pdf reader to byte array c# : Adding images to pdf forms SDK software service wpf windows html dnn online_sub_editorial_guidelines_vs1_10-part1786

1
-1-
bbc.co.uk 
Online Subtitling Editorial 
Guidelines V1.1 
Compiled and Edited by: 
Gareth Ford Williams – Senior Content Producer, Accessibility 
05
th
January 2009 
Adding images to pdf forms - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
adding images to pdf files; add jpg to pdf form
Adding images to pdf forms - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add image to pdf preview; add image pdf document
2
-2-
CONTENTS 
INTRODUCTION.....................................................................................................................................3
EDITING..................................................................................................................................................4
TIMING....................................................................................................................................................7
SUBTITLE BREAKS............................................................................................................................10
KEEPING IN SYNC..............................................................................................................................12
LINE-BREAKS......................................................................................................................................13
MATCHING SHOTS.............................................................................................................................14
IDENTIFYING SPEAKERS..................................................................................................................15
COLOURS............................................................................................................................................18
PRESENTATION..................................................................................................................................20
INTONATION AND EMOTION.............................................................................................................21
ACCENTS.............................................................................................................................................22
DIFFICULT SPEECH............................................................................................................................23
INAUDIBLE SPEECH AND SILENCE.................................................................................................24
HESITATION AND INTERRUPTION...................................................................................................25
CUMULATIVES....................................................................................................................................27
HUMOUR..............................................................................................................................................29
CHILDREN'S SUBTITLING..................................................................................................................30
MUSIC AND SONGS............................................................................................................................31
SOUND-EFFECT LABELS..................................................................................................................34
NUMBERS............................................................................................................................................36
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
NET PDF document page inserting & adding component from PDF page(s) to current target PDF document in server-side application and Windows Forms project using a
how to add a photo to a pdf document; how to add an image to a pdf in reader
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Feel free to define text or images on PDF document and extract accordingly. Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your VB.NET program.
how to add a picture to a pdf file; how to add a jpeg to a pdf
3
-3-
-
INTRODUCTION  
The following guidelines outline BBC Subtitling’s requirements for bbc.co.uk. This 
document is intended for use in subtitle production for BBC Commissioned AV content 
only  
Good subtitling is a complex balancing act - you have to survey the range of subtitling 
guidelines on offer, and then match them to the style of the content. It will never be 
possible to apply all of the guidelines all of the time, because in many situations they will 
be mutually exclusive. 
It is particularly important to understand that different types of content, different items 
within an AV clip, and even different sections within an item, will require different 
subtitling approaches.  
The Content Producer’s task is to judge which practices need to be given precedence 
over others. It would be tempting to try to present a hierarchy of guidelines, ranking the 
guidelines in order of importance. Unfortunately, subtitling is not a science - the 
hierarchy shifts from clip to clip. Sometimes it will be necessary to pay greater attention 
to speaker identification and language register (for instance, in a multi-character 
drama); at other times, there might be heavier emphasis on access to visuals (for 
instance, in a sports report in a news clip). 
In order for the BBC to deliver a consistent user experience across all digital 
platforms, these guidelines are closely based on the broadcast subtitle guidelines 
published by the BBC for linear broadcast subtitling in 1998 and industry best 
practice. Additional sources of information used in the compilation of this document 
include;  
ITC and BBC co-funded research into the use of subtitles, conducted by the 
Centre for Deaf Studies at Bristol University, research on children’s subtitles, 
Dial 888; Subtitling for Deaf Children, conducted by Dr Susan Gregory and 
research on news subtitles, 
Good News for Deaf People, conducted by IFF Research Ltd 
VB.NET Image: Adding Line Annotation to Images with VB.NET Doc
full sample codes for printing line annotation on images. Basic .NET sample codes for adding a line System.Text Imports System.Windows.Forms Imports RasterEdge
how to add an image to a pdf file; how to add a jpg to a pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Create new page to PDF document in both ASP.NET web server-side application and .NET Windows Forms. Support adding PDF page number.
how to add image to pdf reader; adding a jpg to a pdf
4
-4-
EDITING 
1. Since people generally speak much faster than the text of their speech can be read, it 
is almost always necessary to edit the speech. The subtitler must always edit according 
to the amount of time available. Follow the timing conventions (see Timing, p7
).  
2. Where it's necessary to edit, edit everything evenly - do not take the easy way out by 
simply removing an entire sentence. Sometimes this will be appropriate, but normally 
you should aim to edit out a bit of every sentence. 
3. If there is plenty of time for verbatim (or near-verbatim) speech, do not edit 
unnecessarily. Your aim should be to give the viewer as much access to the soundtrack 
as you possibly can within the constraints of time, space, shot changes, and on-screen 
visuals, etc. You should never deprive the viewer of words/sounds when there is time to 
include them and where there is no conflict with the visual information.  
4. However, if you have a very "busy" scene, full of action and disconnected 
conversations, it might be confusing if you subtitle fragments of speech here and there, 
rather than allowing the viewer to watch what is going on. 
5. It is not necessary to simplify or translate for deaf or hard-of-hearing viewers. This is 
not only condescending, it is also frustrating for lipreaders. 
6. If the speaker is in shot, try to retain the start and end of his/her speech, as these are 
most obvious to lipreaders who will feel cheated if these words are removed.  
7. Don't automatically edit out words like "but", "so" or "too". They may be short but they 
are often essential for expressing meaning. 
8. Although it is often tempting to edit by removing conversational phrases like "you 
know", "well", "actually", and so on, remember that such phrases can often add flavour 
to your text. 
9. Avoid editing out names when they are used to address people. They are often easy 
targets, but can be essential for following the plot. 
10 Your editing should be faithful to the speaker's style of speech, taking into account 
register, nationality, era, etc. This will affect your choice of vocabulary.  For instance: 
register: mother vs mum; deceased vs dead; intercourse vs sex; 
nationality: mom vs mum; trousers vs pants; 
era: wireless vs radio; hackney cab vs taxi. 
11. Similarly, make sure if you edit by using contractions that they are appropriate to the 
context and register. In a formal context, where a speaker would not use contractions, 
you should not use them either. Regional styles must also be considered: e.g. it will not 
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
What's more, you can also protect created PDF file by adding digital signature (watermark) on PDF using C# code. Create PDF from Jpeg, png, images.
adding an image to a pdf in preview; add a jpeg to a pdf
VB.NET PDF: VB Code to Create PDF Windows Viewer Using DocImage
PDF page in many ways, like adding rectangle, line view, annotate, process, save and scan images (supporting JPEG and BMP) and document files (TIFF, PDF and Word
add picture to pdf file; adding image to pdf in preview
5
-5-
-
always be appropriate to edit "I've got a cat" to "I've a cat"; and "I used to go there" 
cannot necessarily be edited to "I'd go there." 
12. Having edited one subtitle, bear your edit in mind when creating the next subtitle. 
The edit can affect the content as well as the structure of anything that follows. 
13. Avoid editing by changing the form of a verb. This sometimes works, but more often 
than not the change of tense produces a nonsense sentence and also, if you do edit the 
tense, you have to make it consistent throughout the rest of the text. 
14. A common subtitling error is to edit a piece of speech before finding out exactly how 
much time is available; then, if it emerges that there is more time than anticipated, the 
subtitler forgets to go back and reinstate some of the edited-out text. 
15. Sometimes speakers can be clearly lipread - particularly in close-ups. Do not edit 
out words that can be clearly lipread. This makes the viewer feel cheated. If editing is 
unavoidable, then try to edit by using words that have similar lip-movements. Also, keep 
as close as possible to the original word order.   
16.  Do not edit out strong language unless it is absolutely impossible to edit elsewhere 
in the sentence - deaf or hard-of-hearing viewers find this extremely irritating and 
condescending. Of course, if the BBC has decided to edit any strong language,, then 
your subtitles must reflect this in the following ways: 
(a)  If the offending word is bleeped, put the word BLEEP in the appropriate place in the 
subtitle - in caps, in a contrasting colour (white, cyan, yellow or green only), and without 
an exclamation mark. If only the middle section of a word is bleeped, show this:  
e.g. f-BLEEP-ing . (In this instance, however, you will be unable to use a contrasting 
colour for the bleep, as that would add extra spaces within the word.) 
(b)   If the word is dubbed with a euphemistic replacement - e.g. frigging - put this in. 
If the word is non-standard but spellable - e.g. frerlking - put this in, too. 
(c)   If the word is dubbed with an unrecognisable sequence of noises, leave them out. 
(d)   If the sound is dipped for a portion of the word, put up the sounds that you can hear 
and three dots for the dipped bit: e.g. "Keep your f...ing nose out of it!" (Never use 
more than three dots.) 
(e)   If the word is mouthed, use a label: 
e.g.  So (MOUTHS) f...ing what? 
When the content has been edited for strong language you should allow time for the 
following disclaimer to appear at the end of the AV clip. 
The BBC has removed strong language 
from this film’s soundtrack. The 
C# Image: Document Image Ellipse Annotation Creating and Adding
on color, bitional and black & white images; annotation shape to image - support adding rubber stamp powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
add an image to a pdf; how to add image to pdf
C# PDF: PDF Document Viewer & Reader SDK for Windows Forms
After adding WinViewer DLL into Visual Studio Toolbox, you link to see more C# PDF imaging project converting, compressing and stroing images, documents and
add jpeg to pdf; acrobat insert image in pdf
6
-6-
-
subtitles match this edited version.  
(White on a Black background) 
This explains the position to lipreaders.  
Give the disclaimer a generous timing where possible (i.e. 8 seconds for the 3 lines it 
runs to). 
If you need to write “clip” instead of “film”, “programme” or “show” in the disclaimer.
VB.NET Image: How to Draw Annotation on Doc Images with Image SDK
other image annotating tutorials besides adding annotation using PDF document, image to pdf files and converting, compressing and stroing images, documents and
how to add an image to a pdf file in acrobat; add an image to a pdf acrobat
VB.NET TIFF: Read, Edit & Process TIFF with VB.NET Image Document
at the page level, like TIFF page adding & deleting controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and converting, compressing and stroing images, documents and more
acrobat add image to pdf; add photo to pdf in preview
7
-7-
-
TIMING 
1. Subtitles must be on screen for long enough to be read by a deaf or hard-of-
hearing viewer who will also be trying to take in other visual information at the 
same time (the action/facial expressions/graphics, etc). 
2. In both live and pre-recorded subtitling, timings are intended to be flexible. 
The standard timings shown in the Appendix are intended to provide general 
guidelines, but should not be taken too literally. When assessing the amount 
of time that a subtitle needs to remain on the screen, it is important for the 
subtitler to think about much more than the number of characters on the 
screen; this would be an unacceptably crude approach. 
3. It is crucial that subtitles are displayed for a sufficient length of time for 
viewers to read them. The subtitle presentation rate for pre-recorded 
programmes should not normally exceed 140 words per minute. In 
exceptional circumstances, for example in the case of add-ons, the higher 
rate of 180 words per minute is permitted. 
Less than preferred time 
Do not dip below the standard timings unless there is no other way of getting round a 
problem. Circumstances which could mean giving less reading time are: 
Shot changes 
Give less time if giving the standard timing would involve clipping a shot, or crossing 
into an unrelated, "empty" [containing no speech] shot. However, always consider 
the alternative of merging with another subtitle. 
Lipreading 
Avoid editing out words if they can be lipread, but, again, only in very specific 
circumstances: i.e. when a word or phrase can be read very clearly even by non-
lipreaders, and if it would look ridiculous to take out or change the word. 
Catchwords 
Avoid editing out catchwords if a phrase would become unrecognisable if edited. 
Retaining humour 
Give less time if a joke would be destroyed by adhering to the standard timing, but only 
if there is no other way around the problem, such as merging or crossing a shot. 
Critical information in a news item or factual AV content 
The main aim when subtitling news is to convey the “what, when, who, how, why”. If 
an item is already particularly concise, it may be impossible to edit it into subtitles at 
standard timings without losing a crucial element of the original. 
8
-8-
-
Very technical items 
These may be similarly hard to edit. For instance, a detailed explanation of an economic 
or scientific story may prove almost impossible to edit without depriving the viewer of 
vital information. In these situations a subtitler should be prepared to vary standard 
timings to convey the full meaning of the original.  
Extra time 
Try to allow extra reading time for your subtitles in the following circumstances: 
Unfamiliar words 
Try to give more generous timings whenever you consider that viewers might find a 
word or phrase extremely hard to read without more time. 
Several speakers 
Aim to give more time when there are several speakers in one subtitle. 
Labels 
Allow an extra second for labels where possible, but only if appropriate. 
Flashing subtitles 
Allow more time as these are harder to read. 
Visuals and graphics 
When there is a lot happening in the picture, e.g. a football match or a map, allow 
viewers enough time both to read the subtitle and to take in the visuals. (See 
Presentation p20)
Placed subtitles 
If, for example, two speakers are placed in the same subtitle, and the person on the 
right speaks first, the eye has more work to do, so try to allow more time. 
Long figures 
Give viewers more time to read long figures (e.g. 12,353). 
Shot changes 
Aim for the upper end of the timing range if your subtitle crosses one shot or more, as 
you will need longer to read it. 
Slow speech 
Slower timings should be used to keep in sync with slow speech. 
It is also very important to keep your timings consistent. For instance, if you have 
given 3:12 for one subtitle, you must not then give 4:12 to subsequent subtitles 
of similar length - unless there is a very good reason: e.g. slow speaker/on-
screen action.  
9
-9-
-
If there is a pause between two pieces of speech, you may leave a gap 
between the subtitles - but this must be a minimum of one second, preferably 
a second and a half. Anything shorter than this produces a very jerky effect. 
Try not squeeze gaps in if the time can be used for text. 
Standard Timings 
1. A short and familiar word or phrase - 1.12 to 2 seconds. 
  e.g.: Hello 
or: 
Excuse me. 
2.   Up to half a line - 2 to 2.12 seconds. 
 e.g.: 
Where do you live?  
 or: 
See you tomorrow.  
3.   One line - 2.12 to 3 seconds. 
 e.g.: 
How long will it take us to go home? 
 or: 
He's got a real headache. 
4.   One line and a little bit - 3.12 seconds. 
  e.g.: 
How long will it take Johanna to go  
home? 
5.   Up to one and a half lines - 4 to 4.12 seconds. 
 e.g.: 
It is important to tell her about     
the decision we made.  
6.   Two lines - 5 to 6 seconds. 
 e.g.: 
I think it would be a very good idea 
to keep dangerous dogs on a leash. 
7.   Two lines and a little bit - 6.12 seconds. 
 e.g.: 
How long will it take the whole cast 
to come home by taxi to Duals, North 
Dyfed? 
8.  Two and a half lines - 7 seconds. 
 e.g.: 
The best thing about going abroad is 
that you don't have to put up with 
the British weather. 
9.  Three lines - 7.12 to 8 seconds. 
e.g.: 
What will the City do about the Tory  
Government's humiliating defeat 
in the House of Commons last night? 
10
-10-
-
SUBTITLE BREAKS 
1. Subtitles should start and end at logical points in a sentence. Aim to divide up the 
text into whole sentences. If this is not possible, aim at least to end every subtitle at a 
logical mid-sentence point: e.g. at the end of a phrase or clause. 
2. If a subtitle consists of part of a sentence, try to put the next sentence in a new 
subtitle, rather than tagging it on to the part-sentence.   
So, try to avoid subtitles like this: 
(a)   Wouldn't it be fascinating 
(b)   if it WAS Elizabeth Fitton? Liz, you  
 wanted a rational explanation. 
The following sequence would be preferable: 
(a)   Wouldn't it be fascinating 
(b)   if it WAS Elizabeth Fitton? 
(c)     Liz, you wanted  
  a rational explanation. 
3.
It may be possible to break a long sentence into two or more separate sentences 
and to display them as consecutive subtitles e.g. 'We have standing orders, and we 
have procedures which have been handed down to us over the centuries.' becomes: 
(a) 
We have standing orders 
and procedures. 
(b) 
They have been handed down to us 
over the centuries. 
This is especially appropriate for 'compound' sentences, i.e. sentences consisting of 
more than one main clause, joined by coordinating conjunctions 'and', 'but', 'or'; 
This procedure is also possible with some 'complex' sentences, i.e. sentences 
consisting of a main clause and one or more subordinate clauses joined by 
subordinating conjunctions such as 'since', 'when', 'because', etc or by relative 
pronouns such as 'who', 'that': 'All we wanted was a quiet chat just you and me 
together, but you seemed to have other ideas.' becomes: 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested