pdf reader to byte array c# : How to add image to pdf reader control SDK platform web page .net winforms web browser online_sub_editorial_guidelines_vs1_11-part1787

11
-11-
(a) 
All we wanted was a quiet chat 
just you and me together. 
(b) 
But you seemed to have 
other ideas. 
It is sometimes also possible to break single main clauses effectively into more than 
one subtitle; e.g. 'I saw a tall, thin, bearded man with the stolen shopping basket 
disappearing into the crowd.' becomes: 
(a) 
I saw a tall, thin, bearded man 
with the stolen shopping basket. 
(b) 
He disappeared into the crowd 
If such sentence breaking procedures are inappropriate, it might be necessary to 
allow a single long sentence to extend over more than one subtitle. In this case, 
sentences should be segmented at natural linguistic breaks such that each subtitle 
forms an integrated linguistic unit. Thus, segmentation at clause boundaries is to be 
preferred. For example: 
(a) 
When I jumped on the bus... 
(b) 
…I saw the man who had taken 
the basket from the old lady. 
Segmentation at major phrase boundaries can also be accepted as follows: 
(a) 
On two minor occasions 
immediately following the war... 
(b) 
...small numbers of people 
were seen crossing the border. 
How to add image to pdf reader - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add jpg signature to pdf; add image to pdf acrobat reader
How to add image to pdf reader - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add an image to a pdf; how to add an image to a pdf in preview
12
-12-
KEEPING IN SYNC 
1 Research in eye movement has shown that hearing impaired viewers make use 
of visual cues from the faces of television speakers. Therefore subtitle appearance 
should coincide with speech onset. Subtitle disappearance should coincide roughly 
with the end of the corresponding speech segment, since subtitles remaining too 
long on the screen are likely to be re-read by the viewer. The same rules of 
synchronisation should apply with off-camera speakers and even with off-screen 
narrators, since viewers with a certain amount of residual hearing make use of 
auditory cues to direct their attention to the subtitle area. 
2. The subtitles should match the pace of speaking as closely as possible. Ideally, 
when the speaker is in shot, your subtitles should not anticipate speech by more than 
1.5 seconds or hang up on the screen for more than 1.5 seconds after speech has 
stopped. However, if the speaker is very easy to lipread, slipping out of sync even by a 
second may spoil any dramatic effect and make the subtitles harder to follow. The 
subtitle should not be on the screen after the speaker has disappeared. 
3. Sometimes, in order to meet other requirements (e.g. matching shots), you will find it 
difficult to avoid slipping slightly out of sync. However, subtitles should never be more 
than 1.5 seconds out of sync. 
4. It is permissible to slip out of sync when you have a sequence of subtitles for a 
single speaker, providing the subtitles are back in sync by the end of the sequence. 
When two or more people are speaking, it is particularly important to keep in sync. 
Subtitles for new speakers must, as far as possible, come up as the new speaker starts 
to speak - not before, not after. 
5. If a speaker speaks very slowly, then the subtitles will have to be slow, too - even if 
this means breaking the timing conventions. A subtitle (or an explanatory label) should 
always be on the screen if someone's lips are moving. If a speaker speaks very fast, 
you have to edit as much as is necessary in order to meet the timing requirements.  
(See Timing on p7
6. If the speech belongs to an out-of-shot speaker or is voice-over commentary, then 
it's not so essential for the subtitles to keep in sync. 
7.  Do not bring in any dramatic subtitles too early. For example, if there is a loud bang 
at the end of, say, a two-second shot, do not anticipate it by starting the label at the 
beginning of the shot. Wait until the bang actually happens, even if this means a fast 
timing. 
8. Do not simultaneously caption different speakers if they are not speaking at the 
same time. 
C# Imaging - Scan Barcode Image in C#.NET
RasterEdge Barcode Reader DLL add-in enables developers to add barcode image recognition & types, such as Code 128, EAN-13, QR Code, PDF-417, etc.
adding images to pdf forms; how to add image to pdf
XImage.Barcode Scanner for .NET, Read, Scan and Recognize barcode
VB.NET Write: Add Image to PDF; VB.NET Protect: Add Password to VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for C#; XDoc.Excel for C#; XDoc.PowerPoint for
adding image to pdf; adding an image to a pdf in acrobat
13
-13-
-
LINE-BREAKS 
1. To ensure both legibility and readability, the maximum for subtitle text should be 
roughly 32 or 34 characters per line. 
2. Lines should be broken at logical points. The ideal line-break will be at a piece of 
punctuation like a full stop, comma or dash. If the break has to be elsewhere in the 
sentence, avoid splitting the following parts of speech: 
article and noun  (e.g. the + table; a + book) 
preposition and following phrase  (e.g. on + the table; in + a way; about + his life) 
conjunction and following phrase/clause  (e.g. and + those books; but + I went 
there) 
pronoun and verb  (e.g. he + is; they + will come; it + comes) 
parts of a complex verb  (e.g. have + eaten; will + have + been + doing) 
3. Good line-breaks are extremely important because they make the process of 
reading and understanding far easier. However, it is not always possible to produce 
good line-breaks as well as well-edited text and good timing. Where these 
constraints are mutually exclusive, then well edited text and timing are more 
important than line-breaks. 
4. 
If the text will fit on one line, do not rearrange it on to two lines. One line takes 
less time to read than two short lines and it causes less disruption to the picture.  
Similarly, do not rearrange two lines of text on to three lines, unless there is a very bad 
line-break between lines 1 and 2. 
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Get image information, such as its location, zonal information, metadata, and so on. Able to edit, add, delete, move, and output PDF document image.
add image pdf document; adding image to pdf file
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
add picture to pdf in preview; how to add image to pdf document
14
-14-
MATCHING SHOTS 
1. BBC subtitles match shots as closely as possible. It is likely to be less tiring for the 
viewer if shot changes and subtitle changes occur at the same time. Many subtitles 
therefore start on the first frame of the shot and end on the last frame. If a subtitle ends 
before a shot change or starts after a shot change, there should be a gap of at least 1 
second, preferably 1.5 seconds, between the subtitle and the shot change.  
2.  Avoid creating subtitles that straddle a shot change (i.e. a subtitle that starts in the 
middle of shot one and ends in the middle of shot two). To do this, you may need to split 
a sentence at an appropriate point (see Subtitle Breaks p10),
or delay the start of a 
new sentence to coincide with the shot change. 
3. If one shot is too fast for a subtitle, then you can merge the speech for two shots - 
providing your subtitle then ends at the second shot change. 
4. Bear in mind, however, that it will not always be appropriate to merge the speech 
from two shots: e.g. if it means that you are thereby "giving the game away" in some 
way. For example, if someone sneezes on a very short shot, it is more effective to leave 
the "Atchoo!" on its own with a fast timing (or to merge it with what comes afterwards) 
than to anticipate it by merging with the previous subtitle. 
5.  Where possible, avoid extending a subtitle into the next shot when the speaker has 
stopped speaking, particularly if this is a dramatic reaction shot. 
6.  Never carry a subtitle over into the next shot if this means crossing into another 
scene or if it is obvious that the speaker is no longer around (e.g. if they have left the 
room). 
7.  Well-grouped subtitles are important for ease of reading, so do not produce 
subtitles which are broken in odd places or which start in the middle of one sentence 
and end in the middle of another, just because this is the easiest way of fitting the 
shots. It is usually possible to produce well-grouped subtitles which also match the 
shots. If not, good grouping should take precedence. 
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
DLLs for PDF Image Extraction in VB.NET. In order to run the sample code, the following steps would be necessary. Add necessary references:
add a picture to a pdf document; how to add a jpg to a pdf
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
C# Sample Code: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied in C#.NET. This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
how to add image to pdf file; add picture to pdf document
15
-15-
-
IDENTIFYING SPEAKERS 
1. Where necessary, use colours to distinguish speakers from each other.  (See 
Colours, p18
2. Where colours cannot be used you can distinguish between speakers in the 
following ways: 
Placing 
Put each piece of speech on a separate line or lines and place it underneath the 
relevant speaker. You may have to edit more to ensure that the lines are short enough 
to look placed. 
Try to make sure that pieces of speech placed right and left are "joined at the hip" if 
possible, so that the eye does not have to leap from one side of the screen to the other. 
e.g.      What do you think? 
I'm not sure 
or:           What's your name?  
  Fred 
NOT:   
Who?  
  The owner 
Dashes 
Put each piece of speech on a separate line and insert a white dash (not a hyphen) 
before each piece of speech, thereby clearly distinguishing different speakers' lines. 
The dashes should be aligned so that they are proud of the text. 
e.g.:    
- What am I gonna do now? 
- Forgive and forget?                         
or:                - Found anything? 
- If this is the next new weapon, 
 we’re in big trouble                        
The longest line should be centred on the screen, with the shorter line/lines left-aligned 
with it (not centred).  If one of the lines is long, inevitably all the text will be towards the 
left of the screen, but generally the aim is to keep the lines in the centre of the screen.  
Note that dashes only work as a clear indication of speakers when each speaker is in a 
separate consecutive shot. 
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Evaluation library and components enable users to annotate PDF without adobe PDF reader control installed. Able to add notes to PDF using C# source code in
add jpg to pdf document; adding an image to a pdf file
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
List<Bitmap> images = new List<Bitmap>(); images.Add(new Bitmap(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.gif")); / Build a PDF document with GIF image.
add picture to pdf form; how to add jpg to pdf file
16
-16-
-
3. If you need to distinguish between an in-vision speaker and a voice-over speaker, 
use single quotes for the voice-over, but only when there is likely to be confusion 
without them. (Single quotes are not normally necessary for a narrator, for example.) 
Confusion is most likely to arise when the in-vision speaker and the voice-over speaker 
are the same person.  
Put a single quote-mark at the beginning of each new subtitle (or segment, in live), but 
do not close the single quotes at the end of each subtitle/segment - only close them 
when the person has finished speaking, as is the case with paragraphs in a book. 
e.g.  'I've lived in the Lake District since I was a boy. 
  'I never want to leave this area. 
 I've been very happy here. 
  'I love the fresh air and the beautiful scenery.' 
If more than one speaker in the same subtitle is a voice-over, just put single quotes at 
the beginning and end of the subtitle. 
e.g.  'What do you think about it? I'm not sure.
  (blue text speaker)              (white text speaker) 
(The single quotes will be in the same colour as the adjoining text.) 
4. When two white text speakers are having a telephone conversation, you will need to 
distinguish the speakers. Using single quotes placed around the speech of the out-of-
vision speaker is the recommended approach. They should be used throughout the 
conversation, whenever one of the speakers is out of vision. 
e.g. Hello. Victor Meldrew speaking. 
'Hello, Mr Meldrew. I'm calling about your car.' 
Single quotes are not necessary in telephone conversations if the out-of-vision speaker 
has a colour. 
5.  Single quotes can be used in the same way to indicate when speech is emanating 
from a machine of some kind: e.g. a tannoy, radio, tape-recorder, answerphone 
message, television, etc, but often a label is sufficient. 
6. When an in-shot speaker and an out-of-shot speaker (same colour) need to be 
distinguished, use one of the following devices: 
Arrows 
If the out-of-shot speaker is on the left or right, type a left or right arrow (< or >) next to 
his or her speech and place the speech to the appropriate side. (Left arrows go 
immediately before the speech, followed by one space; right arrows immediately after 
the speech, preceded by one space. Make the arrow clearly visible by keeping it clear 
17
-17-
-
of any other lines of text i.e. the text following the arrow and the text in any lines 
below it are aligned.) 
e.g.   
Do come in. 
  Are you sure? > 
When are you leaving?
 I was thinking of going  
at around 8 o'clock in the evening. 
  When I find out where he is, 
  you'll be the first to know.  > 
NOT: When I find out where he is, > 
   you'll be the first to know. 
The arrows are always typed in white regardless of the text colour of the speaker. 
NB:  If an off-screen speaker is neither to the right nor the left, but straight ahead, do 
not use an arrow. 
Labels 
If you are unable to use an arrow, use a label to identify the speaker: i.e. type the name 
of the speaker in white caps (regardless of the colour of the speaker's text), immediately 
before the relevant speech. If there is time, place the speech on the line below the label, 
so that the label is as separate as possible from the speech. If this is not possible, put 
the label on the same line as the speech, centred in the usual way. 
e.g. JAMES: 
 What are you doing with that hammer? 
or:  JAMES: What are you doing? 
(centred) 
If you do not know the name of the speaker, indicate the gender or age of the speaker if 
this is necessary for the viewer's understanding: 
e.g. MAN: I was brought up in a close-knit family. 
7.   When two or more people are speaking simultaneously, do the following, regardless 
of their colours: 
Two people:  
BOTH: Keep quiet!  
(all white text) 
Three or more:      ALL: Hello!   
(all white text) 
Or:      
TOGETHER: Yes! No! 
(in different colours, with a white 
label) 
18
-18-
-
COLOURS
1. Most subtitles are typed in white text on a black background to ensure optimum 
legibility. Text overlaid on an image should be contained within a black box. 
2. A limited range of colours can be used to distinguish speakers from each other - 
yellow, cyan (light blue) and green. 
Recommended Colours: 
Speaker 1: White #FFFFFF 
Speaker 2: Yellow #FFFF00 
Speaker 3: Cyan #00FFFF 
Speaker 4: Green #00FF00 
Note: All of the above colours must appear on a black background to ensure 
maximum legibility. 
However, unnecessary use of cyan and green should be avoided, as viewers with poor 
eyesight find these colours difficult to read. Green should be the least frequently used 
colour. Once a speaker has a colour, s/he should keep that colour.  
3. Use white text on a coloured background, or coloured text on a coloured 
background for utterances by "non-human creatures" like dinosaurs, robots, mutant 
turtles, etc, or relevant “alert” noises such as buzzers in game shows. These 
combinations must be easy to read. 
White background 
Avoid using any bright colour on a white back as often the low colour contrast can 
render them unreadable. 
Red and Green Combinations 
Almost 10% of men are red/green colour blind; another group are the blue/yellow 
colour blind. Despite the fact that red-green contrasts are very distinct for about 95% 
of humanity, there are about 5% of people for whom this is completely non-
functional.  
Avoid using either Red text on a Green background or Green text on a Red 
background. 
Vibrating Colour Combinations 
In addition to the issues of colour blindness and contrast mentioned above, placing 
areas of brightly coloured hues together can be hard for users with colour vision to 
read. Bright colours cause an afterimage effect. With only one bright colour, the after 
image is usually not bothersome, but with two bright colours together, the 
afterimages interfere with one another, causing a "visual vibration." This can be 
reduced by placing a neutral colour between the two areas of bright colours or by 
making one of the colours a pastel or dark shade. 
19
-19-
-
Vibrating Colour Combinations  
red/green 
red on green 
green on red 
blue/orange 
blue on orange 
orange on blue 
green/magenta 
green on magenta 
magenta on green 
yellow/cyan 
yellow on cyan 
cyan on yellow 
blue/magenta 
magenta on blue 
blue on magenta 
orange/yellow 
yellow on orange 
orange on yellow  
blue/green 
green on blue 
blue on green 
Source:  Pennsylvania State University 
4. Avoid using the same colour for more than one speaker - it can cause a lot of 
confusion for the viewer. (The exception to this would be content with a lot of shifting 
main characters like EastEnders, where it is permissible to have two characters per 
colour, providing they do not appear together.) If the amount of placing needed would 
mean editing very heavily, you can use green as a "floater": that is, it can be used for 
more than one minor character, again providing they never appear together. 
5. White can be used for any number of speakers. If two or more white speakers 
appear in the same scene, you have to use one of a number of devices to indicate who 
says what - see Presentation (p20)
and Identifying Speakers (p15
).   
20
-20-
-
PRESENTATION 
1. BBC online subtitles should be centred below the display and above the controls of 
the Embedded Media Player.  
2. If the media player is embedded in the page the layout should change to 
accommodate the subtitle display. 
3. If the subtitles cannot be positioned below the display, they should be overlaid on the 
image but with a black background to ensure legibility (see Colours, p18
4. A one-line subtitle normally sits on line 1 (the bottom line); a two-liner sits on lines 1 
and 2; a three-liner sits on lines 1, 2 and 3. 
5. As a general rule, each subtitle should consist of no more than three lines.  
6. Where the speech for two or more speakers of different colours is combined in one 
subtitle, their speech runs on: i.e. you don't start a new line for each new speaker. 
7. However, if two or more WHITE text speakers are interacting, you have to start a 
new line for each new speaker. Each piece of speech may then be placed underneath 
the relevant speaker rather than being centred. (See Identifying Speakers, p15
8.  Subtitles that are overlaid on the image must not obscure any onscreen graphics 
that give context to what is being spoken or by whom. 
9.  If the onscreen graphics are not easily legible because of the streamed image size 
or quality, the subtitles must include any text contained within those graphics which 
provide contextual information. This must include the speaker’s identity, what they do 
and any organisations they represent. Other displayed information affected by legibility 
problems that must be included in the subtitle includes; phone numbers, email 
addresses, postal addresses, website URLs, or other contact information. 
10.  If the information contained within the graphics is off-topic from what is being 
spoken, then the information should not be replicated in the subtitle. 
Text 
11.  Characters should be displayed in double height and mixed (upper and lower) 
case. 
12.  Words within a subtitle should be separated by a single space. 
13.  Preferred fonts are Verdana, Helvetica, Tiresias or FS Me.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested