6 - Atlantic 
Red Hook 
Brooklyn Army 
Terminal 
Bay Ridge 
Rockaway 
Governors 
Island 
STATEN 
ISLAND 
Geography is modied to show service more clearly. 
Some landings shown do not yet exist or need upgrades to become operational. 
EAST RIVER 
FERRY  
(EXISTING) 
New York City Ferry Service
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
Multifunctional Visual Studio .NET PDF SDK library supports adding text content to adobe PDF document in VB.NET Add text to PDF in preview without adobe
add image to pdf; add picture to pdf preview
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Load PDF from existing documents and image in SQL server. Besides, using this PDF document metadata adding control, you can add some additional
add an image to a pdf; adding a png to a pdf
93
Transportation
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 1   
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
D. Expand and improve service to and within Staten Island 
Improving connections to Staten Island will support recent revitalization along 
the North Shore and strengthen the connection of the South Shore to the rest of 
the city, an essential link in expanding economic opportunity and building 
resiliency for those communities. The City will work to expand service through: 
•  Enhancements to east/west transportation along the North Shore. In the short term, 
this includes a package of bus service improvements, including additional Transit 
Signal corridors, real time information signs, and treatments for bus hot spots
•  More frequent service on the Staten Island Railway (SIR). New train cars will im-
prove service for existing ridership, while enhanced off-peak service will benefit 
residents of Staten Island as well as visitors to Staten Island’s neighborhoods and 
new attractions and amenities
Initiative 4
Expand the City’s bike network
Supporting Initiatives
A. Continue to expand the City’s bike-lane network, especially to neighborhoods 
with limited bike infrastructure
Bicycling as a way to get around the five boroughs continues to grow in popularity. 
Between 2013 and 2014, the City’s In-Season Cycling Indicator—a measure of bike 
volumes on major bike routes into the Manhattan CBD—rose by 4 percent. 
Overall, cycling has increased a staggering 337 percent since 2000. To support this 
growth and the City’s goal of doubling the Cycling Indicator by 2020, the City will 
continue to invest in new bike infrastructure. Over the next four years, the City 
will add another 200 miles of bike lanes, including 20 miles of protected lanes, 
bringing the total to 1,180 lane miles. The City will work collaboratively with 
communities to continue expanding the bike network outward from the 
Manhattan core and inner Brooklyn. The City will also explore ways to better 
measure bike ridership in areas outside of the Manhattan CBD. 
B. Improve bike access on bridges
Safe and convenient bridge access for bikes is crucial to making New York City 
more bike-friendly. In 2015 and 2016, the City will improve bike connections 
between Brooklyn and Queens with the construction of a two-way bike path on 
the Pulaski Bridge and the installation of protected bike lanes on the John Jay 
Byrne Bridge on Greenpoint Avenue. The City will also improve bike connections 
to the High Bridge in Upper Manhattan to coincide with its reopening this 
summer. Moving forward, DOT is evaluating potential designs for improved bike 
routes on the Grand Street Bridge in Brooklyn and the Honeywell Street Bridge in 
Expanded Bike Lane Network
C# TIFF: TIFF Editor SDK to Read & Manipulate TIFF File Using C#.
Easy to generate image thumbnail or preview for Tiff to Tiff, like Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF, and images. assemblies into your C# project by adding reference
add an image to a pdf acrobat; add an image to a pdf in preview
C# PowerPoint - Insert Blank PowerPoint Page in C#.NET
This C# .NET PowerPoint document page inserting & adding component from RasterEdge is written in managed C# code and designed particularly for .NET class
how to add an image to a pdf file in acrobat; add signature image to pdf acrobat
94
Transportation
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 1 
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Queens. The City is also initiating a study of bike access to the 15 Harlem River 
bridges, which will recommend a program of both short- and long-term 
improvements. Finally, the City is working with the MTA to pilot external bike 
racks on buses that cross bike-inaccessible bridges and to explore options for 
adding pedestrian and bike paths on the Verrazano Narrows Bridge.
C. Expand bike share
In 2015, the City and its partner, New York City Bike Share, will expand Citi Bike 
to Long Island City in Queens, and to additional parts of Williamsburg, 
Greenpoint, and Bedford Stuyvesant in Brooklyn. This expansion will include 
1,000 new bikes and over 90 stations. In 2016 and 2017, Citi Bike will add another 
5,000 bicycles and increase its service areas to additional areas of upper 
Manhattan, central Brooklyn, and western Queens. 
Initiative 5
Expand the accessibility of the city’s transportation 
network to seniors and people with disabilities
Supporting Initiatives
A. Increase accessibility of the pedestrian network to people with disabilities
The City will identify a range of measures to increase the accessibility of our 
streets to New Yorkers with disabilities. These measures include the expansion of 
Accessible Pedestrian Signals (APS) and sidewalk-repair programs, development 
of accessible design guidelines for all New York City street projects, and a pilot 
program to explore ways technology can improve accessibility. New technology, 
such as smartphones, opens up opportunities to assist pedestrians with 
disabilities, particularly the vision-impaired, in navigating the city’s streets—in 
addition to other efforts like DOT’s upgrading of pedestrian ramps.
B. Improve accessibility to bus services for transit users with disabilities
Buses are a critical transportation link for older residents and New Yorkers with 
disabilities. In 2015, the City will roll out a second phase of its Safe Routes to 
Transit initiative to address accessibility problems at 25 bus stops located under 
elevated train lines. At these bus stops, buses cannot pull to the curb, leading 
passengers to wait and then board from the street. This initiative will build 
sidewalk extensions on boarding islands at these stops so that passengers are safe 
and the bus ramps can be properly deployed. 
C. Improve convenience and reliability of modes of transit for New Yorkers 
with disabilities
NYCHA, Citi Bike 
and DOT
New York City Housing 
Authority (NYCHA) is part 
of a collaboration with Citi 
Bike and NYCDOT to place 
bike share stations at public 
housing complexes. NYCHA 
residents receive a discount-
ed rate on the annual fee 
charged by Citi Bike. Having 
bike share stations locat-
ed nearby provides more 
mobility options for NYCHA 
residents and the local com-
munity. There are currently 
43 Citi Bike stations serving 
NYCHA developments, 
with 11 more planned for the 
summer of 2015.
95
Transportation
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 1   
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Working with the MTA, the City will expand use of the yellow and green taxis—
including the growing number of wheelchair-accessible taxis—to provide faster and 
more convenient paratransit services to New Yorkers with disabilities. The City and 
the MTA will work to increase the proportion of paratransit trips made by yellow and 
green taxis over the next four years. And to improve the quality of life for the taxi 
drivers providing these services, the City will create new relief stands and rest areas in 
all five boroughs. The City will also explore the feasibility of installing public toilets 
and benches at some stands.
Initiative 6
The City will make the trucking sector greener and more 
efficient, and continue to expand freight movement via 
rail and water where possible 
Supporting Initiatives
A. Encourage water and rail freight to the New York region through projects such 
as the Cross-Harbor Rail Tunnel and Brooklyn Marine Terminals
The City will continue to protect and invest in deep-water marine terminals in 
Brooklyn and Staten Island. The City has already invested $100 million in upgrades and 
a rail link to the South Brooklyn Marine Terminal (SBMT), a long underutilized facility. 
In the immediate term, SBMT will focus on non-containerized cargos primarily used in 
the construction industry and roll-on/roll-off cargos such as automobiles. In the longer 
term, and in conjunction with the Cross-Harbor Rail Tunnel, additional facility 
upgrades at SBMT and improved distribution facilities East of Hudson, could allow the 
SBMT to handle container ships, which carry most of the world’s ocean freight.  By 
directly serving New York at a point that is already in the market, truck trips will be 
reduced and air quality improved. The City will also support state and federal efforts to 
dredge primary and secondary waterways in order to better facilitate waterborne 
freight movement and water-dependent uses along the waterfront. 
To realize the inherent environmental and cost advantages of using rail, the City will 
continue to work with PANYNJ to advance the Cross-Harbor Rail Tunnel connecting 
New Jersey and Brooklyn. Specifically, the City supports a two-track, double-stack 
rail freight tunnel as this configuration offers the largest capacity and greatest 
redundancy.  When completed, this tunnel will result in a meaningful shift in the 
City’s dependence on truck service for freight. PANYNJ estimates that construction 
of the tunnel would reduce annual greenhouse gas emissions by 80,000 to 110,000 
metric tons by 2035. Such a tunnel would also greatly expand East of Hudson freight-
rail capacity, and support domestic rail needs as well as container activity at SBMT.  
In the meantime, the City will support the PANYNJ’s efforts to enhance the capacity 
Red Hook Container Terminal Operations
96
Transportation
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 1 
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
of freight movements by rail barge across the Hudson River, increasing opportunities 
now for shippers in Brooklyn, Queens and beyond.
B. Reduce the impact of the trucks that must bring freight “the last mile” to market
The City will increase off-hour deliveries by food- and retail-sector trucks, with a 
focus on large buildings, high-pedestrian areas, and bicycle-conflict areas such as 
Midtown and Lower Manhattan, Downtown Brooklyn, and Downtown Jamaica. By 
shifting deliveries to over-night and early-morning hours, the City will decrease 
both congestion and truck emissions. As part of this effort, we will work with the 
trucking industry to explore and pilot low-noise truck technologies.
Mobile applications are now available to match suppliers who need to move goods 
with truckers who are already on the road and have room to pick up additional 
cargo, thus reducing new truck trips on our streets by consolidating loads. The 
City will launch a pilot project to encourage the use of these platforms.
The City will work with large fleets to create a Smart Fleet rating system, similar 
to the Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) standard for 
buildings, but based on truck safety, noise reduction, energy efficiency, and 
emissions-control technology. The City will then publicly recognize fleets that go 
above and beyond in using safe, quiet, and green trucks for their deliveries. 
To facilitate the delivery of construction-related cargo by water, such as building 
components, turbines, and generators, the City will create designated roll-on/roll-off 
and lift-on/lift-off staging areas for maritime cargo in each borough, making it easier 
and cheaper to bring these essential construction supplies into New York City. 
C. Expand JFK Airport’s air freight activity
The City is working with PANYNJ to improve JFK’s air-freight facilities. Over the 
past decade, cargo volumes at JFK have declined by almost a third. Today, over 
15,000 people at JFK work directly in air cargo related jobs. Regionally, the air 
cargo industry supports over 50,000 jobs, $8.6 billion in sales, and almost $3 
billion in wages. The City remains committed to supporting the air cargo industry 
and will work with PANYNJ to increase the capacity of our air freight systems to 
expand JFK’s share of the air-freight market. 
In March 2015, the City adopted a new rule allowing industry-standard 53-foot 
tractor trailers to access JFK. The City is also working with the PANYNJ to build 
new facilities. Over the past two years, a truck stop has opened on-airport, and a 
new animal handling facility (for which the City provided financing) is under 
construction. The next two years will see the construction of a new state-of-the-
art cargo handling facility. 
This work is complemented by the City’s efforts to establish an industrial business 
improvement district in the adjacent Springfield Gardens neighborhood. 
Off-hour truck delivery
97
Transportation
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 1   
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Initiative 7
Expand airport capacity
To maintain our competitiveness as a center of tourism and the global economy, the 
City will work with PANYNJ, New York State, and the Federal Government to 
expand flight capacity and improve airport facilities and terminals at the region’s 
airports, particularly LaGuardia and JFK. Working with PANYNJ and the airline 
industry, the City will support the expansion of Terminal One, Terminal Eight, and 
Terminal Four at JFK and the complete reconstruction of the Central Terminal at 
LaGuardia Airport, an outdated facility that is long overdue for replacement. 
Additionally, the City will encourage the Federal Aviation Administration and 
PANYNJ to continue to implement NextGen technology, a series of upgrades to the 
region’s air traffic control system that will improve safety and enable more-efficient 
take-offs and landings. 
The City supports expanding flight capacity at JFK, but only in a manner that is 
sensitive to the environment and the quality-of-life concerns of adjacent 
communities. The City will work with PANYNJ as it completes a study of capacity-
expansion options, including the addition of a fourth runway. This study should 
take into account the noise, air quality, and greenhouse gas emission impacts of 
different expansion options and ways to mitigate these impacts. 
Initiative 8
Provide reliable, convenient transit access to all three of 
the region’s major airports
Though they are all served by transit, none of New York’s major airports offers a 
one-seat transit connection to the City’s Central Business Districts (CBDs). This lack 
of access impacts air travelers and airport employees, and increases congestion on 
the regional highway system.
The City will continue to work with the MTA and others to improve existing bus 
connections to LaGuardia in the short term, while working with PANYNJ, the MTA, 
and the State of New York to develop a plan for better long-term transit. Similarly, it 
will continue to support PANYNJ’s project to extend Port Authority Trans-Hudson 
(PATH) to Newark Airport, which will add airport access from Lower Manhattan. 
Finally, the City will work with PANYNJ and the MTA to explore additional ways to 
improve existing bus and rail connections to JFK, such as adding more frequent 
shuttle service on the Atlantic Branch of the Long Island Rail Road after East Side 
Access is complete. 
Baggage claim at LaGuardia Airport
98
Transportation
nyc.gov/onenyc
Vision 1 
One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City 
Initiative 9
Improve the city’s roads, bridges,  
and highways
The City is responsible for the operation and 
maintenance of a complex network of roads, bridges, and 
highways that connect the five boroughs. Much of this 
infrastructure is aging—the four East River Bridges, for 
example, are all over 100 years old—and requires 
continual reinvestment to remain in a state of good repair. 
Over the next ten years, the City will undertake dozens of 
major capital projects to restore our network of roads and 
bridges, including significant rehabilitation of major 
roads essential to the City’s economic vitality.  For 
example, sections of the critical FDR Drive will be 
rehabilitated along with the esplanade that sits above it.
In Brooklyn, the City will rehabilitate and reconstruct the 
21 interconnected bridge structures that carry the 
Brooklyn Queens Expressway from Atlantic Avenue to 
Sands Street, including the “triple cantilever” stacked 
section of highway completed in 1948, topped by the 
iconic Brooklyn Heights Promenade. With no 
reconstruction work in recent history, the triple 
cantilever is in need of major repair with many 
components experiencing significant deterioration.  In 
Queens, the City will repair multiple structures carrying 
and crossing both the Van Wyck Expressway and the 
Cross Island Parkway. In addition, the City is initiating a 
series of robust safety improvements along sections of 
Queens Boulevard, a Vision Zero Priority Corridor, as 
part of the Administration’s Great Streets initiative. In the 
Bronx, the Great Streets initiative will implement safety 
and quality of life improvements for users along the 
Grand Concourse, a major thoroughfare in the borough, 
while the City will also undertake the rehabilitation and 
reconstruction of highway structures along the Bruckner 
Expressway and the Hutchinson River Parkway.
In Staten Island, the City will undertake 17 projects to 
fully rebuild city streets, including sections of Father 
Capodanno Boulevard, Victory Boulevard, and Arthur 
Kill Road. Together, these projects will ensure our road 
and bridge network can continue to safely support the 
movement of people and goods across the city.
The “Triple Cantilever” in 1948 and today
Department of Transportation Street, Bridge, 
and Highway Reconstruction Program 
Highway Structure Rehabilitation/Reconstruction
Bridge Rehabilitation/Reconstruction
Great Streets Reconstruction
Major Streets Reconstruction
NYC Major Roads 
Less than $100 million 
$100-500 million
More than $500 million
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested